Title: Guyana chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088915/00007
 Material Information
Title: Guyana chronicle
Alternate Title: Sunday chronicle
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 45 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.,
Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.
Place of Publication: Georgetown Guyana
Publication Date: February 27, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily[nov. 21, 1983-]
daily (except monday)[ former dec. 1, 1975-nov. 30, 1983]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Georgetown (Guyana)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Guyana
Guyana -- Georgetown
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (Dec. 1, 1975)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Publication suspended: Oct. 12-24, 1983.
General Note: Sunday ed. published as: Sunday chronicle.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00088915
Volume ID: VID00007
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 29013105
lccn - sn 93049190
 Related Items
Preceded by: Guyana graphic

Full Text


S UNDA I


The Chronicle is at http://www.guyanachronicle.com
i


A'TICKET TO YOUR
DREAMS!
RESULTS HOTLINE 225-8902


mK=W-- 14. 1W... a .... e ....

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......... .. BATTLING UN: cleaning garbage on hme
PICKING UT E I C Railway Embankment road at
PICKING UP THE .IECES-. yesterday. (Cullen Bess-Nelson pholo)



S_ For further information call 227-0224





2 SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 27, 2005


BATTLE




OF THE




BULGE

President upset

at delay in opening

UG, schools


By Sharief Khan
IT'S a battle against bulging
garbage on the East Coast
Demerara and President
Bharrat Jagdeo has ordered


more forces to be deployed in
the fight.
He is also appalled that
more than 40 schools and the
University of Guyana which
were affected by the flood wa-


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"'The quantity of garbage
would overwhelm any volun-
tary effort", lie declared at a
news aon ference Friday and an-
nounced thai he has instructed
his staff to throw more profes-
sional contractors into the
clean-up campaign.
Mounds aof debris have
piled up along main roads and
villagess on the East Coast
Demerara in the wakee of the
floods which last month swept
through three coastal regions
and officials in the emergency
response prograliiinc say they
pose health ris ks in communi-t
tiec;.
Two cleaning firms have
been employed to back coimiut-
nilv efforts at getting rid of lthe
waste but appear to have made
minimal impact oi the sprawl-
ing debris deposits.
Mr Jagdco visited several
villages on Republic Day and
lletl a barrage of complaints


CLEANING: a crew at work at the University of Guyana
yesterday. (Mike Norville photo)


from residents about tlhe garbage.
"1 don't think we have done
our best to clean up the gar-
bage",. he told reporters Friday.
"...\\hile \we need to have
volunteers to support the clean-
up effort, we need to expand the
contracts that we have given to
the professional bodies". hei
said.
He noted that the two pro-
fessional firms were picking up
the garbage along the Railway\
Embankment road on Ithe East
Coast and said he lhas instructed
his staff to shortlist about fi\x
other coitltractors in GcorCtgetlownx
and gix e larger contracts.
"...\we haxe to spend more
for them to clean thlie garbage -
evein \\itin the coltliunities -
inot just to ocIs onil the Railway
Embankmentl..."
The President said he
wanted Io see \ olunary groups


Vacancies

4mwwfif W oww' SC06re cgttiv~ersibetween the ges
$2AQ yew'. Ip k*-o. ie~pw*. ot the outdoot ooes Teoit.,

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pk" 4.4Pjby5W"A-04 9" IegeS ipa -W'POKxA~Z~


Itokil-ke1* Lid


-U


working along with the contrac-
tors "so that we can quickly get
rid of the garbage".
He said the task was not
just to remove garbage thrown
up by the floods but also get-
ting rid of waste that has accu-
mulated "maybe for five, ten
years...
Flood debris strewn along
the roads has burgeoned with
household stuff and other gar-
bage dumped by thousands of
affected families.
The problem was com-
pounded after waler remained in
a string of villages for more than
a month and mopping up is a
major part of the flood recov-
ery programme spearheaded by
the Civil Defence Commission
(CDC).
The Government Infornma
(Please see page three)


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SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 27, 2005


BATTLE OF THE...


(From page two)
tion Agency (GINA) yesterday
said that at Tuesday's Cabinet
meeting. Minister of Local Gov-
ernment and Regional Develop-
ment Harripersaud Nokta was
tasked with the responsibility of
ensuring that each
Neighborhood Democratic
Council identify an area for gar-


bage dumping.
Towards this end, the gov-
ernment will enforce the laws
to ensure proper garbage dis-
posal and persons caught
dumping garbage in public ar-
eas are liable to be charged and
placed before the courts, the
agency said.
With the flood waters gone
from East Coast Demerara vil-


lages, Mr Jagdeo said, "We have
to move on...although the
people in Mahaica and
Mahaicony are still under wa-
ter."
He said the government was
"keeping a close watch" on
flood-hit communities in the
Mahaica and Mahaicony rivers
after water from the swollen
East Demerara Water Conser-


vancy was diverted there to
avoid further flooding on the
East Coast.
Linked to the massive
clean-up is getting affected
schools back on stream and the
President Friday was dismayed
that so many and UG were still
out.
He said he frankly thought
that almost two weeks after the


0.Oppsiio GEOMmeber use a


chirma'sewsconerence


OPPOSITION members of
the Guyana Elections Com-
mission (GECOM) are upset
that Chairman Dr Steve
Surujbally called a news con-
ference earlier this month
without apprising them of
what he was going to say.
They are also distancing
themselves from statements by
Surujbally at the news confer-
ence, signalling continuing sharp
differences over preparations
for national elections due by
March next year.
The statement issued by
the main opposition People's
National Congress Reform
(PNCR) was from Lloyd Jo-
seph, Haslyn Parris and Robert
Williams, nominees of the op-
position parties in Parliament.
At the February 18 news
conference, GECOM assured
that the integrity of its current
data base was intact but will ob-
viously need to be updated.
But the opposition commis-
sion members argued that it was
unwise for Surujbally to be talk-
ing to the media about matters on
which they had n>rit been .ippn eed
and plan to rai'e their concmrn,
with him and other member' ii at
statutory meeting on Tueda-&
Suriballv t.-ld reporter' ih;.L
samntismg the electoral lisi \ would
preclude the need to thro%, out
the data base.
"People hase been shouting
about the data base and not re-
ally understanding what it was.
But now that the political par-
ties are understanding our posi-
tion more, I think we are getting
on the same page on which it is


written that the developments
will be done by technicians and
not by those who politically
pontificate", he said.
"It is important that 1 say
this because when the time
comes to be speaking about the
data base, there is no question
of throwing out of the baby
with the bath water. Delibera-
tions with the political parties
in parliament, I think, are mak-
ing them understand that the
data base has potency, and (any-
thing incorrect) can be techni-
cally improved."
"There is no sense in say-
ing that the data base has many
errors, and that evolves into
tens of thousands of mistakes;
evolves into hundreds of thou-
sands. You can't allow a few
mistakes to become many, meta-
morphosing itself into dozens
and hundreds of thousands.
That is all rhetoric and does no
one good," Surujballly asserted.
The PNCR has charged that
the data base had been compro-
mised.
However the GECOM
Chairman .aid political p.imie,
hate iheir m.nmliuencies ii rep-
resent and ihe. h.,,e a right i-i
espre, their contern'.
need for a Ilar and elficient reg-
iiraulon proice,- trom which :in
electoral lIt that is enfied .rnd
considered acceptable tu all
stakeholders can be produced,
GECOM was moving to imple-
ment a continuous registration
process.
Political parties have sent
their comments and suggestions


on the proposed paper on con-
tinuous registration and these
will be used to modify or
finalise the final document so
that continuous registration can
be implemented with unanimity,
the commission chairman said.
However, he noted that there
was need for legislative changes
to facilitate the implementation
of continuous registration as the
current laws cater for conducting
registration periodically.
Surujbally said President
Bharrat Jagdeo has assured that
the process of legislative
changes would be expedited and
this could be ready by April.
In their statement yester-
day, the three opposition
members said they also plan to
raise "the undesirability of ad-
dressing at such a briefing


matters not yet discussed to
consensual finality among
Commissioners, and in a man-
ner that allows the impression
that Commissioners have con-
cluded on the very matters still
utinder discussion".
They claimed that there
were "dangers inherent in the act
of GECOM presenting to the
public likely dates for the next
polls which it must know is al-
most pure speculation."
They said their concerns
include that the electorate
"not be misinformed about
any aspects of the pending
elections; not form the opin-
ion that Commissioners have
agreed on matters that are
still under discussion; and
not perceive that Commis-
sioners are ciphers."


NOTICE

Aft


CALL: 227 0191, 227 3947, 624 8877


flood waters had receded from
the worst-hit East Coast vil-
lages, most of the schools were
operational.
lHe said 46 schools were
still not operational, declaring it
was "unacceptable that those
children are not in school they
have lost too many school
hours."
Leaving the task to the re-
gional administration will not
work, he said, and announced,
"We have to do it from the cen-
tre".
The United Nations
Children's Fund (UNICEF)
has been working with the
Education Ministry to
sanitise schools and make
them safe for children to re-
turn and Mr Jagdeo said he
had spoken with officials of
the UN agency on accelerat-
ing the programme.
He expected that contracts
would have been awarded before
the end of Friday for work
through the weekend on the
school buildings, sanitation, wa-
ter and the grounds.
"...you have to look at the
grounds where the children are
playing...l think the focus has
been only on cleaning the
schools and whatever the costs
are we have to bear those costs
and get our children back in
school."
"...we can't allow them to
miss school", he stressed and
appealed to parents to "bear
with us".
"I know that there are many
fears about disease and stuff
like that...as soon as the schools


are open...they should send
their children back".
The President also declared
that it was "unacceptable" that
UG officials have not yet been
able to determine whether it was
safe to resume classes.
In a sarcastic aside, he
noted that the university has
a medical programme and "all
these science departments (and
still) can't really certify (and) *
even check whether the cam-
pus is clean to resume lec-
tures."
"I hope that they don't ex-
pect to be spoon-fed. If they
need assistance, we will give
them the assistance. If they
need monetary support. we will
do so. But we've got to get our
children back in school or the
university. That is very impor-
tant.
Other educational institu-
tions on the East Coast
which were badly affected by
the floods were the Cyril
Potter College of Education
and the Guyana School of
Agriculture.
Schools are among infra-
structure for which the govern-
ment is seeking international as-
sistance following the floods.
the worst natural disaster in the
country.
The floods last month
were spawned by the heaviest
rains in more than 100 years
and forced the government to
declare disaster zones in Re-
gions Three (West Demerara/
Essequibo Islands), Four
(Demerara/Mahaica) and
Five (Mahaica/Berbice).


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GUYANA ASSOCIATION
OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS
\ \NNL GIN R.\I I- I]'INC
Members are hereby invited to attend
the Annual General Meeting of the
Association.
Venue: HotelTower, Hibiscus Room
Time: I 1:00hrs
Date: March 6 2005
Agenda:
I. Welcome.
2. Minutes of the previous Annual
General Meeting
3. Corrections and confirmation
of the Minutes.
'I. Matters arising.
5. Correspondence.
6. The Annual Report,
7. Financial Report.
8. Elections and Installation of the
2005 Executive Committee.
9. Appointment of Sub-committees
10. Any other business.
lng. Jeani Ramlkhelawman
Secretary


0
- .- ~ -


- 4b





SUNDAY CHRONICLE February 27; 2005 5


VP


"p


asat

Fed
0


a m ~ b.


Ia oca r


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Syndicated Content- I

Available from Commercial News Providers"
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FARM HANDS
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2/26/2005. 7:28 PM







6. SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February.27, 2005


I. ....


- *.~* I


President


Jagdeo's daring


PRESIDENT Bharrat Jagdeo's strong defence of
his government's humanitarian outreach to the thou-
sands of victims of Guyana's unprecedented flooding,
has coincided with a very warm, moving personal let-
ter from Britain's Prince Charles.
Mr. Jagdeo's anger over allegations from politi-
cal opponents of discrimination in the government's
handling of flood relief is quite understandable, in view
of concerted efforts made and sustained to ensure col-
lective involvement in providing emergency aid, includ-
ing food and medicine, to affected victims.
From the outset, the government had sought to
involve the People's National Congress/Reform in the
distribution of food and other essential supplies.
Moreover, while the President, Prime Minister
and cabinet ministers have been directly involved in
the massive relief outreach, so also have been the re-
structured Civil Defence Commission, the Guyana Red
Cross, business sector, religious and non-governmen-
tal organizations (NGOs) some either collaborating ef-


forts or acting independently.
Given the nature of party politics in Guyana,
where some, across the political divide, move with
alacrity to make allegations of racial or political dis-
crimination -without compulsion to provide any hard
evidence President Jagdeo's challenge could be
viewed beyond merely an official rejection of such al-
legations.
In "daring anyone", as he said, to produce "evi-
dence of discrimination", the Head of State is clearly
mindful of the harm that such politicking could do to
ongoing efforts to mobilise financial and technical re-
sources from the international community for post-
flood rehabilitation and reconstruction programmes.
It is essential that however great may be the
attraction to score narrow political points, there is a
moral obligation to demonstrate responsibility and
patriotism, while thousands of Guyanese, across eth-
nic and religious lines, continue to suffer as a conse-
quence of a natural hazard with no parallel in living
memory.
Guyana, as a poor country struggling to over-
come enormous social and economic problems, was
fortunate to have had the personal intervention of
former President Jimmy Carter in placing his very
significant moral influence to endorse an international
appeal for United Nations emergency humanitarian
aid for our flood victims.
Carter's appeal that he extended to a live news
programme on CNN, had come at a period when
there were rising concerns over perceived slow re-
sponses by the international aid donor community to
the horrendous natural disaster with which Guyana
had to cope.


Subsequently came a personal letter from
Prince Charles to President Jagdeo, as released to
the media on Friday. Declaring that his "heart goes
out to all those who have been so badly affected by
this continuing disaster", the Prince, also commended
Guyana's own "incredibly generous support for the
poor people of Grenada" in the aftermath of 'Hurricane
Ivan' last year.
Prince Charles has since arranged for an un-
specified donation to be sent to Guyana to help in on-
going flood relief work. The problems are quite chal-
lenging and practical efforts must be made by all sec-
tions of our society to help.


CHRONICLE


Editor-in-Chief: Sharief Khan
Sunday Editor: Michelle Nurse
Editorial: 227-5216; 227-5204; 22-63243-9
Sports: 225-7174
After hours 226-3243-9
Fax: 227-5208
The Chronicle is at www.guyanachronicle.com
e-mail address sundayeditor@guyanachronicle.com
Lama Avenue, Bel Air Park, Georgetown. Guyana


ST. LUCIA last week celebrated
its 26th Independence anniver-
sary against the backdrop of a
dramatic development in its
party politics.
It is a development that
involves a unique leadership tussle
that may be comforting for the gov-
erning St. Lucia Labour Party (SLP)
while quite troubling for the chances
of the main opposition United








.i?


MR. VAUGHAN LEWIS
Workers Party (UWP), currently
led by the well-known regional
academic, Vaughan Lewis, in re-
gaining power at new elections in
December next year..
Some political leaders of
our Caribbean Community seem
not to know when to quit. Worse,
when not to come out of retire-
ment. in the winter of their years.
to assume a leadership role in
party politics.
Such appears the case
in St. Lucia where Compton's de-
cision to stage a political come-
back as leader of the UWP has


shocked both traditional supporters
and opponents.
It is Compton's right to do
as he has decided. The trouble is that
having had the honour of being the
longest-serving Prime Minister of St.
Lucia with almost four decades in
the political life of that Eastern Car-
ibbean nation, the once undisputed
leader of the UWP is today no
"spring chicken".


He would be
heading for 81 years of age
by the time the next gen-
eral election is expected to
take place December
2006. Current UWP
leader, Lewis, holding on
to his academic profession
at the UWI's Institute of
International Relations at
the St. Augustine Cam-
pus, is in his 60s, and in
no mood to make way for
his former political boss.


It is not so
much a case of his age.
Rather, the absence of any
known demand by either
J his party or any section
of the country for his re-
turn to active politics to lead the
UWP into the next general election
that has shocked St. Lucians.
Compton claimed last
week that he had received "calls" to
return and felt he had "a duty" to
himself, party and country.

DAUNTING CHALLENGE

His challenge seems quite
daunting when it is considered that,
if successful in replacing Lewis as
UWP leader, he would be involved
in a very tense, bruising battle for
power against the country's 54-year-


SIR JOHN COMPTON


old Prime Minister. Kenny
Anthony, whose incumbent
SLP enjoys a second term 14-
3 parliamentary majority, and
remains quite confident for a
third term.
Ironically. it is a con-
fidence boosted by a poll com-
missioned for the UWP by
Lewis and recently leaked to
the local media from within his
own party.
The results cast se-
rious doubts for the UWP's
chance of success in replacing
the SLP at the next general elec-
tion.
For example, in rela-
tion to who will make a better
Prime Minister. Anthony se-
cured 59 per cent to Lewis's
41 per cent. In terms of the
party better suited to lead St.
Lucia. the UWP secured 36 per
cent to the incumbent SLP's
40 per cent with some 24 of


those polled categorised as
"'undecided".
That internal poll
may well have been the cata-
lyst for Compton's provoca-
tive, risky decision to stage a
political comne-back. Instead
of bolstering the fortunes of
the LUWP it could further
weaken a very divided party
while energising complacent
Labourites.


Vaughan Lewis
himself is better
remembered as
one of the region's
outstanding aca-
demics, rather
than for any dem-
onstrated astute-
ness as a politi-
cian. He is under-
standably quite
hurt by
Compton's bid to
recapture the
UWP's leadership
ahead of new na-
tional election.
The


sudden public announcement
last week by Compton, who
had quit the UWP leadership
and anointed Lewis his suc-
cessor as Prime Minister in
time for the 1997 general elec-
tion, would have come as a
kick in the groin from a po-
litical retiree nurturing hopes
of again holding the reins of
power.
Politics, they say,
is the art of the possible. Yet,
it may be wondered whether
there are no limits to the thirst
for personal power by those
seemingly driven by an enor-
mnously inflated ego.

WOUNDED LEWIS

So driven, in fact,
that to the consternation of a
very wounded Lewis,
Complon decided last Sunday
to accept nomination for the


UWP leadership against the man
lie had anointed his successor in
1996.
Consequently. when the
UWP resumes its convention next
month, on March 13, it would have
to make a crucial choice between a


retired, almost octogenarian politi-
cian (Compton), and one twice de-
feated for a once traditionally safe
UWP's Central Castries constitu-
ency at the 1997 and 2001 general
elections (Lewis).


PRIME MINISTER KENNY ANT

For all of their own
leadership manoeuvrings, neither
Jamaica's Edward Seaga (now
officially retired), nor Trinidad
and Tobago's Basdeo Panday'
ever posed such a dilemma for
their respective parties.
Compton's decision is
a unique gamble in CARICOM
party politics and imay prove


costly for the UWP at the polls.
Lewis has already
vowed, publicly, to "leave no
stone unturned. I will avoid no
fight. 1 will do all that's neces-
sary to lead this party to
victory...We cannot endure five


more years of hard labour (un-
der the SLP)..."
For Prime Minister
Anthony. who was serving as
General Counsel at the
CARICOM Secre-
tariat in Guyana
while Compton was
still dominating the
local political scene
in the mid 90s, the
ex-Prime Minister's
decision to come out
of political retire-
S ment has to do with
the "nostalgia for
power" and his faith
in the older genera-
tion of traditional
UWP supporters.
Anthony
further noted:
"The SLP support-
ers, including
those who may
'HONY have become com-
placent, would now
be even more mo-
tivated to ensure our re-
turn to government. For
the UWP, Compton's re-
turn is a reflection of the
deep crisis of leadership
and clearly an extraordi-
nary humiliation of its
current leader, Vaughan
Lewis..."


Compton's shock'return'



Dilemma of St. Lucia's


once powerful ruling party


-':





-SUNDAY CHROi F; ary 27, 2005 --..7.



SIR JOHN CARTER TO BE




BURIED ON WEDNESDAY


Funeral service will have 'true Guyanese flavour' Lady Sarah Lou Carter


by Robert Persaud


DEALING


WITH TRUTHS


Guyana has just observed its
35th anniversary as a Repub-
lic. The first 22 years of this
period were lost years. The
nation, during the past de-
cade, has been frantically
trying to make up for that pe-
riod of missed opportunities.
And in this frenzy of catch-
ing up, there have been some
setbacks created by the po-
litically dinosauric antics of
the main opposition and its
surrogates, perhaps a few
missteps by the PPP/C and by
the unstoppable force of na-
ture as evident by the Janu-
ary floods.
The reality is that optimum
progress will continue to elude
this great land if we continue to
evade or manipulate certain ba-
sic truths. I have always held
the view that a Truth and Rec-
onciliation Commission, fash-
ioned off the type used in
South Africa for its transition
from apartheid to democracy,
could have provided some open-
ings for the nation to heal the
wounds of the past and accept
some "hard" truths so as to
move forward more This pro-
cess could have made our tran-
sition from dictatorship to de-
mocracy a bit less difficult. The
absence of this type of Truth
Commission has caused the mis-
deeds of the past to haunt us
like a ghost. Perhaps, a higher
level of political maturity and
sophistry by all in the socio-
political realm can do the trick
to remove this ghost.
Some elements in dis-
cussing the way forward for
Guyana have completely ig-
nored a few basic truths.
These are truths conditioned
by facts, our living history
and the recent declassifica-
tion of papers by the US and
UK authorities.
A most glaring example of
this denial of truth is reflected
in the on-going public debate
and 'quiet' behind-the-scenes
jostling by opposition elements
and certain others.
A number of articles and
editorials have appeared in the
newspapers advocating a new
political force. This is done in
the context of removing the
democratically elected PPP/C
Government, This advocacy,
especially by the editorial of the
Stabroek News, cleverly pre-
sents a Third/Centre Force as
Guyana's political salvation.
This call I must say is not new
and has been made for a long
time. Several other groups have
offered themselves as a Third/
Center Force at different times.
Mind you, I am all in favour of
people's right of political asso-
ciation and to form as many po-
litical forces as they want. This
is a most cherished right and
must not be violated at all costs.


The Stabroek News has
been one of the few ad\ ocates
for executive power sharing
without any period of building
genuine trust. Having recog-
nized that its position on execu-
tive power sharing was prema-
turely made, the Stabrock News
has now joined up for the Third/
Centre Force concept as an al-
ternative to the current political
dispensation. This is not strange
given its obvious editorial pref-
erences.
This debate is premised too
on the denial of this truth: all
those involved in this call \\ would
want to see the back olf lhe
Government. Already, some in-
volved in this call cannot con-
ceal their hunger for power. Ravi
Dev, whose ROAR party lhas all
but folded up, has publicly ap-
plied for a position in the
Third/Centre Force and has gone
so far as naming his choice for
leader. The energies spent by
those in the opposition and cci
tain others to undermine and re-
move the PPP/C, if chiannicled
properly, can help in ad\ dancing
the pace of development in this
country.
The administration has al-
ways been in favour of work-
ing with all committed and pa-
triotic Guyanese in ensuring se-
curity, prosperity and progress
for this nation. Just examine the
monumental reforms to our
Constitution to make it more
inclusionary or even the trim-
ming of the powers of the Presi-
dency and diverting these to the
Parliament. Guyana is the only
country in this hemisphere to
have an Executive-type Parlia-
ment.
The truth is that the past
dozen years has seen the PPP/
C taking the most generous
steps to help forge national con-
sensus, involving and working
with the opposition and civil
society. There are few who can
fault the administration for not
trying even if it did not try
harder on some fronts. Seeking
national cohesion is not a nov-
elty for the PPP/C. The PPP. as
the only real national political
party, was moulded out of a
long-standing struggle to achieve
genuine political cooperat-
and unity among all our ic.
There exists no other, I or
social entity, whicl
cated itself to this miss
The discussion or det,
political alternatives wi,
move forward in substai.c itl uI
truth is deliberately manipulated
or ignored. The thirst for wer
tends to obfuscate seni ,i.,,I
rational reasoning.
We all desire a ne,,> and
more mature politic:
ture. The advocates oi .oi,
Third/Centre Force, formerly
supporters of executive power
sharing, must recognize that


ROBERT PERSAUD
the creation of this desired
culture rests not solely on the
Government, but depends
heavily on conduct and re-
sponsiveness of the opposi-
tion. As the saying goes: it
takes two to tango.


By Sandra Seeraj

Distinguished Guyanese
Barrister-at-Law, politician
and retired diplomat, Sir
John Patrick Carter, who
passed away on Wednesday,
February 23 at Suburban
Hospital in Bethesda, Mary-
land, USA after a brief ill-
ness, will be interred on
Wednesday, March 2nd, 2005,
at the Gates of Heaven Cem-
etery, in Silver Spring, Mary-
land.
There will be a viewing of'
the body between 10.00 and 11
a.m. at the Chevy Chase United
Memorial Church at 7001 Con-
necticut Avenue, Chevy Chase,
Maryland, following which
there will be a funeral service,
at the same Church.
Sir John died just one
month after celebrating his 86th
birthday on January 26th, 2005.
According to his widow,
Lady Sarah Lou Carter, Sir John
had been unwell at home for a


brief period, and was taken to
hospital where he was diag-
nosed with double pneumonia.















He developed complications and
after one week of
hospitalization, he succumbed.
An old student of Queen's
College in British Guiana, Sir
John distinguished himself in
1937 by winning the Queen's
College Scholarship. He was ad-
mitted to the University of
London, Middle Temple in
1939. and qualified as a Barris-
ter-at-Law in 1942.


He and Lady Sarah Lou
were married in 1959 and their
union produced two sons, John
Jr. and Brian. He had two
daughters, Gillian (Case) and
Jennifer (Carter-Clarke) from
his previous marriage. He was
also stepfather to Robin, Lady
Sara Lou's daughter from her
previous marriage. Together, Sir
John and Lady Sara Lou have
eight grand children and two
great-grandchildren.
Speaking from her home in
Bethesda, Maryland, Lady Sa-
rah Lou said that the entire fam-
ily had come together to be with
Sir John during his illness, and
at least one family member was
by his bedside during his entire -
hospitalisation.
Sir John and Lady Sarah
Lou were still very much in
love after 45 1/2 years of
marriage. Deeply bereaved,
Lady Sarah Lou said: "He was
my buddy, my friend and my
lifelong love. We were very
(Please turn
to page nine)


CORRECTIONS TO LISTINGS IN 2004/5


TELEPHONE DIRECTORY

The public is advised that:


Telephone numbers 226-5325, 226-9866 and 227-3058 are the business numbers of Dr. Leslie I.R. Persaud and not of
King Solomon shipping as listed in the Directory.

Telephone number 226-6781 should show the address of Hon. Donald Trotman as 215 King Street, Lacytown instead
of125 King Street, Lacytown.

Telephone number 227-3453 should show Oneeka Smith instead of Petal Adams.

Telephone number 226-2629 should show Dennison Davis instead of Davis Dennison.


The following listings were omitted.


Pretty Posse Cabs A103 Arapaima St, E/LaPen.


Exotic Rentals Limousine Co. 68 Robb St, Lacytown 227-7677

Kevin's Reflection 233 South Road, Bourda 227-7450

SAfrican Chief Taxi Service XX Mandela Avenue, Meadow Brook Gardens 227-4111
De African Chief Taxi Service XX 223-9666


Wattie Singh 297 Thollmas Street, SC u226-8226



GT&T regrets the errors and hopes that these corrections would reduce, if not eliminate, the inconvenience.






8 SUti ., L HHUNIC E February 27, 2005



Governance, integration and security


By Rub6n Silid

THE term governance has en-
joyed great acceptance since it
became part of the social sci-
ences jargon during the eight-
ies, as it provided a new ap-


Dr. Ruben Sili6 Valdez


proach to the issue of the
State. Given the crisis of the
model of the intervening
State, greater importance
started being placed on the
relationship between govern-
ment and society, with the un-
derstanding that they had to
mutually recognize each
other as the actors involved in
main political action.
In the vision of Anto-
nio Camouili]. the study of po-
litical relations from the perspec-
tive of governance. is a question
that alludes to the quality of gov-
ernments, taking into account
aspects associated with efficacy/
efficiency: legitimacy and the ob-
ligation to provide better living
conditions for citizens, guaran-
teeing a balance between State
and society and last. the writer
underscores the obligation to.
guarantee stability. bearing in
mind social demands and -void-
ing social conflicts.
In that respect, the
notion of shared responsibility
is necessary as a civic practice,


which frees citizens from their
status as subjects, who assume
their responsibility to no longer
serve as objects of govern-
ments; through which, subject-
ing to governmental action out
of fear has been left in the past
and political pluralism is re-
stored as the basis of the demo-
cratic agreement of nations.
Those aspects pre-
sented in such a general man-
ner are the points of reference
for evaluating what would be
understood by good govern-
ment. This new vision that pre-
vails today teaches us that gov-
ernmental exercise is not a jus-
tification for force but rather a
process of building consensus.
Furthermore, this
new wave of politics has high-
lighted the importance of man-
aging a system of ethical values
associated with respect for so-
cial and economic rights, trans-
parency, accountability and the
fight against corruption.
It is interesting for us
to point out that such notions
are put forward in an interna-
tional arena, whose
organizations have turned into
a significant source of legitima-
tion for local governments. So-
called Summit politics (or
sunmmiteering) is a mechanism
that compels independent
States to bind themselves to
the values and principles agreed
upon in international
organizations or in regional in-
tegration schemes, so as to en-
sure the functioning of democ-
racy.
The importance of
international politics goes hand
in hand with globalisation as it
fosters awareness that. as local
problems have a global range,
the solution must be found
from the perspective of
globalisation. In turn, the ad-
vancements of that global pro-
cess have incorporated the is-
sue of security, since world


governance requires clear rules
that to guarantee a safe world.
In order to incorporate
the issue of security into the new
context of globalisation, it has
been necessary to question the old
doctrine of national security, with
its aggressive, expansionist voca-
tion, which was based essentially
on the use of force and subject
to the interest of' States.
Globalisation and the
notion of governance described
above, have served as the context
for defining a new notion o01 se-
curity, ";focssed on persons not
on States" Up until the eight-


ies, the idea prevailed that mili-
tary expenditure was key to
ensuring security, despite the
fact that the twentieth century
was a period of great insecu-


rity within the region and
around the world.


"According to the defi-
nition of the Commission on
Human Security, human secun-
rity consists in protecting the
vital essence of all lives in ways


that enhance human freedoms
and human lfulfilment..."


It is thus that
globalisation brings gover-
nance, integration and secu-
rity. To incorporate ourselves
into globalisation we will
have to do so through an in-
tegration scheme and in or-
der to integrate ourselves we
will need a notion of security
that is focusedd on persons".

Dr. Rubin Silij Valdez is
the Secretary General of the As-
sociation of Caribbean States.
The views expressed are not
necessarily the official views of
the ACS. Feedback can be sent
to mail@acs-aec.org


Iund holds 50'thanniversarydi ne'flU


GEORGETOWN PUBLIC-

HOSPITAL CORPORATION


We Ca



V


A


C


.7.


re


SOCIAL WORKER


Applications are being invited from suitably qualified persons to fill
the vacancy of Social Worker within the Corporation.
Applicants should possess the following:

* A Diploma or Degree in Social Work from a recognized University,
Practical knowledge in social work would be an asset.

Applications, along with two (2) references and a recent police clearance
can be sent to:

Leslie Cadogan
Director, Administrative Services
Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation
i, Market Street
Deadline for app ,lications is Friday March 4,200'. .5.'


Deadline for applications is Friday March 4, 2005.


MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill
the following positions:

Deputy Chief Education Officer (T)
Assistant Chief Education Officer
Chief Test Development Officer
School Inspectors
Subject Specialist (Curriculum)
Senior Test Development Officer
Test Development Officer
Senior Education Officer

Job Description and Job Specification can be obtained from
the Personnel Department, Ministry of Education, 21
Brickdam, Georgetown.

Applications on Public Service Commission no, 31 forms
should be sent to:
Secretary
Public Service Commission
Fort Street, Kingston

Closing date March 25, 2005


From left: Minister within
the Ministry of Labour, Hu-
man Services and Social Se-
curity. Bibi Shadick, and
Former President, Mrs. Janet
Jagan chat with Chairman of
Radio's Needy Children's
Fund, Mohamed Sattaur dur-
ing the dinner on Friday
night. (Pictures by Mike
Norville)
THE Radio's Needy
Children's Fund (RNCF)
which was established since
1954 on Friday held its 50th
anniversary dinner at Le
Meridien Pegasus.
The short, simple
programme featured songs by
Megan Vieira and The Swe-
den Sisters and a brief ad-
dress by Mr. Mohamed
Sattaur, Chairman of RNCF.


Government ads can be viewed on iI


The Greater

Caribbean This Week


- ---


-11 .. .1?





' 9


SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 27, 2005


TO BE BURIED ON


WEDNESDAY


(From page seven)

interdependent. It was my
joy to take care of him...we
took care of each other..."
She said that her family w\ as
very heartbroken. but noted that
their faith was very strong.
"We are praying con-
stantly for strength. It is go-
ing to be a very rough jour-
ney for me but with God's
help and the loving support of
my family, and our many
friends and relatives, we will
be able to make it through.
God will give me the
strength to carry on," she
said.
She added that because of
Sir John's deep love for the
country of his birth, she was
making every effort to bring true
Guyanese flavour to the funeral
service. The National Anthem of
Guyana will be played during
the service and the song "Yellow
Bird'. which was his favourite.
will also be featured.
She said that she had al-
ready gotten countless calls.
e-mails and messages from
relatives, friends and associ-
ates in Guyana, .iar'bai.,.
and other countries, among
them messages from
Guyana's former Ambassador
to Washington, Dr. Odeen
Ishmael, and Guyana's cur-
rent Ambassador, Bayney
Karran. She said that Ambas-
sador Karran and the staff of
the Guyana Embassy were
being very hte'pful to her fam-
ily in their bereavemi:t-
Sir John Carter was one of
two West Indians to complete
the Bar finals in London with
honours in 1942. He served as
the General Secretary of the
League of Coloured Peoples
(LCP) from 1942 to 1945 and
on his return to British Guyana
in 1945. he. along with Dr
Claude Denbow. led the BG
chapter of the LCP until the
1960's.
Upon his return to his
homeland. Sir John established
a successful law practice. He
also entered the political arena.
In 1948. he won the South
Georgetown constituency at the
national elections and became
the youngest member of the
National Legislature. Four years
later. he formed the United
Democratic Party (UDP).
which, in 1958. he merged with
the People's National Congress
(PNC) led by LFS Burnham.
Following this merge. Carter he-
caime the first Chairman o ,il e
P\iC alnd a_'in conitels d'il Ihe
clhIcl Pi'. in )(')1 Iso \'(l l ii

-cic'liedJ the holiul;se tAssei!

B" this lime il was evident
ilhait John Caler r iwas onlie of tile


L i!!iant legal and politic-al
minds to emerge frOii0 Guyana's
struggle towards independence.
He was part of the team led by
LFS Burnham (who was then
Leader of the Opposition).
which participated in the nego-
tiations with Britain for
Guyana's independence.
Carter was appointed as
Pro-Chancellor of the Univer-
sity of Guvana from 1962 when
that institution was in its in-
fancy. He served in that post
until 1966, the year Guyana
was granted its independence.
In June of that year. he was
knighted by Queen Elizabeth 11
of the United Kingdom as
Knight Bachelor. an iiG;....
wx which entitled him to be referred
to thereafter as 'Sir' and his wife
as 'Lady'.
Following Independence.
Sir John was accredited as
Guyana's first Ambassador of
to the United States of America
and Canada. He served in this
post from 1966 to 1970. He
also served as Guyana's first
Permanent Representative to
the United Nations (UN)
from 1966 to 1967. and again
.;. -"Crmn'i"nt Representative-
to the UN between 1968 and
1969. He also served as Vice
President of the 23rd Session of
the UN General Assembly in
1968. That was the first time
anyone from the Caribbean re-
gion had held that position.
Sir John's next posting was
as High Commissioner to the
United Kingdom. where he
served from 1970 to 1976. Dur-
;n, that period he held a total
of 16 coc'"rrent accreditations.
including that of Ai;',"sador to
France, West Germany, tnj
former USSR, Yugoslavia, Aus-
tria, Netherlands, India and
Sweden. He jokingly claimed
that he should be included in the
Guinness book of records for
having held the most concurrent
accreditations.
Sir John served as Ambas-
sador to China, North Korea


and Japan from 1976 to 1981
when he was p.C-_'.!d as Ambas-
sador to Jamaica. He held this
posting until 1983 when he re-
tired from the Diplomatic
Corps.
In recognition of his tmerito-
rious service to Guvana. Sir
John was awarded his first na-
tional accolade, the Cacique's
Crown of Honor (CCH) in
1970. This was followed by' the
highest national award. the Or-
der of Roraima (OR) in 1975.
During iis iliistiouS C'l',r.
Sir John was integrally involved
in shaping Guyv;ana's foreign
policy and fostering sound and
lasting fraternal relations be-
tween Guyana and the coun-
tries to which he was accredited.
One of the highlights of his
career was his involvement in
the United Nations negotiations
to resolve Venezuela's claim to
two-thirds of Guyana's terri-
tory. which gained stridency
following Guyana's indepen-
dence:
During his tenure as Ambas-
sador tC China.l he was instru-
mental in the negoi";;;0'ns which
facilitated the establishment k.,
the Sanata Textile Mill in
Guyana, which blossomed out
of a bilateral agreement between
China and Guyana
Another significant ac-
complishment of Sir John's


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AT NCN, HOMESTRETCH AVENUE.

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or phone 222-2541


fn CARIBBEAN O.fMMUNmITY


SECRETARIAT


Employment Opportunity

PRIVATE SECURITY COMPANY TO PROVIDE SECURITY
SERVICES AT THE CARICOM COMPLEX

The Caribbean Community Secretariat, is seeking to position itself toc &k:.-_ -i.el. respond
to the :1 :i-lei j-.. of providing an appropriate level of security at its new headquarters
complex at Turkeyen, Georgetown, GU'Y-NA. The Secretariat recognizes the need to
become more -,e.:i .e and -fficiert in the safeguard of the -cilil Among the initiatives
designed to achieve this is the hiring of a private Security Company to provide security
services at the CARICOM complex.

In this regard, 0nosals are invited from suitably qualified firms being nationals of Member
States and Associate viGbher States of the Caribbean Community, who are desirous of
providing professional security servC,. at the Caribbean Community Secretariat new
Headquarters Complex.

Full details including a copy of the Terms of Reference rhi- ass nt,can oe found at
the CARICOM Secretariat's ..-.. L,:i at '

Proposals must be submitted in hardcopy and placed in the Tender Box i;.i is located on
the 3" Floor,:,' in Bank of Guyana Building on or before the ,.-.a..:i- of 4,30 p.m.. Thursday
31 March 2005.

All enquiries on -in invitation should be directed to:-

Carol Corbin (Ms)
Programme Manager
Administrative Services
CARICOM Secretariat
Bank of Guyana Building
Avenue of the Republic
i',eorqgetown .


between the hours or 08:00 and 16:30 Mondas to Fridays, except holidays.
Monday .riays


SIR John and Lady Sarah Lou last year


career in dipliomaey was the
establishment of Guyana
r'Siaries by ihe Qovernment
of Japan, which came int I be-
ing during his accreditation
as Ambassador to that coun-
try. He was also instrumental
in brokering bilateral agree-
ments between Guyana and
Japan for the strengthening
of Guyana's bauxite industry.


~







SUNDAY CHRONICLE February 5


EddyGoI,
Eddy Grant to yreease r-ew album


dedicated to Guvana's rehabilitation cross


on the East Coast Demerara
tor almost a month has led to
a Guiyanese international
sillnger and songwriter to pro-


Members of the public are hereby
notified that the Melanie Local Office
will commence its operation with effect
from Monday, 28th February, 2005.


National. Insurance Scheme regrets
any inconvenience caused by the
closure of this local office, and would
like to thank the members of the public
for the patience exercised during this
time of crisis.


Management
National Insurance Scheme


!.v ,iasminee Salioye

The recent niassive floods
that Guyana faced particularly


VACANCIES


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Minimum requirements:

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Applications together with Curriculum Vitae should be made in person
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Human Resource Consultant

TOOLSIE PERSAUD LIMITED
GROUP OF..COMPANIES
<'00L l-- 10-12 Lombard Street, Georgetown.,


D)emerara to Ismav and Patrick
Grant, h1is been giving back to
the community in many ways.
Of recent, he donated G$ 1.7M
to the Plaisance community
which was severely flooded to
assist the village in its clean up
efforts, now that the I'lood wa-
ters have receded.
And a 'red letter' day
\\as created on February 17
lor tthis superstar, when a post-
age stanlip bcaringo his portrait
and logo tRingbang)i was iun-
veiled at the Unmana Yana in
Georgetown. At the ceremony,
lie challenged Guyana to build
its identity.
"We are taking
Ringbang, Guyana and the
Caribbean up one little notch


(duc I an illndedicated to the
rehabilitation of' (;uyana for
its first year of sales.
Internationally ac-
claimled 'Ringlbag' singer and
soin0'writer, Eddy Grant sal
down with the Chronicle at Le
Meridien Pegasls poolside over
lunch last Friday and talked at
length about his passion for
Guyana and how much lie would
like to see Guyana and its people
"g'row".
The album to be re-
leased soonI is titled Repatriationl.
"I' i hoping that
Guyanese people will be that
conscious and buy it in such a
way that Guyanese [are sup-
posed] to buy their number 9',;
artiste. If I 1 ith; e number one
;iiiste of this country, Guyanese
people should be buying tthe al-
bum), because in the time of the
Beatles. they bought the Beades
in serious numbers, the Rolling
Stones...whoever is the man, that
the person you are supposed to
be buying, \wCe are the only coun-
try that I know that is not like
that... Something is wrong and we
must look alt it. The floods caiiec
and gavt\e us the perfect opplor-
tunity to look at it," he salid.
(Graint. \\ ho \as born
n P laisante. Elist Coastt


EDDY GRANT


lore, lie said.
Grant told the
Chronicles during the interviewv
that tlie staIlip is all endtorse-
mient.
"It is a recognilitionl
that I ami somebody for this
country. They have put tile in
the league of' few people in this
country andI 1 have pledged to
hold m myself and people of
Guyana in high esteem."
He has made a name
for himself in several ventures
w.ic, m.iy have gone unno-
ticed.
"Guyanes---ie i ,ow
paying R ''oang llsic which
'`erybody is calling soea
now... Historian can trace it
back to mle. Just like you copy
the American culture,. Ringbang
is your culture; this is what I
have created under the inspira-
tion of God. How do you ex-
plain an inspiration? You can't
explain an inspiration. Like
somebody has asked ine where
did 'Gimnime Hope Johanna'
come fronm. I know I didn't
steal it from anybody.." When
you hear Ringbang music, you
know it: il causes something to
happen. The whole Ringbang
philosophy is one that has not
been seen inl this region since
Marclus Garvey and I knows
that Garvey was even
marginalised by even his own
people in Jaiutaica," the super-
star said
The symbol of
Ringhang was designed by
Ricardc Rcedlan alter Eddy ex-
plained his thoughts nto hiti.
Grant has strong
view about tlhe intellectual


people pay people for the use
of their copyright. Our country
has to observe those things
wheIn they do deals with
America," citing the examples
of KFC and Popeyes that the
owners have to pay for the
franchise (copyright).
This international su-
perstar had once thought of set-
ting up a recording studio in
Guyana. but according to hi.,
it's not feasible sinl- ''ne issue
of copyri' 1is not respected.
"There is no point in
setting up a recording studio in
this country ...vour son wants
to be an artiste...somebody
spends a lot of mlloney to make
a record, and then lie puts out
one record and a guy in some
shop in town makes thoLusands
and thousands of copies, he
can't make a living."
There will come a
time when the leader of this
country will have to confront
the issue of copyright. Grant
said.
In another few days.
the Ringbang inventor would
turn 58. Hle said Ilis entire life
is centered on Music and making
music. noting that "people have
been asking me if i' I going to
get involved in politics, Let te
sav Ithis. I'm nolt interested in
political position or power. I've
had all the fame that one mianl
can ask for. I'm n iot looking for
famlle in Guyana or elsewhere.
I've got 'liime ll over the world,
I can go to aiv country in tile
world and be recognized."
And there is a possi-
bility that Grant could set utip a
medical institution here, it' his


copyright issue, saying that the
institutions and policing of laws
regarding alln individual's rights
and ability to make a living do(t .
not exisI.
"The issue is. in,
Guyana, it is very difficult for
an artiste to exercise his copy-
right. In England and America,


R ingang Foundation is suffi-
cientll' funded. FIe ,';;.s several
building;, in the city and is in
tile process of rehabilitating one
of their which once housed the.
Chinese Embassy.
He said he has been
encouraging a friend in Barba-
dos, who is also a Guyanese, Dr
Alfred Sparman., a cardiologist,
to set up a clinic here.
"1 have been encour-
aging people to come here... and
I've been trying to get him in-
Svolved in our health situation, at
least he can screen oui people
to avoid sudden death in some
cardiac situation... He is cur-
rentlyv interviewing people who
can serve in a certain capacity
within his organisation and
hopeful' that \will happen.
Maybe one day wvheIn i"I
.''ti'Iang tFoundation beconics
sulitCiicIIntl fuInded. \\e nmay be
able to build our own hospital
instead of begging people for
money to come and do that."
"The Ringbang Foun-
datioln was setL up by 'y, chil-
dren under liy auspices because
1 ha\e been talking about it for
soilletime llCand for the last folur
or five years, they have been
faced with various other chari-
ties at orphanages and so
onil..,'ve been hoping that they
\would gel to like Guyiana be-
cause the Foundation is basi-
cally for ,. r*... tho ', Cari. -
bean..." he said, adding that
during the devastating floods.
"all my family was here and
others who subscribe to
Ringbang out of Barbados to as-
sist in any\\ay that we could
\\ ith the curl i 'ti t _ion-".
His four children are
grown, the youngest being 32.
None of them has actu.:ii fol-
lowed his fhl;,',srep. He, ho\\ -
eve", ialded that "they can all
sing to some degree and a couple
of them can play, but they have
chosen the music business.
show business and business."
Through his many al-
bums which have been sold in-
ternationally. Grant said he has
been able to put Guyana on the
map and hlie intends to continue
to promote Guyana. Referring
to his home. an island in the
Essequibo river called Ringbang
island. Grant said: "This is my
home: it has a value to interna-
tional people who know of
Eddy Grant ...They come and
photograph it, it's on the
internet, they talk about it. it
gives Guyana another piece of
the plan to advertise."
'The island, which is
about an acre and a half in his
estimation, w\\as bought from an
architect. Mr. David Klautky
who had developed it. "All I'm
doing now is basically to keep
it looking good." Grant said as
we were finishing lp our meal
of curried vegetables, with rice.
roli and achar.
Eddy Grant lived in
Eigland for some 20 yeaiirs
1111d according to him lie
joined in the struggled for
the recognition of black
people in England.


YeI -1Id


I


'""~U'Y~"-U1"4~'







SUNDAY CHRONICLE February 27, 2005



Two Caribbean



beverage giants


BANKS DIH of Guyana and
Banks Holdings (BHL) of
Barbados have signed a
Memorandum of Understand-
ing (MOU) which is expected
to strongly impact the beer
market in the Caribbean and
beyond.
A release from the lo-
cal beverage giant said the
MOU, brokered by BANKS
DIH Chairman, Mr. Clifford
Reis and CEO of BHL, Mr. Ri-
chard Cozier, was signed after
the two companies, for years,
had pursued differing strategies
in production, marketing and
distribution of one of the stron-
gest beer brands in the region.


Under the new agree-
ment. Banks DIH, which owns
the majority of the Banks
trademark rights globally, will
remove existing barriers to mar-
keting and distributing BANKS
branded products through
CARICO1M and all other in-
ternational markets.
According to the re-
lease, both companies, which
manufacture beer, malt and a
range of other beverages, have
also agreed to market, promote
and distribute each other's


unite


brands on their respective do-
mestic markets so long as those
brands do not compete with
their existing brands.
The new arrangement
was effected by a share trans-
fer agreement which sees Banks
DIS acquiring 9.14 per cent of
BHL, and BHL acquiring 11.8
per cent of Banks DIH. Banks
DIH is a publicly owned com-
pany with more than 13 000
shareholders. BHL has more
than 3 000 shareholders and is
the largest beverage producing


conglomerate in Barbados. It has
seven subsidiaries which range in
scope from bottle manufacturing
to beverage production/distribu-
tion and recycling.
"Both companies
have agreed to use their best
endeavours to examine all
CARICOM and major inter-
national markets with a view
to promoting the BANKS
brand name most suited to
that market. This, the parties
say, will ensure that any con-
fusion between the two com-
panies is avoided," the press
release said.


An. ......ir,i industrial proper y located at Mc
Doom, East Bank Demerara is now available for
sale or'. --.! ,, 11 lease

This property was not affected by 'i.- recent floods
and consists of:
* 3 Acres of [and
* 2 Industrial : I in totaling 33,000 Sq. Ft.
* 1 Admin Office i,. I of F i Sq. Ft.

Foradditiona! l,,i'n i;,. ,please call;

Ms. Sharon Rodrigues
Telephone number: 226-8606


a E
Iea.,:outS o S io So


THE United Nations
Children's Fund (UNICEF) is
urging youths in Guyana
who have access to the
internet to join the millions
of young people worldwide
speaking out an diving their
views on violence against chil-
dren.
The call comes as five
of Guyana's youths prepare to
join their Caribbean counterparts
as delegates to the Caribbean
Regional Consultation on Chil-
dren and Violence, scheduled to
be held in Trinidad next month.
"This way, we give
children the opportunity to have
their voices heard and contrib-
ute directly to the United Na-
tions Secretary General's Study
on the Violence Against Chil-
dren," Representative of
UNICEF Guyana, Maria
Ribeiro said.
The UN Study on
Violence Against Children looks
at violence committed against
children across the world and
what can be done about it.


In 2001, the General
Assembly requested that the
Secretary General conduct a
study on Violence Against Chil-
dren (VAC). This study, to be
submitted to the General As-
sembly in 2006. will explore
the forms, causes and impacts
of violence affecting children
and young people (those under
18 years old).
It will provide an in-
depth picture of violence
against children and among
other things, will review legal
and institutional responses to
VAC. In its final study report,
clear recommendations for im-
proved legislation, policy, and
programming will be proposed.
With the vision of be-
ing an inclusive study that
blends practical and theoretical
information, the study on VAC
will be a collaborative effort be-
tween UN agencies, govern-
ments, non-government
organizations (NGOs), academ-
ics and institutions, the public
and, most importantly, children


and young people.
Their views, strate-
gies, and interventions, particu-
larly those designed by chil-
dren, will inform the study pro-
cess and the final report.
Each region of the
world will be holding a meeting
to discuss VAC in that region.
The Caribbean Re-
gional Consultation of Children
and Violence is scheduled for
Port-of-Spain, Trinidad. on
March 10 and 11, 2005. and
Guyanese youths are being en-
couraged to add their voices to
those of other youths around
the Caribbean and beyond.
To add your com-
ments, just log on to the follow-
ing website, register yourself
(no fees attached) and join in
the ongoing discussion. Com-
ments will be downloaded and
summarised daily.
http://www.unicef.org/
voy
The forum for discus-
sion will remain open until
March 10. 2005.


Help and Shelter, CIDA conduct


Psycho-Social counselling sessions


HELP and Shelter
in collaboration with the
Canadian International
Development Agency
(CIDA) Gender Equality
Programme recently con-
ducted a three-day train-
ing session on Psycho-So-
cial counselling recently.
The 16 partici-
pants were selected from
the Volunteer Youth
Corps, Red Thread,


Women Across Differ-
ences, the Ministry of
Labour, Human Services
and Social Security, Men
of Purpose and Help and
Shelter.
The training
programme focused on a
number of Psycho-Social
problems which would
have arisen as a result of
the adverse impact of the
recent flooding, and tech-
niques that should be


used when counselling
flood victims.
At the end of the
training programme, par-
ticipants were also pre-
sented with certificates by
Coordinator of CIDA, Ms.
Vanda Radzik.
The training ses-
sion was facilitated by a
three-member team from
the Social Work Depart-
ment of the University of'
Guyana.


THE GUYANA OIL COMPANY LIMITED

PRE-QUALIFICATION OF CONTRACTORS

1. Contractors are invited to apply for the Pre-Qualification for Works to be
undertaken by the Guyana Oil Company Limited (GUYOIL) for year 2005.

Contractors who had previously been qualified are asked to re-apply.

Areas of work include but are not limited to the following:

a. Construction & Rehabilitation-of Buildings, Roads, Drains and
Associated Drainage Structures.
b. Fabrication of Fuel Storage Tanks.
c. Installation of Fuel Storage Tanks (Foundation, Bond Walls, Pipe Works &
Access).
d. Replacement of Fender Piles and other repairs to Berths of Terminals.
e. Vehicle Servicing and Repairs (Mechanical, Electrical, Body Work and
Spray Painting).
f. Installation and Servicing of Air Conditioning equipment on Buildings and
Vehicles.
g. Electrical Installation of Motors, Switches to API SPECS.
h. Sinage, Logos, Canopy Facia, Artwork and Graphics.
i. Painting and General Carpentry.

2. CONTRACTORS ARE REQUIRED TO SUBMIT:

a. Valid National Insurance Scheme (NIS) and Guyana Revenue Authority
(GRA) Compliance Certificates.
b. Copy of Company or Business Registration.
c. List of Machinery & Equipment, including their capacity and current
status.
d. Evidence of availability of financial resources from Banking institutions to
undertake works.
e. List of personnel with relevant experience.
f. Record of past performance of works completed during the past three (3)
years.

3. PRE-QUALIFICATION BIDS MUST BE SUBMITTED in sealed envelopes
bearing no identity of the Company or Business and clearly marked at the
top, left-hand corner "Pre-Qualification For Contractors".

4. PRE-QUALIFICATION BIDS must be addressed to the Chairman Tender
Board Committee. The Guyana Oil Company Limited, 166 Waterloo Street,
North Cummingsburg, Georgetown and must be deposited in the Tender
Box which is located in the lower flat of Building 'C' 166 Waterloo Street,
Georgetown, not laterthan March 15,2005.

5. PRE-QUALIFICATION TENDERS which do not comply with the stated
requirements will be regarded as non-responsive.

6. GUYOIL RESERVES THE RIGHT to inspect and request certification of
equipment at any time.

7. GUYOIL RESERVES THE RIGHT to reject any or all submissions without
assigning reasons for such rejection.


2/26/2005. 9"58 PM





SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 27, 2005 ,


GPSU wants



inquiry into flood


Sick Pow s mrKac

timf It~i~v goElowhC


- --
- --


THE Guyana Public Service
Union (GPSU) wants a com-
mission to probe the causes of
the recent flood disaster.
General Secretary
Randolph Kirton yesterday told
a news conference at the union's
Georgetown headquarters that
the government did not heed ad-
vice after the East Demerara Wa-
ter Conservancy (EDWC) dam
was breached at Cane Grove in
2001.
He claimed.the govern-
ment also did not involve pro-
fessional engineers in fostering
a response to the recent floods.
Kirton said profes-
sional engineers had warned of
the consequences of the shoddy
work done on the EDWC dam


following the breach at Cane
Grove, and this he charged has
been confirmed by United Na-
tions experts who alluded to the
fragility and poor state of the
dam.
He also said that engi-
neers have expressed concerns
about the balance between the
volume of water in the EDWC
and the Crown Dam which if
not right could lead to a breach
or breaches.
He also claimed that the
government was partisan in for-
mulating a response to the flood
disaster and there should have
been broad-based committees,
rather than teams headed by
ministers and dominated by po-
litical activists.


In addition, he said the gov-
ernment had neglected the issue
of disaster preparedness, claim-
ing that the Civil Defence Com-
mission (CDC) had not been al-
located any funds for the past
five years.
President Bharrat Jagdeo, at
a news conference Friday,
shrugged aside calls for an in-
quiry into the causes of the
flood.
"There was some neglect",
he acknowledged, noting that
some kokers (sluices) and drain-
age canals were blocked, but
said. "we do not need a com-
mission" of inquiry for that.
He stressed that the record
rains last month were the pri-
mary factor in the floods and


signalled that the government's
overriding concern was to help
flood victims recover and to ac-
celerate drainage plans to avert
a similar catastrophe.
The United Nations de-
ployed two Dutch engineers
here to assess the situation and
they have put reconunendations
to avert another disaster which
the President said the govern-
ment was acting on.
Their focus was on the
worst-hit East Coast and five
new outfalls three on the
East Coast and two on the East
Bank Demerara are among
the immediate recommenda-
tions the government was
implementing, Mr. Jagdeo
said.


mw


Usty


ImtosatlIsal Fesmed


- S4S


a -


"Copyrighted Material


O- --" Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial NewsP.roviders'


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The Bailk reserves the right to refuse the highest or any bid.


I I~i11131~C--I __ LI -


Jib


a 4mool. ow






SUNDAY WHRiONILE' Fbrua 7 200'5' '. 13:


Guyanese in "


St. Lucia raise _


money for


flood relief


HUNDREDS of Guyanese
gathered in Greater Castries,
St. Lucia on Thursday to cel-
ebrate Guyana's 35the anni-
versary as a Republic.
"We are Guyanese who are
proud to be Guyanese and it is
heartening to see that we have
come together to celebrate this
milestone," said Guyana's Hon-
orary Consul to St. Lucia. Mr.
Lokesh Singh.
With tradition folk songs.
poems and cultural dances, it
was evident that Guyanese
have not forgotten their culture.
More than 12 000
Guyanese live on the island.
The event which was hosted for
the sixth successive year was
planned by the Guyana/St.
Lucia Association and the high-
1161.. o.e,- -- th -
award ceremony for Guyanese
who have made a sterling con-
tribution to the' island's devel-
opment.
According to the Govern-
ment Information Agency
(GINA), among those receiving
awards were Sabina Paul, who
excelled at the recent CXC ex-
ams with eight Grade Ones and
a Grade Two; Certified Peer
Counsellor and Coordinator of


Youth Apprentice Programme,
Dorani Azees: accomplished
painter. Ron Savory; and Presi-
dent of the Guyana/St. Lucia
Association and Chairman of
the Toastmaster's Club, Edward
Morris.
"This illustrates the impact
Guyanese are having in St.
Lucia," said Advisor to the
President on Investment,
Maniram Prashad.
This is the sixth year that
the Association has been active
in promoting Guyana's rich cul-
ture and heritage and recognising
the contributions made by
Guyanese.
Mr. Prashad told the audi-
ence that Guyana is now recov-
ering from its worst natural di-
saster and noted that the gov-
__emient is making every effort
to returnfi eTounut it ...y
malcy.
Before bringing the cur-
tains of the ceremony, sev-
eral individuals donated cash
for Guyana's flood relief.
Vice President of the Guyana/
St. Lucia Association, Shiv
Doonauth announced that
more than US$2 000 was re-
ceived from members of the
audience.


Stolen bag of

jewellery recovered
QUICK response from the police mobile unit after
alarms from Rose Hall, Berbice municipal vendors, led
to the recovery of a bag with gold, silver and diamond
jewellery at the Babu John foreshore on Friday after-
noon.
Maria Persaud and her husband Robin were on their
way home after vending at the town- market when they
were robbed of the bag.
Speaking to the Chronicle yesterday from the Port
Mourant market, Maria was in high praise for the police,
the Rose Hall constabulary and residents whose uni-
fied efforts and persistence aided in the recovery of the
valuables.
Meanwhile ranks are continuing to search the town-
ship and neighboring areas for the two armed, un-
masked but unidentified bandits who carried out the
daring attack outside the Rose Hall municipal market
at about 13:00 h on Friday.





The Centre of Brazilian Studies
of the Brazilian Embassy
Wishes to inform interested persons that
registration for the examination for the
"CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY IN THE PORTUGUESE
LANGUAGE FOR FOREIGNERS"
will be from February 14
to March 18, 2005
This examination is sponsored by the Higher
Education Secretariat of the Ministry of Education of
Brazil and is offered twice a year, in April and in October
For more information call
Tel. Nos.: 226-2573 or 226-8054
Please note you must have a good knowledge of
'! *'"tei'ru u'~''a gu g t rgse;


Post-flood cleaning


In the wake of the recent floods which inundated parts of
LGebogeTowTrama-thtc-Ea.ot-Ce.t namerara, clean-up ex-
ercises have begun.
While the main focus on the East Coast is the removal
of garbage, work in Georgetown has focused on the clean-
ing of waterways.
This Winston Oudkerk picture shows a desilting ex-
ercise on the trench between Vlissengen Road and Irving
Street.


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51


V-11 535-,-






14 SUNDAY CHRONICLE February 27, 2005


'Ive


put m


best foot






forward'

I- BERNICE NICHOLS IN HARARE, ZIMBABWE


Story and pictures by
Amanda Wilson in Harare,
Zimbabwe

SHE'S in Zimbabwe. one of
the most breathtaking coun-
tries in southern Africa,
known for its safaris, and
of course, the seventh
natural wonder of the
world, the magnificent
Victoria Falls.
Yesterday the finals of
the 2005 Miss Tourism
World and Bernice Nichols,
Guyana's representative told
thateimdau Ghronixctc=hc bc-
lieves she stands a chance of
taking home the crown, the
US$100.000 cash prize, one-
year modelling contract and
other perks.
She knows best since
the former tennis champion
has spent the last two
weeks sizing up the compe-
tition 85 other contestants
from South and North
America. Africa. Europe. Asia
and the Caribbean.
"I feel very confident right
now. I believe that I've made my
mark over the last two weeks,"
Bernice shared when I caught up
with her in the Harvest Garden
Restaurant of the Sheraton Ho-
tel.
The caramel toned beauty
was hurrying to final rehearsal
at the state-of-the-art venue, the
Harare International Conference
Centre. She looked stress-free
and did not come across as a
first timer on the international
pageant scene.
It's 8:30 a.m. in Harare.
Bernice looked gorgeous in a
black and green sundress de-
signed by Guyanese Derek
Moore. Her straight black hair
was swept back in a ponytail
and her face perfectly made up
with earth tones-
"I'm not nervous because
I've been preparing myself for
the final since I landed in Zim-
babwe. There's not a lot of pres-
sure on me from my country
because the pageant is new to
us, but I've put a lot of pres-
sure on myself because I really
want to show the rest of the
world watching that Guyanese
women are both brilliant and
beautiful."
Bernice has so far blown
away the local and international
media. Everyone has com-
meoted on her interviewing
technique and confidence. But
she knows she has to be an all-
rounder to win the title.
"The competition is
very stiff. The girls are all well
educated, well spoken and in-
credibly beautiful. I've put my
best foot forward," she smiled.
She has so far completed na-
tional costume, swimwear.


evening dress ai in li .I. i'
liminary round.
Talking aboni I.'.I IIi, 1... I
model decided .,. .- I ... ,, -,
herthree-inch ht i iii -
"Girl. it's like be'mn- .1 Ii.'n.h
she said, wiggln,- hi I, i -
"The weather is -ici ie .iii,.-


'Guyana is somewhat like Zimbabwe. We are
misrepresented in the foreign media and our
tourism industry has suffered as a result. We
just need a major push into die-inenmtkimtl--
spofTghtfand I think the Miss Tourism World
pageant would be good for Guyana's tourism
industry. Think of having 85 girls from all
over the world and even the foreign press
becoming Guvana's ambassadors.'
GUYANA CONTESTANT AT
MIS:S: TOUCijRII V'IJHLE CONTEST. BERNICE NICHC',L!


sphere is wel-
coming. It just
feels like
home."
The Uni-
versity of
Guyana gradu-
ate has come to
understand how
important it
was for Zimba-
bwe to host the
Miss Tourism
World pageant.
"The tourism
sector needed this
boost and I am
happy to be a part
of that process
Zimbabwe is si
misrepresented in
the media. Before
coming here I
thought that ever. -
thing was falling hi
hind as far as de'.cl ,
opment was con-
cerned. But I havcn ri
seen anything negal' e
so far. The people are
very nice and very re- Bernic
spected. They've been
bending over backwards to help
us."
The new queen will spent a
year promoting Zimbabwe's
tourism industry worldwide.
According to Bernice, that
would be an honour since her
tours of Harare, Victoria Falls.
the Great Zimbabwe, Eastern
Highlands, the Heroes' Acre and
Kariba were "educational and
very enjoyable."
She hasn't had breakfast
yet. It's just a few minutes be-
fore 9 a.m. Her manicured fin-
gers are in my fruit bowl. Next,
she's having my cup of tea.
"I'm eating on the run these
days." she laughed.


te Nlchols and aunu...- -


"Maybe
-you should grab some breakfast
before rehearsal," I advised.
She shakes her head in the
negative. "I'll have something a
little later at the venue," Bernice
smiled and continued to slip my
tea.
Her eyes keep roaming
around the breakfast area. But
she's not looking at the other
contestants. She's checking out
the building. Comining from an
architectural background, the
buildings have really impressed
the 24-year-old city girl. She
was part of a group of contes-
tants who stopped traffic dur-
ing the busy lunch hour on ;a
walk-around of the capital.


"I am very im-
pressed with the buildings.
They look very modern. It feels
like you're walking through cer-
tain parts of New York City
when you walk around Harare.
Like the Sheraton hotel and the
Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe
buildings, they are top of the
line in design."
As much as the five feet.
eight inches beauty is enjoying
herself in Harare, her mind shifts
to homeland Guyana ever so of-
len.
"Guyana is somewhat like
Zimbabwe. We are misrepre-
senlted in the foreign media and
our tourism industry has suf-
fered as a result. We just need a
major push into the international


spotlight and I think the Miss
Tourism World pageant would
be good for Guyana's tourism
industry. Think of having 85
girls from all over the world and
even the foreign press becoming
Guyana's ambassadors."
If this is how she has been
answering the judges' questions,
Bernice with statistic 33:26:26
definitely has a chance.
A no-nonsense looking
chaperon is rounding up contes-
tants for the 9:00 a.m. final re-
hearsal start nearby.
"'I have to run. It's final re-
hearsal and that means we have
to get every oull'it." she's al-
most out tlhe door looking for
designer Derek. Some ofl her
outfils have caused quite a stir


amongst the girls, especially
her national costume that de-
picts Guyana's natural re-
sources.
"You know Derek does
-his one-of-a kind outfits and
puts every creative bone in his
body into his work. I'm
happy he's my designer for
the pageant. Always loved his
clothes." she added on the
mov\e no\\.
"So what happens if you
don't win Bernice'." 1 asked.
"This pageant will be
good forin me no matter how it
turns out," she nodded. "It
brought me to Africa for the
first time and this trip will
certainly not be mil last on
thle Al'ricam colntin'ent.
iV c y c .":


Harare, Zimbabvve-
"W 7=ntestanoin Ha'r-I
---,-ntherCOn





SUNDAY CHRONICLE February 27, 2005 15


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16 SUNDAY CHRONIC


One supplier in Lusignan
to Ramroop's Furniture
Store also suffered losses of
materials used to manufac-
ture furniture.
He said this was his
only loss since he was able
to move up all his household
items to higher ground before
the waters rose.
"I suffer losses from my
materials that I use to build
the furniture. The wood
colour changed so I have to
dress them back, which is
more money to do so; some
plywood was destroyed and
a motor for one of the ma-
chine is damaged.
These were all my losses.
Now that the water is no
more we have already
cleaned the place and I have
already built some furniture
to sell since this is my main
income which I depend on
and I have to do something,"
he said.

While some families are
busy cleaning their homes,
one was last week still en-
camped on the roadside
along the railway embank-
ment at Lusignan.
This family, whose main
income is from cattle rearing,
lost cows and pigs in the
flood waters.
"We cannot move into
our house yet because the
yard is still wet and the cows
and pigs cannot go into the
yard so we have to be out
here to look after the ani-
mals.
I went home already and
do some cleaning so, we are
just waiting for the yard to
dry and then we will move
back in. This is the only loss
for me because as soon as I
saw the water coming in, I
started to raise my house-
hold items. I am glad I was
able to save those things,"
said Mrs. Sital who was still
living under a tent along the
roadside.


HARD JOB: cleaning up the stains that remain after the flood waters.


By Nathalene DeFreitas

THE flood waters -- chest-
high and up to the waist in
many cases have now gone
from those East Coast
Demerara villagess where resi-
dents battled In survive for


more than a month.
Many abandoned flooded
homes and sought refuge with
relatives and friends in other
parts of the coast or in shelters
opened in school' and olher gov-
ernment buildings.
Others moved to ent on higher


ground nearby and kept watch on
property and livestock animals they
managed to drag along with them.
For more than a month, as
the waters painstakingly
dropped bit by bit, it was a diet
of soup kitchens or food ham-
pers and communal cooking for


THE WATER WAS HERE: a member of the Ramsingh family p
water was in their home. (Quacy Sampson photos)


thousands with help from the
massive government-led emer-
gency relief programme.
Jobs were lost, lives turned
upside down, dreaded diseases
stalked the land and many were the*
woes in the long flood nightmare.
Some in the worst-affected


villages were last week ;iill u~at-
ing to move back home because
the ground was still wet, while
most others have trekked back to
begin the long haul to normalcy,
trying to pick up the pieces of
the life they once had
_ The Chronicle checked in


'I -


A


NO SCHOO:: Mrs. Harrybarran cleaning up after thIK food" and her three children
attend school.


In LBI Housing Scheme, nne
1'amril'. "as busN cleaning up
since the water is no more
Mr' Harr',aharrarn i,. pleaed.
that the %%aler inii, mo re but -he
is bothered that her children are
not dLn ndin f ch .I
The'e Lhildren cann.,t g., I'.
chlit'l hecaiuie the -chol did not
clean cood. the. are hrme now
,inrce he li,.d -taried and up to
noA the., cannot e ti school,"
she -aid
Her lanmil I-1 rnly house-
hold 1iem- and the:, a ill try to
replace these
Bui thc,: till hate to wait
un til th>; .j ear eijia .-'an offer
enmpi\ mnini
No. .*,.rl r. ..-ilale at the
c-I.IL I d ith, rrL.,J jrinners in
ihi.. Ijmil, ire honi.m hoping for
Ihe c'.,i I.. Tari *' riding cane
a lain t lh:i Ihi, 'ain return to
... rk


.2


are at home since they cannot


DAMAGED CHAIRS: so


- -


'' ~-





E February 27, 2005


points to the damaged stove showing how high the


DESTROYED: pieces of furniture destroyed by the flood waters and cannot be used any more.


PIECE


,ith some families to find out
ow they are coping.
'The Ramsingh family in Bet-
-r Hope (south) said most of
eir householditems were gone,
ir depire bthe damage, they
,ise started to clean and rebuild
ie dow stairs that was almost


falling apart because of the flood
waters.
"The flood water was really
terrible and I feel much better
since the water is no more. Be-
cause of this flood water two
family members fell sick and
were rushed to the hospital to get


treatment and I thank God that
they are well now.
Now that the water is gone
there is so much: work to be
done, but it has to be done and
we have to get back to our life
that we once had", one family
member said.


Indian village


boy's NASA


claim crashes


to Earth


"Copyrighted Material ;
... ...... Syndicated Content -
Available from Commercial News Providers"


:*- "


- 0 ON-I


S.... ................ tj Jl lllllL. .
N ew --M.


me of the.Wahid family's damaged furniture.


.. *- *


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10 SUNDAY CHRONICLE February 27, 2005


Cell phone mak ers choose
betw(eefi style and tech


dab


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Available


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated content
le from Commercial News Pro


riders"


Singh's Confectionery
7 Longden & America Streets, Georgetown. -~


esto ad~se evep 0esi ,
manl isoesce"t lod Coo es'
!50 to Oethe aes Z haY

ae(s om oc005-01


We are asking all Wholesalers, Shopkeepers AISO C001[RI SOOR
and Supermarkets to cooperate with us and Dx Whole Wheat Gpacke
pass the reduction to the Comsumers. tivi Faces
8 Festival Grazs Faces
EAT PLENTV & STAY HEALTHY
.9ana g n ."u.i.-,...r
m. 'I, i., Thank You
"-- 1% ^ ^"*'''i Managing Director
il^&~zzi~l- G Singh


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SUNDAY CHRONICLE February 27, 2005





"iGCopyrig hted Material



jSyndicated Content


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o



PROPERTIES FOR SALE
AT AUCTION AT THE INSTANCE OF THE REGISTRAR
OF THE SUPREME COURT

Residential land (approximately 6,990 sq. ft.) situate at W V2 of N /2 of Lot 25 and W z
of S '2 of Lot 26 Goed Fortuin, West Bank Demerara.
Freehold agricultural lands (308.977 acres) situate at Block 'D' Plantation Malgre Tout,
West Bank Demerara.
Riverside Resort (land 9.651 acres/420,397 sq. ft.) situate at Riverview along the right
bank of the Essequibo River with four buildings comprising guest house (648 sq. ft.),
workers quarters (625 sq. ft.), Mini-Mart (100 sq. ft.) and Bar (504 sq. ft.).
(Resort approximately one hour by speed boat from Parika Stelling).
Residential land (0.02186 acre) situate at Lot No. 65A being part of Area R, part of
Pattensen k." as Turkeyen, Georgetown.

Residential land (1,152 sq. ft) with one storey wooden building (456 sq. ft.) situate at E ',A of
Lot Lettered 'C' Nelson Street, Section B, Mocha, East Bank Demerara.
Residential land (5,250 sq. ft.) with two (2) one flat wooden buildings situate at W ',2 of Lot
25, Hague' ill 'Y West Coast Demerara (Front Building 875 sq. ft; Back Building -
375 sq ft.).
Industrial Land (approx. 44.2 acres) situate at the eastern position of Plantation Coffee
Grove, cum annexis, situate on the west sea coast of the County of Essequibo,
save and except:
a) One complete Satake Rice lii in the name of Allen's Enterprise Ltd
b) All moveable items in the name of Allen's Enterprises Limited
c) One complete Kumar Coconut Oil Mill equipped with 14 electric motors, two storage
tanks and two Kumar Oil Expeller Oil Machine
Residential land (approx. 96,000 sq. ft.) situate at lots Nos. 62 and 63 Section A, Danielstown,
in the Three Friends-Walton Hall Local Government District, Essequibo Coast with modern
-- two storey wooden and concrete building (approx. 2,000 sq. ft.) straddling both lots.
A 20 years lease over residential land (0.1377 acre) with two storey wooden and concrete
building (496 sq. ft.) situate at Lot 136 Richmond Village, Essequibo Coast.
Residential land being Parcel Nos. 55 (0.1257 acre) and 158 (0.1257 acre) Block XXXI,
Hampton Court (South of the Public Road), Essequibo Coast with one storey wooden
building (486 sq. ft.).
* * Residential land (3,562 sq. ft.) situate at Lot 143, Half Mile Wismar, Linden with incomplete
concrete structure (approx. 400 sq ft)
TBll f*i Residential plots of land situate at Lots 85 and 86 Block 'Z', Section 'A', Upper Pearl, East
Bank Demerara comprising 6,577.56 sq. ft. each.

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2005, at 13:00 hours.
State Warehouse, Kingston, Georgetown





SUNDAiV'CHAON I CLE


icBanks Hold!ings Limited


BANKS DIH LTD
D'AGUIARS INDUSTRIES & HOLDINGS


BANKS DIH LIMITED BANKS HOLDINGS LIMITED OF BARBADOS

The Directors of Banks DIH Limited (BDIH) are pleased to announce that BDIH and Banks Holdings
Limited of Barbados (BHL) have agreed to expand and enhance their mutually beneficial relationship.
This step was taken as part of our continued efforts to position ourselves as a competitive force within a
liberalised market.

The benefits of this enhanced relationship include:


(i) The parties agreeing to examine each market in the Caricom Region and Internationally with a view
to promoting the BANKS brand name that is most suited to that market, so as to ensure that
confusion between BDIH and BHL Banks marks is avoided.


(ii) Marketing and distributing the products of BHL, which are not in competition with the products
produced by BDIH, in the Guyana market.


(iii) Marketing and distributing the products of BDIH, which are not in competition with the products
produced by BHL, in the Barbados market.


(iv) Removing any barriers to marketing and distributing BANKS brand name products throughout
Caricom and all other International markets, subject to Clauses (ii) and (iii) above.


To this end, the Directors of Banks DIH Ltd have signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Banks
Holdings Ltd of Barbados. In pursuance of the terms of the said Memorandum of Understanding, Banks
DIH Ltd issued to Banks Holdings Ltd, the remaining 118,281,250 of its authorised share capital, and
payment for same was effected by Banks DIH Ltd accepting property i.e. 3,591,397 shares issued by
Banks.Holdings Ltd.

The intention is that the synergies developed from this relationship between the two companies will
facilitate the growth of both businesses, thereby enhancing shareholders' value and that the mutually
beneficial agreement with the BANKS trade name, will help to ensure the success of both Companies
within the new CSME and with the FTAA knocking at the doorsteps of the Region.


25thFebruary,-2005.--- .


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SUNDAY CHRONICLE February 27, 2005 1


hoAds


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$40,000.00 "SHOULD-BE-WON"

CROSSWORD PUZZLE
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NAME- NAME
ADDRESS- ADDRESS'


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one 40
MO W OR

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ACROSS:
1. Leptospira organisms
have been found in
cattle, horses,
rodents and
wild animals.
4. Persons with
symptoms suggestive
of Leptospirosis
should ____ a
health care provider.
6. Word used as a
homophone, ie, a
word that is
pronounced in the
same way as another
but spelt in a
different way and
has a different
meaning.
7. Direction.
8. Outbreaks of
Leptospirosis are
usually caused by
exposure to water
contaminated with


the ***** of infected
animals.
12. Male personal
name.
14. is included as a
symptom of
Leptospirosis.
15. South American
country.
16. River on the Left
Bank of the
Essequibo River in
Guyana.
20. Comb. form relating
to the earth.
21. Synonym for the
verb, bother.
22. Acronym for "Water
Closet" (Restroom).
DO 'N:
2. Acronym for
"Government
Resolution".
3. Word used as a
homophone.
4. A fact or piece of
evidence used to solve
a crime, or that seems


Congratulations to Mr. S.. Chapman of Arcadia,
East Bank Demerara for being the winner of
last Friday's "Must-Be-won" Chronicle
Crossword competition. Mr. S. Chapman's
two entries with four errors' were the best for
this drawing. He will receive the full prize of
$40,000.00 along with the 40+ entries
incentive prize. There were several players
with five errors who', came .pretty close to
sharing this prize with Mr. Chapman but
unfortunately had on6 error ,too many.
Congratulations to the other players of the 80+
entries category. They are Mr. C.E. Bracelly of
9 Republic Road, New Amsterdam; Mr. J.R.


to reveal something.
5. Word used as a
homophone.
7. South Africa (Abbr.)
9. Acronym for
"Research Officer".
10. Direction.
11. Leptospirosis is
by laboratory test i
of a blood or urine
sample.
13. Country on the
Africani continent.


17. ULniversity of Guyana
(Abbr.)
18. "Behold I will do a
*** thing, now it
shall spring forth;
shall ye not know
it? I will even make
A way in the
wilderness and rivers
in the desert".
19. International Olympic
Committee (Abbr.)


Bolivia, clue, confirmed, consult, contact, depress,
Deo, diarrhea, disrupt, disturb, dogs, Ecuador, geo,
GR, IOC, Leo, Mazaruni, NE, new, NW, Nigeria,
pigs, real, reel, RO, Rupununi, SA, SE, sea, see, Seo.
Senegal, Siparuni, Somalia, SW, tale, tail. UG.
urine, Uruguay, validated, vomiting, WC.


Lord of McDoom, EBD: Mr. Sheikh Dinool
of 61 Barr Street, Kitty and Mr. R. Khan of
8 Verg, East Bank Essequibo.

Could Mr C. E. Bracelly collect his
payment from Mr. G. Wynter's office at
New Amsterdam on Thursday, March 03,
2005 while the other prizewinners collect
their payment from the Georgetown Head
Office on Wednesday, March 02, 2005?
Please present a suitable form of
identification when collecting payment.

The Winning Solution and a new
"Should-Be-Won" puzzle for
$40,000.00 are now presented to you.
Note well, this Pre-Easter "S-B-W"
competition will be drawn on Friday,
March 18, 2005. The rules for this
competition will remain the same,
except, that where there is one error,
the prize money is $25,000.00 and for
two errors the prize money is
$15,000.00. If there is more than one
winner the prize money will be shared
among the winners.

The additional incentives of $1,000.00
and $2,000.00 for the 40+ and 80+
entries groupings are in effect.

If you play smart, as Mr. Chapman did,
you can win this offer of $40,000.00. The
more you play the greater is the possibility


of winning. The amount of entries submitted
must be covered by the relevant sums of
money or they will not be judged. Then
place those entries in a Chronicle Crossword
box at a location near to you.

If you need coupons just purchase a copy
of the Sunday or Wednesday Chronicle.
For extra coupons, purchases can be,
made at our offices in Linden, New
Amsterdam and Georgetown. You can
also obtain extra coupons from Mr,,.
Vincent Mercurius of D'Edward Village,.)
Rosignol, Berbice. They cost $20.00 each'
or $40.00 for two as they appear in the
Sunday or Wednesday Chronicle.

Players are reminded that they need to
write legibly for the judges to understand.
No entry is opened before 12.30 pm on the
day the puzzle is drawn and judging does
not begin before 4.30 pmi when the last
entry is opened. The solution to the
puzzle is not known before that time.

This apart, our general rules apply.

We continue to be optimistic that our
many fans and residents affected by the
flood situation would experience quick
relief and resolution to this crisis.

Thanks
Crossword Committee'


- S-~ 0





ALA,- A-1 i]







22 SUNDAY CHRONICLE February 27, 2005


MTV CHANNEL 14 CABLE
65

06:45 h Sign On With
Bhajan Melodies
07:00 h Dabi's Musical Hour
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13:00 h H.E President Jagdeo
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18:30 h The Dairy
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21:00 h The 77th Annual
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12:30 h Radha Krishna
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16:30 h Cartoons
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07:00 h Full House
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NTN CHANNEL 18 CABLE
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135 Sheriff & Fourth Streets, Campbellville, Georgetown, Guyana
Tel: 226.-9823,231.7172 email: horizon@networksgyom


NOTICE

MR. FRANCIS AUGUSTINE, of
Lot 109 Soesdyke, East Bank
Demerara, and former employee
of NEW HORIZON INC. is asked
to contact the management of
New Horizon Inc, 135 Sheriff & Fourth Street,
Campbellville, Georgetown, immediately to settle his
long outstanding account with the company.

Anyone knowing the whereabouts of the said Francis
Augustine is asked to draw this notice to his
attention.

Mrs. Dianna M. Rodrigues
Managing Director


20:00 h Musical Inti
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K-


erlude 10:30 h Documentary
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or The 15:00 h In Memoriam
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Death 19:00 h Birthday Request
19:05 h Sitcom
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20:00 h C-Span's: "Not
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u 22:00 h Death
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23:30 h Sign Off




weather


atch n^^


TODAY'S FORECAST: Mostly fair weather is expected to be
interrupted by cloudy spells with isolated showers.
WINDS: Are expected to vary between the North Northeast
and South at 1 to 8m.p.s.
WAVES: Moderately high reaching about 2.3m in open waters.
HIGH TIDE: 05:53h at (2 90m) and 18 07h at (2.98m)
LOW TIDE: 12:06h at (0.56m)
GEORGETOWN TIMEHRI NEW AMSTERDAM
SUNRISE: 06:06h N/A NiA
SUNSET: 18:05h N/A N/A
MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE: 29 5 31.0C over near inland and
interior locations and 30 0 33.5C along the coast
MINIMUM TEMPERATURE: 21.0 23.5C over near inlanu and
interior locations and 22.5 25.5C along the coast.
RAINFALL: 1.5mm
RAINFALL ACCUMULATED : 213.3mm
MARINE ADVISORY: Fishermen and other marine users
are advised not to damage or interfere with the ocean
platforms, whose data are vital to the provision of the
weather information and warnings for the safety of the
marine community.
HIGH TIDE ADVISORY: All residents of coastal,riverine
and low-lying areas are advised to guard against
possible flooding due to above normal high tides.

FOR WEATHER RELATED QUERIES PLEASE CALL --
261-2216, FAX 261-2284







DEMERARA HARBOUR BRIDGE CLOSURE TO ROAD
TRAFFIC FOR SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005












S..;*- .,.' '-


For Ocean going vessels & Trawlers 05:30h
For Trawlers t0:30h
For Ocean Going Vessels opening last about l-l"-lhrs

*JJJ .M ..IO.0 I0l II. -MI









SUNDAY CHRONICLE Fetrruar,


..l-. -- -h --









Please check


23

For customer service call I


your ads on the first day of appearance. FOr cueries call Pratima on Tel: 226-3243-9


NOVELS, Story books, text,
etc. Also Novels and other books
on sale from $20 up. Telephone
223-8237.



BUILDING, renovating or
doing any kind of construction
work? We give free estimates.
Prompt, reasonable and reliable
service. Call 622-0267/629-
2239.



SCREEN Security Services
(SSS). For quality and
professional security coverage at
competitive rates, call
telephone No. 613-3572,
e m a i I :
Lettscomms@yahoo.com, P.O.
Box 12304, Georgetown.



WHOLESALE prices for
potatoes, onions, garlic, split
peas, channa, milk powder, jar
oil Steve's Trading, 35 William
St., Campbellville. Tel: 624-
6414/225-0688/22.3-4,- 2,.



ARE you desirous of
rebuilding or repairing or
extending your home. Please
call 227-2494. Mortgage
financing,



JEAN offers courses in
Elementary, Intermediate
& Advanced Dressmaking,
also Designing. 153 Barr
St., Kitty. Tel. # 226-9548



ENROL now at Shalom
Ent.. Lot 2 Croal Street,
Stabroek. Georgetown. You
could also obtain an
International Driver's Permit. For
information, Call: 227-3869/
622-8162.



INDRA'S Beauty Salon 112
Oronoque Street. cold wave,
straiahtt-,;ong, facial, manicure,
scalp treatment and design on
nails. Also Beauty Culture
available. Tel. 227-1601.
DOLLY'S Hairdressing
Salon. 175 Middle Street,
C'burg., Georgetown for cold-
waiving, straightening, styling,
colour streak, cut-blow dry,
manicure, pedicure, facial, etc.
Phone: 227-2428.



SPARE time earnings.
Information: Send stamped
envelope. Tara Surijpaul, 50
Best Village, West Coast
Demerara, Guyana.
WORK from home.
Information? Send stamped
envelope to: Bibi Farid, 65
Public Road, Eccles, East Bank
Demerara, Guyana.
WORK & earn from home.
Send stamped envelope.
Anastacia Salim, C/o B. F.
Salim, # 63 Village, Corentyne,
Berbice, Guyana.
BIG profits from home.
Information? Send stamped
envelope. Vidya Singh, 35
Campbell Avenue,
Campbellville, Georgetown,
Guyana.
TURN your spare-time into
money by filling envelopes, For
info, send stamped envelop to
Jasodra Sarwan, 61 Goed
Bananen Land, East Canje,
Berbice,
CONTROL your income
working from home filling 100
envelopes for US$500 or more
weekly. For information, send
stamped self-addressed
envelope to: Nathaniel
Williams, PO Box: 12154,
Georgetown, Guyana.


FOR PROFESSINAL
COMPUTER Repairs, Sales &
Services Call Kersting's
Computer Repairs & Sales
Centre @ 227-8361/618-8283.
Home & Office services
available. 24 hrs.
PROFESSIONAL
Computer repairs, sales and
Networking. Reduced prices
on brand new systems. Tel.
624-5659. 220-6262.
FOR all your computer
repairs, Networking, Website
development, Point of Sale,
computerised accounting,
computer training, Software
sales and computer hardware
imports (at Factory Direct
Pricing). Contact: Ronald #
618-5750, James # 660-7232



ONE Cleaner. Apply in
person to Len's. Sheriff &
Fourth Sts., C/ville.
EXPERIENCED Hire Car
Drivers. Contact. Jeffrey -
Cell .MS: 22-8350.
TAXI Driver preferably
from East Coast Demerara
Contact: Chungman on: 220-
4701/628-7440.





















PORTERS. Apply in ,ison
with valid PC,;e, C clearance to
BlI[ & SONS, 159 Barr Street,
K itty. .
PROFESSIONAL Cook,
Assistant Cook and Counter
Staff wanted. Apply to: Jerries
Snackette, 228 Camp Street,
MAID, Home Attendant,
Carpenter, Waiter, Handyman,
Maintenance (male).
MURRAY'S TEMP AGENCY -
# 231-3302.
PORTERS, Plainer & Rip
Saw Operators, owners of
chainsaws to operate in the
Mabura area. Call: Richard -
# 624-0774/233-2614.
WAITRESSES, 18 22
years, to work in bar. Apply in
person to: Naka Pool Mall, 64
better Hope, ECD. Telephone:
220-4298/617-6100.
FOR experienced
Sewing Machine Operators.
Apply to: Kent Garment
Factory Ltd., 12 Plaisance
Public Road, ECD or
Phone: 222-2541
SALESCLERK 20 30
years, (2) years experience and
must be good at Maths &
English. Apply to Lens, Sheriff
& Fourth Sts., C/ville. Tel, 227-
2486,
2 ACCOUNTS Clerks,
Driver/Mechanic, Trainee
Machinist, Machinist Welder/
Fabricator. Send application to
172 East Field Dr., Nandy Park,
E B Dem.
VACANCY exists for one
female Receptionist/Clerk, age
18 26 years. Must have a
secondary education, Apply: PO
Box # 101305, not later than
15/03/05.
2 TRAINEE Beekeepers,
50 Pickers/Labourers, 1 -
Mechanic, 1 Auto Electrician,
1 Interior Truck Driver,
Goldfield Inc., 'C' Eccles, EBD.
# 233-2423.


VACANCY Lorry Driver for NEED to activate your body
7-ton Leyland. References and and mental strength? Come for
Police Clearance required, Also a well-balanced health
one Labourer. Telles Steel & massage, shower available. Call
Hardware, 74 Hadfield St., G/t. Mrs. Singh (daily). Tel. 220-
Tel. 226-677 1. 4842/615-6665.
A MERCHANDISING ESCAPE Bodybliss
Company is looking to recruit (5) massages. Alleviate headaches,
five ambitious, qualified and insomnia, muscular pains,
energetic persons to do door to tension and stress. Certified
door home selling. Send Massage Therapist Ulelli
applications now to P.O. Box Verbeke # 226-2669/615-8747
101334.


WANTED TRANSMISSION
OPERATORS, EDITORS.
CAMERAMEN '".SuKANCE
ALALS REPRESENTATIVE.
INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICIANS,
FITTER/MACHINIST
(MILLWRIGHT). CONTACT: 227-
3339.
1 FEMALE Shop
Attendant, I General
Domestic, I Security Guard. 1
- Handyman. Vacancies exist in
the Interior Middle MazaruLr.
Persons interested Call No: 225-
7118 between 08:00 to 16:00 h
- Office hours.
PART-TIME Information
Technology Teacher with
experience in dealing with SBA
Apply -'-////with written
application to: International
Business College, 262 Thomas
St., North CumL ingsburg Tel
223-7210/223-7219.
MECHANIC for gas and
diesel especially Canters. Must
be reliable and uilJg ?"'I ed.
Excellent wages, NIS. annual
leave, bonus, $1M insurance,
etc. See Mr. Raghubir RsK's
Security, 125 Ragent Road,
Bourd3. Tel: 226-7541 or 227-
;072.
VACANCIES exist for
Accounts Clerk, Cashiers. Must
have sound knowledge of
computers. Previous experience
would be an asset. Apply in
person to: The Manager, United
General Store, 12 Croal &
Longden Streets, Stabroek.
Georgetown.
ONE Office Assistant. Must
have knowledge of Payroll, NIS.
Filing and must be computer
literate. Must be between the
ages of 20 and 30 years old.
Must have knowledge of Maths
and English and at least two (2)
years working experience. Len's
- Sheriff & Fourth Streets, C/
ville.
OXYGEN Plant Operators.
Age: 24 years and older.
Preferably person living on the
EBD. Qualifications: CXC Maths
& English or Trade Certificate.
Knowledge of Workshop
Practice would be an
advantage. Apply: Friendship
Oxygen Limited, 30 Friendship,
EBD, between 13:00 h & 16:00
h.
VACANCIES exist in a
reputable, stable, financial
organization ifor sales
representatives. Applicants
should be mature in age and
possess a minimum of 3 CXC.
GCE subjects or an equivalent
qualification. Send application
to: Unit Manager. 133 Church
Street, South Cummingsburg,
Georgetown. Telephone
number: 622-0307.
SCREEN Security Services
Ltd. Vacancies exist for Visiting
Inspectors, Sergeants and
Security Officers between the
ages of 18 and 55. Apply in
person with valid Police
Clearance, Birth Certificate,
two recent Testimonial and
National ID, NIS, GRA code #s
to Lot 23 Percy Alley, Agricola,
Gr. Georgetown, daily, between
09:30 and14:30 hours.- '


NOTICE LAND NOT FOR
SALE The public is hereby
notified that the property (vacant
land) situated at Lot number 182
Duncan Street. Lamaha
Gardens, Georgetown. Guyana
is owned by Phillip Campayne
TRANSPORT #1900/80. This
land is not for sale, nor transfer,
nor has been bestowed to
Power of 1.t lie land -is
lot fo0 sale This is the second
lot on the left. heading east as
you entered L.imaha Gaidens
along Duncan Street.
Georgetown
NOTICE TAKE NOTICE
that there will be publicly sold
to the highest bidder at
Georgetown Magistratee's Court
yard onil Monday 28" February.
2005 at 09.00" hours 1 1 -
Computer table Ibrown). 2. l-
Akita fridge (2) doors, 3 1-
Hoover Futura S/N -
129400022562. 4. 1 ,
(TV & Radio) S N .''--: ,
5-piece chairset with dinner
table. 6. 1-carpet ruciq RHONDA
BRENDA MC KENZIE
represented herein by duly
constituted attorney Neville A
Grahan of 189 Charlotte Street
Lacytown. Georgetown,
anreeably with Power of
Attorney No 3839 of 1999
Plaintiff and MICHAEL
YOUNG Defendant. Terms of
Sale cash Plus 30 auction
sale duty Sgd an lamlal
R ,'t:1n;i supreme Court of
Judicature.



JOIN THE PHONICS CEN-
TER. We teach your child/chil-
dren the art of reading. See
them develop into good read-
ers. Call 618-2068.
COSMETOLOGY classes at
Sheer Magic Salon. Affordable
cost. Teaching to suit your every
need. # 226-9448/227-8737.
after hours e-mail:
bd_sheermagic@yahoo.com
JEAN offers courses in:
dressmaking, tie dye fabric
designing, bedroom elegance,
soft furnishing, soft toys, curtains.
cushions, crochet, ribbon
embroidery, hand embroidery,
plastic canvas, smocking, floral,
craft, cake decoration. 159 Barr
St., Kitty. # 226-9548.
PRACTICAL electronics
course beginning 211' Feb.
Professional instructor teaching
repairs to televisions, microwave
ovens, amplifiers, stereo
systems, etc. evening classes,
Call Abdul's Electronic Services
for further information on Tel.
226-6551 or 225-0391.
Guarantee your future now!
EARN your computer
Certificates and Diploma now at
Computer Training Centre.
Certificates/Diploma courses
Microsoft Windows, Word, Excel,
Access, PowerPoint, FrontPage
2003, Adobe Photoshop CS,
Corel Draw, Publisher Diploma
in Computerised Accounting,
QuickBooks Accounting,
Peachtree Accounting, AccPac
Simply Accounting, Repairs &
Maintenance, Networking &
CompTIA network,
A+Certificates, Information
Technology, Computer courses
for children's ages 7 12, We
also repair and service
computers at a low cost.
Software, & Games for sale. Visit
our Office at 58 Upper Robb &
Oronoque Sts., Bourda,
Georgetown. Telephone No.
225-1540. '


ARE you hurt, depressed,
lonely, financially unstable,
demonically possessed,
emotionally stressed and angry?
Kingdom Ministries 223-1930



WE build middle and low
income homes. Special low
income offer at $10 000 per
month Please call telephone
No. 227-2494/227-2479, after
hours 227-5192.



HOW to check your
battery, overcome obstacles,
win in emergencies, stop
being a victim, avoid mental
tension and old age? Call:
Leonard on Tel / 22-
06q1' 4' 1 4!8.



BEAUTY Queen
Perfection Piroci.irm io. Do
you i want to be a beauty
queen or just look ke one2
S impi Royal is proud to
announce registration for its
Beauty Queen Perfection
Programme. A (6) six-week
preparation that puts you on
the cutting edge of pageant
participation. Learn how to
market yourself. your sponsor
and your country, build
question and answer skills,
prepare a portfolio,
.1 skills, modelling,
i ,,P ,i Yeou would just like
a Complete Makeover. then
this programme would be
perfect for you. Classes
commence on March 1. 2005
(Monday, Wednesday &
Thursday evenings) Seait ;>.
limited so REG- I,T R NOW'
Regisit lion ends Febiuary
zu. 2005. For further
information and . .
Call us on Tel. -
come into us at 140 Quamina
Street, Georgetown (opposite
Kings Jewellery World)



BROTHER MARAJ 28,
invites female single Christian
(21- 28) to correspond. Send
mails to Rox 9r049 K Y. G/town.
MAGAZINE Worldwide Pen
Friends. Information? Send
stamped envelope CFI, PO Box:
12154, Georgetown, Guyana.
IF you are a single
employed male over 60 years
and would like to meet the lady
of your dreams 50 years and over
for serious relationship. Call
Telephone 223-8237. 09:00h -
18:00h.
COMMUNICATE with
interested persons by telephone
for friendship or. serious
relations. Call: CFI Telephone
Friendship Link: 261-5079,
Sunday to Saturday, 07:00 to
21:00 h.
EUROPEAN man, Med,
Doctor, 40-ies, single, look for
pen pal and friendship.
interests in sports, novels,
music, hiking and adventures.
Kindly reply to Dr. Molhan.
Box 2047, 22002 Lund.
SWEDEN.
PROFESSIONALS and
other employed males and
females for friendship, love,
marriage. Call the Junior/
Senior/Singles Dating
Service 18 80 years.
Telephone 223-8237 Moi.
Fri. 09:00 18:00 hours,
Sat. Sun., 10:00 14:00
hours (Immediate link).
A MIDDLE aged, healthy,
educated and divorced male
seeks a relationship with a
female companion of the
same calibre for a serious
relationship leading to
marriage. Only a serious
mindeidc co-operative and
sincere individual would be
successful. Write to Raju, P.O.
Box 12351, 'Bourda,
' ,G e t g e t w n , ,


MUSIC system, wax
machine. Contact
Freddy, 43 Bent Street,
Werk-en-Rust. Tel. 231-
7789/621-5984. Reason-
able rates.



INTERIOR FLIGHT
SERVICES. For flights to
Interior locations Tel: 226-
7516, Cell: 616-5668.


DIESEL INJECTION
SERVICES. For services
and repairs to fuel pumps
& injectors Tel: 222-
5779, 222-2207. Cell.
623-2605.
FOR all your elegant
wear, working suites, etc.
in sewing and sewing
classes Contact: Liz or
Stacy Telephone No:
629-5341.
NEED AN EMPLOYEE?
Guyana Ernployrmeiii
Agency provides top
employees with a broad
range of skills in a variety 7, ,
fields. Contact 227-3339.
REPAIRS done to TVs.
VCRs, radioitape/CD
combination sets. miicrowave
ovens, etc. Free pick up and
delivery. Call Stanley -
Telephone No: 615-2546/
218-2465.





U.S.A IMMIGRATION
Papers for National Visa
Centre
Processing, Petitions,
Adjustment of Status,
Case Follow-ups,
Enquiries, Consular
Appointments etc.
LLOYD WILLIAMS & ASSOCIATES ,
[THE CRUCIBLE]

105 Regent Rd., Bourda,
[ Between Cummings &
Light Sts.,
Georgetown.
Tel#:(592)-223-8115
Fax#:(592)-225-6496
E-mail-
crucible@guyana.net.gy

C A N A D I A N
IMMIGRATION PAPER
WORK. We assist with the
aper work. Cost $6 000 for
ull package and
consultation is FREE!
Contact 227-3339/623-
1195.
FOR all your telephone
services, repairs to cable
eq uipmient, rewiring,
adjacent, etc. Contact
Qualified Technician with
over 35 years experience,
Don't delay. Telephone 226-
2766/617-0427 anytime,.
FOR YOUR TURNING
NEEDS, I.E. SPINDLES,
LEGS, BALUSTERS, ETC. -
CONTACT: 233-2770/611-
7008.
USA GREEN CARD
LOTTERY. Live & work in
the USA. Family
application: $4 000.
Contact 227-3339/623-
1 195,


2/26/2005. 9:59 PM


'







4 SUNDAY CHRONICLE February 27, 2005


PR---P-ERT


WOULD YOU LIKE TO UPPER Demerara River -
BE FREE FROM THE plots of land: 25, 50, 100 & 600-
STRESS OF SELLING OR acre plots, note: $65 000, per
RENTING YOUR acre, Ideal housing, agriculture.
PROPERTY? WE AT MEG'S cattle, shipping. Ederson's #
REALTY & INFORMATION 226-5496.
ESTABLISHMENTCANMIoT DtO-- 1r.rI c7uVM.
PCoR-YCU. CONTACT US Convention Centre and now
ON: 613-5735 OR 263- going up 5-Star Hotel, $4.5M:
6043. Lanaha Gardens $10M:
Supply, EBD $16M.
Telephone 225-4398.
1 HOUSE lot (300' x 100') -
leasehold title, in Yarowkabra.
Prico $800 000. # 614-5791 or
623-1919 after 18:00 h. Rice
land for sale Fair Field.
Essequibo Coast. Contact: 614-
57-91/621-5905.
Migrate to ONE square mile of
registered gold and diamond
dI land claim. Easy access to water
'I -- for all-year work. Ideal for land
dredging operation. Minimal
vegetation, Mining will not
Lt ol uaified affect environment or cause river
Let only Qualified pollution. Location:
Consultants/Lawyersi Imbaimadai Area Upper
Mazarunim. Interested persons
in Canada that are please Phone: 614-9709.
approved by the TRANSPORTED $300 000
Canadian Government S900 000 Queenstown $5M.
Pike St. $3.5M. Dowding St. -
prepare your S3M, Kitty $4M. Liliendaal -
Immigration papers $.511M, Lamaha Gardens S10M,
Ear! .s C rt LBI $5M,
Permanent Residence, Albeattown $8, U 'Cri -
Visitors, Students, Work S1.5M & West Ruimveldt $2M,1
Low cost houses and pre
Permits, Refugees, etc fabricated houses $10 000
Canada: Balwant Persaud monthly. Call 231-6236.
& Associates
Email:


balwantpersaudt6ahoo.ca
Tel: 416-431-8845, 416-
795-6051
Guyana: 225-1540
Also: Earn your
Permanent Residence in
the USA through the USA
Govt. Green Card Lottery
Program




LAND FOR SALE OLE-
ANDER GARDENS 89 FT
BY 152 FT. PRICE $25M.
CALL: 612-0349.
PRIME commercial
land for sale 115 ft x 31 ft,
Charlotte Street, Bourda.
Contact owner 226-0683
(anytime).
LAND in Georgetown
from $8 million upwards.
Call: 225-2626/231-2064
or e-mail:
ornyreidsrealty@hotmail.com
REPUBLIC Park -
vacant Transported land:
50'/100' $5M (US$25
000). Build your dream-
home. Ederson's # 226-
5496.
HOUSE lot for sale Lot
53 Area "H".Earls Court, LBI.
ECD reasonable offer
accepted. Tel. 227-1711
between 17:00 and 20:00 hrs.
TWO transported adja-
cent lots in Earl's Court,
LBI 18 080 sq ft total.
Please telephone 623-
7438 between 6-8am and
8-10pm for details.
17 VACANT,
transported house lots to be
sold in one parcel at
Blankenburg. Public Road,
West Coast Demerara. Call
225-2487/627-3806.
DUKE St., Kingston (2)
large house lots: 48'/117' -
$9.5M. Ideal school,
luxurious hotel, apartments,
storage bond. Ederson's #
226-5496.
ROBB Street (corner),
High Street, Church Street,
GuySuCo Park/Turkeyen
,West of UG Road $8M neg.
TELEPHONE 226-8148/625-
1624.
TWO Transported house
lots light, water available,
area free from any flood -
going for $1.8M situate at
Best, WCD. Telephone: 254-
)101 Singh.
105 ACRES land along
inden Soesdyke Highway.
leal for housing
development. i rustrial
evelopment-, -resort etc-
ELEPHONE 226-8148/625-
1624.


ROOM for a decent.
working female. Call 225-
0706.
ROOM for single working
female. Telephone: 227-
0928
ONE TWO-BEDROOM
BOTTOM FLAT. TELEPHONE:
625-4383.
FURNISHED bottom
flat to rent Shell Road.
Kitty. Call: 223-7812.
SELF-CONTAINED ROOMS
TO LET. TELEPHONE: 225-
1293.
ONE (1) self-contained
apartment in .residential
area. Call 227-88b0. _
SHORT-TERM RENTALS
FOR OVERSEAS VISI-
TORS. PHONE 225-9944.
3-BEDROOM semi-
furnished. Phone: 613-5735
or 263-6043. Meg's Realty.
KITTY 2-bedroom
apartment. Telephone: 226-
7743/626-6161 Terry.
2-BEDROOM concrete
lower flat sp-mi-fLirnishp.r -
East Street. Telephone: 226-
4245.
OFFICE space over 1 000
sq. ft Queenstown,
Georgetown. Telephone: 624-
4225.
SEPARATE house with
water and electricity at
Lusignan. Telephone: 220-
2472.
ONE 2-bedroom apartment
- Lot 1687 Nat. Ave. South
Ruimveldt Park. Tel: 225-0235/
269-0299.
BEL AIR PARK fur-
nished executive house on
double !ot US$1 500. # 223-
5204/61 2-2766.
3-BEDROOM concrete
bottom flat with telephone
and other conveniences. Tel.
627-9973/619-9683
(1) 2-BEDROOM bottom flat
apartment 77 'CC' Eccles.
Telephone: 233-2263/617-0632
Rishi.
ONE apartment with light
water, room and own kitchen
included. Priced to go.
Telephone 225-9759.
NEW one-bedroom
apartment suitable for single,
working girl. Rent $27 0000, per
month. Phone: 227-5852.
EXECUTIVE, furnished
and unfurnished houses and
apartments, offices, honds.
etc. TEL 226-8148/625-
1624.
2-BEDROOMI boltom flat -
S45 000 monthly at Plashad
Na cai Seriouis rnluirlie'. only.
Telephone: 225-808"
FURNISHED ROOM DE-.
CENT. SINGLE-WORKING FE-
MALE. TEL: 226-5035 (08:00 -
17:00 HRS).


, IND *RAL


WHAT a gift for (3) fully fur- I BOTTOM flat Camp PRIME CITY LOCATION. PRINCES/CAMP Streets -
nished bedrooms only US$15, Street area. Ideally suited for BRAND NEW SELF-CON- vacant -'ments
per day prime location, school or offices. Call: Richard TAINED TWO-BEDROq driveway $6.5M (US$30 000)
Phone: 225-0230 or 223-6900. # 624-0774/233-2614, ,Cff- FtObRS) $45 000 neg. Ederson's # 226-5496.
DO You need an honest, uvil f-" 189 DUrban EACH. SLIGHTLY NEGO- LARGE lot D'Urban St.,
/uibI'p I otheMinute Backlands $45 000 monthly. TIABLE. REFERENCES OF Wortmanville, between Louisa
Rt'y. # 225-8097/226-5240. Upstairs (4) bedrooms, (2) HIGHEST ORDER NEEDED I.FORE Row and Hardina Streets. Back
bathrooms $50 000 monthly. COMPLETION FIXED FOR 3 and front buildings, vacant
TOP flat $45 000, house Available April 1, 2005. Call: WEEKS COMMENCE. VIEW- possession. Call 622-6000.
by itself $60 000. Phone: 225- Ju i # 233-2175/623-1562 or ING NOW ETC, IN ORDER TODOOM Riverside-note
2626/231-2064 or e-mail: 227-3067 HAVE ONE. NUMBER OF M roa d to river. Land: 47218'note:
....:227-3067.-- CHILDREN LIMITED. FIRST road to river. Land: 47'/218'-
tonyreidsrealty@hotmail.com_ FOR immediate lease on CHILRE FIRST SEFRVED" $22.5M, neg. Ideal wharf, large
LODGING for students Northern Hogg Island -200 HR- VE 2 shiP,autosales, (4)storessmin
cooking/iving roo facilities, acres of cultivated rice land 8937 226-5496
No flooding, no crime area $12 along with rice mill complete 2265496.
000 monthly. Telephone: 233- with drying floor and dryer GIFT: Kuru KU,"J active
2915. Also tractor, combine, bull- business property with freezer,
ONE lower business flat dozer for sale. Contact: 626- pool table, music set, chicken
situated at Lot I Non Pariel, 1506/225-2903. Serious en- ONE flat concrete 3- pen on 22 acres of land $10M
Area A, East Coast Demerara. quLries only. bedroom house at 34 Cove & (US$120 000) neg. Ederson's
Apply to Jerome Fredericks at REGENT Street 2 newly John, ECD. Telephone: 625- #226-5496.
same location. renovated 1-bedroom apartments 4383. ONE new (2) two-storeyed
ONE new (2) two-storeyed
ROOMS to rent monthly $20 000 $25 000: 2- bedroom 1 HOUSE lot with 4 concrete building with
self-contained Le Rich $35 000; South Ruimveldt 3- houses: Persons interested telephone and garage -
Luxury Rooms 25 Princes bedroom $55 000. Must see N. please call 333-2420 Price $14.9M, neg. corner spot,
Street $25 000 monthly Call P. FINANCIAL SERVICES- 223- negotiable .... Kiskadee Drive, South
# 227-3067. 4928/623-3751. (1) CAMPBELLVILLE Ruimveldt Gardens. Call: 611-
ONE apartment lower flat- ATLANTIC Gardens (Phone property. (2) Success ECD 3452.
Cummings Street, Alberttown. and parking) $25 000 (including property. Call: 226-7043 or 613- CHARLESTOWN, Charles/
Ideal for business or residence light and water): D'Urban Street 4225. Sussex Streets. near school -
Telephone: 621-3094/225- Phone and parking) $25 000: PROPERTY for sale in vacant front building & land -
3343 Gordon Street- 20 000 and 30 PROPERTY for sale in 4.5M, dealInternet
3343 O.. 000, Ecces-S35 000 rooms (semi- Nandv Park good location. Cafe, mechanic shop, taxi.
A bottom flat apartment, furnished) $9 000. $10 000. $12 Telephone: 223-3647/226- Ederson's # 226-5496.
situated in Kitty. Excellent 000. Call 231-6236. 0176.RSAS
condition. Only serious EXECUTIVE residence/ 2-STOREYED 3-bedroom Owners of buildings/lands,
enqulirie. C2 223-1626. business furnished 3-storeyed business property at Uitvlugt, welcome to our General
FOR foreign missions. pnertv Kingston: executive WCD. Price $6.5M Management Services. We pay
embassies, diplomats All residence Gardens negotiable. 624-5397. insurance, taxes, do general
needed facilities. US$1 500. furnished: executive residence OROPERTIES for sale repairs. Call now! Ederson's -
US$2 000 Telephone 225- GuvSuCo Gardens- furnishedden concrete # 226-5496.
4398. executive residence Subryanville one wooden concrete
riished. TELEPHONE 226- building, located at 50E 5nei- CAMPBELLVILLE
FURNISHED S50 000, 8148/625-1624. iff Street. Tel. 223-1529. vacant, 2-sto;yd, concrete 4-
US$400: business S120 000 DOUB LOT 3-bedroom bedroom mansion. (3) toilets
top flat on Regent Street, office COURIDAPark- 1 -bedroom, for sale in Am3-bedroom & baths, large sitting, library,
space. Telephone 225-4398. furnished $40 000. D Urban property for sale in Amelia's & baths, lar ing, library,
Backlands- bedroom, furnished \Aard. Linden. Price 4-car parking $16M.
ONE TWO-BEDROOM Backlands- 3-bedro frnshed et 3 negotiable. Call 223-4938. Inspection anytime. Ederson's
BON I I US$7Q0 Queen Street 3- # 226-5496.'
BOTTOM FLAT-INSIDE TOILET! bedroom- $50 000, South ONE two-apartment
BATHROOM. CONTACT:INDRA Ruimveldt 3-bedroom house- building and land for sale (2) 1 FLAT concrete house
C- # 222-4201 0D S55 000. N. P. FINANCIAL bedrooms each. Price $3 with a two (2) -store ed
COLONIAL-STYLED SERVICES. TELEPHONE 223- milhon. Call: 223-1940/624- millfoundation locatedrooms at 23 -5CC'.5
building (3) bedrooms upper 4928/623-3751. 2658 Amilliond S located at 23 Eccles New
and or lower flats. parking and 2 ACRES riverside site at HOUSE and land C/Ville 4 Scheme. EBD. Telephone:
telephone Queenstown. Call: Caledonia. EBD roadside access bedroom upstairs 3 toilet and 233-2433.
6 TRu24-4225 i-veld Gardens and large frontage, two newly built bath 2 apartment down stairs. ONE (1) newly reno-
a- ieOhcHRuirnveldt Gardens large concrete buildings with TelON 223-1713 vated 3-bedroom house -
- furnished rooms -$15 000 each. security doors and grill work. ...1713 vated 3-bedroom house -
monthly. Ideal students. Suitable for lumber, cement, bond BUSINESS PROPERTY. telephone facility, overhead
teachers, nurses. Ederson's # or gas station. Serious enquiries V\/lissengen Rd. & Garnett Street. tank, car park for (2) ve-
226-5496. only to Telephone 233-2491 or Price negotiable. Telephone hicles Drysdale street,
1 2-BEDROOM concrete 233-2492. E-mail aff.-f.' i.-' j 225-4398. Charlestown. Tel: 225-9816,
1- hu 2e- gBEDROOM concrete a --_ iondav Saturday. (08:00 -
house fully grilled, front and LU.I 'J T furnished 4- Port Mourant 3-bedroom 17:30 hrs)
bac '."frandahs. Telephone: bedroom house. Eccles fully concrete/wooden house. $12M
225-8210 -Shiriey C' Ganesh air-conditioned, fully screened, negotiable. Telephone No. 263- ONE two-storey wooden
225-8334. iu' tiled bathrooms, large fitted 6043 or 613-5735. and concrete 4 bedroom
-kitchen ... .throoms laundry house, South Ruimveldt
ONE bottom flat to rent kitchen, 3 bathrooms, laun space ONE two-family, three- Gardens Contact Ronald on
inside toilet and bath with large verandah, wastiir" bedroom house excellent 662-5033 or Samantha on
ceiling located at Ogle. Price machine ad eneraor N condition in Alberttown. Price 624-1370. No reasonable
$20 000. Telephone No: 222- fooding. US$2 000 per month. $12Mv, ;,- Call: 227-0289/ offer refused. Vacant
5448. Telephone 233-2491 or 233- 222-6996. possession.
1 BOTTOM flat apt. in 2492. E-mail: tff@gol.net.gy (2) TWO-STOREYED busi- 1 EXECUTIVE 5-bed-
Kitty fully grilled, inside toilet WE have for the CEO ness/residential properties in room rm^1Pr room, three tol-
and bath water, electricity. (NO DIPLOMATS and MANAGERS Robb St., Bourda. Tel: 225- lets, three baths, iu,o filtered,
luo,1; .P c $ one 22 secured houses with all 9816, Monday Saturday insect-proof, generator, air-
7109. Price $37 000. amenities in highly residential (08:00 17:30 hrs). conditioned, large yard space
CUMMINGS Lodge neighbourhood. Also available TWO properties Lot 80 with beautiful gardens. etc. -
beautifully tiled large self- are buildings and flats for $11M, Lot 114 $14M, both at Bel Air Park. # 225-9816.
contained rooms $18 000 per businessioffice purposes and Vreed-en-Hoop. West Coast EXECUTIVE 3-storeyed
month. Also in Queenstown. Tel. accommodation for smaller Demerara. Phone 233-5755. concrete structure located in
226-8261 or 624-5082. income families. SUGRIM'S prime business area-No. 78
REAL ESTATE AGENCY. TEL. 40% REDUCTION on all Corrivme busrtiness a, Brerbice. Ide78al
FULLY furnished 2-bedroom 226-4362 ANYTIME. properties from $8 million orri business and o
bottom flat modern upwards. Tel: 225-2626/231- r for business and or
conveniences. Rent $35 000 SHADES and shapes. 2064 or e-mail: res d2e2nal2p 4
per month Old Public Rd. Executive Real Estate Rental tredsrealty@ho339-22742377/616-1414
Eccles. Contact: 233-2182. Areas. Bel Air Park: tonY-reidsrealty@hotmail.com Price negotiable.
3-BEDROOM apartment Queenstown, Eccles, Courlda LOT 8 Princes St.. Werk- 171,, ACRES of
3-BEDROOM apartment Park. Bel Air Gardens. Lamaha en-Rust, 2nd building North agricultural land suitable for
f urnish ed, parking, etc. Gardens, D'Urban Backlands. of Camp Street suitable for rice and cash crop cultivation
US$700 South Puimveldt. New Providence, Atlantic Ville, any business your dream along with house at Industry,
MURRAY'S Property Prices: US$500 US$5000.' home going cheap. Call 226- Mahaica Creek. No
Management Services. # Contact Christopher- 614-2073/ 6017. reasonable offer refused.
231-3,302. 226-1808. Location Bel Air FRIENDSHIP Riverside Serious enquiries. Call: 226-
EXECUTIVE house Gardens. Email: business land road to 2963/220-0636/222-6910.
furnished or unfurnished apt. Theserviceexpects@yahoo.com going business land road to 2963/20-SUBR0636/222-6910.
flat rooms business place, o river $12M (US$60 000) neg. S U B R Y A N V I L-L-E ,
flat. rooms business place BEL AIR PARK: Seniolr Ideal ship wharf, hotel, overlooking the Atlantic -
offices, bond etc. for executive residence, fully Ederson's # 226-5496. mansion active swimming
immediately rental Call 225- furnished, fully air conditioned REGENT Street, America pool, largeoof garden
2709/225-0989/623-2591. generator 5bediooms, 4areself- REGENT amp Street, Kitty generaP ool, large roof garden,
QUEENSTOWN. fully fur- contained US$3 000, and 2 $8.5M. TELEPHONE 226-8148/ Sunday overlooking big lime,
nished 1 & 3-bedroom apart- others at US$1700 and '25-1624 food fair/drink $35M (US$175
ment with parking space to US$1200. KITTY: In a quiet 625-1624, f000). Ederson's 226-5496
rent. Suitable for overseas compound, large 5-bedroom 4-BEDROOM house, 239 -9.
visitors on short term basis, home for US$800. COURIDA Greenheart Street, Linden CRANE/La UNION Public
Tel. # 226-5137/227-1843, PARK: One-bedroom furnished unfurnished, light, water, etc. Road, WCD-vacant 2-sforeyed
apartment $50 000. PLUS Price neg. Telephone 641-2965/ wooden & concrete 4-bedroom
COMING from overseas? many offices, bond and smaller 225-9144. property-$5M. Back 2 otrm,.d
Check out Sunflower Hotel other residences. ABSOLUTE REALTY. ETTON 2 4-bedroom concrete ....-h,,9 "
apts. Furnished, long term. short Call 226-7128/615-6124. ALBERTTOWN 2 stoey $4M. Package $8M, neg.
term 4 hrs 8 hrs., etc. We T 55ft x 28ft 10'/ft driveway Ederson's # 226-5496.
take bookings. Call 225-3817 or KITTY $35 000: paved, grilled, telephone, --EG-EN & Cumming.
223-2173 or 226-1933, Campbellville $40 000: strictly no flooding rain or REGENT & CUrilings
CAMPBELLVILLE THREE storm. Contact 223-7908. $9 Streets 2-storeyed business-
Bottom flat- Duncan Street, BEDROOMS $45 000: 500 000 top vacant. Ideal general
formerly Video World, also top Queenstown $50 000; D'Urban business, future 4-storeyed
and middle flats and part of Backlands furnished $95 2-STOREYED wooden mall/stores $33M. Ederson's
bottom flat in P.c'r:.nl Street. 000: EXECUTIVE PLACES building. 2-bedroom top flat. # 226-5496 WeVbsite:
Tel 22/6-2260, 619- SUBRYANVILLE, Queenstown, 1-bedroom bottom flat with www.edersonsrealtv com
5)01 Bel Air Park, Bel Air Gardens. back lands at Ithaca, W.C.B. KINGST n 1 .
L m i a h ai G a rd e n s H a ip y i ie s P ric e $ 3 i ,. I, 1 ,i 6 2 4 -NS
RESIDEiNT-IAIL anid Pr sudGar ,s c B FFICE I53 1 9, 624- vacant 3 toieed 6-bedroonl
comm ;rcil iroperlis ,BUILDINGS i ,, i... Main ,'ffico mansion $40M, 111"I
flirishr,'d ,n l unfurnished, Sheet, Clmn Stiee BUSINESS QUEENSTOWN, 37 B'Anum i Ideal 1 Mli OtiS hoto'I
Prices ranging from $35 000 to PLACES: Sheriff Stir'et Regent Stroet viicant l 2storeved ,ixecutN\oes offices, 8-c i
US$3 000. Contact: Carmen Street Croal Streeti nd others, building and Innd (for back pIrking. ,iiualified.i move ,,
Greene's Realty. rel. 226-119 2/ MENTORE/SINGH REALTY building). Contact: Kissoon Lall tomorrow Ederson's 4# 22(
623-7742. 225-1017/623-6136. on Telephone No: 225-4328. 5496,


I SERVICES I


I TO


I I TO L ET I


1. TO







SUNDAY CHRONICLE February 27, 2005
!I


GIFT-: Market Street
- Doctors/Investors, iu2 for
hospital, beer garden/food
restaurant 2-storeyed
concrete & wooden building,
from road to alley $17.5M.
(US$85 000). Ederson's #
226-5496.
CAMPBELLVILLE (6)
bedrooms. (4) washrooms,
240/110 volts circuit. Ideal
concrete property suits
business, domestic/hotel
purposes. Phone: S.
Abraham # 623-2537/225-
1865-7. Ms Wilson # 226-
2650.
DIAMOND Housing
Scheme new, 2-storeyed, 3-
bedroom, concrete 2-year-old
building with all modern
conveniences, parking $8M
(US$40 000) neg. Ederson's
- # 226-5496. Website:
www.edersonsrealty.com
URGENTLY needed -
commercial, residential
buildings for sale or rent in
Kitty. South Ruimveldt.
Campbellville, Subryanville.
Prashad Nagar. Bel Air Park,
Lamaha Gardens. Atlantic
Gardens. Also land.
Ederson's # 226-5496.
2-STOREYED 4-bedroom
concrete and wooden house
on land: 150' x 50', fenced,
drive-way, parking, telephone
- $4.9M. Immediate vacant
possession. Best Village,
WCD, half mile from Vreed-
en-Hoop. Call "MAX" on: 628-
9970/264-2498.
KITTY $7MI
Campbellville $9M; Bel Air
Park $16M & $27M: Prashad
Nagar $15M; Queenstown -
$13M; Lamaha Gardens -
$25M: Regent Street $45M;
Sheriff Street $45M.
Contact: Carmen Greene's
Realty. Tel: 226-1192/623-
7742.
GIFT: Queenstown wise
investment, 3-storeyed
concrete building top/
middle: 2 & 3-bedroom
luxurious apartments for
overseas visitors, bottom:
sitting, toilet and bath, 4-car
garage $18.5M. neg. Owner
will give $7.5M financing.
Ederson's # 226-5496.
ECCLES $16M &
$20M, Charlotte Street -
$4.5M, Samantha Point -
$5.5M. Happy Acres $30M,
South Ruimveldt $12M &
$14M, Shamrock Gardens -
$30M, Nandy Park $10M.
Many more N.P. FINANCIAL
SERVICES. TELEPHONE
223-4928/623-3751.
POULTRY FARMS -
Garden of Eden and Craig
Planning for a bigger
yield? We have pens that
can accommodate 15 000
birds and lots and lots of
running water we are situ-
ated near to a creek, 1 Ma-
chine Shop Industrial Site-
with an extra lot. Call
SUCCESS REALTY 223-
6524/628-0747
OGLE: Large 3-
bedroom 2-flat on 1.3 acres
of land $15M, FELICITY:
Vacant lot 10,800 sq. ft. -
$6M, BROAD STREET: 2-
flat 5-bedroom $7M,
MANDELA AVENUE: (near
Banks) 2-flat $9M, and
lots more all over.
ABSOLUTE REALTY. Call
226-7128/615-6124.
BEST IN SMALL
PROPERTIES VIZ $3.5M,
$3.8M, $4M, $2.8M, $3M,
$2M. AREAS VIZ
QUEENSTOWN, KITTY,
NORTH RUIMVELDT. FLATS
TO LET FROM $28 000 TO
$50 000. HOUSES FROM
$70 000 TO US$3 500.
HUMPHREY NELSON'S -
226-8937.
FIRST TIME BUYERS
DON'T BE DUPED/MISLED
BY FLAT-FOOT
UNLICENSED
COMPETITORS SUGRIM'S
REAL ESTATE AGENCY
PROVIDES GUYANA'S
MOST EXTENSIVE RANGE
OF PROPERTY RELATED
SERVICES. We have two-
flat affordable properties in
and out of Georgetown,
Canje Nagar and Parika
from $5M to $10M. We also
have for the middle income
from $10M to $20M in
highly residential area and
lands for any application.
TEL. 226-4362 ANYTIME.


KITTY $3.8M, John St. -
$2.5M, Queenstown $9.5M &
t8.5M, Eccles $6M, $11M &
$14M, At""town $8M & $11M.
Business Spots: Vhsb, gnen Rd.
(corner) $16M, Quamina St.
(corner) $9.5M, Barr St. (by
market) $14M, Sheriff St. -
$18M, Robb St. $18M, Duncan
St. (by Popeye) $29M, Camp
St. $13M, Alberttown $13M.
Call 231-6236.
MASSIVE, massive fall in
Real Estate prices at Tony Reid's
Realty. By now the price can
increase. Republic Park $12M:
Eccles $20 million: New
Providence on (3) house lots:
60 000 sq ft lot US$225 000:
South Ruimveldt Gardens -
$10M; Prashad Nagar reduced
to $11M; Meadow Brook
Gardens $11M: Queenstown -
$12 million; Bel Air Park $16M;
Bel Air Gardens $39M: Kitty -
$6M: Hadfield Street $8M;
Land for $5M up in Republic
Park, Eccles; Meadow Brook,
Ogle & Happy Acres, Phone: 225-
2626/231-2064 or
toinyreidsrealty@hlotimlail. com_
D'URBAN STREET
(WORTMANVILLE) SIZEABLE
LAND CARRYING TWO BUILD-
INGS. REPAIRS NEEDED (EACH).
TRANSPORTED. PRICE NEGO-
TIABLE. (2) CHARLESTOWN
(LAND ONLY) FRONT. RESIDEN-
TIAL CUM COMMERCIAL $1.8M.
(TRANSPORTED). BENT STREET
(NEWBURG) $3.2M
ALBOUYSTOWN $2.5M
PRASHAD NAGAR (4 200 SQ FT
OF LAND INCOMPLETE BUILD-
ING THEREON $8M CHANDAR
NAGAR STREET (PRASHAD
NAGAR)"AMERICAN" SCHOOL
VICINITY. EXECUTIVE CATEGORY.
FIVE-BEDROOM. $40M NEGO-
TIABLE. TELEPHONE 226-8937.



VARIOUS P.T.O. &
PERKINS, GM, LISTERS, ETC.
TELEPHONE 225-8448.
DIESEL water pumps 2
and 3 inch, brand new from
UK Call 261-5403 for details.
1 NEW stand up General
Electric freezer 56 x 28 $50
000. Contact 225-3412.
1 BRAND new Dell
computer $200 000, neg.
Telephone: 220-7643 or 611-
1088.
16 CU. FT frost-free fridge
in excellent condition $30 000.
Contact: 233-2182.
ONE new Admiral VCR 4-
Head Hi-Fi Mts stereo. Telephone
226-7085/225-6288.
FURNITURE and PLAY
STATION II GAMES for sale.
Telephone: 619-2373.
ONE 4-cylinder Bedford
portable welding plan, D.C. Key
start. Tel. # 265-4217. Call
#621-4417.
ONE SET OF 20" D'VINCI
CHROME WHEELS (6-HOLE)
FOR A SUV. CALL: 623-3122.
NEW Honda generators, UK
standard key manual start,
2500 watts to 6000 watts. Call
233-5500.
FERNS in hanging baskets.
Large concrete plant pots.
Telephone 226-1757/225-5641.
24 Belvoir Court, Bel Air.
YAMAHA Outboard motor -
25 Hp, long foot. Excellent
condition. $300 000 negotiable.
Telephone 223-2491/233-2492.
YAMAHA Outboard motor,
40 Hp, short foot. Excellent
condition. $450 000 negotiable.
Telephone 233-2491/233-2492.
ONE brand new com-
puter with CD Burner, CD
Walkmans, car stereo and
DVD Player. Contact 225-
4112, 626-9264.
PARTS for washers/dryers,
thermostats, knobs, belts, pumps,
motors, splines, etc. Technicians
available. Call 622-5776.
CLOSURE of Secretarial
School. Typewriters selling at
reasonable price. Good
condition. Telephone 231-
7135.
1 WOLSELEY 16/60 PZ
3926, in good condition. Price
- $300 000 or nearest offer.
Tel: 227-1459.
PURE bred Doberman
pups 6 (six weeks) old
dewormed and vaccinated.
Contact 254-1092 or 614-
1105.


FOUR brand new long-
lasting, low profile tyres highest
quality. Price discount for the
entire set. # 628-8600.
ONE Nissan March (K10)
body _and all parts. 2 sets
aluminum rims S;ze: 14 x 5 hole.
Contact Telephone # 222-4155'
641-7526.
SALE! SALE! A/C unit, DVD
Player, Microwave, stove,
washer, fridge, stereo, home
theatre, TV 27" Cologne. 623-
5534/227-3717.
1 FLOOR model PLAS-
TIC SEALING machine, 1 -
PORTABLE ELECTRIC air
compressor in excellent
condition Tel: 222-4507/
623-7212
ONE SINGLE BED AND
COMPUTER 20 GIG UNITRON
(COMPLETE COMPUTER).
TELEPHONE 231-6729/614-
2105.
FISHING boat, 40 Yamaha
engine, 400 lb Banga Mary
seine, ice box $900 000. Call
Telephone # 220-9690/613-
7633.
(1) 6 HP LISTER generator
- 3 KVA, 110-volt, water-cooled,
double fly wheel, English-made.
Telephone: 627-7185.
ELECTRICAL tile cutter 7'
blade, American-made, used
only twice. Price cheap.
Telephone: 220-2472.
4 TVs. 1 amplifier, 1 micro-
wave. 3 music sets, 1 TV stand,
2 DVDs, 1 VCR, 1 truck pump, I
camera, 2 TVs not working.
265-5876.
SANITARY rubber gloves -
$300. plastic aprons $500,
white over coats 52 000.
Contact Francis Persaud.
Telephone 220-3064.
ONE 150 HP & one 250 HP
Yamaha Outboard engines.
Price $700,000 & $1,200,000,
Also parts for 150 HP & 250 HP.
Call 629-6651 anytime.
QSC AMPLIFIER RMX
series, 800, 1 400 watts.
Celestion Frontline 11 18"
speakers 2 800 watts; Numark
Juggler CD package. Telephone
615-1203/231-2893.
POOL tables local and
foreign with slates, including
cloth, balls, pocket, rubber, etc.
Contact: Naka. 64 Better Hope,
ECD. Tel: 220-4298/617-6100.
FIBREGLASS matting, resin.
jell coating, hardener, 8 x 4 sheets,
etc. We also do repairs. 97
Providence. EB Demerara (near
Toolsie Persaud). Tel: 233-5207/
614-8095.
1 HONDA pressure washer,
brand new: 2 drills: 1 saw; 1
Jialing motorcycle, next to new; 1
amplifier; 1 truck pump; 1 battery
charger; 1 bicycle. Tel. 265-5876.
QUALITY SWEET POTA-
TOES available in large quan-
tities at very good prices. Place
your orders early for prompt de-
livery. Contact: 621-0371/226-
3563.
PUPPIES for sale.
Rottweiler and German
Shepherd (mixed) fully
vaccinated. Contact: Dr. Mc
Lean. Telephone No. 226-3592/
227-0116/223-0754.
4 MOTION-ACTIVATED
SECURITY LIGHTS AT $6 500
EACH; (8) 150-WATT OUTDOOR
SECURITY LIGHTS AT $1 000
EACH; 1 KENMORE 30"
RANGE GAS STOVE (NEW) -
$140 000.
CAUSTIC SODA: 55-lb $3
600; Alum: 55-lb $4 000; Soda
Ash: 100-lb $8 000; Sulphuric
Acid: 45-gal $35 000; Granular
Chlorine; Chlorine Gas. Phone
227-4857 (8am 4pm), Mon. to
Fri.
SKY Universal for the best of-
fer in Phillips digital dish. View
up to 125 channels including Pay
Per View channels and also Direct
TV. Contact: Gray on Tel. 227-
6397/227-1151 (0), 616-9563.
CELLPHONES! Cellphones!
Cellphones. Motorola V600, V66,
V505, V60i, Sony Ericsson T 616
and more. All phones are going at
wholesale prices and are brand
new. Contact Tel. # 621-8225.
BOOKS on Air Craft.
Electrical Engineering, Motor
Vehicle, Farm Machinery,
Management Practices,
Computer Graphics Designing/
Promoting, Hindu Religious
books. Contact Francis Persaud.
Telephone 220-3064,


BRAND new Frigidaire
side-by-side refrigerator $240
000, neg. Serious enquiries
only. Contact Tel. No: 225-
9808.__
John Deer Diesel
Generator, 30KVA, like new. Also
Bay Linder Speedboat with
Yamai'3- 115 HP outboard
engine, Honda power W _asher
3500psi with 13 HP engine
(new). Tel. 225-2319, 225-
2873, 660-1061, 660-1060.
COMPUTER programmes
from $1 500 AutoCAD 2005,
Adobe Premiere 7, CorelDraw
12, Corel CLIPART, Print Master
Gold, any Accounting.
Educational English, Maths,
Spanish, Games, Dreamweaver
2004 AND MUCH MORE. #
222-5330/625-7090.
LARGE QUANTITIES OF
GOLDEN BROOK VEGETABLE
COOKING OIL. ALL SIZES
AVAILABLE AND PRICES ON
ALL SIZES HAVE BEEN
REDUCED SIGNIFICANTLY.
COME IN TO POMEROON OIL
MILLS, 16 MUDLOT, KINGSTON,
GEORGETOWN OR CALL: 223-
5273, 223-5274.
FOR sale by owner 2-
storeyed fully concrete house -
5 bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms.
eating kitchen, built wardrobe,
central air-conditioner, car
garage, front view to Public
Road Lot 6 Nandy Park. EBD
Interested person only to call.
Day- 226-7806. evening 225-
8410
Brand new 64 J\C fiat screen
TV PIP, Xero\ 5028 Photocopiei
Machine, like new. Split AC units.
(new). Also Saniserv Cone
Machine one-spout and thr'he-
spout, like new. )annrnr tiJk soi
Generator, Honda 5000 watts key
start Generator. Tel 225-28"73.
225-2319, 660-1061. 660-1060.
ONE 3-disc plough IMF-
made). one locally made trailer
(18 ft long ,,ith heavy-duty
axle), 1 locally made steel
back blade, two pairs cage
wheels to fit MF 290 tractor, -
Nissan Bluebird motor car. 1 -
Nissan Datsun, 160 B motor car,
1 Nissan Sunny pick-up. Items
can be inspected at 170 West
Main St, Windsor Forest. WCD,
Phone: 269-0253/621-9471.
PLAYSTATION I & 2. X-BOX,
game cube. Nintendo 64. Sega
Dreamcast & Genesis, and all
video game systems, game CDs,
cartridges, memory cards,
connectors, and all accessories
DVD players, DVD movies (for sale
and rental). Best prices and service
countrywide. Gamestation Video
Game and DVD Stop. Pouderoyen
Main Road. WBD. Opens Monday
- Saturday. 10:00 21:00 h. Call:
628-9970.
(1) ONE 22-ton link belt
crane: (1) Bob Cat # 863: (1)
Kbeloc SK 200LC excavator
with 2 buckets: (2) 10 inch
hydraulic cutter head floating
fridge; (1) large trowel for
scrubbing gardens: (1)
Goldfield 75-ton per hour
working plant; (2) Bateman
guard screens, exploration and
lab equipment; (1) Goldfield
portable gold saver wash plant;
(1) Knelson MD 7.5 inch
portable concentrator, self-
contained, electric powered, 1-
inch to 8-inch diesel power
pumps, Suction and discharge
hours, all sizes up to 8", 2 inch
to 8 inch; Gravel and Sturry
pumps (electric); construction
equipment, generator and
welding plant. Tel. 222-6859/
612-8868/623-8662.
COMPLETE Weider home
gym $35 000, Barbell/weights
- $5 000, Oxy/Acetylene bottles
(4), hoses and cutting set
including a trolley $80 000,
Air compressor $60 000, Metal
bender $50 000, electric
concrete vibrator $100 000,
vertical drilling machine $40
000, rolling machine $300
000, Metal tools press $20 000,
quality of gears $10 000,
quantity plastic straps $5 000,
steel and plastic pipe fittings -
$20 000, cylinder ridge reamer
- $10 000, compression testing
gauge $3 000, oil pressure
gauges $1 000, engine
analyzer $5 000, auto electric
switches $1 000, car computer
code reader $3000,
stroboscopic timing light $5
000, 60 feet 1" rubber hose -
$15 000, miscellaneous
machine/auto shop items, V2 ton
chain hoist $15 000. Contact
Francis Persaud. Telephone
220-3064.


A QUANTITY of office wall
dividers $30 000; 3 rolls
upholstery material $16 000; 1 -
new tent enclosed to
accommodate (4) persons over
night, hunting, U.S.A.-made -$25
000; 1 Canadian heavy-duty
shredder -fully automatic, 110V -
$20 000; 1 large wall divider -
U.S.A.-made, beautiful $50 000;
2 secretarial and typist adjustable
chairs on wi-ieels '5 000: each; 1
- executive large writing desk chair
on wheels $20 000; 1 inverter -
12V to 110V, 400 to 800 watts -
$22 000; 1 Land Ranger cycle for
boy excellent $10 000; 1 -
combination Panasonic double
tape and 5-CD player set along with
(2) speaker boxes and remote
control $55 000 110V-240V; 1 -
large thick egg-shaped carpet -
$15 000; 1 4-burner gas stove
(SINGER) with oven and bottle
complete $25 000; 1 piece
10 x 12 carpet for office $11
000; 1 Whirlpool freezer $45
000 110V; 6 plastic chairs with
1 round plastic table and
umbrella $15 000; 6 used 4-
drawer filing cabinets -$15 000,
each: 4 used 2-drawer filing
cabinets $10 000, each; 3 -
security Mercury Vapour lamps -
110-240V, complete $5 000,
each: 1 Sharp turntable
microwave 110V $13 000: 1 -
Toshiba combination tape
recorder, radio, tape and CD
player 110-240V $15 000: a
quantity of 50 Meridian phones
- M 7310 and M 7324, from (5)
lines to (20) lines phones.
bargain for the lot. could work
hotel, offices, ntc : one nei,.
Peal split AC unit 18 000 BTU.
complete: 2- 18 000 BTU Peak
windo w units $25 000, eachi
Owner leaving. # 611-8766 621-

ONE 15 KVA Kubota
water-coo!ed diesel generator
- cuLstom-built with security
sound proof casing, no noise
or vibration, hardly used.
crank or battery start, 12V.
110-240V, mint condition -
$800 000. neg.: one 5-ton
hydraulic pallet lift with new
scare wheel -S55 000; two
Yale chain hoists. 1-ton $25
000, 2-ton S20 000 English-
made, two small portable
welding plants: 150k 240V -
S40 000. 75k I !OV S30 000
- complete with rod holder and
head goggles: plumber tool -
one electrical drain and pipe
line cleaner for blockage -
110V, 50-60 H: ', Hp motor -
complete kit for $40 000 -
U.S.A.-made: one STIHL FS
160 brush cutter hardly
used, with spares $60 000: 1
- Drill press 12-speed.
adjustable table. 110-240V -
$45 000: 1 large 1-in bore
Sears pressure pump with
pressure tank. 110V-240V -
$35 000: 3 metal English
bench lathes: (21 5-ft 100
000. each and (1) 8-ft $150
000; 1 4-ft width sheet metal
roller on steel stand heavy-
duty, mnanuall operated,
English-rnade $105 000: 1 -
Dayton indoor an outdoor dry
vacuum industrial and
commercial use, on wheels.
large dust collector bag.
U.S.A.-made $35 000; 1 6-
in Delta electric belt sander
on stand 110V. for wood work
- $30 000; 1 machine to do
tool shaping -240V $200 000
(large); 1 machine to do
cutting of crankshaft 240V -
$200 000; 1 -heavy-duty arc-
welding transformer 240-
320-440V $50 000: 1 -
compressor and air tank 100
Ib, 110V $40 000; 1 5-ft
aluminum ladder with 2-ft by
18-in platform, U.S.A.-made
- $15 000. Owner leaving. #
621-4928/611-8766. A
quantity of electrical panels
with circuit breakers heavy-
duty switch-over panels 110-
220V.



1 BEDFORD MODEL
M TRUCK. TEL: 455-2303.
1 Isuza Pick up. Call
227-7082/223-1456 $700
000.
1 NISSAN Caravan E
24, excellent condition.
Tel. # 220-4782
ONE Bedford TL 7-ton
lorry (not dump). Tel: 227-
1923/616-5679.
ONE 2000 Yamaha RI
going cheap, legal docu-
ments 226-6527 /623-3122.
GX 81 Toyota Mark II, PFF
3637. Price negotiable. Call
622-3736.


TOYOTA Extra Cab, V6,
fully powered. $1.3M neg.
Tel. 254-0387.
HONDA 450 & 500 cc
ATV 4 x 4 Motor bike. Tel.
231-4172/623-6243.
1 HONDA CBR F3 600 for
sale $700 000 (neg.). Tel:
612-6409 Ricky.
AE 81 TOYOTA Corolla -
PFF 3317. Telephone: 269-
0299/2i 8-2042/615-5685
TOYOTA Tacoma (1999),
Tundra (2000). Phone 623-
5534/227-3717/614-6453.
ONE Honda motor
scooter in good condition.
Contact: Trevor King. Tel:
627-8276.
ONE Toyota Surf, good
working condition. Contact A.
King on # 225-4443 or 622-
7628.
1 TOYOTA Ipsum van.
Please Contact Telephone #
227-0791/227-0805/628-
5580.
2 NISSAN Sunny FB 12 -
$500 000. Contact Francis
Persaud. Tel. 220-3064.
ONE Toyota Sprinter. AE
91 automatic, mags, music,
sports. Price $600 000. Call
618-5107.
(1) ONE Ford Cargo Cab -
very good condition. Price 1
$155 000, neg. Telephone
220-1068.
4-WD RANGE Rover -
Land Rover with alloy rims &
Sony CD player. Pnced to go
621-7445.
ONE Toyota 4-Runner.
V6 engine, in excellent
condition with music and
mags. Tel. 623-4614/227-
7309.
1 MITSUBISHI Canter -
(3 tons), enclosed. Contact
Tel. # 263-5404 after 16:00
hrs, 618-9602. anytime.
2 TOYOTA pick-ups, 1 2-
door & 1 4-door at reduced
prices. Contact: 225-6759. 274-
0418 after hrs.
1 -AT 192 CARINA. Call
Rishi 641-3577 or Button
Stall, next to Wireless
Connection, Bourda Market.
TOYOTA Corona static
wagon, back wheel drive. Pric,
- $550 000. Call 640-1318,628-
2910.
TOYOTA Pick-up JJ
series. Perfect working
condition. $2.1M. Telephone
233-2491/233-2492.
ONE TT 131 CORONA ir
good condition mag rims,
stick gear, tape deck. Tel: 626-
6837 after hours # 220-4316
ONE AA 60 Carina, in ex-
cellent working condition, !
needs body work tape deck,
AC etc. Tel. 617-4063/22
0236.
1 EP 82 Starlet 4-door.
PGG series, AC not working -
$1 million, neg. Tel: 227-0615 I
(W), 233-5636 after 18:00 h.
TOYOTA AT 212 Carina,
AT 192 Carina, AE 110 Corolla
- all excellent condition
Phone 226-9316/619-9187.
ONE AA60 Carina car, sti'"
gear. Excellent conditic
Priced for quick sale. C!'
telephone No. 277-0194. |
1 AT 150 Toyota full fla,
exhaust system, 13" mag rir,,. ,
newly sprayed. Tel: 626-76-
229-6491 Vishal.
1 NISSAN Single Ca.c
(4x4) pick-up gear, excellent I
working condition. Price $525
000. Contact: Rocky # 225-
1400/621-5902. 1
1 NISSAN Double Cab r
(4x4) pick-up gear, mags,
excellentt condition). Price '
800 000. Contact: Rocky #
225-1400/621-5902.
CARINA AA 60 excelled,
condition, new engine, 5-FWD.
AC, PS $425 000, neg. -
Babu, Peters' Hall. # 233-5476/
629-2313.
1 NISSAN Violet. Good
condition, back wheel drive $250
000 neg. Tel. 223-7521/223-
751 ... 0heik
Saih,,.
1 DIESEL Isuzu Canter 1.5
ton, GHH 9542, good work'
condition. Telephone: 231-658 "
226-4798/619-1609 ask i
Andre.


2/26/2005, 9.40 PM


__ _____ _=/_~_ _I_







26 '




TOYOTA Carina 212, 1 TOYOTA (GX 90) Mark
Toyota Carina 192, 2 genera- II (private), alarm, (fully)
tors: (1) diesel, (1) gas 6 250 automatic, fully powered; AC,
Watts, 110/220 Volts. Tel: 629- mag rims, CD player, music.
6464. Ask for Sir Ken. Price $2.1M. (neg.). Contact:
Rocky # 225-1400/621-
1 DUMP truck, 1 water 59Ro02
tender and 330 Timber Jack 59 .
Skidder all are in good work- 1 HONDA Vigor -
ing condition. For more infor- (executive-type 4-door),
mation Contact: 264-2946. autoniaiic, fully powered, AC,
alarm, spoiler, semi-leather
(2) 3500 R Fiat combines. interior, immaculate
Price $5.5M, neg.; (2) MF 290 condition. Price $1.3M.
tractors (English) with cage Contact: Rocky # 225-1400/
wheels. Price $1.5M, neg. 621-5902.
Tel: 624-9083/624-4427. 5 ...
TO T 2 tn 1 SV 40 TOYOTA Camry
TOYOTA Dyna, 2 ton (PHH series), automatic, fully
open back canter, GGG series, powered, AC, chrome mags,
in good condition; 1 long CD and DVD player,
wheel base Series II Land immaculate condition. Price -
Rover, gasoline. Call 266- $2.1M (neg.). Contact: Rocky
2458/625-5873. # 225-1400/621-5902.
TOYOTA4 Runner- (1992) 1 MITSUBISHI Pajero -
Model, (PFF), fully powered, (PHH series), immaculate
alarm, CD, excellent condition condition, automatic, fully
$2M, neg. Owner leaving. powered, AC, mags, CD player.
Phone: 225-8931/619-2245. Price $5.6M (neg.). 4-wheel
ONE (1) TOYOTA Hiace Land Cruiser. Contact: Rocky
Super GL 14-seater mini bus # 225-1400/621-5902.
diesel engine, four (4)-wheel 1 TOYOTA RAV 4 (came
drive dual air conditioned, CD in brand new), low mileage,
deck, BJJ 1995. Call 225- manual, fully powered, AC,
5274/226-7665. chrome mags, roof rack, crash
1 SV 32 TOYOTA Camry bar, immaculate condition.
(excellent condition), Price $3M. Contact: Rocky -
automatic, fully powered, AC, # 225-1400/621-5902.
mag rims. Price $1.2M. 1 TOYOTA Extra Cab
Contact: Rocky # 225-1400/ Tacoma (GJJ series), (4
621-5902. months old), automatic, AC,
1 TOYOTA RZ Long Base CD player, music set, crystal
(excellent condition), light, bed liner, immaculate
manual, mag rims, (15-seater), condition. Price $2.9M.
BGG series. Price $1.3M. Contact: Rocky # 225-1400/
Contact: Rocky # 225-1400/ 621-5902.
621-5902. 1 AE 91 SPRINTER -
1 NISSAN Pathfinder fully powered, automatic,
(V6), PHH series, (4x4), excellent condition $775
automatic, crash bar, step 000; (1) 2-door EP 71 Starlet
board, (2-door), enclosed. Turbo 5-speed gear,
Price $2M (neg.). Contact: excellent condition $775
Rocky # 225-1400/621-5902. 000. Contact: Raymond.
1 ST 190 TOYOTA Telephone: 265-4760.
Corona (EFI 4S), automatic, TOYOTA Corolla AE 91 -
fully powered, AC, mag rims, automatic, EFI engine, fully
mint condition. Price $1.5M. powered $750 000; Toyota
Contact: Rocky # 225-1400/ Carina AT 150 -manual gear -
621-5902. $550 000; Toyota Ceres -
1 TOYOTA Celica (2- automatic, fully powered $1 200
1 TOYOTA Celica (2- 000. Tel- :() 227-0613.
door Sports), excellent 000. Tel: (0) 227-0613.
-ondition, automatic, fully Yamaha R1, cat-eye, like
wered, AC, CD player, (PGG new. Price to go. Yamaha XT
ries). Price $1.3M. 600cc Dirt bike Scrambler, also
I contact: Rocky # 225-1400/ Yamaha Banshee Four-wheel
^"1-5902. drive Sports bike, Honda 250cc
1 AE 100 TOYOTA Rebel, Honda 90cc ladies
Sprinter (private, never in Motorcycle5-2319 660-1061Tel. 225660-
hire), automatic, fully 1060.
powered, AC, excellent
Condition. Price $1.3M CARINA AT 170 $850
:eg.). Contact: Rocky # 225- 000, Sprinter AE 91 $750 000
1400/621-5902. & $850 000 ($300 000 down
payment), AE 100- PGG -
1 AT 170 TOYOTA Carina $1.2M ($350 000 down
(PGG series, never in hire), payment), Marino ($350 000
automatic, fully powered, AC, down payment), Carina 212
excellent condition. Price $1.5M (like new) $500 000
"850 000. Contact: Rocky -# down payment. Call 231-6236.
'-1400/621-5902. dwn payment 231-6236.
Po- T 22TOYA C a Honda Delsol Sports Car, PJJ
S-AT 212 TOYOTA Carina series, like new; Toyota Ceres,
IPjJ series), never in hire, fully powered, AC, like new; GMC
automatic, fully powered, AC, Sierra Extra Cab diesel 4 x 4
mag rims, alarm. Price pick-up, 1998 model, like new;
$1.825 000. Contact: Rocky Land Rover 110 County diesel
# 225-1400/621-5902. Turbo, Nissan Pathfinder. Tel.
1-AT 170 TOYOTACarina 660-1061, 660-1060, 225-
'PHH series, never in hire), 2873, 225-2319.
omatic, fully powered, mag EOR the best in factory
s, (EFI) clean. Price $875 reconditioned Japanese
.Contact: Rocky # 225- vehicles: IRZ mini bus, AT 192
;0/621-5902. Carina, fully loaded; Hilux Surf
I ONE Toyota Mark II GX 71 4 Runner; T. Extra Cab4WD Pick
ully oowered, automatic, Ups; Toyota T 100, Super Truck
ver windows, power Carina wagon. Trade-in and
,rir.g, power mirror, music, credit terms available @ Paul
., spoiler $750 000, neg. Camacho Auto Sales, 111
jpnone: 220-4058/623-3193. Croal St., Stabroek, G/town,
AT 192 Carina, AE 100 bet. Albert and Oronoque Sts.
Sprinter & Corolla, EP 82 225-0773/621-5869.
Starlet, Marino & Ceres, AT 170 1 AA 60 CARINA (back-
Carina, CRV Honda. Amar wheel drive) $450 000 (gear);
226-9691/227-2834/621- 1 -Toyota Camry- (back-wheel
6037. drive) $550 000 (gear); 1 -
Nissan Vanette bus -$500 000;
NISSAN Vanette HiTop .1. RX7 (gear), 2-door, (new
,welv e seats, PEE serivines. .engine)-$800 000; 1 -Toyota
SReasonable driving (4x4) Single Cab pick-up -
)ndition being sold "AS .S" mags $950 000. All vehicles
,th Power of Attorney. $250 in excellent condition
j00 negotiable. Telephorte (working). Contact: Rocky #
-26-2847. 225-1400/621-5902.
1 AE 100 TOYOTA 1 G-TOURING wagon -
Ceres excellentt automatic, 1 Mercedes Benz
condition) automatic, fully $1.5 million; 1 KE 76
powered, AC, mag rims, Corolla wagon $250 000 -
I spoiler, CD player. Price needs some repairs; PJJ series
1 # AT 192 automatic, 15" mags,
I 220o-'-'0 '- -w". air-conditioned, CD player,
FOR sale (owner leaving fully loaded, dash and interior
untry) (2) Kawasaki (ZX neon lights, etc. $1 375 000,
.0) Nihja motorcycles in neg.; AT 150 Corona $350
.cellent condition, like 000, neg. Contact: Mr. Khan,
new, with accessories, cat 28 'BB' Eccles New Housing
eye, low mileage. Call # Scheme, EBD. Tel: 233-2336/
iA-. 642.37221223- 1 ,5 .9 9 161.. ,. 9."7216 7 94.


SUNDAY CHRONICLE February 27, 2005


~b~LU


1 GX 81 TOYOTA
Mark II (excellent
condition), automatic,
fully powered, AC, (EFI),
Price $1.3M. Contact:
Rocky # 225-1400/621-
5902
1 HALU'X Toyota
Single Cab 4x4 pick-up -
excellent condition $875
000, neg.; 1 AT 170 Toyota
Carina fully powered,
automatic, music, spoiler,
etc., PEE series $650
000, neg.: 1 RU 12 Nissan
Bluebird Sedan PGG
series, first owner, fully
powered, mags, etc., very
good condition $500 000,
neg.; 1 AT 170 Toyota
Carina fully powered,
automatic, AC, deck, etc.,
excellent condition $825
000, neg. ACME AUTO -
222-3459/260-2355.
AT 192 $1.350M; AE
110 Sprinter $1.5M, neg,.
EV 13 Nissan Bluebird (Ark)
new model -$1.1M, neg.;
Toyota Mark II (GX 90) -
$1.9M; SV 30 Camry mint
condition $1.5M: AE 100
Corolla $1.3M; SV 40
Camry $2M; Toyota Ceres
PJJ series $1.375; AT
170 Corona $1M; AT 170
Carina $775 000; Nissan
March (Sports) $900 000:
Toyota MR II (round shape)
manual Sports car superb
condition $1.9M; AT 212
Carina $1.9M; AE 91
Corolla and Sprinter $600
000. K and N Auto Sales -
# 227-4040/628-0796/616-
7840.
NEW SHIPMENT
RECONDITIONED
VEHICLES. Cars: Sprinter
AE 110: Starlet Galanza
Turbo EP 91; Carina AT
192; Lancer CK 2A; Cynos
Sports Coupe EL 54:
Toyota Cynos Convertible.
Wagon: Corolla AE 100 G-
Touring, Mitsubishi RVR N
23 W. fully loaded. Pick
Ups: (4x4) Toyota Hilux YN
100. Trucks: enclosed
freezer, open tray
Mitsubishi Canter: used
Carina AT 170, Mark 11 GX
81. DIEO MARAJ AUTO
SALES 207 SHERIFF
AND SIXTH STREETS,
CAMPBELLVILLE.226-
4939. A NAME AND A
SERVICE YOU CAN TRUST.



LIVE-in Maid/
Babysitter. Telephone:
619-2373.
HOMES WANTED
$$$$. KEYHOMES #
223-4267
1 -LIVE-IN BABYSITTER.
TEL. NO: 227-0791/227-
0805/628-5580.
(1) ONE MAID/BABY-
SITTER, LIVE IN 5 DAYS PER
WEEK. TEL. 624-8428.
MATURE live-in
companion for female
in mid 40s. Call 616-
5334.
FEMALE general
help for home office.
Training provided. Call
225-1540.
1 FULLY experienced
Coles crane operator.
Contact # 233-2774/623-
0957.
WANTED contract
cars for a reliable Taxi
Service.. Tel. # 223-8655/
227-3037.
ONE EXPERIENCED
HAIRDRESSER. CONTACT
TELEPHONE # 225-5426.
ONE mature' live-in
Domestic worker to work in
Georgetown area. Contact:
629-4679.
WAITRESS, Cook.
Apply to Play Boy's
Hide Out Bar, Success,
ECD. Tel. 220-4719.
URGENTLY needed 3-
Bedroom top flat $25
000. Contact No: 629-
6567 or 625-4207.
OLD Nelson's West
Indian Readers Books -
2, 3, 4, 6. Telephone
226-7085/225-6288.
URGENTLY wanted -
Waitress. Apply to: De Club,
Annandale Market Road,
ECD. .. .... .


GIRLS with over 5 yrs. ON
Factory experience to as- Mecha
semble ladies garments, interior
Call Sharmie 225-2598. -CCuom
REGENT s-REET. Teleph
ESTAE'.ISHED COMMERCIAL 2605/6
BUILDING. HUMPHREY inform
NELSON'S REALTY. TEL: 226- BAF
8937. one M
OLD Dutch & English Accomi
bottles, onions, mallets and provide
in. Tel: 260-0059, 612- Pe225rso12
188, 06:00 to 22:00 h only.
SALESBOY and SAn
Handyboy. Apply in person Anand'
to: TSING TAO STORE, 34 Athina's
Robb St., Bourda. Vater
CHILLY'S Restaurant and 226-336
Bar, Riverview Ruimveldt.
wanted Cook, Cleaner, arE
Waitress and Waiter. Hairdre
manicu
WAITERS and Cashiers. and ha
Application person to chairs t
Kamboat Restaurant, 51 Tel. 223
Sheriff Street, Georgetown. COO
SALESCLERK for store years.
male/female. Must live in Restau
Georgetown. Flexible hours. Street,
Call 625-2710. Cinema
ONE Gardener and one handwi
Domestic. Telephone 226- between
1757/225-5641. 24 Bel Voir HO
Court, Bel Air. Drivers
URGENTLY needed live- Taxi nd
in Bartenders and Waitress to Policeand f
work in bar. Attractive salary. Refero
Contact: 618-8375. leasfere
ONE Arc and Acetylene anytime
Welder. Must know grill TW
work. Contact: 21 Broad betwe
Street, Charlestown. Tel: and betwe
225-2835. and 20
country
WANTED urgently. One live-in
Nissan Cabstar Canter truck work ai
any condition to buy. Call # 621-4
Cell # 613-6979 or 618- -
4239. I -
4239. ductior
ONE female to share an chine C
apartment around shift an
Georgetown, Ask for tor to
DEVEIKA. Telephone: 225- 9752 be
4298/641-8168. hrs.
1 KITCHEN Attendant, ONI
1 Puri Maker. Apply to: ages o
Nicky's Natural Juices. 7 work a
Camp Street. Telephone: Charity
227-3880. Must h.
SALESGIRL kitchen night
staff, live-in girl from busine
country area. Nazeema Deli from 09
318 East St., N/C/ Burg.
226-9654/618-2902.
APARTMENTS flats, I
houses to rent from $25
000 to US$2500 in/around
Georgetown. Prestige Re-
alty 231-5304 or M
EXPERIENCED Accounts
Clerk. Salesgirls Nazeema
Delil, 318 East St., North C/
burg. 231-4139/226-5063/
231-3913. UP
.. ..storey
ONE Manager and business
Salesgirls. Apply to: A & A in Cob
Variety Store, 130 Regent Police
Road, Bourda, Georgetown. Telepel
Phone: 226-4864.
WANTED- live-in coconut
pickers and boys to pick up I
coconut. Good salary. Please CI
call 624-6855/623-6852/616- Cafe
5334. School
PART-TIME Gardener. Villag
224 Phase 1, Republic Park, lnterri
EBD. Call in person. Monday Photo
nd
Saturday, 12:30 14:00 hrs. 330-2
DRIVERS to work 24 hours. 7189.
Must have Hire Car Licence, i
Contact: Pacesetters Taxi
Service. Telephone: 223-
7909/223-7910. Or
PLEASANT, intelligent Ploug
young lady 18 25 years to cage
assist in small library in West back I:
Ruimveldt. Telephone 223- Call T
8237. 09:00h 16:00h. 0X
ONE (1) single young ases
male or female to share three aoren
(3) -bedroom flat $15 000, Phone
per month. Telephone No: Subna
225-9574 (H), 641-7537 (C). 3-I
ONE live-in Domestic locate
age 18 24 years to work in poolh
Mahaicony River $15 000 mach
monthly. Apply at 192 aml':
-Duncan St., Newtown, Kitty. 5171.
225-6571. 1
ONE property to buy in dragli
Georgetown, preferable in 1 roel
these areas: Roxanne ft ni!
Burnham, East La Penitence, 1 P
West Ruimveldt, South. Call: transr
624-3376. engin
stand.
APARTMENT/Flats, head;
houses $15 000 $40 000 hase
monthly. Get 12 months orch h
advance rent (on contract) & w ed
loan to do repairs, Call 231- G.3226
" '623 6. 6 - .... , . ... ....-


~i~h. II~


E experienced
nic to work In
Dr, All
nodations provided.
one 223-1609/623-
624-2653, for more
action,
RTENDER, Waiters, also
maintenance Person.
modation will be
ed for Maintenance
Contact Telephone #
93.
LESCLERK. Apply:
s, Regent Street;
, by the East Coast Car
id Avinash Complex,
Street. Telephone No:
31/227-7829.
PE RI E N C E D
sser, Must know to do
re, pedicure, facial
hairstyles, etc. Also
o rent. Please contact.
1-5252 or 628-3415.
OK, Cleaners, 30 45
Contact TAJ
rant, 228 Camp
next to Plaza
a. Walk with
written application,
n 10:00 h and 18:00h.
NEST and careful
Sto work in popular
service. Good wages
ully loaded cars.
Clearance and one
ence required.
e Call: 226-0731,
e.
O live-in Domestics
en the ages of 17
0 years from the
y areas. Also one
boy to do Handyman
round yard and bond.
928.
ASSISTANT to Pro-
n Manager, 1 -Ma-
)perator to work night
id 1 -Machine Opera-
work day. Call: 615-
etween 13:00 and 16:00

E Manager between the
f 30 and 45 years to
t Hotel Purple Heart,
y, Essequibo Coast.
ave knowledge of the
club and hotel
ss. Call: 225-2535
9:00 15:00 h.


FANTASY Nails and Hair
Salon, 140 Quamina Street,
Georgetown. Looking for
certified professional
cosmetologists and nail
technologists with a following
to operate their own stations.
Call 226-3822 for an
appointment.
ONE Mechanic to work in
interior. Must know to repair,
Perkins Bedford Excavator
engine and hydraulics and pick
up. Full knowledge of
excavator would be an asset.
All accommodation provided.
Call 223-1609 and 624-2653.
WANTED urgently Security
Guards and Ice Plant Operators,
Must have (2) recent References,
valid Police Clearance, Identifi-
cation and NIS cards. Apply in
person to: The Manager, BM En-
terprise Inc., GFL Wharf, Houston,
East Bank Demerara.
WANTED urgently
Mechanics who must have valid
Truck Drivers Licence, and (1) one
Excavator Operator. Must have
experience in repairing both
gasoline and diesel engines.
contact: Ramjit or Johnny on
Telephone No: 225-4500/225-
9920/777-4065.
ONE male worker who lives
in the neighbourhood at Mahaica
to work at Pete's Video Club,
Helena No. 1 Public Road,
Mahaica. Kindly apply in person
and an application to the
Manager Pete's Video Club, Lot
2 George and Hadfield Streets,
Georgetown.
WANTED MOST URGENTLY
5TO 10ACRES OF UNCULTIVATED
LAND POSSESSED OF SEASIDE
ADVANTAGE FROM PAPRIKA TO
VREED-EN-HOOP, ALSO AT
ANY PART OF EAST BANK OF
DEMERARA. TRANSPORT.
MUST BE FREE OF COM-
PLICATION. TELEPHONE
226-8937.
WANTED FOR RUNNING
OF CHINESE RESTAURANT
CLEAN HYGIENIC COMMER-
CIAL SECTOR AT BUSYAREA.
NOT AT A MADDENING RENTAL
HUMPHREY NELSON'S REALTY
226-8937 ALSO PURCHASING
WISE OFFICE BUILDINGAT DOWN-
TOWN GEORGETOWN TELE-
PHONE HUMPHREY NELSON'S
226-8937.


1'lcase oitact:
Mr. G. Wynter on 333-3154/333-6628
Ir. Clifford Stanley on 618-6538/232-0065


PER flat of two-
ed building for
ss purposes located
burg Street (next to
Headquarters). Call
hone # 618-6634.



RCUIT City Internet
and Computer
il, Lot 2 D'Edward
e, W/C/B. All
iet facilities,
copying, Scanning
ax services. Tel.
762/2830 or 625-




ie Ransom 3-Disc
h, one pair MF 35-
wheel, one 35 MF
blade, one steel rake
el: 333-3460 .
OXYGEN and
lene industrial
S. # 58 Village,
ityne Berbice.
e: 338-2221 (David
auth).
STOREYED building
d in New Amsterdam;
tables, ice maker
ne, 1 complete
1 Lister generator.
333-2457/231-

LITTLE Giant
ne with 371 engine;
48" x 36" pitch
ler; (1) 3/" dia. x 13
is. propeller shaft;
erkins marine with
mission; 1 Bedford
e block with
ard crank shaft and
all sizes of 3-
e motors; cutting
one complete gas
ng set; one 371
nglne. Tel: 333-


TV/VCR Repairs.
Rosignol Market Stelling
Road. Telephone # 621-2256



DANZIE'S: Brand
name footwear for all.'
Stall # D 9 N/A Market.
Tel: 333-4685


CHURCH View Hotel1
Main and King Streets, NA,
Tel: 333-2880. Gift Flower and
Souvenir Shop, Main &
Vryheid Streets. # 333-3927

e0 a *

WOODWORKS Door
Store, panel doors, cupboard
doors, windows and mouldings;
Pitt Street & Republic Road,
N/A. Tel.333-2558.



PRIME business
property located at Main
and Kent Streets, New
Amsterdam, Call: 225-
7747, weekdays.
1 3-STOREYED
building newly built in the
heart of New Amsterdamr
Price reduced drastically'
Call 333-2457, 337-2348&
(1) 2-BEDROOM house
at Whim, Corentyne price
US$40 000. Phone: 220i
6115. Ideal fo
businessperson or lawyer.
2-STOREY prim
residential property situate
in Canefield Cane Publl
Road. Price $20 million
negotiable. Contact Tel. 327
71 64., ....






SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 27, 2005

^ -'i 't


SSport Chronicle


- _


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4*


.-~ -
- - ~ -


' "I. 4 -



SINCERE THANKS



.; TIhe family of
the late


ELFREDA IRENE HENRY .;

who dlied on February 3, 2005, would like to
thank all those who supported us in our recent
bereavement, sent wreaths or in any other weay
sympathized with us.

Sp't' ial /ih / /, 1 1 /1il'm Pt'ltniL't V mt, l ( l i./ Ii S'.
6 (, ''Lr I hlcii (,tniild, atinl ithe 1ih'./,lni I',i /i

IIImt i lit / h h I w in, ii i d. 4 L hilih e .
\,,I -i -li '. 9 r'inld hiltlr'e andtd '3 I
1 1."-' 'c h l . .'.. .


o i" l. ing memory of L, 't
., WINNIE MAPP ,
DORRA (Aunt .. ,
I Winnie) who fell '
Sleep c.n February 13, .
[' "20(2 ..4' ,i


: De' i leaves an "
heartache no one can
, heal
M Memories are
treasures no one can
steal
Some may forget you
now that you are gone i
But we will remember p_ .. -
no matterhowlong
Deep in our hearts you will always stay
-Loved and remembered in eveiyway
,IL' t, r-,- n,, words can ever say
i-I..'L .... i ne miss you everyday
"The Lord gave and the Lord has taken
Blessed is the name of the Lord".'
Sadly missed by your loving mother,
aunt, nieces, cousiins and all those
It '. whose Inites you touched
,, 1 ,- . . , , ,
.-1, *,1 , L,,'I ** i ... .,,, ,, c -
' 4',k t,, ,: i ....... i ....-.i,,-- -' -,,I. ',W :
,', V -e?" ^ ..- ll,


IN MEMORIAL
In loving
and
cherished
ielllorv of ,

MR. FRANK LEWIS SCOTLAND and MILDRED
OPHELIA SCOTLAND who died on 19'" February.
1995 and 13"' February, 1998.
The days are remembered and quietly kept
No words are needed, we shall never forget
A wonderful and loving mother and father have gone to rest
For all of us they gave of their best
Gone are their faces we loved so dear
Sweet are their voices we loved to hear
Se% enteen memcradle ) ears have quickly slipped bi
If love couoj have sad ed them
They would d have never died
Dearly and sadly missed by their hirteen children thiiny
grandchildren seventeen great grand children, sister and
brother COusins relatives and friends
'* '. *


IN MEMORIAL




' ANGELINA GRIMES


"/'/"' {(ft'lv /"" '""- .

God saw she ,was getting t
So He put His loving arms aro
And whispered "Come to
IWith tear-filled eyes, we watch,
fade away
.Although we loved her de
fit could not make her s
Lord, keep your arms around
.AInd ill your loving car'
,Make her rest very peace
And completely free fiomj
A golden heart has stopped b
Hard working hands at r
God has broken our hearts to,
Its
Hle only takes the best

Sadly remembered by all
relatives and friends.
L 4


S.


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28 SUNDAY CHRONICLE Fderbahr 7; 2005


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SA SAID Guyana HIV/AIDS
S.. Reduction and Prevention (GHARP) Project
A Joint Government of Guyana-U.S. Government Project

ADVERTISING AGENCY REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

SAID GUYANA HIV/AIDS REDUCTION AND PREVENTION
(GHARP) PROJECT

The USAID Guyana HIV/AIDS Reduction and Prevention (GHARP) Project, a
Joint Government of Guyana US Government Project is soliciting proposals
for the services of an advertising agency or partnered agencies to design develop
and implement two communication campaigns:

1. A comprehensive anti-stigma and discrimination campaign that
addresses myths and misconceptions related to the modes of HIV/AIDS
transmission and reduces the stigmatising and discriminating practices in
relationfto HIV/AIDS

2. A comprehensive, multi-media campaign to promote AIDS safe attitudes
and practices including delayed sexual debut, consistent condom use
and reduction of sexual partners orfaithfulness.

Details of proposal submission guidelines and application criteria will be included
in the Request'for Proposal (RFP) guidance document. Applications are due on
or before 16:00 hrs, 14 March 2005.
Interested agencies can uplift this document at the USAID/GHARP Office at 44
High Street (DDL Building), 3rd Floor, Kingston Georgetown.

To apply or receive additional information by email or telephone please contact

Mr. Dale Browne

dbrowne@fhiguyana.org


Ab sepe EM
*rmd^ b^^^^^^^ ^^^


WEATHER AFFECTS

TELEPHONE SERVICE
aWe\ther conditions have severely affected telephone
service in the country, resulting in a larger than usual
numn.er of faults and, ccinsquernll., some delays in
e .oring service to customers.
In SLome situations, with corrosion developing in the
S. stem :r., time. it has become necessary not justto
, ..;.. ieppj a fault, but to execute the complete rewiring of
S" e premises.' In almost every other country, the
rewiring of the customer's premises, with the
installation of the telephone instrument, is undertaken
ty private contractor and not by the telephone
company.

As a result work towards restoration for one customer
," wl'hiclh would normally take 15 minutes now lasts
on i,: derably longer, negatively affecting the schedule
M lthe Company's technicians.

GT&T wishes to advise that, with the escalation in fault
reports, the Company has placed priority on the
i restoration of service ahead of the installation of new
services.,


G- dw 40 411. -


Martyn predicts


Aussie exodus


after World Cup
DAMIEN Martyn predicts a string of retirements from the
Australian team after the 2007 World Cup.
Half the players in the current side are over 30 years of age
and must be considered to be in the twilight of their careers.
"I think you'll probably see a mass exodus of the guys af-
ter the World Cup from one-day cricket, and rightly so.
Martin told The Sydney Morning Herald.
It would he amazing to play three World Cups and win
three."e
larB\ said the future of the Test team was less clear,
however.
"If the selectors feel they want me to keep playing Test
cricket after that, I'd think about it. I'll never hang on until
my last dyint breath."
Nia i aid the ousting of Darren Lehmann from the
side before the cur-
rent tour of New
Zealand was a sign
that team members
Cannot be guaranteed
of a long-term place.
Butl he feels close
to all the players.
% He said: "I see
these guys more than
Mum and Dad. Fm
on the road 10
months a year, we

laugh with the guys
who are happy.
"There are lots of
emotions. I class us
as one big family.
.-. ~ One of the big rea-
S sons were number
DAMIEN MARTYN one is because -we
handle that so well.
"So when someone goes out of that, and Boof
(Lehmann) was a big part of what we've been, you just feel
sad about that." (BBC Sport)


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Eemcsarai Bank
F"FT!
Fl-i


(0'
9' 00


u00


204


B, cl iadian t)Doll r


F":. -selIect vd{ dricom l ixchange


Belie$ =


G$ 9220
C$ 4.45
G$ 65.77
G$ 94,76


I-, -.
U I V'- '4 '09-'


3 imonths


2.89000%
3. 13000',o


G(. i,,, Rate


L'-
(JuNal~


15..4 '
14.54%


Source: International-Department. Bank of Guyana..


GLOBAL FUND/ GUYANA HIV/AIDS PROJECT
GRANT# GYA-304-GO1-H
MINISTRY OF HEALTH
HEALTH SECTOR DEVELOPMENT UNIT


VACANCIES
Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill
the positions outlined below:
(1) BCC Specialist (2) Health Education/Community
Moblization Coordinator, (3) Treatment Care and Support
Coordinator (Physician)(4) Physicians (contract
20hrs/week,5 outlying Regions), (5 ) Medexes (2/Region ,5
outlying Regions), (6) Home-Based Care (HBC) Coordinator,
(7) Social Services HIV/AIDS Coordinator (8) HIV/AIDS Deputy
Programme Manager for the PMU, (9)HIV/AIDS Technical
Advisor for the PMU, (10) Project Accountant, (11)
Administrative Assistant, (12) Driver-ERU and PMU, (13)
Deputy Procurement Officer
Details of duties for this position could be obtained from,
and applications addressed to:
Health Sector Development Unit
Project Management U nit
Georgetown Public Hospital Compound
East Street, Georgetown
Guyana
Deadline for submission of applications is Tuesday 15"'
March, 2005 at 3:00 p.m. Only short-listed applicants will be
acknowledged.
< _.',<, ". ^ :" "--


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30 SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 27, 2005
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FISCAL AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAM [FFMP]
EXECUTING AGENCY: MINISTRY OF FINANCE [MOF]
VACANCY- PROGRAM MANAGER

The Government of Guyana (GOG) has recently concluded a Loan Contract # 1551-SF/GY
(US$29.5 million) with the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). Part of the proceeds of this
Loan will be applied to the financing of the implementation of the Fiscal and Financial
Management Program. The FFMP consists of three sub-components namely:

(i) Tax Policy and Administration;
(ii) Public Sector Financial Management; and
(iii) Fiscal and Fiduciary Oversight.

The overriding aim of the FFMP is to tr idl effective and sustainable executive and oversight
capacities in the Guyana Revenue Authority (GRA), the Ministry of Finance (MOF), the National
Assembly (Economic Services Committee (ESC) and Public Accounts Committees (PAC) and the
Public Procurement Commission (PPC). To this end the MOF is required to establish and staff a
Program Coordination Unit (PCU) which in turn is required to establish and staff the PEU at the
Guyana Revenue Authority and National Assembly.

The PCU hereby invites applications from suitably qualified candidates for the position of
PROGRAM MANAGER Subcomponent 1- Guyana Revenue Authority.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ABOVE POST:

1. Masters Degree in Management, Economics, Accounting, Computer Sciences or equivalent
professional qualification;
2. Minimum of ten (10) years experience in the management of financial sector reforms;
3. Minimum of five (5) years experience in design, execution. review of customs and tax reform
programs and project; and
4. Knowledge of IDB procedures, information technology data bases, project/program
management, capacity building, etc.

Detailed Terms of Reference for the post referred to above may be obtained from:

Confidential Secretary/Administrative Assistant
Fiscal and Financial Management Program
Ministry of Finance
Main & Urquhart Streets, Georgetown
Telephone No. 225-0742


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FIFA to [[mp [o[lm.t.0it

0irohi0 0holg


The closing date for all applications is Friday 111h March 2005.


Government ads can be viewed on
S' http:7/www.gina.gov.gy


Q






cEQlflV IU PR~flrtF- Ph.r~ii 27.9f2005


S usM.'. U* UI LL, r y u


02.


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Williams in strong

sprint captures

R&R Trophy


4Sport Chronicle


By Isiaah Chappelle

WITH a strong sprint. M larlon
Williams won the feature
race of the R&R Interna-
tional cycle meet at the Na-
tional Park. yesterday.
Williams rode inll aead ofr
Alonzo Greaves and John
Charles. the three top finishers
who completed the 35-lap Nov-
ices & Schoolboys iace in one
hour 26 minutes 33.31 seconds.
Coming in a lap later alone.
Toney Simon placed fourth then
still later. Linden Blackman had
better luck than Kennard Lovell
to ride in fifth. Lovell's foot
slipped out of the pedal com-
ing into the homestretch and had
to settle for sixth.
In the second lap. Williams.
Greaves. Charles and Darren
Allen -broke away. but Allen
dropped back in the fourth lap
and dropped out of the race in
the tenth. The three leaders
eventually lapped the pack in
the 18th lap.
But the leaders relaxed in
the remaining laps and finished
the race some three minutes 40
seconds behind the previous
race, two weeks ago.
On the turn before the
homestretch, Williams was
third, Alonzo second and
Charles first, but Williams
surged forward on the inside
coming out of the turn to win
by a cycle's length. Williams
and Greaves claimed four
prime prizes each.
Berbician Judah Klass
was top rider in the Juve-
niles ten-lapper winning in
28 minutes flat. with Geron
Williams second and Andy
Singh third. Klass and Romel
Bhagwandin won one prime
prize each.
The day began with Geron
Williams winning the 12-14
years, completing the three laps


in 8:29.78 minutes, Iollowed by
Chris Persand and Scott Savory.
Persaud go thile prime prize.
Kennard Lovell was the top
Veterans Under-45 rider, taking
the five-lapper in I 1:26.I0 min-
utes. along with the prime
prize, with Virgil Jones riding in
second.
The Veterans Over-45
winner was Patrick Santos
who completed the five laps
in 13:37.31 minutes, followed
by Clement Douglas and
Lloyd Williams.
Krisnanand Singh first took
the prime sprint then \\on the
five-lap Upright race. with
Maurice Fagundes second and
Harry Lall third.
In the BMX races. Jonathan
De Abreu won the 6-9 years
Boys two-lapper. while
Johnatan Fagundes claimed the
9-12 Boys race over three laps.
followed by Romario
Bhagwandin and Hausanni Van
Lewin.
Enzo Matthews won the
12-14 years Boys three-lapper,
with Christopher Holder second
and Kevin Edwards third. While
Mitchroy George took the
Open three-lapper, with Travis
Glasgow second and Kevin
Chattergoon third.
On the distaff side. Ashley
Ali was first in the 6-12 one-lap
race and Sheri Ann De Abreu
second.
The R&R-sponsored-meet
continues today with a 65 kmin
road race from the Demerara
Harbour Bridge to Bushy Park,
Parika and back. Marion Will-
iams won the last one. two
weeks ago in one hour 44 min-
utes 48.03 seconds. The race
starts at 09:00 hb.
Organiser Hassan
Mohamed said the series of
races were geared to prepare
riders for the Independence
three-stage meet,


CWC 2007 SA looking

for seven blacks
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa, (CMC) South Africa's
cricket authorities hope to have a minimum of seven black
players in their squad for the 2007 ICC World Cup in the
West Indies.
Gerald Majola, the chief executive of Cricket South Africa.
outlined the target was based on an increase of the five black
players in the squad for the 2003 World Cup held in South
Africa, Zimbabwe and Kenya.
"This target was recommended by both the United Cricket
Board of South Africa's transformation-review sub-committee
and the management committee, and has been accepted by the
board of CSA." Majola told a news conference on Friday.
He added: "We now have a pool of more than 200 black
players in senior professional and amateur domestic competi-
tions, and we believe this is a good platform from which to
build for the future.
"Our transformation programme is ongoing, and we are go-
ing to make it sustainable until parity is reached at all levels."
Majola revealed that the CSA board also endorsed a recom-i
mendation that a squad of potential team members be identi-
fied now. and be put into the high-performance programme. un-
der its manager Gary Kirsten. to prepare them for the next
World Clip.
"This programme will include mentoring and monitoring.
so that we can send a formidable team to the World Cup." hle
said.
"We do not believe in tokenism, but in capacity building to
ensure that all team members can take on the best the world
has to offer."
Majola noted that the inclusion of seven black players for
2007 was all part of the transformation programme aimed at
making South African cricket a truly national sport.
"South African cricket is part of South African soci-
,e,ty,, and0 we, mtst play, our part in the tranm4<'iriimatiii
'programme for the betterment of our nation." he con-
cluded.


-4


WITH lBourda "pregnai t with
sunshine" as described on
radio by Barbadian cricket
comnientator Andrew Mason.
there were mixed views at
Bourda yesterday afternoon.
Some felt that Guyana and
Barbados should have started
their eighth round Carib Beer
Series game.
However anyone who took
the time to have a walk around
the out field would have
encountered very sopp\ areas.
previously waterlogged areas lfor
the first day on Friday. which
would simply have been too
dangerous for tile region's top
cricketers to risk injury.
The long-on and long-off
areas to the northern end land
the deep mnidwicket region on
the eastern side of the ground
were the prime areas of worry
for the umpires and the two
captains.
Daylong sunshine and
two inspections, at 13:00 hI
and 15:00 h Iheld promise of
play yesterday, however
minimal it would have been.
ULipires Zainool Mccuum
and Colin Alfred. who did not
request tile two teams to appear
at the venue, decided after the
15:00 h inspection that the
conditions were uinsuitablk for01
tilhe region's premier first class
competition.
Thie decision was made ill
consultation witlh tle two
captains. Siivnarince
Chanderpaul who was at the
ground with tihe rest of hlis team
and Courtney Browne w1ho
remained at the team hotel and
was represented at Bourda by
his tean manager Roland
Holder wiho communicated with
him by mobile phone.
While the umpires made the
sensible decision, play could
have been possible it there was
a more proactive approach in
the mopping up on Friday
afternoon.

Hotel Tower

hosts cricket
commentators
CARIBBEAN cricket
coninientators Red-;
Perreira and lndre Mi-
son are gileqt il Holtel
Tower while they cover
the Carib Beer series
here between Guyana and
Barbados.
St Lucia-based Perreira
and t- t, ..,, rI 1 ,, have
1. ii mi I ih,.. .live cricket
.. ii. i i .ii n I his year,
c,..', lh: Ill.iich. inI B .,I' -
dI.Os Si LcI Si '.'incent &
the 1 iiL i.idline, and St
Maarten.
In a release. Hotel
Tower management
stated lthat it was "lhapp.'
ti niake a contribuliin In .
the notieriae ofr h ll fiir-
(lay game."


Instead the covers fIrom
thie pitch were removed and
the water, lodged on those


covers, wzas simply (lumped
onto the outfield, not
surprisingly, in the precise


areas which caused play to
have been abandoned the day
before. (Imrani Khan)


UMPIRE Zainool Maccum (in front) along with umpires Colin Alfred and Joseph Jeffrey
inspecting the ground. (Winston oudkerk photo)






Reniembeng Dr, Cheddi Jagan



The Peop rs Pogrmas e Party (PPP)
invit you to Annual "Clembraton of the
Lite &f o Fda r of t, Nation, Dr, Chetdd :2

J^@n1'~~~~~~~ ...,.JhPotMurnSebe


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Fci' Pre- t ldoo -ji i i:;-, J ;.Iht g on




S ~Sunday, March 6
x 20053cat 2Z3pm

at OiuJohn,,

~ ~"Pwftm fIoumi


ry) 0gt f ~ f 4 u o'4 gli tjfIofi tit 40H~


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SPORT

tUtDf, TT(I" T

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S-Edward B. Beharry & Company Ltd.
S Tel: 227-1349, 227-2526




The Real Thing


TWIRLS WHEELS


CHOWMI'EiN
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SHELLS MrNlk PMAC Vi k \ CZLU
ELBOWS CRESiTE UFCliKt


2 ji/J 9J1


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NOT much has been said
about the fact that Neil
McGarrell, perhaps still this
country's most 'lion-hearted'
cricketer is no longer in the
Guyana squad in the middle
of a prolonged regional com-
petition.
McGarrell has never been a
complainer; he does his job qui-
etly and is a battle-hardened
warrior. As Guyana seek points
to nudge them into the finals
they need to call on their more
experienced players, the ones
who will take their bruises and
never say die until it is long
over.
After the five away
matches, the Guyana selectors
left out McGarrell saying that
his groin injury required rest.
It was the understanding
then that McGarrell would have
been out for the one game only,
against Trinidad & Tobago. Yet
for the second home game
against Jamaica the left-arm
spinner was not selected. Per-
haps he needed more rest, but
this was never conveyed to the
public by the seemingly 'high
.IAnd IIIIhli ,eleci'nlll p:inel
No., Ior tihe third hliine
.inie "I h Be.-,i .,, he ,,
kni. n ii n ii hi' e:iiiinn.ile' .IIid
fI',11 r hi ioura.i t'.. *pirtI l [.
,lill minu ing in .icltii N. c\pl.i
n.alion Kh.li \.el o'' l[oril
McIGlell i, rep ric.ll', in
.ihd a, llin, i. pl.., Tlih bepic
llte c.',e Iheie i .nll une.i. i 1-
lene.' urroundirn the nidiler II
aippe.r a, ihhou.'1h .cen.iin per-
,on,' wa.inl the ml.itier It i l',u
di[,.pp,:ii bhul it (GuI', n.J
inipro .e Ih bc-i pl...cr, I u lI
be selected
kI II ,hat ihe le ii's no


longer think of McGarrell as one
of the better cricketers in this
country? If that is the case then
make that declaration and deal
with the consequences, but do
not simply bypass the issue as
if it is irrelevant.
His five away games
brought him 8 wickets. This
may not speak volumes, but
his years of tireless service
to Guyana's cricket do. And


his statistics since making
his debut fur GCu ana in 1996
underline, his outstanding
contribution for his country.
Before he started this season.


McGarrell's bowling record
read: 58 matches, 226 wickets
at an average of 26.46. He is
still the best left-arm spinner
in the country and the better
of the two spinners overall, as
some will argue, given
Mahendra Nagamootoo's de-
teriorating form.
All of this being known,
why then is McGarrell not be-
ing selected?

I. i4"


Perhaps the answerr lie' in
the current mquad The hbiling
s %lll is Reon Kinle
N:".-iiiioul_..o. E aun Cr.indrdn
.inId liiirai Jalaralls I ho I, in


his debut season. For support
the team looks mainly to
Damodar Daesrath, the vice-
captain, Narsingh Deonarine and
Lennox Cush.
In the two home games they
left Crandon and Jafarally out of
the final 11, using Daesrath as
the opening bowler alongside
King.
After the one-game rest the
matter seemed straightforward,
Jafarally had to make way for
McGarrell in the 13-man squad
while Daesrath would perhaps
slip down to being 12th man for
McGarrell to play and bolster
the bowling staff. With the con-
tinued non-selection of
McGarrell the selectors seem to
be saying that in their minds
Jafarally is the better spinner
and that they are fearful of hav-
ing to drop the vice-captain
from the final 11.
It is difficult to fathom the
thinking of the selectors. With
such a severely depleted bowl-
ing staff why is a man who is
one of the leading spinners in
Guyana and certainly among the
top spinners in the. entire West-
Indie. not in tle squjd '
The selectors minut .jis'.'er
io the Gu. inese n.ric euing pub-
lic h\ kl.Ganell is not in the
squ.adJ I hit hi club die illtls-
Iiiius Georgetoi n (Cricket Cluh
is making the smaller is l g do', n
\with eCes closed i, also unfor-
liinate
Mc(arrell is fit and w ill-
ing to plah and the public, let
alone McGarrell himself.
needs answers as to why heis
sitting at his home and not in
the dressing room at Bourda.
Come on. honourable selection -
panel, be man enough to ex-
plain %our decisions.


----i^^---M---^HflHH~?,'.R -', '.-HHBH~iH^HHB~BH^&


?,,: .' *'' '-


CLICO'S

LIABILITIES POLICIES
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Pr, tection Today!


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Printed and Published by Guvana National Newspapers Limited, Lama Avenue, Bel Air. Park, Georgetown. Telephone 226-3243-9,227-5204,227-5216.Fax 227-5208 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2005


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ting angry with you for no good
: reason; he becomes distant and
.sometimes doesn't listen to you;



Sherry Boilers-Dixon

or he suddenly becomes incred-
ibly sweet and ingratiating.
Q. Can you tell me 3. Your partner's physical
symptoms to know if my habits change: He starts work-
husband is cheating? ing out regularly at the gym; he
Please tell me the most spends much more time taking
common things men do care of his body; or he goes on
when they're cheating. a healthy, or not so healthy,
Thanks. food binge.
4. Your partner's lifestyle
changes: He begins to have regu-
SUSPICIOUS lar unexplained absences from
home; he routinely works late at
Dear Suspicious, the office, when he has rarely
done this before; or he fre-
While I don't know what quently leaves the house on the
your husband is doing to make pretext of 'doing something for
you suspicious, it's clear you're work or with a friend'.
uncomfortable with what's go- 5. A sexually, emotionally, or
ing on. Maybe you've picked physically absent partner is
up signals that your husband likely to be getting fulfillment
has already cheated. somewhere else.
Usually, someone senses
infidelity before becoming WHY WOULD YOUR
consciously aware of it. There HUSBAND BE DOING ANY
are almost always signs I OF THESE THINGS?
call them black flags that Typically, a man cheats un-
indicate there's something der two circumstances: when he
wrong. These are the typical is desperately unhappy in his
symptoms of cheating: marriage and when he is pas-
1. Your partner's sexual sionately attracted to someone
behaviour changes: He doesn't else besides his spouse. The
want sex as often; he wants it first circumstance is the key. If
more often; or he introduces new your husband is getting his
sexual techniques. needs met, he can have lunch
2. Your partner's emotional with a super model and still re-
pattern changes: He starts get- main faithful to you. If he's


starved for affection, ego sup-
port or sexual variety or if he
feels trapped in your relation-
ship he's fair game for almost
any woman who offers to give
him what he craves.
So you need to take the
temperature of your mar-
riage. How much
fun have you
two had re-
cently '
When was
the last
time e


you took a romantic break to-
gether? How is your sex life?
How much attention have you
been giving your husband? Do
you still treat him as if he's

urn-


szrc~~=wm-~!~ ~Ii~t~tla: f2OO5"~~9


special and important,'the way no guarantee that he'll tell you
you did when you 'first got the truth, but at least he'll know
married? When he talks do you that you're interested in his
listen attentively to what he happiness and care about mak-
says? Does he share What's re- ing your marriage work.
ally on his mind with you, or What if your husband
are your conversations largely gives you a vague answer?
about the weather, the garden That's usually a definite sign
and who does the housework? that there's something
Do you give him the freedom to sneaky going on. You have
pursue his own activities and two choices: Allow him to be
interests? evasive, or resist. If you'd
Perhaps he may. have al- rather not hear the whole,
ready shared some pf his dissat- unpleasant truth, you can ac-
isfactions with you,, but you cept his refusal to give you
may not haje ye i uned in. the information you re-
How do you know exactly quested. Or you can say, 'If
where your husband stands? you won't answer my ques-
The best way to find ,out is to tions, if you won't talk to me,
have an hones conversation if you won't give the details
with him when the two of you of what's going on with you
are alone together. Ask him, now, I'm going to keep ask-
'Are you happy with our mar- ing until you do.' Wait a
riage? Am I respecting your couple of weeks, and then
feelings? Is there anything initiate another conversation
you're not getting' that I can and then another. Sooner or
give you?' : later he'll break.
When you phrase your In the meantime, don't as-
questions this way, you're ask- sume anything. Your husband is
ing for information instead of in fact innocent until proven
accusing him. You're offering to guilty. You can become over
be helpful instead of putting suspicious, even paranoid,
him on the defensive. There's about infidelity when actually
nothing is going on at all. That
could be disastrous for your
marriage. A fearful, insecure at-
titude will drive him further
from you and may actually en-
f te courage him to wander.
Be patient. Let him know
that you love him, that you
. want him to tell you what's
on his mind, and that you're
,. willing to do your part to
(Please turn to page VI);


Pfin together th






P 'I,




PUZ.


PART 1
PROTEIN is once again in the news, what with all
ihe controversy surrounding the Atkins Diet, which
prescribes high consumption of protein and low intake
of carbohydrates. We may well ask ourselves: What
exactly is protein? Why is it important? Is it possible to
have too much? In this article, we will help you to put
the protein puzzle together.

WHAT EXACTLY IS PROTEIN?
Proteins are made up of small units called amino acids,
'which as small molecules of carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and
sometimes sulphur. These are often referred to as the 'building
'blocks' of protein, and are joined in chains that make up many
different types of proteins. The proteins we eat in foods are
lhot the same as the proteins in our body, when we eat protein
n'ffTb-dSt'fiy"ay-tlM 'ao-t' orflyaor-


acids. There are about 20 different amino acids, of \yhich nine
are called 'essential', meaning that the body cannot make them
at all, or in the amount that the body requires: they )iave to be
provided by food and drink. The important thing is foriall these
nine essential amino acids to be provided at the same time, and
in the correct proportions, so that the body can produce the
other non-essential amino acids and ultimately, assemble the
kinds of proteins it needs for various purposes.


HOW IMPORTANT IS PROTEIN"
Protein makes up the basic material of the body. Hair, skin
and fingernails are all protein. Even the things we cannot
normally see such as blood, muscle and body cells are made up
of protein. Protein has many different functions in the body,
with one of its most important functions being to build new
body tissues for growth and to replace those tissues which
are old and worn out.
Protein has several other important functions:
it supplies the materials for manufacturing enzymes, which
have many uses in the body including helping to digest food
and keeping the body functioning well;
it is also needed for the production of hormones, which
must team up with other nutrients such as carbohydrates, fats,
vitamins and minerals, which we get from eating a variety of
foods. If there is not enough fat or carbohydrate in the diet,
protein will be used for energy, growth and repair and so other
body functions will suffer.

SOURCES OF PROTEIN
Protein is available from both plant and animal sources.
However, the quality of protein varies widely among
different foods. 'Protein quality' refers to the amount and
type of amino acids a food contains. In general, foods from
animals, except gelatin, provide considerable amounts of
all the nine essential amino acids, which, as mentioned
earlier, are the protein building blocks. Legumes such as
peas, beans, seeds and nuts are also very good sources of
protein. Cereals such as wheat, rice, corn and their
products have moderate amounts, w.hjle,fryjts, vegetables,
ground provisions and bigh gelatin-containing animal
p3od-ucts'''e poo'r sources of prorevn-.Ge'tatn''l'S',l


I


*1~


Ic % l C, I VI l s _me l a i c iln 1*1 auU da-t u1 UI pV uiuL ll
building bhtLk,' kand so is pi..>li used by the body. The
plitein%. \\w yet I' l'm co\ 's foot o chicken's foot or from
"Cl1lo' is not ai' nutritinus a the protein we get from
meat. isi,. cheese and mulk.
II \ou .ie hilnitmng ,ur aiiim:l pinteii-rich foods because
l luigh putIe'S. \ou ImaN be un\in ug that you are not getting
Ceniuiih protein'l Thi could happen if most of your supply
'.i 11.11 l e Ii C 1.1111' li M n .' unld IIovisions, which have very
liii IL' p'1. ilm l I'-,m e\ cr. t, hern I CI i e .ire combined with legumes
II tIe 1 iw ,t.o 2li Ite qu.ili ,l1 the protein in the meal
bt'coIIIC .i,s gid a s inoln io i animal protein sources. For
insitnikc. when mrice and pei.s a:e e.iien in the ratio of at least
one cup ol dried peas to three cups 'it rice (uncooked), the amino
acids o, the iice complement those of the peas. If the ratio of
ine Io pieIs I- 1 or 2 I. he meal is een more nutritious and
proteih-rilth.
So, if money is in short supply, animal protein can
hbe reduced and ybur diet modified to include more
legumes like peas and beans in combination with
cereaik- like rice anid flour to meet you daily protein


r -


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~






Vun v hrnc .e.ru....27.2.05.Page II


-rnglil


My wife, 41, and I have been married 18 years. She is very
religious and attends church every weekend. During the past
six months she's shown special interest in a 25-year-old young
man who is new to her church.
Based on our phone records, she calls him several times a day
even when we are on vacation. When I ask why she is so inter-
ested, she says she is mentoring and coaching this young man in
life situations. He recently broke up with his girlfriend, and she
serves as a sounding board for him.
She told me she has no romantic feelings for the young man.
However, she does care for this single young man and loves him as
a friend. He is always a perfect gentleman, she claims. She says she
would like to help him find a girlfriend, but I do not see much evi-
dence of that.
A few months ago she asked if he could spend the night in our
house since he lives an hour away and it was late. I told her no. She
invited him anyway. When I found out he was in the house, I asked
her to tell him to leave. She did.
That incident did not change their relationship. She took a trip
with him to a church function out of town, while I was on a busi-
ness trip. Am I simply being jealous? Should I be concerned this
relationship will grow into a romance?
JIM
Jim, if you don't have children, and if we consider your wife's
age, there is an innocent possibility. Many women in their 40s feel
a biological need to mother. They often want a child. We might call
this the last gasp of their biology. What your wife is doing could be
a last expression of her biological urge. He's a young man, lost in
life, and she can direct and mother him.
This may also be what is expected of her in her church, so she
is taking care of two things. She is nurturing him as a mother, and
she is nurturing him spiritually as her religion requires.
There is another possibility, of course, one which trips your
triggers. You see this as the movie 'The Graduate' and your wife as
Mrs. Robinson, the older woman who seduces a young man. Women
in their 30s and 40s are at their sexual peak, and your wife could be
attracted to a young man.
Which of the two is it? Is her biological clock ticking, or is her
sexual pot boiling? You know your wife better than anyone. Take
an honest look at your relationship with her right now. Not how
you imagine it to be, but how it ac-
tually is.
Is she enough disconnected Send letters to: Direct
fiom you to be having an affair PO Box 964, Springfie
with a young man? Or is she
looking for the spiritual and MO 65801 or email:
emotional connection you've DirectAnswers@Wayr
lost with her?
WAYNE & TAMARA


MONDAY TUESDAY
February 28th March 1st
Grade 6 Grade 4
English Mathematics
Language LENGTH -
INDIRECT STANDARD
SPEECH .UNITS


Science

MAJOR
ORGANS OF
THE HUMAN
BODY-THE
NERVOUS
, SYSTEM
-.. .. ..L ' :


Science

COMPARING
LEAVES AND
ROOTS


WEDNESDAY
MARCH 2N[
Grade 5

LANGUAGE
ARTS

PREPOSITI

Science

ARTHROPO


kY
D


ADS
I work at a small
radio station. I started
eight months ago, and
I've done really well. But
the longer I'm here the
more problems I have
with my boss. He's the
type of man who can
talk friendly all day,
but the minute you want
to talk business, he gives
you the cold shoulder.
I work on
commission and am
paid once a month. I
was supposed to be
paid 10 days ago, but I
haven't even seen my
boss. Five of my
paychecks have
bounced since I started.
I need money to pay
bills, but the more I ask
for my commission, the
more he avoids me.

NATALIE

Natalie, the Greeks
invented a way of
deducing answers called
the syllogism. Putting
your problem in a three-
part syllogism, we get
this: I have a job and
jobs pay money. I am not
being paid. Therefore, I
don't really have a job. I
must move on.

WAYNE &
TAMARA


Answers,
ld,

neAndTamaraom.


THURSDAY
MARCH 3RD


FRIDAY
MARCH 4TH


Grade 3 Grade 6
Mathematics Social
ADDITION- Studies
TENS, ONES
HURRICANES -
ONS PREPARING FOR

Social Mathematics
Studies
)DS FRACTIONS
LOCATION OF SUBTRACTION
YOUR OF MIXED


COMMUNE


Al',f 4~ 4'~~4 ~,;44*. 4


IITY NUMBERS WITH
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Chinese Xmas

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trf Syndicated Content 0.
Available from Commercial News Providers"



GUYANA SUGAR CORPORATION INC.
S** -* <- GUYANA SUGAR CORPORATION INC.


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Tenders are invited for lthe
following items:


supply of the


1. MotorCycles
2. 45 HPTractors
3. 80 HPTractors
4. 100 HP Tractors
5. 140 HPTractors
6. Rotary Ditchers
Tender documents can be purchased from the
Materials Management Department, Ogle, East
Coast Demerara for a nonrefundable fee of
G$3.000 and can be uplifted from Tuesday,
February 22, 2005.
Tender closes on Thursdayv March 10, 2005 at
14:00hrs.


INVITATION FOR BIDS


Guyana Water Inc. invites sealed bids from eligible bidders for the




to GWI locations countrywide.
Interested eligible bidders may obtain further information from and inspect the
bidding documents at the office of Guyana Water Inc., 10 Fort Street, Kingston,
Georgetown, Guyana, Ph: 592-225-0471-5, Fax: 592-225-0478.
The bidding document (and additional copies) may be purchased by interested
bidders at the Guyana Water Inc., Cashier, Shelter Belt, Vlissengen Road,
Georgetown, Guyana for a non-refundable fee of $2,000. dollars.
Bidders must submit, as part of the bid, valid Inland Revenue Department and
National Insurance Scheme Compliance Certificates.
The completed bid comprising of one (1) Original and one (1) copy must be
submitted in a sealed envelope which does hot in any way identify the bidder and
must be clearly marked on the top, right-hand corner as follows:
Guyana Water Inc. Board Tender Box
-Guyana Water Inc.
10 Fort Street, Kingston, Georgetown
Supply of Security Services to GWI location Countrywide
All bids must be placed in the tender box Guyana Water Inc., 10 Fort Street,
Kingston, Georgetown on or before the closing time of 14:00 h, March 29, 2005.
Bids will be opened in the presence of the bidders or their representatives who
choose to attend at 14:00 h on March 29, 2005 in the Company's Training Room
(same address as above).


WANT Pest fears bar


BROADCASTS TO SCHOOLS: TIME TABLE
NCN Radio 13:30 14:00 hrs

FEBRUARY 28th MARCH 4th, 2005


Sulndav Chronicle February 27, 20)05


I


Page III





,.Sunday Chronicle February 27, 2005


Appellant's non-compliance with


Ordinance causes


IN 1953, the Full
Court of Guyana
held that it had no
jurisdiction to hear
an appeal from the
Magistrate's Court by appel-
lant Williams on the ground
that there was non-compli-
ance with the Ordinance by
the applicant.
The appellant/applicant
had failed to draw up his
grounds of appeal and serve
,ame on the respondent
Chestney. So he applied-to the
Full Court for an extension of
time to put himself in order.
The Full Court. constituted
-by Justices F.M. Boland,
Harold J. Hughes and Kenneth
Stoby, who later became Chan-
cellor of the Judiciary in this
country, rejected the application
and struck out the appeal.
The facts revealed that the
appellant had given notice of
appeal within the prescribed
time and complied with the re-
quirements as to the giving of
security, but did not draw up
his notice of grounds of appeal
and lodge it with the clerk of the
Magistrate's Court and serve a
copy thereof on the respondent
within the time limited by the
Ordinance
At the hearing,. the respon-


dent submitted that the Court
had no jurisdiction to entertain
the appeal.
Judge Boland; the President
of the Court held that the Full
Court. in the exercise of the in-
herent power of a, Court to con-
trol -its procedure in the absence
of a positive enactment or of a
rule of court to tthe contrary.
could in a proper case, where
justice so demands, excuse an
appellant who, through un-
avoidable circumstances, has
failed to comply ,vith the direc-
tions of the Ordinance as to the
procedure relating to grounds of
appeal.
"The failure to comply with
the directions of the Ordinance
in this appeal was not unavoid-
able," Justice Boland had said.
Justice Hughes went on to
say: "Without deciding whether
the Court had jurisdiction to
entertain an application for ex-
tension of time to appeal,, the
reason given for the delay
would not merit the grant of an
extension of time."
Justice Stoby held: "The
Full Court has inherent power
to extend the time for carrying
out a direction concerning a
matter of procedure, but the
provision requiring an appellant
to draw up a notice of his


grounds of appeal within a
specified time is not procedural.
and consequently the Court had
no jurisdiction to entertain the
appeal or an application for ex-
tension of time to appeal.
At the hearing of the mat-
ter, Lawyer Mr. P. A.
Cunmmings, who subsequently
became a Justice of Appeal, ap-
peared for the appellant while
Attorney-at-Law Mr. Clinton
Wong represented the respon-
dent.
In his judgment, Justice
Boland said that submission
made in limine by the
respondent's Counsel against
the jurisdiction of the Court
to entertain the appeal raises
once again a very interesting
point of law. The issue refers
to the consequences that shall
follow upon an omission by
an appellant to comply with
the provisions of the Sum-
mary Jurisdiction (Appeals)
Ordinance Chap'ter 16, which
gives directions to an appel-
lant as to the performance of
certain acts as preliminaries
to the hearing of his appeal.
The appellant had given no-
lice of appeal within the pre-
scribed time and had also com-
plied with the requirements as
to the giving of security. But it


- - - - - - - - - - - --




EC

QUESTION

I live at Lethem and find it easier to access health care (beyond what
is available at our Regional Hospital) if I cross the border to Brazil. I
Will NIS reimburse me for medical expenses if the Doctor refers me
to Brazil for treatment. What of Sickness Benefit?. 0

ANSWER

(A) Permission.for NIS Overseas Medical Care is granted when the-,
treatment required is not available locally. Your requirements
may not be available in region No. 9, but may be available in
Region No. 4 (Georgetown) Whilst necessary care through
Brazil may be easier for you, it is out of the ambit of the laws
I of Guyana, Chapter 36:01 to facilitate such an act.


(B) Now, Sickness Benefit is another thing. This you can claim-
providing you are sick. Once you lose income as a result of
the illness, you can receive benefit.


.- I


Do you have a question on N.I.S ? Then write/call. .
NIS MAIL BAG I
C/O Dianne Lewis Baxter
Publicity and Public Relations Officer (ag)
National Insurance Scheme
Brickdam and Winter Place
P.O. Box. 101135 ... i
E-mail: pr nis(@solution2000.net I
Tel: 227-3461. .
-- III--- - ---- - --I


appeal
is admitted by his counsel that
the appellant did not draw up
his notice of grounds of appeal,
lodge it with the clerk of the
Magistrate's Court and serve a
copy thereof on the respondent
within 14 days after delivery at
his address of the notice from
the clerk informing him that a
copy of the proceedings and of
the Magistrate's reasons for de-
cision were ready for delivery to
him on his paying the proper
fee.
Section 8 of Chapter 16 ex-
pressly directs that he shall do
so within 14 days of the receipt
by him of the clerk's written




ByGeo

notification.
Justice Boland added: "In
this case, the clerk's notice was
forwarded to the appellant by
registered post at his last known
place of abode as specified in the
record of proceedings, which
happened, in fact, to be his
proper address at the time.
"It occurred that appellant
was away from home on the
day when the registered letter
was delivered there and he did
not receive it personally until
the next day.
"It would seem that ap-
pellant made the mistake in
the calculation of the period.
He apparently thought that it
commenced to run from the
date of the actual receipt by
him of the clerk's notice, and
consequently, he was one day
late in his transmission of his
grounds of appeal.
"There can be no question


f's


dismissal


that he thereby had failed to
comply with the directions
given in Section 8 of Chapter
16.
"This Court has on more
than one occasion decided that
unless an appellant complies
strictly with the directions
contained in Sections 4, 5 and
8 (3), his appeal will not be
heard. The reason advanced for
refusing to entertain the appeal
in such circumstances is that the
Court is without jurisdiction,"
Boland explained.
He pointed out that the Full
Court has no jurisdiction with
respect to appeals from Magis-
trates' decisions except such as
is given expressly by the Ordi-
nance.


rge Barclay
According to him. the Ordi-
nance now in torce is the Sum-
mary Jurisdiction (Appeals)
Ordinance. Chapter 16. and it
was accordingly held that it was
a condition precedent to juris-
diction that the appellant shall
perform at the time and manner
prescribed in Section 4. 5 and 8
(3) thereof all that he is directed
to do before the hearing of the
appeal.
It was said that not only
must the notice of appeal be
strictly in conformity with the
provisions of Section 4 and 5
(subject, however, to the excep-
tions contained in Section 6) but
there must also be undeviating
compliance with Section 8 (3)
which relates to the drawing up
and service of the notice of
Grounds of Appeal.
Justice Boland declared that
he had been at some pains to set
out at some length his views onil


--*


CHANCELLOR
KENNETH STOBY
the question as to the conse-
quences of a failure by an ap-
pellant to observe strictly the
directions in the Ordinance re-
lating to the notice of grounds
of appeal as distinguished from
those relating to the actual no-
tice of appeal.
It is with regret, he said, that
he found himself in disagree-
ment with previous decisions
given in the Full Court. which.
though entitled to respect, are
nevertheless not binding on the
Court.
He added that he had read
the decisions in Balkisson and
Resal Singh v. Corporal George
Williams 1938 L.R.B.G. (Law
Report of British Guiana), 187
and Edward Ramcharran v.
Ramsluk; 1931 1937. L.R.B.G.
563. but did not find that in ei-
ther it is held that the court has
no inherent power to extend the
time for carrying out a direction
concerning a matter of proce-
dure.
He added: "Whether I am
right or wrong in the views I
hold, I join in expression of
hope repeated in many of the
(Please see page IX)


GUYANA TOURISM AUTHORITY





All accommodation establishments (Hotels,Guest Houses, Inns
and Apartment Buildings, Etc), Tour Operators, Tour Guides,
Resorts and Lodges are hereby notified that the Guyana
Tourism Authority has commenced its licensing process.
Applications for licence are hereby invited. The deadline for
submission of applications is Thursday, 10"' of March, 2005. A
penalty of $500.00 will apply to late applicants.


Licensing application forms and regulations can be
downloaded on
\. ii.g'\a i-m -ltlirinloni.c i lic isin or uplifted -from the
Authority's office in the National Exhibition Centre
compound, Sophia.


For further information please contact the Guyana Tourism
Authority on telephone number 223-6351 or Fax 231-6672.


Pae IV ..






Sunday Chronicle February 27, 2005


retires to a life of





relaxation and reading


By Jeune Bailey Van-Keric

R EVEREND
Prasbhulad
L e d r a
recently retired after a
working life span of over 50
years that were punctuated by
countless positive
contributions.
The Sunday Chronicle met
Rev Ledra on a visit to the
Ramdeholl Memorial, Guyana
Presbyterian Church at Princess
Elizabeth Road, New
Amsterdam. on the eve of the
church's 90th anniversary last
month.
Born at Whim Village.
Corentyne. 81 years ago. he
obtained the Junior and Senior
Cambridge Examination
Certificates from the
Chandisingh High School at
Rose Hall Town.
Subsequently. on receipt of
the Trained Teacher's
Certificate. Rev Ledra. taught at
Wales Canadian Mission School,
and Latchmansingh Government
School. among others.
Because of his skilful
management of the latter school.
along with the willing support
-and cooperation of the staff,
examination results improved
and the learning institution
became a pilot school in the
areas of English, Social Studies.
and Mathematics.
This initiative allowed him
to become the Chairman of the
Curriculum Development Unit
on the West Coast Berbice.
Rev. Ledra served also as a
member of the Social Studies
Programme (national and


by a neighbour. The decision,
Ledra said, has brought much
satisfaction.
After 24 years of unbroken
service, Rev. Ledra reminisced
with pride on some of his
achievements.
He was an active member
of the New Amsterdam
Christian Council for all the
years as a Priest and also served


regional).
Expressing his views
about Mr. Ledra, the then
Education Officer, Mr.
Edward Heyliger wrote: "As
headmaster of
Latchmansingh Government
School, his astute leadership
made that institution one of
the most effective in the
delivery of quality education
in this region. In fact, his
school became a pilot school
in several areas of the
curriculum. In pursuing a
policy of innovativeness in
the administration of schools,
I relied heavily on his


cooperation and leadership.
As an innovative leader. Mr.
Ledra. was always among the
first to appreciate and
cooperate fully in the
promotion of progressive
educational practices".
Following his retirement
from the teaching service after
36 years, Rev. Ledra's portrait
was mounted in the Guyana
Teachers' Union building.
Retirement from teaching
did not mean the end of
working life for Rev. Ledra. The
father of three opted for the
Ministry instead of being a life
insurance salesman as suggested


-



TO ALL PHARMACISTS

In accordance with Part II Section 3 subsection (1) and Part X Section 28 and the subsequent
constitution and appointment of the Pharmacy Council of Guyana, the Pharmacy and Poisons
Board is no longer legally authorized to conduct registration.

All pharmacists are hereby advised that registration for the year 2005 will commence from 21st
February, 2005 and will close on 18th March, 2005. Registration will be done from 9.00 hrs 15.00
hrs and you are required to walk with two recent passport size photographs.

The new registration fee is $2500.00 for pharmacists

Registration will be done at the office of the Chief Pharmacist, Ministry of Health, Brickdam,
Georgetown.

The register of Pharmacists will be published in the Official Gazette on 1st Saturday of April, 2005.

Please contact Ms. Colette Gouveia (Registrar) Ag. on Telephone no. 227-5262 with respect to all
issues pertaining to registration.

COLETTE GOUVEIA
REGISTRAR (AG.)
PHARMACY COUNCIL OF GUYANA
7th FEBRUARY, 2005

Government ads can be viewed on1 I:, ,. 1.'.'. '..'


Page V


as Chairman of that council for
two consecutive 11-year
periods.
Under his leadership, health
clinics were held in New
Amsterdam and its environs.
The free community service
which was established in July
1992, accessed finance from
OXFAM, while a large quantity
of pharmaceutical drugs were
donated from a Canadian
medical organisation.
As a member of the church,
he served as Clerk of
Presbytery for six years, as
Moderator and, in the last five
years as Chairman of the
Theological Committee which
was responsible for all lay
persons' training.
In addition to education
and religion, Reverend Ledra
spent most of his working life
in community and social
work. He served as Chairman
of the management


committee of the National
Psychiatric Hospital, Fort
Canje, and member of the
Advisory Board of the
Medical Termination of
Pregnancy.
He also carried out an
extensive programme on health
education and social issues such
as HIV/AIDS, Substance Abuse,
Family Life, Wife and Family
Abuse.
For his outstanding work in
the fields of education, religion,
community and social work, he
was awarded the Medal of
Service.
Asked what he intends to do
for his retirement, Rev Ledra
said that he would now rest,
relax, and read.
Also, time would be spent
listening to the classical
music and the timeless songs
from movies like South
Pacific, Oklahoma, My Fair
Lady and Sound of Music.


. .. ._ .




INVITATION FOR BIDS







BOXES/ENL OLURES & ACCESSORIL
The Government of Guyana (GoG) has received financing from the Inter-American
t Development Bank (IDB) towards the cost of the Unserved Areas Electrification Program rie
(UAEP). It is intended that part of this financing will be applied to eligible payments for the
Goods for Electrical Distribution Systems for the Projected areas. Bidding will be conducted
i through the international competitive bidding procedures the Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB)


Guyana Power & Light therefore invites sealed bids from eligible bidders for the supply of
meter boxes/enclosures & accessories. Interested bidders may obtain further information
from, inspect and acquire bidding documents at the office of:
The Procurement Officer
Guyana Power & Light, Inc.
257/9 Middle Street,
Georgetown, Guyana
Tel:592-225-5252, Fax 592-225-5255
A complete set of bidding documents may be purchased by eligible bidders
on submission of a written application and upon payment of a non-refundable
.. fee of G$15,000 (or equivalent amount in US dollars) at the office of:
The Contracts & Supplies Manager
Guyana Power & Light, Inc.
40 Main Street,
Georgetown, Guyana
Tel: 592-226-9598, Fax 592-225-7398
Bids must be delivered (or mailed) on or before 09:00h on Tuesday 5th
April, 2005 to the Tender Box located at the address below and must be
accompanied by a bid security of not less than 2% of the total price in Guyana
dollars (or equivalent amount in US dollars). They must be labeled:

UNSERVED AREAS ELECTRIFICATION PROGRAMME
Bid for the supply of goods for Electrical Distribution Systems
for the Guyana Power & Light Inc.
Central Tender Board, Ministry of Finance.
Main & Urquhart Streets
Georgetown, Guyana, South America.
Bids will be open at a public ceremony at 09-00h on Tuesday 5 April 2005
it the address given for submission of bids. Bidders and, or their
Representatives may attend.

lBidders registered in Guyana must submit Inland Revenue and National
S insurance compliance certificates along with their bids.

l, 'he Puichaser is not responsible for bids not received on or before the tit,
d. date, specified ford reception of lds, L/'ito bids will betWreet~ed.2d.
~ "' y ',ftlll'rte l "tlt'K fl;X!'W? t -* .... ...... ..... .... ..... .... ..... ... ....-*'. --* ..... ... .. .


I






Sunday Chronicle February 27, 2005


anyone you can trust to sup-
port you, get them to come and
help you out.


-- tfrin-,pai~e iJl -- frntl-pi ti'sbeen cheated
..- -n~-ereare. some guides -to
impro orriar~g Tppcu]~uhteiiti
'Mm ', -iire -est-you i.-airdb -w acran.;--
irlighliou01%. --A- : o u -nm av ue leisuspi-
-~ -- -- -- .A~iI~ufor-a %hIdle. ~ri~i~,


It will help to acknowledge
that you are angry, and to do all
you can to get rid of the angry
energy. Women often report of


DENIAL screaming into a cushion, play-
You may then find yourself ing daily games of squash, go-
uhabicl e to accept what's ip- ing to ti, gyli, ~it1ing in a
opened particularly, if the news parked car with the stereo full
of the affair has come to you blast, so that they can rant and
Through -a third party. rave to themselves.
s tr g a l ~-You-may uigno--the --- _ut- e-nnit t-comes--to--
itWn.- .--.---' n ud rfruse tl lemiiipitni l.T1g li-t'i' ilt whi
S-hallenge .Aiur -_partneri. -, .iuallIs lc.. if_,tu Continue
-s.eries- we look-aitte-dession -. oThce. -And et ye,-leiw-.,: ii-- Tessa. 35.-simplL-rcfused4 o- heine--in-_r\ .-\-fir.t-uriou, re -
-whether you stay,_ gooriiake pactof hearig.the-niih-canbe talk about-her husband', :iciion \e, Bui cnntruou,
him cihte-.pfiinporhtue. L ool p-h-i'.illhiiumun, '-i cn-fession f--hiis-ten -ear --'.Larfnare .s-~ll~-nlderi-ti p brin -
-at-lhe-rcenperritn -tn-w- -- Yonu iH--fe r ntorrrnal -7- 1affir'. -l a c ~-n 1 y-t'IDL.uohLr -ililli'
Sbruine-':\ ou-talion noiptl'icn h--h'.aLrlo ma _elL- think -I -thoughtl-thait.-if I --m.A iehui ,in-les-_likely. ha..-
i i, ...e .t itl t.iiL- 13it ,hl- '- h..-- ph .-.i'l. .i n..!. l ign" redit.-i-1t- -ould -o1w -'. n ', .IN t1.- r-4 --'-b e-. el-r. --
III./.J ILI,1l nm mll lK k. .. Ih lk il } t/l .}ll~nlljl inlI p ___ ----- .. .. . -..-,.-_: '_ _7 "


`btESE3i~H uhie.Butm)%ito"ic\(put ilintle .1.1icIco~oI~t.~ 'ILL~.-.* IU, j_, '.TiG 'tOvt.Xt ,i1s. 11, --


-Cou le., couib~eIfin-5f% one There 1-e Tlicee %tage'tlmi "I t -%%.Ilike heingi iffa- mA Phn'Jcall Nupp-r n 1; .it1~ ~fter Intifllg.he-iruth :- f- -;-u-ind _vur,-Ih.won--
Sir( o \ani tolltm [hi. awlul nes th er.- cctdeii.- mne-friend said t it-)Ik, iteiututbe-hvkL-a-, vott mai. -v.IntL t '. ot I.1-'ucrnA JRve ji~--del ljleiiijt: 3cafiar \xas
imu -n~~ ein iedc~~;td ..'he hetutd hiti WCthe if embafifsin21o admwhitht hln t'clvf'i!.
ido tru'-k,ow .-when It ou cprto npniso1tt- ate a.-m-,h i~a f11ng it the- .hj-happenctIL But if there -1, tiwhij-.hiIIamI art~t'e Ita- "d re Ittel-.11iiip OlIItg

t hine. out intinthe Pen-I-fAour part ner Bu:nt cmi almost al1-
T~~~T~ A T~fl~ ~--in ca ep ntk 5mette''21r ac t eU-tt


CO-OPERATIVE REPUBLIC OF GUYANA


MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

BASIC EDUCATION ACCESS AND MANAGEMENT SUPPORT PROGRAMMED

Loan No. 1107/SF-GY


1. The Government of the Co-operative Republic of Bids must be clari c. marked a .he lop. ieft-hand
-.:.. -GCyana.bas. rec'ei. ed. fianacing frorrm.-te. Iriter- corner aft he.quter envelope BEAMS-'BIDS FOR
..i:',' e-t. Bank itBytird&4 - tE --iUP' -ANDI- INSTALLATION -
E4dU~ Ciat u es -emil .ACCESSORlES-:AND6 R

14:11B.- -oSPPJa ..,.



* a, t-.. -. 'tte-tw- "ne'. "" on -'.- be.9e-rt .. .8 *-"
,' -..-wa.tesealed-b tr ... hhourseiFuAsdayl Fr.ch .29,2005.4t AiI1 not .
* -..-,AerwaeL a-Deelppmerit la ret.rial-and . be neces.prrryo-subn tl t .s in person since-the'
n,',n-repqic-nal rnmbeLr -unlries for the supply rni be seft hb.' n.3l H-:. ','.r ihe employer is
anid Installation of Computers, Accessories not responsible tor bids not rece'veo thereof on or
and SolarSystems with otherApplications. before the time and date specified for receipt of


3. The BEAMS Project Implementation Unit has the
,undertaking of facilitating this process and all
relevant information for this bid can be had by
contacting:.

The Project Manager
BEAMS Programme
Project Implementation Unit
109 Barima Avenue
BelAirPark
Georgetown.

Tel. Nos.: (592) 226-3332 or225-4626
Fax No.: (592, 225-2773
4. a. Bids iust be placed iin ini rl-ii env.lo (.
bf,'arir., ,.-' ,*>r;. i^-ir~i; *inci< a.io;{ J.;,; i|'; hifider.


bids. Late bids will be rejected and returned
unopened.

6. Each bid mustbe accompanied by a valid NIS and
iRD Compliance Certificate for firms registered in
Guyana.

7. Bids will be opened at a public ceremony in the
presence of those bidders cr their representatives
who choose to attend immediately after 09:00
hours on Tuesday, March 29, 2005 in the
Boardroom of the National Board of
Procurement & Tender Administration fou neu
Central T7- dei Boa.. !:',s. of finance
Bi I .I j. Plain & : s GI-orin:wn
Guv-llra.


lion i e: IN he -Also, guilt can end up
hurting you, badly. One cli-
SAD)NFSS nct ofl ine-endedtup and tip-
(Ov\ef a"i b\ ill ithe 'ilst toeingi rouiind the house,
icactions to ne\\s of an affair. guiltily, trying to please her
vou \will teel ,:m. Siad because huishund., a if she had had
vou'\e It the parnr and lhe the affair and not him.
relationship you thought you The only constructive thing
ihadl, to dio with uiiill is. not to regret
So expect to cry. to grieve., the pas,. but to aim tor a better
to mourn. If you trust friends future. So ask yourself this
or rehuiai s. r i \\ib themin. I' quiestido: is there anything you
not, then again you may can do that will help?
\V,.nt to turn to a counsellor. 11t' our relationship is un-
ha;ppy. ,,' lto charnel your
\N(GER g fuilty encrg' into finding the
You \\i alniost certainly cause o tIhe unhappiness. and
leel angry that your partner has then tackling the problem. I1'
slept ii ih ;m'conc else. A\nd \ou dJ,. therc, i: more chance of
it's likely that the longer hc yo h both remaining faithful to
Aiffairh as gone on and the deeper each other.
thie, J. i- .mil he mi e t.'t.. -Finall). rin member ihali.it

S toi ,t, *le ,l iT.'r ..1 3ut .. t ind..iti;ih!-difficU o e'-.,t
.noi ksl-anprr 4a .s l ceineiids olfi jE






S.i it i ,I.-l i t -, l ., .So .iiiirinH .,a r t-' ', 4



DiEMEI;t-RAA. hDIS TIl.l RS I MITEIi-d)

VACANCIES
Applications arc invited from I uitably qualified
persons to fil lthec following vacncices:-


P(O)SIT IONS




1 -o kI ii I5ut t() ltcva t o r.


11 EQU; I RE.N I: NA'SS

5; sltbiccts (A\Ci, \tths
and~ I'nllt-.h mnil. luix e


Sound secondary
0 elt ':ion
Nls-i it\ e" Tr'acto!'
1 icn'ise
\M 1,-,1

I ,lk liI't


, 7 ,> .. ;'5 ',,


Pae VI


I


-, li ,,


? .


-i : _.


:j '-:I ~


~:- ::-~


i; ";*







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February 27, 2005


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page 8 & 13.p65






Sunday Chronicle February 27, 2005 Page IX


APPELLANT'S NON-

COMPLIANCE WITH

ORDINANCE ...
.. .... .. (From page IV)
-judgments that there will be early legislative enact-
ment which would confer express power on the Court
to avoid the hardship which an aggrieved party may
experience as a result of an excusable omission on
his part to comply with the directions of the Ordi-
nance relating to the notice of grounds of appeal.
"In this particular case, the reasons put forward by
appellant's counsel are not such as can be accepted as
excusable. An appellant who has given notice of appeal
must make provision for the receipt and early delivery
to him of the Magistrate's Clerk's notice should it be
left at his home during his absence.
"He has 14 days from the date of delivery for the
filing and service of his notice of grounds of appeal. '
"In my view, an extension of time should be granted
only if the delay was unavoidable and not because of
mistake. It was not unavoidable in this case." Justice
Boland said. and added:
"In the circumstances, there being no grounds of ap-
peal before the Court the appeal will be dismissed with
costs to respondent. Appeal struck out."
In his judgment, Justice Stoby said: "I agree with
Justice Boland that the Full Court has inherent
power to extend the time for carrying out a direction
concerning a matter of procedure, but I do not agree
that the provision of Section 8 (3) requiring an
appellant to draw up a notice of his grounds of appeal
within a specified time is procedural.
However, Justice Stoby disclosed: "In order to
prosecute an appeal an appellant must not only give
notice of appeal, but must state the reasons.
"The consequence of a default in the due prosecu-
tion of an appeal is that it is deemed abandoned in ac-
cordance with Section 16 (1) Chapter 16. This is a salu-
tary and necessary provision.
"In the absence of such a section, a person convicted
and sentenced to imprisonment could give notice of ap-
peal and do nothing more because the execution of the
decision under appeal is suspended as enacted by sec-
tioin 12 of Chapter' 16.
"Section 16 was specifically designed to prevent de-
laying tactics and if it were held that the grounds of ap-
peal are not an indispensable part of the prosecution of
an appeal, it would follow that the section is valueless,
as a. Magistrate could not properly sign a commitment
warrant until an appeal is deemed abandoned, and 'if the
Court has power to extend the time for filing the rea-
sons of appeal, it cannot be said that an appeal is aban-
doned until an application for extension is made and refused.
"Subject to this qualification, I am in entire
agreement with the view expressed by Justice
Boland."



1 ^VACANCIES



TUG CAPTAIN
Qualified and experienced Captains are urgently
required for Toolsie Persaud Quarries Inc. operations
at Providence, East Bank Demerara.

Candidates must have at least six (6) years relevant
experience plus the following -

*Valid Harbour Licence
*Certificate of Competency
*S.T.C.W. Certificate

A valid Police Clearance Certificate will be required
before employment.

Applications should be made in person direct to:

Marine Superintendent
Toolsie Persaud Quarries Inc.,
TPL Providence Complex
East Bank Demerara
Tel: 265-4,973-7 Ext.J'9 ,


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Page IX


Sunday, pbronicle February 27, 2005


ClT', i' ,iiirJTRY







Guyana Chronicl


SOO, O


/ r- -


.........-..


by -e ab -,- ',







by Petamber Persaud


.5


tile breeding grounds for our
writers.)


F OR a writer to That period seemed to be a
have a library turning pointing in Gilroy's life.
named after her Like a divine vision visited upon i
is a significant her there was no turning back. L
recognition, far exceeding Very early, she was recognized as E
many other a gifted teacher and was elevated
acknowledgements. to head the infant section at I
acknowledgementsBroad Street Government s
Beryl Gilroy is such a School. She contributed to a
unique character. In Camden, weekly educational column c
London, you would find the which teachers read, and new
Camden Black Sisters' Beryl ideas infiltrated our schools be- a
Gilroy Library, now a memorial ideas infiltrated our schools be
to that exceptional writer, edu- cause teaching at that time in
to n th rBritish Guiana allowed teachers s
cator and thinker to be innovative. Gilroy also lec- e
And why not? She was a tured on the UNICEF's nutrition
prolific writer, authoring educa- programme before the itching to
tional books for children to gramme before the itchiner s
counter "Eurocentric books further her education steered her s
counter Eurochentric books overseas. That move and choice v
foisted upon children in order to of destination was easy as the
set their places in the slurry at period was characterized by mass c
the base of the pyramid, of periodwas characterised bally mass c
achievement." And her adult rpost-war migration especially to
books, novels and historical fic- However, her initial cntt.
tion, were the "rewriting wrongs arriving in London in 9 ,
imposed on the blackthe 'motherland' was dJiticuil .
correcting the ills of historical Se was unable to land.i h I,,
misrepresentation." She was unable to land h.
misrepresentation match her training unnil i...,
In that library, you would years later training uil ...
also find, among other reading years later. But Gilh,. .. .- c
l never idle, trying her hand .. \'
materials, books written by journaistdle, a tryingherhapnt :. ,
Gilroy including 'Nippers. and ournalistatherapi
'Little Nippers Read'iers 1972d- publisher's reader and a book re- t
1974, four volumesof 'Green viewer for the BBC Carbbean
1974, four e Cof 'Ge Service All of these thing-, uith
nooksld'-a 7, 'C ofDreams" which she occupied herself came s
1980, and 'In For .
A Penny' 1978,
which won the
XGr er. London
SFicion I v :r'e



iir ng titles r in ..1- .
tha hi lry inca~ih
'Fr alig pLA i i
House' 1986
which won the
Greater London
Council Black Lit-
eratnl4re Competi-
tion in 1985. sub-
milled as manu-..
script, and ,.
'Stedman and
Joanna 1991 thait
w3a given a Spe
cial Prize for His-
ioncal Fiction by'
The Guyana Prize
for Literature in BERYLTGILROY
1992. That book
explored the history of the sla-
very in the Caribbean and the in handy in her career as a writer.
African Diaspora. (That same In 1953, she gained an ad-
year of the prize, David vance diploma in child develop-
Dabydeen'-won the Best Book ment and taught at the Inner
of Fiction for 'The Intended'Boo London Educational Authority
tracing the Indian Diaspora ex-nded schools until 1956 when she ac-
ptracing the Indian Diaspora ex quired a Bachelor of Science in
Writer, educator, ethno-psy- Psychology. Soon after, she was
Briteryl Gilroy was borny elevated to deputy head teacher
ceiologist, Beryl Gilroy was bo at Beckford Infants' School.
Springlands, Berbice 1924, iGuyana. In 1969, she created history

She grew up feasting on folklore by becoming London's first
of Guyana and Suriname ab- BlackIf that was a crown to her
sorbing sayings, names of me- If that was a crown to her
dicinal plants, absorbing the career in education, then the
characteristics of the Corentyne book 'Black Teacher' describing
River dividing the two countries her early experience as a black
which she transformed, accord- teacher in London was another
ing to; Jessica and Eric Huntley; feather in her headdress.
ing to Jessica and Eric Huntleyy. Gilroy did not sit on her lau-
That informal schooling re She kept eleaing heelf.
stood her in good stead: enter- going on to acquire an M.A. and
ing the Teachers' Training Col- PhD in Ehronomentum Pa ycholog
lege as a teenager, 1943; she Gilron'" nhomentuma o,
graduated with a first class di- sustained awith a little help from
p. ......... T ...e ..- -.. fnendc, all writers. all adihoin"'
poma-i.1945.;( Th c-er bOdks o 'their xperience in :
Training Collegean thd "uy Britain. First and foremost on ',
of Betbice were and still are fer-


t
al


I..1


By Stacey Bess


OR British photographer, lan Brierley venturing
out of his European homeland, going after the en
chantment of the dazzling distinctiveness of the
Caribbean aura, was a well-calculated move.
Caribbean "subjects" lured him. For this young, zealous, ca-
reer photographer, his sojourns here are at once adventurous and
so grand that after a decade, he keeps coming back.
With every visit to this region, his camera magnetises fresh sub-
jects. He loves Guyana, the architecture, flora, fauna, tourism at-.
tractions, historical sites, night life, the people.
In the height of his recent photographic sessions, the 'devastat-
ing flood waters crept over Guyana's coast. But even the unprec-
edented levels of water could not drench Ian's fervency to engage
models in photo shoots. Neither .could they be diverted from the
opportunity for self-expression, self-portrayal and self-exposure.
In the broadest sense there are three types of modelling: fash-
ion, motion picture and print media. Fashion modelling is generally
pursued in London, United Kingdom or other parts of Europe, while
motion picture modelling is mainly sought after in Hollywood,
United States of America. Print media modelling is easiest to fol-
low, allowing models to work for such publications as newspapers,
magazines, mail orders, calendars, greeting cards, post cards, and
advertising boards.
Ian and models from Classic Essentials Modelling Agency made
a smart team. The ladies flowed with their urge o10 otall surren-
der their soul to the camera, and lan fell that they have got it night.
Right for print media modelling, night for a 2006 Guyana Cal-
endar'
- The calendar will feature six models. ages. 20 to 25 years. in '
poses for each of the 12 months of the year
Classic Essentials Modelling Agency is a local, decade-old


hat list was E. R. Braithwaite,
ilso from Berbice, Guyana, who
wrote that ever-popular novel
To Sir With Love'. Sources of
inspiration were also George
Lamming author of 'The
Emigrants', Samuel Selvon
author of 'The Lonely
Londoners' and Leila Berg whom
she described as "a prolific
writer of the period and a
champion of children's rights".
Gilroy went to great lengths to
acknowledge the help of Andrew
Salkey who was a constant
source of encouragement to
emerging writers, especially
women writers in a period that
was characterized by the
slighting of the contribution and
'alue of women. "Women," she
wrote, "were peripheral
creatures."
And what a mighty woman
she was! Ameena Gafoor, editor
of The Art lonurnil Guy:inn.
]',L I In l Gilri, .A. ha lm1 he nMcl
I 01 ilnii. I i ~l rhl.'[i",' eiil h.'it'll '
n I III I.nt l i I liin' t-i i '1 ,i
11 1 1d. 1 ,on...,11-,'C
. nip.i-,i nr i shin,, itllrl.-h in ticr
rilinl .iln enter et'lic rilcr
% hose iniellecCiu.l cirio-ii', and
hirt for self-know ledge need to
be emulated today."
Gilro% %as later to act as a
source of encouragement to
other writers like Janice
Shinebourne and David


Dabydeen, both from the an-
cient county, Berbice and both
residing in Britain.
The union of Beryl and her
English husband Patrick Gilroy
between 1959 and 1975 was de-
scribed as a supportive marriage,
"a cocoon time, when I enjoyed
my family". It was also a learn-
ing experience dealing with the
trauma of their mixed-race'chil-
dren.
The death of Patrick af-
fected her badly "from day to
day my heart like a frenetic bird
in flight sought him" but his
quiet mind helped her "find the
diamonds nestling in the chaos"
as she returned to the Inner Lon-
don Educational Authority's
centre of Multicultural Educa-
tion acquiring a greater under-
standing of children. This new
knowledge she passed on to
friends and other teachers in Brit-
ain and the USA. Her only re-
gret as an educator was her in-
ability to help her homeland in
this respect because of what she
described as "Guyanese poli-
tics". This stung her more than
any other lamentations espe-
cially after the mark she made on
infant education in the late 40s,
especially after writing 'The
Green and Gold Readers' for
Guyanese schools, especially al-
ter transcending so many man-
made boundaries in her writings.
The death of her husband
caused her to return to her first
lh 1c -- irn, G ilh w 'lliiin l
Io \ 'in.' \ ii.ib, p.r, Vm n I rlrl-
elp.innl Hoimic' I S t, *. I]uIl
Bo', S.iild'.hich 10 'Si'dili.ii
.ind l .Jo.nn.i .and ELch....: .I.i J
Voices biih in 1991. 'Sunlighn
on Saeel Water' 199-4. and "In
Praise of Loue and Children'.
"Gather the Faces'. 'Inkle and
Yarnco', all three published in
1996.
For her contribution to edu-
cation and for her writing, the


thriller writer whom my aunt
had been reading". It was here
she learned to think for "my
grandparents always forbade me
to see with other people's eyes,
hear with their ears or think
their thoughts." And it was
also here she started to write
and to write for profit, "I
wrote stories, poems, mini-
books in longhand and bartered
them to my cousins in return for
various objects."
Beryl, a precious stone, a
gift to the world, died on April
4, 2001, still an unpolished gem
in the country of her birth.


References:
' *Reflections' by Gilroy in 'Caribbean Women Wriers.
Fiction in English' edited by Mary Conde & Thorunn
Lonsdale
Preface to 'Echoes and Voices'
Stabroek News 2001
' Interview with Ameena Galoor, editor of The Arts Journal,
Guyana
STribute to Gilroy by Peter D. Fraser

Comments please-contact this author telephone# -
226-0065, Email: oraftraltion2002@yahoo.com-' .:,.


school that tutors in the art of modelling and beauty science.
Marcia Trotz, who inherited the beauty and fashion legacy
from her mother Monica Trotz, manages the agency. She se-
.lected six of her most animated girls for Ian to photograph
for the 2006 calendar project that features them at different
locations of Guyana. Upon completion, the calendars will be
marketed as a product of Guyana and sold in stores nation-
wide and also in other Caribbean territories.
"Women sell," is what Marcia has boldly stated as her mar-
keting theory for the Guyana almanac. She believes that it is a unique
method for women to portray themselves, adding that other women
can exploit the success of the 2006 venture.
Ian and Classic Essentials are seeking members of corporate
society to join the calendar team in order to have it printed and
promoted. Sponsors will have their emblems and company infor-
mation inked beside picturesque photos of the models taken at sites
such as Umana Yana, the Botanical Garden, the Georgetown Sea-
wall, the 1763 Monument, the Promenade Garden, and Baganara
Island Resort.
Answering queries about apprehension by the models to take
a print media job that will have-at least 1 000 publications in cir-
culation, Marcia said: "We groom these girls to look like a model,
to be a model. We tell them what a model has to do, and that a
model has to be prepared' for anything. The photographer is a pro-
fessional and he made them look beautiful."
Marcia's words to potential sponsors are: "You will.be giving
model-, in Guyana a needed break in the industry, we will get the
mode Ito do charitable work for you and \ou %will get publicity."
One third of the proceeds of calendar sales will be do-
nated to a chosen charitable cause. Interested sponsors should
contat. Marcia Trolz at Classic Essentials Modelling Agency, a
East ahtl'Church Streets. Georgetown or via telephone num-
hers 225-6026 or 227-7978. .


picks Localn models, j


historic sites for .


LITERARY
-. ,"*. .. ., .-- ...'. ,7,' .-.': .." :"- : .-.
-' -, . ; '":L * "r' == .' .. 1 ^ *: .










-! -. .,-,.-- -.^-,I
; .., .....
-. "-'= _. -T'f '[ "..1J _.... -. E...:, , .-.


Institute of Education made her
a Fellow and the University of
North London conferred on her
an honorary doctorate.
To be honoured in one's life-
time is a privilege, constraining
the glorified to greater responsi-
bility and larger service to hu-
manity.
And it all began in a little
village in a little known country.
The village of Springlands gave
her a religion, family, place iden-
tity, and personal identity rep-
resented by her given names:
Beryl, a precious stone and
Agatha after Agatha Christie, "a





e February 27, 2005


LOCAL

TALE iiues at

FLOOD RELIEF
CONCERT
L ast Sunday, Guyanese got a glimpse of a wealth
of local talent at a concert organized to raise
funds for the flood relief programme.
The concert at the National Park featured performances
by The National Dance Company, the Guyana Hindu
Dharmic Sabha, Basil "Clarendon' Bradshaw. Ru,%ell
Lancaster and the Methodist Circuit Choir.
Renowned churney singer from Tnnidad and Tobago,
Rikki Jai lent international flavour to the e\ent.
The concert was organised by Gem Madhoo
Nascimento. Margaret Lawrence. Enrico Woolford. John
Mair. Shinington Hannays and Andrea Teekasingh. The
funds will be donated to the Gu ana Red Cross.


J..- .flk W r ...o j.. tv ,


A se





pON qf the groups that performed Sunday. a
- w


0


"''"""







- -ud c Fu 2 2


..n.. .Jnhjii6 i J i w


iiy _


Siewl Ca'e Castellan'2kL~i' F i qirL '1 scre!enaAilngL*fillms!1 w1 ith alifference K


By RI!-IL.JOHNSON



lover to do
with the
cinemas all on the decline. no
cable sersict. satellite service
(for most (,u\anese) a luxury .
and the dissemination of
mostly ho ,tleg D)'DI) ideos
(the oni;e', here a silhouette
usually pops up onscreen or.
especially during comedies.
there is a'; unsianted laugh
track")?
'Catlt', lughes., co-(m.ner
willh hier huisand allornies Nigel
Iluhes (ol the Sidewalk CaLe
and JaL// (lubi had a nt\el idea.
"'Nigcl and I used to go the
ciiinema up iito maybe a year
ago. Hulghes told the Sunday


Chronicle. She said however.
that with conditions fast dete-
riorating. the cinema experience
became less than entertaining.
She said that since ihr busi-
ness. Sidewalk Cafle. has been
hoslinIg musiclianslll, lisl po-
etr icradinl s cl teILr. :C regularI
filin sh V, sn i pun in-
tended ou ol the pici llT Shec
said tlal afler c n i l planning.
the decision v.'as a, ilid I, cIrCIIC
Sides a'k ITuesda, Mos ic
Nimhis. Sltirlin off slowly late
:\Augij,. Ithe iCdeCu cLt2hll on.
Ior li'e past couple of
lllonlhts people hatle been flock-
ing, or trickling to Sideswalk Call
to watch h anything from hllie lal-
est l loll wood action block-
huslter lio more cerebral fare.
such as Michael Moore's Bowl-
inL for Colunmbine and ]ahren-


heit 911. According to Hughes.
it 2'ot so popular that people ac-
tually started gi\ ing feedback as
to what thev wanted to sec.
"It"I a kind olf atmnosplcre ."
sird Hughes. \\ here. 101r \-
aiinplc. \\c \ had people sit
dol\n iandil llk hloutl a Il o\ ic 'or
Zin h( I ll after l[the cin ingIi aidl
it's lnotl ust the do umClllL ltanlsc,
eithlir."
No\sI lHughcs has an incrias-,
ingl2 lIrgc IImailing lis, t tlI-rogh
5\hich she [lIforills lim m ic nihlll
iegl' itrs lfolIt uii[-cominiig fea-
itluis.
Side\;ailk isn't oi course Cthe
pioneer in screening movies for
more than just tiransitol \ enlcr-
lainIent \ value. Sinall filn clubs
have flowered andl w withered
around Georgelown lor years.
Up to a few years ;i"o. to pro-


GOVERNMENT OF GUYANA

INTERNATIONAL FUND FOR AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
CARIBBEAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE

POOR RURAL COMMUNITIES SUPPORT SERVICES PROJECT

INVITATION TO TENDER FOR SUPPLY OF SECURITY SERVICES

The "Poor Rural Communities Support Services Project" ia -poverty alleviation project being
implemented in Regions 2 and 3 of Guyana. The Project comprises five major components
(Technical Service Supply, Community Investment Fund, Credit, Drainage and Irrigation and
Project Coordination and Monitoring), which are implemented utilizing a demand-driven
approach involving the full participation of the beneficiary communities in decision-making in
project activities. The Project is funded by the Government of Guyana (GOG), the ntrirnaih-r.1il
Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and the Cariobean Development Bank (CDB).

The Project is now inviting tenders from -. ilb', '-'.li ible suppliers for the SUPPLY OF
SECURITY SERVICES TO THE DEN AMSTEL PROJECT OFFICE, REGION 3.

Interested suppliers can inspect the Tender Documents at the Office of the Project Manager,
PRCSSP, Den Amstel, West Coast Demerara. (Tel. 276-3017 to 276- 3020). Tender documents
can also be purchased from the Project Manager's Office from 25th February, 2005, for a
non-refundable fee of Four Thousand Dolhars ($4,000).

All tenders must be enclosed in sealed envelopes bearing no identity of the tenderer and must
b:- clearly marked on the top left hand corner, "Tender for Supply of Security Services -
PRCSSP".

I.' tenderers must be accompanied by a valid Income Tax, Compliance and NIS Certificate,
a d must be addressed to:

The Chairman
Ministerial Tender Board
t';nistry of Agriculture
F gent & Vlissengen Roads
Georgetown

' tenders must be deposited in the Tender box located in the Ministry of Agriculture building
,ore 14.00 hrs. on Wednesday 23rd March. 2005

nderers or their representatives may be present at the opening of the tenders which will take
f ;ce immediately after.

Employer reserves the right to accept or to reject any or all tenders without assigning any
son.

F .rmanent Secretary.
r ministry of Agriculture
S, ,Gernneep ads crn tbe ... IJ,. 'L' *1 l'I''" : ". .... ...


\ide a specific example. former
British High Commissioner to
Guyana. Eds ward Glover. during
his tenure here usually hosted
an annual British film festival.
focusing on films either made or
primiiily about. the United
KingLdoml. Usuiall held at Carti
Lodge. the screenings, \cre gen-
erally open to the public and
And recently. Castellani
House the National Art Glil-
ler\ -- has been hosting monthly
screenings ol classic films. from
HI ollwood comedies to French
film n0or. According lto curalor
of C'astellani House. Llfrieda
l3isseciber., the management iof
the gallery had often considered
hosting a film series but the idea
took on as new life after she had
a conversation with al-rtist and
writer Terrence Roberts. Rob-
erts. who writes a regular film
column for Sunday Chronicle.
indicated that he would be more
than willing to help since he
owned a large collection of clas-
sic films. There was an aborted
attempt early last year to start
the series. but after Roberts re-
turned from a trip to Canada
with some more movies, the se-
ries was given the green light,
starting last October.
Like Sidewalk, the films are
usually shown on Tuesday
nights, though earlier in the
evening. So far, Castellani
House has shown five films:
'Cinema Paradiso'; 'A Man and
a Woman'; 'That Man from
Rio'; 'Yesterday, Today and To-
morrow'; and 'Monkey Busi-


ness'. 'The Woman in the Win-
dow' is due to be screened next
month,
Bissember said that the
films shown are not the regular
thing you can catch on the TV.
She said that she doubts that cin-
emais would slihow them ais swell.
\V\e'\ had a really good
turnout from the start." she re-
porl. "Usually 75. 80 people
coiCme every month."
Side\ walk has been a bit less
fortunate. VWith a Imore regular
schedule to follow. however, the
attendance there has dwindled,
particularly due to the recent
flooding.
Hughes said that the stress
of cleaning up Las well as taking
part in relief efforts took a toll
on the attention she could af-
forded to pay on what is essen-
tially a pet project of hers and
her husband's.
The first post-flood movie
night had a zero attendance,
while the second saw about
12 people turning up. The
third night, however, proved a
hit with a relatively large
number of people turning up
to see 'Ray' the bio-pic of leg-
endary American singer, Ray
Charles starring actor/come-
dian Jamie Foxx.
A member of the audience
that night, Trinidadian Nicholas
Laughlin said that currently
there is a popular and growing
film weekly film night in
Trinidad, called Studio Film
Night hosted every Thursday
hv a Rritish artist resident in


Trinidad. Laughlin said that it
was interesting that a similar
concept had developed here.
"I hope", said Hughes,
"that it will build up again
and we're definitely trying
now to go with a wider range
of films ... and we're trying
to include some foreign [non-
American] films. There are a
number of excellent films
that are there and maybe we
can give people the opportu-
nity to be exposed to those
types of movies. There are
the movies that you don't see
in the cinema, movies that
you don't see on TV. The out-
let is always there some of
the embassies have been do-
ing an excellent job: like the
Brazilian."
Recently. Brazilian Ainmbas-
sador. Ney do Prado Dieguez
has been fairly regularly screen-
ing critically acclaimed Brazilian
filins like 'Shattered April'.
'City of God' and 'Bufo and
Spallanzani'. The audience to
these screenings unlike the
ones hosted by Glover is un-
fortunately an invitation only
one, due to the small seating
area at the embassy.
Hughes said that she is
very open to the idea of screen-
ing, at Sidewalk, films that lo-
cal diplomatic missions might
have available.
"Certainly," said Hughes,
"if we can get an opportunity
to share some of their cul-
ture, we would love to be a
nart of that process."


Bg "Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content _

Available from Commercial News Providers"


Sunday Chronicle February 27, 2005


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Sunday Chronice February 27, 2005


wlMUL.
-'1





..........:


pT.


~; **->


1: ~ ,J~
V
--'--r
- ~-


b' ShauniaJemmoi

1T-IT",MiliTi lf c

Sty n-air- -tieel- an reci

pa)i reciil'- nade' up f
absence of the steel pai
petition that is usually
as part of activities t
ebrate Mashramani.
ust a -lew loyal pan
siasts urned up. as soi
steel bands displayed so
what they would have o
al the cancelled annual c
lition this year.


dlr.e-d in heir \arious uni ,oi coloji -lffS a.' ash wh '
re1.0. -_ = 0-. .' -- .. i
1 -,nrs. lheiheid -wer jU ,- re- ,,,.,,ore,. i ,,,i 1 ..
linirig gains vwentl-placd pendenzac .
'ullturer Sm-d errc he hidrinTi SuiB -
;ed an- -.--'ji,-. sup -rir dr iT. im-inii -. i..,' ul I._ li -, e'
ial onil .' 1 2 .Io. e.. rkr." 'i---iejdi pi'.i *". n.5aL.tjnL
I>. I 1h .. .1 I .' ,ih .[ ..I .h. I i. 1.... I.'u e lf \). nln ,ri ,, .. ui ,,ll --.
or the I:'' pounds ol onme-; th "This is ;n' '*pe tin-1
n coni- iih,, dclighllul models of Ca- whe.l 1 really g.. :. diibit mn'
y held ibbean art. s-!elpan quality. -t hear that
:o eel- \L sh. the festival which this thing cano:,e! hke a stab
,ives the greatest meaning to in mv hearr."onrie raner within
enthu- 'Thruary here, was postponed the l'.Pn Re sd .ij dh, l, said4<,-
Me six !bcau;e ol the recent dcvaslia Sulltinday C'hrIl:';!IL'|
omie of ing I'floods that affected llh, The young man,
offered coast. Some of the activities will
omlpe- ino\\ be held on Indepcndeice (PIY'ase turn
Day. May 26. to page XVI)


THE SUGAR INDI STRY Lr'RYLABOI I'L-LUAREFNAD COMiIMITTLE


-.. t (.t,'nliit Drs ,re t '.i 't-u14Lt s bf In .~e '.
. iii. List of maciery and equipment owncere(d by CompanyContract or and copie's of







Certificate of Ownership/Registrationof Bie!eac piece of machinery equipment.
iii. List of machinery and equipment owned by CompanyiContractor and copies of

Certificate of Ownership/Registration of each r piece of machinery oi equipment.
iv. List of key technical and professional personnel available to work on projects
including detailed curriculum vitae of each technical/professional staff.
v. Details of similar works undertaken by the Company/Contractor over the last five
(5) years together with authentic documentation of performance from previous
clients.
vi. Statement of present financial position including present bank balance
certificate, and evidence of accessible credit facilities.
vii. Up-to-date Compliance Certificates from the Guyana Revenue Authority (GRA)
and National Insurance Scheme (NIS)
Letters of Interest must be submitted n a sealed envelope bearing no identification of the
Company/Contractor and marked on the top Ieft hnd corner
"Pre-qualification of C, i~- "'- contractors s for
Selective Tendering (Small Projects)


and be addressed to
Fhe Chairman
The Suga lin-st, L
87D,ike8 ;;7:,--"0


PRINCIPAL CROWN COUNSEL MONTSERRAT ,

Applications are invited from sui ably qualified persons for the post of Principai Cikl,
Counsel, in the British Overseas Territory of Montserrat.

- KEYR, ST I.,,,,.1.. S,- .- .









Advise on all matters, criminal and civil, involving the Government of Montserrat.
Supervise the CrownCounsel in the exerise of his duty the U


Advise G64ernment Departments on ail masters including, b'"'ibol limited
leases, contratts and agreements, land acquisition, legislation reform and impe I
legislation extended to Montserrat by Orders in Council.

Advise on all matters, criminal and civil, involving the Government of Montserrat.

Supervise the Crown Counsel in the exercise of his duty.

Act for the Attorney General in his/her absence.

PERSONNEL SPECIFICATIONS

The applicant should have at least five (5) years experience practicing as an Attorney-at-Law
and should have practised both Criminal and Civil Law.


SALARY


cr f." i1


Basic salary is in the scale R12-8. that is S56.088 $61.800 per annum. In addition.
a package of allowances are also available, to include:

Housing $1.200 per month (for officers recruited fi om overseas)
Legal S4 000 per month
Travel r,00pcrSc700 .' '' '
T,.


tL


Km





wv
own 7


AMIR






Sunday Chronicle February 27, 2005


(From page XV)


Colgrain Whyte said that
even though some people
have lost interest in partici-
pating in the competition it-
self, it is an event many oth-
ers look forward to in the
second month of each year.
Many of the bands are made
up of at least 15, and more than
10 bands participate in the
competition the Chronicle un-
derstands. Years back, a large
band was one consisting of 40
members. One consisting of 15
members is now considered big.
"Over the years steelpan
has really deteriorated... it's a
shame to see where steelpan is
today," the young man said.
He painted a very sad pic-
ture of where pan music is head-
ing, and is appealing to the busi-
ness community to reach out
and assist.
One manager of another
band said the calling off of the
event can affect the life of pan
in this land.
Ivan Chapman of Pan
Groove told the Sunday
Chronicle that he would have
been more satisfied if the
competition, like Mash fest.
had been pushed back, or was
allowed to go on just like
some of the other competi-
tions.
His band, which had won
the senior band competition last
year, has grown even stronger


and was ready to defend the
title this year. More than 30
members practised daily on Pan
Groove just to be ready for the
2005 competition he said.
At the concert, just 17 of
them played.
"We are disappointed... We
still had the calypso finals and
so on," he stated, but added that
his band will not come off of
the pan scene in a hurry.
Pan Wave Steel Orchestra is
made up of some 15 ex-students
of St. Gabriel's Primary. The
members, all teenagers, have
been preparing for this year's
competition since the first day
after last year's.
They practised for about
four hours on Mondays, Wednes-
days and Fridays of every week,
and for the past month, have be-
ing doing so daily.
Pan Wave participated in
the competition for the first
time last year and placed second
in the school band category.
Two weeks ago the sttu-
dents were informed that this
year's competition was called
off.
One of those manning their
band told Chronicle that they\
had to be comforted.
"They were practically in
tears when they heard it was
called off... they were going ev-
cry single afternoon from 3pm
to 7pm. and they still have the


spirit," he said.
Now the girls and boys in
that band are adding even more
to the additional pan skills they
have acquired in order to come
stronger and cop the first prize
next year.
Pan Wave is the junior form
of the Park Side steel orchestra,
a senior band whose members
are equally upset by the cancel-
lation, Charles Gillis told the
Chronicle.
The Republicans, consisting
of mainly men who are serving
prison sentences, was also out
performing for the audience.
The band's manager, a
prison officer who preferred
only to be called Henry, said the
inmates have been rehearsing
daily for at least one hour, and
were ready for competition once
again.
They placed second in the
open steel band category last
year. and preparation for next
year's battle is now on the
cards.
The band is made up of 11
members. but only six were
taken to the downtown event
last Monday.
The Queens College
steel orchestra was second on
the evening's programme
and they performed before a
small audience. They played
just after the band manned by
the Guyana Police Force.


The ERC You


Monitor and review all legislation and all administrative
acts or omissions relating to or having implications for ethnic
relations and equal opportunities and, from time to time,
prepare and submit proposals for revision of such legislation
and administrative acts and omissions;

Immediately report to the National Assembly and to all rel-
evant authorities any proposed legislation, which the Commission
thinks, may be contrary to the constitutional provision relating to
ethnicity:


(IWE R*


,htic rI


0
C,)


CoJhiS;


Promote equal access by persons of all ethnic groups to all public or other services and
facilities provided by the Government or other bodies;
Promote and encourage the acceptance and respect by all segments of the society of the
society identity and cultural inheritance of all ethnic groups;

Promote co-operation between all bodies concerned with the fostering of harmonious ethnic
relations:

Investigate on its own accord or on request of the National Assembly or any other body, any
issue affecting ethnic relations:
Identify and analyse factors inhibiting the attainment of harmonious relations between among
ethnic groups, particularly barriers to the participation of any ethnic group in social. economic,
commercial, financial, cultural and political endeavors and recommend to the National Assembly
and other relevant public or private sector bodies how these factors should be overcome;

Monitor and report to the National Assembly on the status and success of implemen-
tation of its recommendations.



7_ -_-
KOUIDNUU i


. Today we will be looking at some natural disasters that have been
occurring in the world some quite recent affecting livelihood and
their results.


A F D B V C N R L L A N D

W L T N S Y O A O E I R C O


e you

betv.' n

th. ac.- of

18 to 45 years

with a
for Succ'ss?


Suitably motivated and disciplined young men and women
are invited to fill vacancies in a newly established elite
Security Enterprise in the position of:

Security Officer/Supervisors
The applicant must:
* be in possession of three GCE/CXC passes, one of
which must be English Language or equivalent.

* possess a clean criminal record and, if selected for
training, provide a Certificate of Good Character issued
by the Police in the last three months.


+ be prepared to undergo a programme of training, if
selected, to equip himself/herself with the necessary
expertise to allow effective job performance.

+ provide two testimonials with telephone numbers of
e 're referees.
i .ted. Previous service in the military or law enforcement will be
an asset.
Let's 1 kl
Benefits:
Attractive remuneration packages.
Professional development in ancillary disciplines.
Finest law enforcement and developmental training,
Medical & Pension Schemes,

Applicants are requested to submit documents to:
The Corporate Secretary
P.O. Box 10530
Georgetown
I ------ ---- ------------


O E U

E 0 A

Y A 0

S N R

VE U 0

S R M


I C N I L N 1 E A SO

L D N O O C C SM H L

T S A I W N A R O D F


T
T


H T L 0 S O N S R L

A E C W T T 'E 0 1 E


SH H R S A N O G E G


M E D M T Q R P A V H R S S

E A S L E E U C A T E E M R

R G A A D R I A E T G S E S

K E A N E R H N K U T L N D

H C U R R S I E A E I E E I

I H I U I N I L A E S A R A

T K H S G M P D F T D L I N

F A M I N E S T S E D 1 L S


AID RELIEF
CYCLONE
DEAD/SICK
DISEASES
EARTHQUAKES
EROSION
FAMINE
FLOOD
HIA L/STORM
HEAL-TH CONCERN
l,.,llURRlC4Nl.S.,
LAND/SLIDES
LIGHTENING
MIRAGE


PLAGUES
RADIATION
RAIN/STORN
SNOW/STORMS
SUMMER/HEAT


Page XVI


THUNDERSTORMS
TIDAL/WAVES
VOLCANOES
WEATHER PATTERN
YOUNG/OLD


CORRECT SOLUTYl,,
*u 11i ^t-HBB






Sunday Chronicle February 27, 2005


Page XVII


Continued
PREPARATION FOR
MARKET

CLEANING
Watermelon should -be
picked when the fruit surface is
dry. Any adhering soil in the
ground spot area or other sur-
face stains should be removed at
the time of harvest with a soft
cloth or cotton.gloves. Water-
melons are usually not washed.
However, if washing is required
to remove excess soil or to en-
hance the appearance for a par-
ticular market, the-wash water
should be clean and properly
sanitized to reduce the potential
for spread of disease. Sodium
hypochlorite (household bleach)
is commonly used since it is an
inexpensive and readily avail-
able wash water sanitizing
agent. It is effective against de-
cay organisms when added to
the wash water at a concentra-
tion of 150 ppm and a water pH
of 6.5. This is equal to 2 oz of
household bleach (such as
Marvex) per 5 gallons of water,
or .3 liters of bleach per 100 li-
ters of water. As the wash wa-
ter becomes contaminated with
soil and organic matter, the sani-
tizing ability of the hypochlor-
ous acid is diminished. There-
fore, the wash water tank
should be changed when neces-
sary and filled with clean water
with 150 ppm hypochlorous
acid.

GRADING
Watermelons are graded ac-
cording to external appearance.
Fruit shape should be sym-
metrical and uniform in size
within the same container. The
surface should be clean, bright,
and waxy. There should be an
absence of scars, bruising, sun-
burn, transit abrasions, decay, or
other surface defects. Watermel-
ons destined for export must
meet the quality standards es-
tablished by the receiver. Typi-
cally, the fruit are more carefully
inspected than those intended
to be arketed domestically.
Freight costs constitute the
greatest single expense when
shipping to an offshore market
and it is critical that all fruit of
inferior quality be excluded
from the shipment. Also, the
presence of disease, insects, or
soil can result in failure to meet
phytosanitary requirements at
the destination and lead to re-
jection of the entire shipment.
Inspection areas should
be kept clean and surfaces
should be disinfected periodi-
cally with chlorine solutions
to reduce the risk of spread-
ing pathogens. A simple con-
veyor belt can be utilized to
transport the watermelons in
a single row past workers who
can examine each fruit indi-
vidually before they are
placed in shipping contain-
ers. If the inspection is done
on a stationary table, the sur-
face should be covered with
carpet or some other mate-
rial that will'pre'vent scratch-


ing of the fruit surface. In ad-
dition to the external appear-
ance, randomly selected fruit
should be cut open and
checked for internal quality.
The edible flesh should have
a high sugar content (mini-
mum of 10% soluble solids),
a deep red color, and a pleas-
ant crisp texture. These qual-
ity characteristics are depen-
dent on fruit maturity, culti-
var, and postharvest care.

PACKING
Watermelons may be loaded
directly from the field into the
bed of a truck or trailer and
transported to market. This is
essentially a form of field pack-
ing. Watermelons destined for
export are generally taken in
bulk from the field to a collec-
tion site for grading and pack-
ing. Workers should unload the
fruit with care and place them
on a packing table where other
workers sort them into more
precise size groups and pack
them. Table surfaces should be
covered with a nonabrasive ma-
terial, such as carpet, to help
avoid scratching the fruit. Large
packing operations can improve
packing efficiency and increase
product throughput by using a
conveyor belt to move the fruit
past stationary workers trained
in grading and packing. Water-
melons packed for export should
be put in strong double-walled
corrugated cartons containing
from three to five watermelons.
depending on fruit size and
shape. The cartons typically
weigh between 25 to 35 kg (55
to 77 lb). Since watermelon fruit
are so heavy, inserts should be
used inside the carton to help
support the weight. Smaller
sized round fruit may be packed
6 to 8 fruit per carton. The car-
tons should be stacked properly
to permit adequate air flow
through the load during trans-
port.

TEMPERATURE
MANAGEMENT
The optimum temperature
for storage and transport of wa-
termelon is 10C
(50F).Watermelons should not
be held at temperatures below
10C because they are suscep-
tible to chilling injury. Market
life is up to 21 days at 100C.
With increasing storage tem-
perature, market life is dimin-
ished and the fruit lose their
sweetness. Watermelon market
life is usually 14 days at 15C
(59F). Watermelons held at
ambient temperatures of around
290C (85 F) should be marketed
promptly, as quality declines
quickly. If they don't succumb
to decay, watermelons held for
more than 2 weeks at ambient
temperature will have poor fla-
vor and the texture will lose its
crispness.

RELATIVE HUMIDITY
Watermelons should be held
at 90-95% relative humidity
' (RH). Storage at low RH will


result in shriveling of the rind
and a loss of external shine. Me-
chanical injuries incurred during
harvesting and handling become
more noticeable at a low RH.


PRINCIPAL
POSTHARVEST DISEASES
Postharvest diseases are im-
portant sources of postharvest
loss of watermelons in Guyana.
The amount of disease pressure
depends on cultural practices
used during production and the
local climatic conditions at har-
vest. Disease pressure is greater
in areas with high rainfall and
humidity during production and
harvest. A number of pathogens
may cause postharvest decay of
watermelon. The primary de-
fense against 'the occurrence of
decay is the exclusion of dis-
eased fruit from the marketing
chain through careful selection
at harvest and appropriate grad-
ing before shipment. Also. hold-
ing the fruit at 100C (50F) will
slow the rate of disease devel-
opment, compared to ambient
temperature storage. There are
no postharvest fungicide treat-
ments for watermelon.Common
fungal diseases that cause rind
decay after harvest include black
rot, anthracnose, Phytophthora
fruit rot, Fusarium, and stem-
end rot. The most
commonpostharvest bacterial
disease is soft rot.

BLACK ROT
Black rot, also known as
gummy stem blight, is caused by
the fungus Didymella bryoniae.
Fruit lesions appear as small
water-soaked areas and are
nearly circular in shape. They
rapidly enlarge to an indefinite
size, up to 10 cm to 15 cm (4-6
inches) in diameter. Mature le-
sions are sunken, may show aI
pattern of concentric rings, and
turn black. Lesions in stems and
fruit may ooze or bleed an am-
ber plant fluid, hence the name
gummy stem blight. A brown
streak may also appear at the
blossom end of the fruit. The
pathogen is transmitted from
contaminated seed and is spread
from plant to plant by
splashing rain or wind. In-
oculum is also found on old
plant debris. The disease is con-
trolled by planting clean seed in
soils free of watermelon crop
debris.

ANTHRACNOSE
Anthracnose, caused by the
fungus Colletotrichumn
orbiculare, is a common
postharvest watermelon dis-
ease. Dormant infections may
exist at the time of harvest, with
no external evidence of the dis-
ease. During storage, the latent
infections may become active at
high temperatures or after expo-
sure to chilling injury inducing
conditions. Disease develop-
ment is rapid at temperatures
between 20C to 300C (68F to
860F). The fungus can penetrate
the fruit surface and wounding
is not necessary for infection.


Symptoms of anthracnose in-
clude sunken spots on the rind,
which eventual become black.
Red or orange colored spores
may appear in the decayed ar-
eas. Anthracnose spores are
spread by water, insects, or
pickers' hands. Infection is par-
ticularly severe after prolonged
wet periods. A combination of
seed treatment, crop rotation,
removal of infected debris, and
fungicide applications are neces-
sary for controlling this disease.
Protective spray applications of
the fungicide chlorothalonil
should be made when vines
start to run and should be con-
tinued at 7 to 10 day intervals
during periods of humid or rainy
weather. Also, storage of the
fruit at 10C (50F ) will retard
the growth of this fungus.

PHYTOPHTHORA
FRUIT ROT
Phytophthora fruit rot is
caused by the soil-borne fungus.


NOTICE OF


Phytophthora capsici. The fruit
rot will appear as greasy
blotches on the outer rind. A
whitish mold is likely to be
present on the greasy tissue.
This disease is most likely to
occur during or after periods of
excessive rains where water re-
mained in the field. Control of
Phytophtlhora may be obtained
by avoiding planting in low ar-
eas. In addition, foliar sprays of
the systemic fungicide Ridomil
provide some protection against
this disease.

FUSARIUM
Fusarium is a soil-borne
fungus that attacks the roots,
stems, and fruit of watermelons.
The fungus can attack both
sound., and wounded tissue.
Fruit symptoms first appear as
spots-on the underside of the
fruit, and eventually spread to
the upper surface. Infected tis-
sue is usually spongy or corky.
Under humid conditions, the


fruit may become covered with
a white or pinkish mold (Figure
9). Decay may be shallow or it
may extend deep into the flesh
of the fruit. There is usually a
sharp separation between
healthy and rotted
tissue. The temperature
range that favors Fusarium
growth is 22 to 29C (72F to
84F). Use of resistant variet-
ies can minimize the risk of
Fusarium. Rotating the
planting site and removing
and destroying all plant de-
bris at the end of each grow-
ing season will also reduce
the incidence of the disease.
For watermelon, a minimum
eight-year planting site rotation
is recommended to avoid
Fusarium. This disease may
also be spread by planting pre-
viously saved seed that came
from contaminated fruit.
TO BE CONTINUED


LECTURES


GPHC in collaboration with Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Centre present
CME Lectures:


Date:
Topic:








Time:

Date:
Topic:






Time:


Friday February 25, 2005
Imaging of the colon and its interpretations.
Learning Objectives:
(a) To describe neoplastic, as well as non neoplastic
diseases of the colon.
(b) Understand the role of the different imaging
modalities.
(c) Describe novel future applications.
18:00 hrs

Wednesday March'2, 2005
3-D Reconstructions with multislice CT Scanning.
Learning Objectives:
(a) To describe the capabilities of multi-slice CT.
(b) Understand the fundamentals of 3-D reconstructions.
(c) Describe possible clinical applications of 3-D
imaging.
18:00 hrs


Presenter: Dr. Jacob Sosna
Attending Radiologist, Department of Radiology,
Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Centre,
Jerusalem


Venue:


Eye Clinic Waiting Area, Georgetown Public
Hospital Corporation

1CME Credit will be awarded for each Lecture


Dr. Madan Rambaran
Director, Medical & Professional Services
Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation


-, GEORGETOWN PUBLIC

We Care HOSPITAL CORPORATION


i


.1/pno.1 S-np P






Sunday Chronicle February 27, 2005
s,


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-- Copyrighted Material -



T --:. Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers"


- ____


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a -d


Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the
position of Finance/Administrative Officer at the Upper Corentyne
Fisherman's Coop Society (UCFCS), No. 66 Village, Corentyne,
Berbice.

Finance/Administrative Officer:

Under the supervision of the Management Committee, the
Finance/Administrative Officer will be responsible for developing,
implementing and coordinating initiatives of the UCFCS Strategic
Plan (2005-2007). The successful applicant will also be expected to
strengthen and support existing initiatives and where necessary
develop new ones that support the overall sustainability of the
organisation. The incumbent will be based at No. 66 Village,
Corentyne, Berbice and will be required to travel both around the
Corentyne area and elsewhere.

Requirements:

Tertiary level education in Management, Accounts, Finance,
Development Planning or a related field with a minimum of
3 years working experience at a Non Governmental
Organisation or
5 years senior level experience at a Non Governmental
Organisation
Strong inter-personal skills
Working knowledge of the Corentyne area would be an asset
Computer literate

Gender and Equity: Qualified And eligible women candidates and
those from disadvantaged backgrounds are strongly encouraged to
apply.

Applications clearly marked Finance/Administrative Officer should
be submitted on or before February 28,2005 to either:


The Upper Corentyne Fisherman's Coop Society
No.66 Village, Corentyne, Berbice
Or
The Upper Corentyne Fisherman's Coop Society
c/o CHFpartners in rural development
26 Lamaha & Irving Streets, Queenstown
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wPge-I


EVERI practising ieteri-
narian would hale been con-
fronted b\ clients who shier TH E VE T
in fear as the) present their lIE VETl
pets who the. believe are suf- "'
fering from cancer. Some are
reluctant even to mention the
word. They call it the "Big C'
or just simply a "'growth". It
takes some effort firstly to
placate the owner and as- Carcinomas. Sarcomnj or LM-in
suage the terror, before actu- phomas depending upon the cell
ally administering to the pet. ipei Cancer., inade and de-
Yet. so often, the "lump' or -tro%. The tend to spread :. i
swelling has nothing to do the bloodstream and Ilmphainc
with cancer. Today we'll be- system to disi.tni paris ot the
gin a series of articles on the bod\. Thi is called
subject. I have relied heavily measiasisng.
on texts from Drs Giffin and Cancer is graded accord-
Carlson in their Handbook ingl. to its degree of malig-
for pet owners. nanc.s Lo%-grade cancers con-
Most people associate the tnue to grow Iocall, and attin
%Aord 'lumour' with a growth a large size TheN meitatai;se
occumng on the skin or some- late in the course of the illness
,here inside the bodN. How- High-grade cancers nmeiataasise
ever. an\ sort of lump. bump. earl %hen the pnmnarN focus is
growth or swelling such as an still quite small or barely deteci-
abscessi is a Tumour Those able
w which are true growths are Cancers are approached in
called Neoplasms the following manner- Suppose
Benign neuplasms are a female dog has a lump in her
growths whichc h do not invade breast Since it is solid. it is.
and destroy) nor do the, spread probablN a neoplas-m. It could
rapidly. and onconirollablh be benign or malignant Thede-
The\ are cured b% surgical re- cision is made to biopsy the
moval, provided that all the tu- lump. This is a surgical opera-
mour has been removed. tion during which the lump, or
Malignant neoplasms are a part of the lump, is removed
the same as Cancers (also called and sent to the pathologist. A


p.iihologst, is a medical doctor
who has been trained to ni.tke a
diagnosis b% tual inspeciion
ol iit;sue under a iincroscope
An e\penrenced patiihlogil c.in
tell whether r ithe tiniiour I- .1
cancer HFie can often pro% ide ad-
ditional intornmation as to the
degree ul malignancN This
s.eres the purpose ol making
the diagnosis and in many
cases, gi\es- the rationale for the
niost appropriate irealnent
Net\l eck e will continue
thi- topic
Please implement disease
preentative measures (%acci-
nations,. routine deuormings.
monthly anti-Heartwormn
medication. edc) and adopt-a-
pet from the GSPCA's Ani-
mal Clinic and Shelter at
Robb Street and Orange
Walk. if vou ha'e the where-
withal to care for the ani-
mals. Also, find out more
about the Society's free spay
and neutering programme by
calling 226-4237.
-.

,- .d4. 0 ,


Friends of Trek Force.


* *-~-


-I
.-, ,











BLACK PERFORMERS...

(From page XX)
nated for roles as a pimp in 'Street Smart', a chauffeur 'Driving Miss Daisy' and a
prison inmate in 'The Shawshank Redemption'.
The lone minority actress up for an Oscar this year is the previously unknown Sandino,
making her feature film debut as a drug mule in the Spanish-language drama 'Maria Full of
Grace'.
Racial diversity has been slow in coming to the Oscars.
It took 10 years after McDaniel's triumph for a second black performer even to be nominated -
Ethel Waters for the 1949 racial dranta 'Pinky'- and nearly a quarter century for Poitier to win his
landmark Oscar for 'Lilies of the Field'.
Only six Oscars have gone to black actors since then, and oi more than three had been nomi-
nated at once before now.
Part of that is a function of limited opportunities in Hollywood for blacks, who were
long been relegated to clownish parts in comedies or to ineiii.il and criminal roles in dra-
mas.
Blacks have also fared far worse behind the camera at the Academy Awards. Only one,
John Singleton, has been nominated as best director, for 'Bo 3 N Ilie Hood' in 1991.


CHAMPION


Cookery Corner
cll r%*


,. Welcome to the 334"'edition of
"Champion Cookery Corner", a
S" weekly feature giving recipes an
tips on cooking in Guyana.



Hailing from Holland, this mellow, savory cheese has a pale yellow interior with a red or
paraffin coating (the yellow is more common in Holland). It's made from part xkimmed ti
percent milk fit) and comes in spheres that can weigh anywhere from I to 4 pounds. Ed
second only to Gouda as Holland's most exported cheese, It's a great all-purpose cl
especially good when served with dark beer.


This is a Dutch ("aribbean recipe that would
be great as an appetizer or snack! Use a
combination of the sharp cheese and some
i Gouda or Edam cheese for a more Authentic
Dutch Caribbean i1 %,W'i'i 'ienp hini ,ii h.ides
time for dough to, -:i I Iourl .i'. linite is


2 eggs
I tsp Champion Baking Powder
2 cups flour
GCarlic powder to taste
I tbsp chopped onion


estimate on how !.n; ... I ,h,,:e t-,.ill ioks Finely grate cheese. Add remiainirrg
inoil. ingredients. Knead dough and cover with
*' .... (ladamp cloth for I hour. Shape into small balls.
la fIrpiheddarcht st 1 P' 'I".'.Dr'b iM tdPey. h6otoi' 1^ 9 ,* ,,I, ,.
'/2 lb Edanm cheese s.itsijp j W- iv'p'at:awds Ser. c t


SKeshi Yena (Netherlands Antilles Stuffed Cheese) |


d tI small Edam cheese
Sloi natoes, chopped and peeled
2 onions, sliced
S clove garo li, minced
I bell pepper, chopped
I14 cup sliced olives
yelloww I tablespoon capers
Ok (40 I tablespoon parsley
riaft i8 habancro chile, seeds & stem renoved.w niinicd
cheese, %, cup raisins
I tablespoon tomato paste
2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
2 tablespoons ketchup
2 tablespoons mustard .
2 pounds shredded chicken or minced bIeei'
1/2 cup vegetable oil
S eggs


Salt and ( ,,,' HlA a. Pepper to taste
Slice the lop of1 t1h1 cheese and preserve. GIcntly
scoop out the inside leaving a 1 :4 to 1,2 inch shell.
The cheese, should resemble a holloNsed out
pumpkin. In a lair .skillet, saute the vegetlablcs.
seasonings and 'mniat in the vegetable oil; simnimer
lor about 20 iitttes, .Beat 4 eggs and stir into the
mixture. Spoon into the cheese shell. replace the,
top and spread remaining beaten egg on top to seal...,
irease.I, I.,-il-. I i, i dI1, 1.i- a:tnd Fill it w ith about I ',,
inch of water r i il,... I in the dish and bake, .
for I to 1 1l2 hoLti's at 350 degrees F. The cheese
will expand and flatten -ii J-il. but keep its ',.,-.
I I..' L SI I ,' 1 tll' 1 l s
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Baking IPowder xg


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