Title: Guyana chronicle
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088915/00006
 Material Information
Title: Guyana chronicle
Alternate Title: Sunday chronicle
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 45 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.,
Guyana National Newspaper Ltd.
Place of Publication: Georgetown Guyana
Publication Date: February 20, 2005
Copyright Date: 2005
Frequency: daily[nov. 21, 1983-]
daily (except monday)[ former dec. 1, 1975-nov. 30, 1983]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Georgetown (Guyana)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Guyana
Guyana -- Georgetown
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1 (Dec. 1, 1975)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Publication suspended: Oct. 12-24, 1983.
General Note: Sunday ed. published as: Sunday chronicle.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00088915
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 29013105
lccn - sn 93049190
 Related Items
Preceded by: Guyana graphic

Full Text

-e '~~


The Chranicle is at litiwww.guyanachron iete.csm


A TICKET TO YOUR
DREAMS!
RESULTS HOTLINE 225-8902


I. T'aS iIIi-F I~ill


Availa


S"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content U


w Ia I


ble from Commercial News Providers"'


GUYANA MILESTONE: President Bharrat Jagdeo, other CARICOM heads of government and representatives, Chile
President Ricardo Lagos, seventh from left and Japanese envoy Tatsuo Arima, left, outside the new CARICOM
Secretariat yesterday. (Mike Norville photo)


HUTTON ARCHER RiE'TMEMBil'T


~- )..-.- -~
~4i ~


A


m -


For Brand Name Cosmetics by
VARY KAY, COVER GIRL, MAYBELLINE, NEUTROGENA and SACHA
Also a wide range of Stationery, Novels and Cards





2 SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 20, 2005


I


want to commend my country-
men and women for their cour-
age and pledge that everything
is being done to bring life back
to normalcy", Mr. Jagdeo said
Current CARICOM Chair-
man, Suriname President Ronald
Runaldo Venetiaan, expressing
sympathies to Guyana on the
floods, said it was important to
continue to monitor the situa-
tion here and to help Guyana
recover from the disaster.
Jamaica Prime Minister P.J.
Patterson said Guyana and


Grenada deserve "not only our
prayers" but "our full and tan-
gible support".
Other leaders flying here
for the opening from their
half-yearly summit in the
Suriname capital
Paramaribo were Trinidad
and Tobago Prime Minister
Patrick Manning, Barbados
Prime Minister Owen Arthur,
Antigua and Barbuda Prime
(Please turn
to centre pages)


By Sharief Khan
DARK clouds and rain were
a grim reminder yesterday of
the disastrous floods that last
month swept dozens of
coastal communities but
Guyana. faced with a mam-
moth rebuilding and recovery
programme, took a breather
to register its strong commit-
ment to forging a wider re-
gional community.
With evidence of the worst
natural disaster in this country
still stark in the watermark of
several feet on fences along the
road south to the site, and as rain
clouds gathered. President

'*ROSE BUD
, t' t C' C F, R k A
DAILY MENU

I Peas & Rice
% Salt Fish Stew
' Fresh Salad


$395
Fre a Pend


Bharrat Jagdeo formally handed
over the new secretariat complex
at Liliendaal. Greater
Georgetown, to the Caribbean
Community. (CARICOM).
Seven other CARICOM
heads of government. visiting
Chilean President Ricardo Lagos
and a special envoy of the Japa-
nese Government and others in
the packed marquee on the
forecourt of the spanking new
secretariat headquarters rose to
applaud the moment, a mile-
stone for regional integration
and a testimony to this
country's commitment to the
cause.
"This is indeed a proud mo-
ment for all Guyanese, espe-
cially for me, as it represents the
fulfilling of a promise made
more than 30 years ago when
the regional integration process
began", host President Jagdeo
told the gathering.
"The event must certainly
rank among the more significant
occasions in the life of our inte-
gration movement", he added.
Liliendaal is among the vil-
lages on the East Coast
Demerara hardest hit by the
floods spawned by the heaviest
rains here in more than 100
years and there was little pomp
and ceremony for the two-hour
inauguration proceedings.
African and Indian drum-
ming combined in infectious
background beats before and af-
ter the formalities and the


Guyana Police Force band
dished out a medley of Carib-
bean tunes in a short break in
the proceedings.
But that was it and the
rains came shortly after Mr.
Jagdeo announced, "...it gives
mle great pleasure in the name otf
the people of Guyana, to hand
over this headquarters building
to the people of CARICOM."-
The secretariat site was
spared the brunt of the flood
waters last month but diplomats
and other residents in adjoining
areas were not so fortunate and
many had to abandon bottom
flats and even houses as the wa-
ters rose.
United Nations and other
officials have estimated that
some 300.000 might have been
affected in the flood that led the
Guyana Government to declare
disaster zones in three coastal
regions.
Mr. Jagdeo noted that the
event was planned some time
ago "and in spite of the floods
we decided to go ahead."


"If there is any short-
coming we ask for your un-
derstanding. Nevertheless, 1
think that you will agree with
me that those who were in-
volved in the preparation of
the building and this cer-
emony have done an excel-
lent job. I wish to thank them
for their contribution", lie
added to applatse----.
NEVER FAR FROM
THE FORE
The floods and other re-
gional disasters, including the
devastation of Grenada by Hur-
ricane Ivan last September. were
never far from the fore yester-
day.
"1 wish to convey the grati-
tude of the Guyanese people to
those many friends within and
beyond the region who offered
assistance to Guyana during the
recent flood disaster. For several
weeks many Guyanese experi-
enced great difficulties but they
showed great courage and resil-
ience in overcoming these. I


The new


secretariat
CONSTRUCTED at an estimated cost of US$8M, with
approximately US$4M in grant assistance from Japan, the
headquarter complex is a main centre and an
-atncillary building located in Liliendaal on the eastern
outskirts ot e.eo"ge.u...;..
It includes parking areas that form anrinter-linked
driveway to accommodate some 300 cars.
Colin Cumberbatch, Project Officer (Administrative
Services) of the secretariat, said the entire main building is
characterized by a dark reflective glass facade, designed to
minimise the transmission of direct sunlight into the fully air-
conditioned and carpeted structure that boasts a significant
amount of modem modular partitions and furniture.
Built by the contracting firm of S.A.Nabi & Sons Limited
in association with Newel Lewis Broadbridge Associates, the
headquarter complex will also house an Information and
Documentation Centre that is intended to serve as an
information base for both the secretariat staff and the regional
public.
Contractual obligations required by the Guyana
Government are to be met in time for official staff
occupation by June this year.


VACANCY

MICROBIOLOGIST

A dynamic Manufacturing Organisation is
looking to recruit a Microbiologist.

Applicants should possess at least a Degree
in food and Water Microbiology or
equivalent and two (2) years experience in a
food Industry.

We offer an attractive salary & benefits
package.

Interested persons should apply before
March 12, 2005 to:

Human Resources Department
P.O. Box 10510
Georgetown


MILESTONE MOMENT: Suriname President Ronald Venetiaan and CARICOM Secretary General Edwin Carrington, with
President Jagdeo and Antigua and Barbuda Prime Minister Baldwin Spencer, second from right, at the unveiling of the
secretariat plaque. (Winston Oudkerk photo)


Mrv
IMllVde4


FREE TICKET 2005-02-19
LETTER .. BOUS ... ALL
BOl B
*M (1) ....r) 2) 2)!2


w RESULTS

DRAW DATE 2005-02-19

BIG-D MID-D LITTLE-D

010 591 960


&2Dia&lyn$


MONDAY


20


RESULTS
05-02-14 14 03 19 21 17


TUESDAY 2005-02-15 09 03 23 11 05
WEDNESDAY 2005-02-16 04 05 03 15 21
THURSDAY 2005-02-17 24 14 21 12 17
FRIDAY 2005-02-18 09 03 05 23 04
-ATIrinnAv 2405-02-19- ,, -.. ,






SIIlAVCHROfNICLEF.Fohruarv. 20,2005


Presidents Jagdeo, Lagos meet


PRESIDENTS Bharrat Jagdeo
and Ricardo Lagos Escobar greet
each other yesterday afternoon
at the Office of the President
where the Guyanese leader
hosted a meeting.
The Chilean President ar-
rived in Guyana Friday after-
noon for a State visit.
One of the issues President
Lagos was expected to raise
with President Jagdeo and other
CARICOM Leaders is support
for Chile's Interior Minister
Jose Miguel Insulza's candidacy
for the post of Secretary-Gen-
eral of the Organisation of
American States, the Govern-
ment Information Agency said.
The other candidates for this
post are the Mexican Foreign Sec-
retary Luis Derbez and formnner El
Salvador President Francisco
Flores. Recently. the fonner El Sal-
vador President was in Guyana and
met President Jagdeo.
Chile was one of the coun-
tries that responded to.
Guyana's natural disaster by
supplying foodstuff. Chile also
assisted Ecuador in bringing re-
lief items to Guyana.
The Chilean President
leaves Guyana today.


, fPrye


WORLD Day of Prayer is to be observed on March 4 under
the theme 'Let our Light Shine'.
The Worship Service is written by the women of the World
Day of Prayer Committee of Poland and adapted by the Guyana
World Day of Prayer Committee.
World Day of Prayer is a global ecumenical movement of women
of many traditions in more than 170 countries and regions who have
a continuing relationship in prayer and service. This brings them in
closer fellowship, understanding and action throughout the year.
The service in Georgetown will be held at St. Andrew's Kirk,
Brickdam and Avenue of the Republic at 17:00 hrs.
Services will also be held in New Amsterdam, Corriverton, West
Coast Berbice, East Coast Demerara (Beterverwagting), East Bank
Demerara (Grove). West Coast Demerara, Linden, Bartica and the
Fssequibo Coast.
On Sunday March 6, there will be a service for children at Cal-
vary Lutheran Church, Alexander Street and North Road,
Georgetown, at 15:00 hrs.
An invitation is extended to all.


2Beea

tomorrow


Canafdian ImmiHration
Paperwork
We assist with the paperwork
Cost: $6 000 for full package
and consultation is v '.'
Contact: 227-33391623-1195


(GINA) THE 2005 National Budget will be presented
in Parliament tomorrow under the theme 'Confront-
ing Challenges Sustaining Growth and Develop-
ment'.
Minister of Finance, Saisnarine Kowlessar told Govern-
ment Information Agency (GINA) yesterday that the budget
will be the largest in Guyana's history and promises to pro-
mote long- and short-term measures to ensure growth and de-
velopment.
He said that plans are also on stream to prepare a supplementary
budget by mid-year.
The recent disastrous flood delayed the budget presenta-
tion which was scheduled for January 24, 2005. The budget
presentation will still be within the constitutional time frame
of March 3.


ILive & work in the USA.1
|Family application:
$4000


Need An Employee?
Guyana Employment Agency
provides top
employees with a broad
range of skills in a
variety of fields.
Con atet: 227-3339


QuaAfy 1 4e Y "Mm

InternmatIlouEdly Uecgmiized
.Diplomi In Co-pwter Stuweles
Foundation Courses ($3000 each)
Windows, Internet Explorer.
AdIvance Courses ($ 5000 each)
Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint 2000/XP
Diploma in Computerized Accounting
1. Service Business Accounting with Excel $ 5000
2. Merchandising Accounting with Excel $ 5000
3. QuickBooks $7000 4. Peachtree $7000
Diploma in Computer Repairs & Networking
1. Hardware 2. Software & Networking $12000 each.
Diploma in Desktop Publishing & Webpage Design.
1. PoweiPoint-$5000 2.CorelDrcw-$7000 3.Webpage Design $7000
** Courses Begin Feb. 22, 26 Mar. 1 & 2**


Time: Part-Time: Mon to Fri. 5 to 7 pm
Full-Time: Mon to Thurs. 9 am to 4 pm


C.


a "-,


Diisiei nrn


Deserves Genuine

Cummins Parts

AND FLEETGUARD FILTERS


~.


PIee~uarfl


S. .15


FOR GENUINE CUMMINS PARTS
AND FLEETGUARD FILTERS


; ", --r

SAfLES & SERVICE

;LOT 1 PUBLIC ROAD, ECGLES,E ,.E; T;.TI.-:.2.33-4.96/233-2498 FAX: 233-2499 E-mail swiss(anetworksgy.com .
, T' c "". 7'7 Ti' .'." ,,A' t .'."t 't-Vt ,,. L. Lt A L'AA .. A .', ..,c.,x* V'A,'1 Tc Vv -A. A


MU U T n ulII,ru lcty4u -V ,


I


I


at




4 SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 20, 2005


Hlzboll


tells Lebane


to cool anti-Syria line


. f


-eu-,


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Conteit

Available from Commercial News Providers"
Ia%#* *9%L ts* -ftesm % ** * n4y"

Iraqi ShiItes mark holy day


MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
EXTENSION OF CLOSING DATE
Education For All-Fast Track Initiative (EFA/FTI)
Grant No. 053679
ICB-POPSB/0010/004
PRINTING OF PRIMARY SCHOOL TEXT BOOKS
The closing date for the submission of tenders for
the above mentioned bid originally scheduled for
9:00 a.m. on February 22nd, 2005 has now been
extended to 9:00a.m. on March 15th 2005.


Pulandar Kandhi
Permanent Secretary


Government ads can be viewed on
http://www.gina.gov.gy


a -,d 4b


-


- -


-w - ~ -
~


.. .- 4
0"404


- - ~- -


4p -0 mm




SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 20, 2005


Investors bet on Silicon 4


Border in


exico


Paraguay to fight l.

'doat';Copyrighted Material


Sy ndicated.C.ontent

Available from Commercial News Providers"


1 Motorola V600
9CR nDPL. ...


Ruo- -
ob W - o


I=1


- .~ -

S
_____ .~-
* ____ -
m *


Lowest Prices &
Available

_Call anytime


CHEDDI JAGAN
INTERNATIONAL
AIRPORT
CORPORATION
CLOSURE OF THE VIEWING GALLERY
The Viewing Gallery at the Cheddi Jagan
International Airport will be closed from February 16
to March 15, 2005 to facilitate the installation of a
new Roof over the Viewing Gallery and Arrival
Terminal.
The Cheddi Jagan International Airport Corporation
regrets any inconvenience to members of the
public.
Chief Executive Officer
CJIA Corporation


S -
S


4 0.
- *


* -


no


I


W1111MR
im


4
I*ftw






6 SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 20, 2005


EditorialI



Memorable week


for Guyana

U NDOUBTEDLY, it was a very hectic week of offi
cial activities for Guyana as the government
continues to maximise advantages in collabo-
rative efforts with Caribbean and Latin American part-
ners and international agencies and organizations in
our national interest.
It was a memorable week of official visits by the
Presidents of Brazil and Chile; of top officials of UNICEF
and the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on
Agriculture; and participation in the 16th Inter-Ses-
sional Meeting of CARICOM Heads of Government in
Suriname that climaxed with yesterday's historic open-
ing ceremony of the Community Secretariat modern
headquarter complex.
Amid all of these and other events and develop-
ments, the relevant ministries, government depart-
ments and disciplined forces maintained their respec-
tive commitment to post-floods humanitarian and re-


cover efforts, including the round-the-clock watch on
the health needs of flood victims.
It was also the week when the Guyana Parliament
held one of its very rare sessions that ran into the wee
hours of Friday morning to approve a government mo-
tion.
The motion conveys sympathy with the flood vic-
tims as well asexpressing. gratitude to local, regional
and international agencies and organizations and the
numerous groups and individuals who have been in-
volved in so many ways in helping Guyana to deal with
its worst natural disaster from flood waters.
While the cut and thrust of the parliamentary de-
bate revealed strong dissenting views on some ap-
proaches and policies, the approved motion also dem-
onstrated a welcome level of political maturity and
commitment by both sides of the House. This is en-
couraging at the time of an unprecedented natural di-
saster.
The expressions of practical solidarity that have
come from the international donors and Guyana's part-
ners in CARICOM and Latin America at our period of
national distress, would be encouraging to all who have
been faithfully labouring to overcome the conse-
quences of the flooding.
The visits of both President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva
of Brazil, though brief, and the three-day state visit of
President Ricardo Lagos Escobar that ends today,
have highlighted new commitments to strengthening
the bonds of bilateral relations as well as for en-


hanced cooperation between CARICOM and its Latin
American allies.
Brazil, Venezuela and Chile have been demonstrat-
ing increasing interest in furthering meaningful rela-
tions with CARICOM.
We have no doubt that our Community leaders and
heads of delegation gathered here for yesterday's
opening ceremony of the. new CARICOM headquarter
complex, well .appreciate the positive dimensions of
this greater bonding between 'Latin America and the
Greater Caribbean.
We join in extending warmest welcome to the
,CARICOM leaders and the Chilean President still in our
midst after 'a week that focused on meaningful friend-
ship and solidarity.



CHRONICLE
Editor-in-Chief: Sharief Khan
Sunday Editor: Michelle Nurse
Editorial: 227-5216; 227-5204; 22-63243-9
Sports: 225-7174
After hours 226-3243-9
Fax: 227-5208
The Chronicle is at www.guyanachronicle.com
e-mail address sundayeditor@guyanachronicle.com
Lama Avenue, Bel Air Park, Georgetown, Guyana.


Mixed signals on joint




aluminum smelter plan


THE NEWS, as reported
in last Monday's edi
tion of the 'Observer',
that Jamaica and China are
considering partnership de-
velopment of a major alumina
refinery for this country, must
have left some regional inte-
grationists wondering
whether competition has over-
taken coordination within
CARICOM for this kind of
--huge investment project.
Establishment of an alumina
smelter involving at least three
CARICOM states -Jamaica,
Guyana and Trinidad and Tobago
in partnership with foreign cor-
porate entities doing busi-
ness in the Caribbean, is an .
issue that is at least 33 years
old.
First raised in 1971 by
then Prime Minister of -.-:
Trinidad and Tobago, Eric
Williams and warmly em-
braced by his counterparts .-U'.
in Jamaica (Michael '-,
Manley) and Guyana
' (Forbes Burnham), the idea
of such an intra-regional .'
smelter project, blending
the bauxite/alumina re-
sources of Jamaica and
Guyana with the oil and gas
resources of Trinidad and
Tobago was never seriously
followed through. P
Headlines highlighting
claimed conflicting interests
involving, on one hand, Ja-
maica and Mexico and, on
the other, Venezuela and
Suriname, were at one stage
competing.with reports out .
of Guyana in 1979 about ,
plans for massive invest- .,.
ment in a hydropower/alu- K.
minum project.
By the decade of the
1980s, William Demas was
heading as President of the Car-
ibbean Development Bank, a


team of regional experts review-
ing the functioning of the region's
integration movement, and pas-
sionate media analyses and pub-
lic discourses were taking place
on medium and long-term devel-
opment perspectives, including
integrated regional projects in the
mining and agricultural sectors.
Somehow, amid the debates
that had included some of the
region's best known economists
and political scientists, the idea
of a regional aluminum smelter
got lost and long before the pass-


MICHAEL MANLEY


ing from the scene of Williams,
Burnham and later Manley.


Like political union, the
region's governing political lead-
ers were to consistently avoid.
for years, any serious discussion
on concepts of major integrated
regional projects like an alumi-
num smelter.
Then came surprises, rap-
idly, in 2004: First, from the
Prime Minister of Trinidad and
Tobago, Patrick Manning.

MANNING INITIATIVE
He paused from marketing
his concept of a massive Carib-
bean gas pipeline
S." .. project, initially
., linking Trinidad
N and Tobago and
countries of the
Eastern Carib-
bean, to disclose
'.', his new initiative
construction of
an aluminum
smelter in that
twin-island state.
The May 26,
2004 edition of
the 'Trinidad Ex-
press' featured
,* J the signing of a
memorandum of
understanding
between Man-
ning and the
Chairman and
Chief Executive
S.r Officer, Alain
Belda of
America's big-
gesl aluminium
c o m p a n y ,
', ALCOA, for the
establishment of
Sa smelter, costing
approximately
TT$1 billion
(TT$6=US$1) with a minimum
capacity of 250,000 metric


tonnes per annum. of-Spain and Georgetown on
Two days later, Manning the possibility of involve-
was talking about the possibil- ment in the Manning initia-
it), of doubling the production tive for a regional aluminum





RICKEYV SINGH


,


capacity of the proposed smelter
in Trinidad and Tobago in part-
nership agreements involving im-
portation of alumina from Ja-
maica and Suriname and also
Guyana when the latter is able
with his government's assistance,
to establish an alumina plant.
In the absence of more
specific details, cautious pub-
lic responses from Jamaica
and Guyana and virtual si-
lence from Suriname, ques-
tions were being raised by the
cynics and doubting
'Thomases' whether the Man-
ning initiative for a regional
integrated aluminum smelter
project may go the way of the
one that had originally in-
volved the late Williams and
Manley.
Guyana, which has had its
own disappointing experi-
ences with ALCOA was, by
December 2004. deeply in-
volved in bilateral negotia-
lions with the giant Russ'ian
aluminium company,
RUSAL, for some US$20 mil-
lion investment in the
country's bauxite industry.
While admitting to infor-
mal exchanges between Port-


smelter, the Guyana Govern-
ment was maintaining an in-
terest in an economically vi-
able alumina plant that was
linked to expansion of the
bauxite industry with regional
and international investment
capital.
With no firm official an-
nouncement of any collaborative
effort being underway for a re-
gional aluminum smelter,
Guyana's involvement with
RUSAL and vague signal of in-
terest in having an alumina plant,
was to be followed by the most
recent disclosure in Kingston last
week of the pursuit of an invest-
ment programme with China for
a possible alumina refinery in Ja-
maica.

JAMAICA/CHINA
As a major bauxite pro-
.ducer of the Caribbean region,
Jamaica is among suppliers of
alumina to help meet the grow-
ing hunger of China's
alumininum smelters as the
Chinese economy continues
its rapid growth.
With an envisaged capital in-
vestment of some US$700 mil-
lion to make a reality of the pro-


posed Jamaica China one mil-
lion metric tonnes aluminum
smelter, new concerns have
arisen.
These include, according to
reports. ALCOA's plans for sig-
nificant investment in Trinidad
and Tobago's initiative
i for an integrated re-
gional smelter, as well

lier announced expan-
sion plans for its Ja-
maica alumina refinery
of which the Jamaica
government is part
owner.
^ This scenario
emphasises the ne-
cessity for the governments of
Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica
and Guyana, and perhaps
Suriname as well, to collec-
tively signal to the region's
people the status of plans, if
any, on shared interest in the
creation of a regional alumi-
num smelter in collaboration
with key foreign players like
China. ALCOA, British Pe-
troleum (BP) and RUSAL.
If the intention by
CARICOM member states is to
avoid detrimental competition in
advancing the region's industrial
development, then it seems rea-
sonable to inquire about the col-
laboration at whatever level -
that is taking place for a partner-
ship arrangement for a
CARICOM aluminum smelter
project.
It is doubtful that the
Heads of Government of Ja-
maica, Guyana, Trinidad
and Tobago and Suriname
found time during meetings
this past week to discuss
this evidently desirable re-
gional project that would
involve billions of dollars in
investments and thousands
of new and indirect jobs.


New moves on an old concept





SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 20, 2005 7





INTERNATIONAL SUPPORT


THE last five days have
seen more than 16 Heads
of State and Government
visiting Guyana for
important and even
history-making events.
Among these were the
President of Brazil the
continents economic
powerhouse and heads of
nearly all CARICOM
states.
President Lula of Brazil's
visit was in response to an
earlier invitation by President
Bharrat Jagdeo. His presence
came at a time when Guyana is
grappling with the effects of the
nation's first natural disaster.
Brazil, it must be recalled, was
the first country to have sent
flood relief supplies on the
ground and its support, like
other countries, has made a
significant impact on the relief
efforts.
The CARICOM Heads and
President of Chile Mr. Ricardo
Lagos attendance were for the
inauguration of the CARICOM
Headquarters Building. This not
only represents the regional
body's permanent headquarters,
but the fulfillment of a promise
to the region by Guyana since
1974. The anticipated solidarity


of those leaders and countries.
at this most crucial moment, is
testimony to the growing
respect Guyana has won in the
international community.
Brazil has been an
important ally of Guyana in
many regards. Its close and
expanded cooperation augurs
well for the national economy
and geo-political standing. The
commitment of President Lula
to strengthening ties and links
augers well for our future and is
consistent with President
Jagdeo's vision of deepening ties
with South American countries
while not compromising our
historical links with the
Caribbean region, the US, UK,
Canada and elsewhere.
That there was significant
presence from both the South
American continent and the
CARICOM region is testimony
to Guyana's new focus. The
strategic position of Guyana on
the continent was evident by
the number of Heads who were
in Guyana.
But this did not happen
by accident. The past several
years saw a well-crafted and
executed foreign policy to
enhance ties with traditional
allies and seek out new and


strategic alliances with new
and emerging economic and
political giants. During the
past several years, President
Jagdeo has met President Hu
Jintao of China, President
Putin of Russia, the Prime
Minister of India, to name a
few. In fact, President Jagdeo
was the first Head of State to
have been invited by
President Hu Jintao to
China.
In the global economic and
political context, Guyana's size
and economy could have
reduced its importance for many
of these states. But the correct
foreign policy positioning of
Guyana has made it a valuable
ally for many of those
countries. Coupled with this is
the recognition from various
regional and international
institutions.

SUPPORT FOR
RECOVERY
This increasing respect will
no doubt put our country in
good stead as we embark on the
recovery phase following the
January floods caused by the
historic level rainfall. While
significant resources will have to
be found from within for the


uy r


recovery and rehabilitation,
international support is very
much needed to sustain and
achieve some measure of
success in the medium to long-
term. There will have to be more
pledges, less harsh
conditionalities from the IFIs
and more rapid delivery of
rehabilitation support to reduce
the dent on the economy and
the social infrastructure. The
national budget will not
cater for the cost of the
flooding. The President
has said that a
supplementary budget will
have to be passed once the
full cost of the natural
disaster is determined. But
this would not slow the
efforts to recover and rebuild,
as it has not interrupted the
rapid relief response. The
severity of the impact on the
national economy is not yet
known.
In the meantime, the full
relief cost has not yet come


in. Already, the emergency
allocation of $220M has been
surpassed. The assessment
by various sectors and
groups is currently in
progress and the cost of
rebuilding when it comes in
will certainly be mammoth as
the government works with
families, farmers and
entrepreneurs to restore or
ensure repair their livelihood.
The rebuilding period
will be smooth and effective
if there is the type of unity
and solidarity demonstrated
by groups and entities during
the relief efforts. The
political opposition,
especially its operatives
which have controlled the
Region Four Democratic
Council since the 1960s, must
now show maturity and
commitment to repairing
people's lives, communities
and other amenities as this
region was the hardest hit.
The time for rebuilding from


the
nat
and
nat
inte
alre
Thi
com
and
nat
Gu:
togi
sea


obertPersaud















ROBERT PERSAUD
destruction of this
ural disaster has come
I requires a continued
ional response. The
national community has
'ady signaled its support.
e government has
imenced work in this area
d is committed to a
ional effort. Now, all
yanese must get our act
ether to make this process
less.


ANNOUNCING A





GREAT CATASTROPHE


By Carlos DAivila

the Association of Caribbean
States more than one year
ago, a growing trend in the
frequency and intensity of
disasters could be observed.
Unfortunately, the sense of
urgency to react to these di-
sasters does not demonstrate
the same intensity.
The recent events that took
place in the Indian Ocean and
the great coverage that has been
given to this catastrophe have
once again awakened interest in
this topic on the part of the dif-
ferent Organisations involved in
it. The reality is that the images
disseminated were moving and
affected all levels, Governments,
International Organisations, Re-
gional and Sub-regional
Organizations, the general popu-
lation, etc. Today, those pow-
erful images have stirred
everyone's conscience.
The question that we ask
ourselves is: why do we have to
wait for major calamities or such
powerful images before we re-
act? Why, if we know that we
are living in situations involving
risk, do we not seek to remedy
these situations before an event
of great magnitude occurs?
It does not matter which
strategies are sought nor the
work plans that are made, the
reality is that those very events
are the ones that are shouting
from the roof tops that we must


be better prepared. It would ap-
pear as though Mother Nature
ness. Whether this is true or
not, the fact that the indian
Ocean disaster occurred iist one
month before the World ('onfer-
ence for Disaster Reduc: )n has
had a special effect on ; par-
ticipants in terms of nmilt-
ment.
The World Comi ncec
for Disaster Reducti was
held in Kobe, Hyogo, ,'ipan
on January 18 22, 2005. The
date of the meeting sought to
highlight the formidable re-
covery of the Japanese people
following the Great Earth-
quake of Hanshin-Awaji that
struck on January 17, 1995. It
should be underscored that
not only did the Japan ',e so-
ciety recover from the event,
but it has been able to reduce
its vulnerability throrm et-
ter preparedness on t part
of its societies to handle
events of this nature.
The mandatory "' ) be
taken is to conduct eternall
analysis and ask oui. : are
we learning from our ri-
ences, and despite the ia:. s
we have encounter t are our
societies better prepared?
The aforementi. 't-
ing produced the Dec., ion of
Hyogo and the participants ac-
knowledged that the i ,,
tional community has managed
to accumulate countless experi-
ences with respect to risk reduc-


The Greater

Caribbean This Week


tion. and in this field it is im-
portant to highlight the leader-
ship of the International Strat-
egy for Disaster Reduction
(ISDR) and the way in which it
has been able to encourage the
region to focus on prevention
strategies and tasks. The
region's response agencies are
undertaking great efforts in the
area of prevention since it has
been recognized that this has a
huge impact at all levels of the
society.
Within the Declaration
of Hyogo, participants
recognized the intrinsic
link that exists among
disaster reduction,
sustainable development
and the eradication of
poverty, among others.
Moreover, they stressed
the importance of
teamwork including
governments, regional and
in t e r n a t i o n a l
organizations as well as
financial institutions, civil
society, including non-
governmental and
volunteer organizations,
the private sector, in
addition to the scientific
community, in other words,
everyone!!
Now, we can say that the


framework has been set or that
it has always existed, but the
time has come to take concrete
action that would enable us to
learn from our own experiences
and those of others, both the
successful and unsuccessful
ones, and in this way we will
have better prepared societies
that are resistant to disasters. It
is time for action.
It is not necessary to wait
for or to announce a new ca-
tastrophe so that through
joint efforts, we could have a
Greater Caribbean that is
better prepared.
Mr. Carlos DAvila
Sanchez is the
Director of Natural
Disasters and
Transport of the
Association of
Caribbean States.
The views
expressed are not
necessarily the
official views of the
ACS. Feedback can
be sent to
mail@acs-aec.org
Picture under
filename 'carlos
sanchez':


ommiliga
I













"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


2/19/2005. 7 19 PM


I






e8 e SIMItcl1OGHNICl- kEaOtORU roQDG


Emergency fund for farmers


a necessity


- IICA Head


by Wendella Davidson
Director General, Inter-
American Institute for
Cooperation on Agriculture
(IICA), Dr. Chelston
Brathwaite is of the firm
belief that a regional
emergency fund needs to be
established, to help farmers
deal with risks in a more
strategic way.
"We need a regional
emergency fund that would
allow farmers in a situation like
this to call on a fund for
assistance", he told the
Chronicle in an exclusive
interview on Friday afternoon,
mere hours after deplaning at
the Cheddi Jagan International

'We need a regional
emergency fund that
would allow farmers
in a situation like this
to call on a fund for
assistance.' Dr.
Chelston Brathwaite,
Director General,
Inter-American
Institute for
Cooperation on
Agriculture


Airport, Timehri.
He arrived here from
Paramaribo, Suriname where he
had participated in the just-
concluded intersessional meeting
of Caribbean Community
(CARICOM) heads of
government on February 16 and
17.
Dr. Braithwaite's comment
was made against the
background of the tremendous
setback which Guyana's
agriculture currently faces from
recent torrential rains and
devastating floods.
Noting that recently, other
Caribbean countries have also
suffered as a result of natural
disasters, he said the
recommendation based on a
strategic paper put together by
IICA, will allow for
expeditious response to such
situations.
IICA had been taking a
leadership role in supporting
the Ministries of Agriculture in
the region in the
conceptualisation and the
preparation of the document,
which has been handed over to
the Heads of Government.
Dr. Brathwaite
suggested that the fund be
placed in the Caribbean
Development Bank (CDB),
(Please turn
to page 14)


DIRECTOR General, Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture (IICA), Dr. Chelston Brathwaite, second
from right, is flanked by his wife Mrs. Rosanna Brathwaite and Acting Representative IICA, Guyana, Mr. Cromwell
Crawford. At extreme left is Dr. Arlington Chesney, Director of Operations, Caribbean and Adviser to the DG. (Pictures
by Quacy Sampson)


Support ofthe-aresrment's-ca ToDasa
created as a result of the recent floods, we at R Ramroop & Sons have made a conscientious decision to sell these products at
a cost recovery price so as to assist in our little way towards making life a little easier for the victims of this disaster.

We give the undertaking to continue this practice for as long as is necessary.

We take this opportunity to inform you that on our last shipment of Potatoes and Onions we did not apply for or received any
exemption of duties and taxes; this can be verified with the remission unit of the Guyana Revenue Authority however, we sold
our products at the SAME prices as those Importers who received these concessions.


JUST ARRIVED IN UNLIMITED QUANTITIES








Also available: Garlic, Split Peas, Channa,
Black Eye, Sardines, Cooking Oil etc. '
AT THE MOST REASONABLE PRICES! l


P. RAMROOP & SONS
23 Lombard Street,
Werk-en-Rust. Georgetown.
Tel: 227-6458 Fax: 227-6110


I.
'f.


d -'
'I


* ,4~ ~J.


-lip- b ~ .j "


p


nrMMFlMMIMu ~lnnir-,t-C=





SUEDAYCURONICI19 FtiOhjbb; ?


By Sandra Seeraj

IT IS a true measure of a
man that a memorial service
to mark his passing would be
characterized by laughter,
joy, camaraderie, friendships
rekindled and would become
a celebration of a life well
lived.
Such was the mood and tone
of the memorial service held for
Hutton Gilbert Archer early in
February, at the Eugene Black
Auditorium of the World Bank,
Sn -'-o,ton DC.
in wam '. a on
Archer died in a ..-
November 24, 2004 while at-
tefding the funeral of Keith
Byrne, an old school friend, two
days after he celebrated his 60th
birthday.
The Auditorium was
packed to capacity; an air of
upliftment pervaded as friends
greeted each other, some after
many years. Songs of praise ren-
dered by members of the
Northminister Presbyterian
Church Choir stirred the hearts
of the audience and set the
mood for the time of reminis-
cence of a loved one recently
called to a higher purpose.
The memorial was hosted
by the Global Environmental
Facility (GEF) of the World
Bank/IMF Group, where, until
his passing, Hutton served as
team Leader for External Affairs.
The proceedings were
chaired by Hutton's close
friend and associate, fellow
Guyanese Erwin Brewser,
who set the tone for the trib-
utes to follow, and regaled the
packed auditorium with scin-
tillating 'Hutton' vignettes.
While functioning as Master
of Business, Brewster punc-
tuated his introduction of
each contributor with enter-
taining, often hilarious anec-
dotes of his lifelong friend
and "brother," eliciting
laughter and as fond reminis-
cences flowed.
The event was attended by
several relatives, friends and col-
leagues of Hutton Archer, in-
cluding his widow, Patricia, and
his two daughters, Jeannine and
Carolyn. Several of his friends,
and associates from Guyana, in-
cluding Mr. Mayo Robertson of
the Queen's Colliege Old Stu-
dents Association, Mr. Louis
lcMnstead, [MSOfficel]Mr.
Keith Dublin arid FTrmer Min-
ister of Information, Fraiilk
Campbell also attended.
Among those paying trib-
ute to Hutton was Mr.
Mohammed El Ashry, former
CEO of the GEF, who told of
the outstanding impression
Hutton created at their first
encounter, when he was being
interviewed for his post in the
GEF. El Ashry was followed by
the current CEO of the GEF,
Mr. Len Good who also spoke
highly of Hutton, his integ-
rity, his impeccable sense of
professionalism, and his easy
interaction with his fellow
staff members of the GEF.
Executive Director of the
UNDP/GEF, Mr. Frank Pinto,
also paid tribute to Hutton.
In each of the tributes,
Hutton's unflappable
demeanour, his sharp wit, end-
less stream of anecdotes and his
love of laughter, were
emphasised. Those paying trib-
ute also spoke highly of his love
of family, his sense of profes-
sionalism, his equanimity, his
ubiquitous smile, his vast
knowledge of and appreciation


for the world in which he lived
and his abiding faith and belief
in the will of God.
Frank Campbell, who saw
and spoke with Hutton at the
Byrne funeral in Canada before
he succumbed, and who was one
of the many Guyanese who wit-
nessed his passing, said in his
reflections of his friend, "He
could take the measure of a per-
son, then govern his own
behaviour to be able to co-exist
with that person without com-


I At


HUTTON Gilbert Archer -
November 22,1944 -
November 24, 2005

promising his own integrity."
Hutton Archer had a deep
and abiding love for the environ-
ment. It was as if it were di-
vinely ordained that he would
one day translate the love into
action within a prestigious inter-
national organisation. As noted
by Campbell in his reflections,
"...someday there would arise
the necessity for a person with
a passion for both people and
God's other creations, someone
who could, though a blend of
leadership and collegiality, help
to increase the awareness of the
... =Q.d 1f ne potential to pre-
serve and protect a fragile glo-
bal ecology for the benefit of
present and future generations."
This was a calling Hutton
fulfilled at the GEF, where
he had the opportunity to see
many environmentally ben-
eficial projects in developing
countries around the world,
come to fruition.
One such project was the
Biodiversity Reporting Award,
sponsored by Conservation In-
ternaLcnal in collaboration with
Conservation I-frnational
Guyana, the International fed-
eration of Environmental Jour-
nalists and the International
Center for Journalists.
Hutton Archer was instru-
mental in accessing co-funding
for the attendance of the first
winner of that Award, Journal-
ist Robert Bazil's attendance at
the Awards Ceremony, held in
Bogota, Colombia, in 1999.
Through his good offices, he
also assisted in funding a
Biodiversity Reporting Seminar
for Guyanese Journalists in
Georgetown, Guyana, the fol-
lowing year. [MSOffice2]
Campbell[MSOffice3] also
noted that another Hutton Ar-
cher quality was his balance and
his capacity to manage the vari-
ous dimensions of who he was.
"He had no difficulty re-
maining a Guyanese while being
a Caribbean person, no diffi-
culty remaining a West Indian
while being a Canadian, no
problems being Canadian while
being a servant of the wider in-


international community, no chal-
lenge being a Christian while be-
ing in the very best sense, a man
of the world."
Campbell noted that Hutton
was the best friend a person
could hope to have. He said
that as far as he was aware,
Hutton never used an electronic
address book, "but he had the
best Rolodex in the business,
together with a paper address
book, that, however tattered he
would never abandon.
"His was an enviable net-
work, and he promoted the con-
cept of staying in touch into one
of the fine arts. In other words,
he cared. He-was urbane, classy
*" every sense and as another
former coe out it: 'He was
former collea8J -_- he
a man of quality, yet a .--
walked with kings, he never lost
the common touch.'"
One of the most touching
and profound tributes came
from 22-year old Kitindi Van
West Charles, son of Roxanne
and Richard Van West Charles
and grandson of the late LFSB,
former President of Guyana.
Young Kitindi. a close friend of
the Archer family, wrote, on
hearing of Hutton's passing:
There are some things
that we all need to know
Ask questions like why
do the good have to go?
Well I'll humbly say that
I do not know
Not being the all know-
ing I'm not sure for certain
But if life is a show then
is death the final curtain?
Does it hurt to utter his
nnm-9


Look at it as a transition
phase
Where, this is only a
metaphysical plane
Has there really been a
change
How do you acquaint this
with the pain you feel
In my mind it seems so
surreal.
Wake up hoping that its
not real
It's amazing how one
man touched so many lives
It's amazing how a man
never really dies
For he is remembered by
all of us on the inside
To see him again I simply
close my eyes
And as tears begin to run,
I slowly smile
S-td celebrate as he has
I... .--. ide.
gone to the bente ._-

Hutton attended Queen's
College in Guyana and
taught briefly at Tutorial
High after his graduation. He
attended Me Gill University
in Montreal, Canada, where
, served as President of the
International Students Asso-
ciation and Graduated with
Honours in English Litera-
ture. Always studying and
learning, he later gained his
Masters Degree in Business
Administration.
He worked with the giant
aluminum processing company,
ALCAN in Montreal before re-
turning to Guyana to serve as
Deputy Chief Information Of-
ficer in the then Ministry of in-
formation. He later served as
Chioe fof tho rnnference aindl


FORMER staff members of the Ministry of Information,
from left, Louis Kilkenny, Maurice Bledman and Colin
Mapp.


SVACANCY-




MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:

1. Three (3) Subjects at CXC or GCE O'Level
including Maths and English and at least
three (3) years sales experience with a
reputable firm.

2. Valid Van Drivers' Licence

3. Two (2) recent Testimonials.

4. Recent Police Clearance.

Apply in person to:
The Human Resources Manager
EDWARD B. BEHARRY & CO. LTD.
191 Charlotte Street, Lacytown
Georgetown
Applications close Monday 28th February 2005.


Public Information Section of
the Caribbean Community Sec-
retariat, in Georgetown,
Guyana, before remigrating to
Canada, where he served as As-
sistant Director at the Interna-
tional Development Research
Center in Ottawa. His next ap-
pointment was with Habitat, a
United Nations agency based in
Nairobi, Kenya where he held
responsibility for public infor-


MASTER of Business
Erwin Brewster at the
podium

nation.
Next came a posting as
Head of Public Information with
the International Civil Aviation
Organisation in Montreal prior
to his 1996 appointment within
the GEF of the World Bank
Group. In his most recent po-
sition, he also functioned as
President of the Caribbean As-
sociation of the World Bank/
IMF and as a member of the
Bank's Appeals Committee.
Among the notable
Guyanese attending the Memo-








WE PAT.THE,
RESTl PRtNICES
ff! Vl] l:]HUR;, 1g

[ N E I, Cif1 .qESt,

CON:llTACLT:


rial were Dr. Cedric Grant, Dr.
Brenda Do Harris, Mr. Winston
King, Dr. Richard and Roxanne
Van West Charles and several
former staff members of the
Ministry of Information.
In addition to his immediate
family, Hutton Archer is sur-
vived by his siblings Kenneth,
Agnes (Gibbs), Maurice, Den-
nis and Yvonne Archer and their
families, his mother-in-law
Eileen Walks, brother-in-aw
Horace Walks and his son-in-
law, Olayinka Warritay, his
daughter Carolyn's husband.
In a note of thanks,
Patricia Archer, Hutton's
widow and their daughters
said "We would like to offer
a testimony of God's love and
his promise to never leave us
or forsake us. Instead of say-
ing if or asking why, we say,
"thank you, let God's will be
done."




HELP!"

We have an over
abundance of
qualified buyers
and a shortage of

HOMES

TO SELL ...
If you or someone
you know either
needs or are
thinking of
selling... Please
give us a call!!!
You'll be glad you
did!!!





REAL ESTATE
PROPERTIES FOR
RENT OR SALE
LOT 2 GEORGE ST.
WERK-EN-RUST
TEL 226 9951 : 226 5546
em il: petesreoleiloleco''ynhoo.inm


ST. JOSEPH MERCY HOSPITAL


VACANCY




REQUIREMENTS:
>-A Degree or equivalent qualifications in civil
engineering/maintenance.
OR
> 5 years experience in facilities management
including supervisory experience.
> Ability to develop and implement procedures and
systems
> Good interpersonal relationship and communication
skills.
Send application to:
Human Resource Director
St. Joseph Mercy Hospital
130- 132 Parade Street, Kingston
not later than 28"'February. 2005


2/19/2005. 6:59 PM


_ _________LL: _I____


HUTN,,ARCHER RMEMBERE


Alemoris ofa lif wel-lied.






10 SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 20, 2005


4-


ddaie rani anud manda Evans. a .moer of the Classique Dance Company, unveil one of the stamps to the pleasure
of the audience at Umrn '^ana Thursday evening. (Picture by Cullen Bess-Nelson)

7l li LLI1L i 11111LLIiI~ k I


CONSERVATION Interna-
tional (CI) is offering
Guyanese journalists a capac-
ity building opportunity and
a chance to network with en-
vironmental journalists inter-
nationally through the
Biodiversity Reporting Award.
The seventh round of the
award was launched during a
simple ceremony at Hotel
Tower two Friday evenings
ago. The award is a collabora-
tive effort between Conserva-
tion International (CI), the In-
ternational Center for Jour-
nalists (ICFJ) and the Paris-
based International Federa-
tion of Environmental Jour-
nalists (IFEJ).
Conservation International
Vice President and Executive
Director of the award, Haroldo
Castro, said the competition


aims at promoting the work of
participating environmental jour-
nalists internationally. He an-
nounced that the organisation is
working on involving its winner
in the Eighth World Wilderness
Congress to be held in Alaska in
October.
Each participant, he said,
is allowed to submit a maxi-
mum of four articles that
qualify under the environmen-
tal theme. He said copies of
entries published between
June 1, 2004 and May 31,
2005, must be submitted to
CI Guyana's Communications
Manager Ajay Baksh.
The articles will be posted
online on the award's official
website at
www.biodiversityreporting.org,
but will only be accessible to
the five official international


NOTICE


THE GENERAL PUBLIC IS NOTIFIED THAT
FORMER METER TECHNICIANS:


Rodwick Ooodridge









I~nuoGftb"rt


Shelly George


Rodwick Goodridge, Shelly George
and Mawuko Gilbert are no longer
employed by the
Guyana Power & Light Inc.
and are not ,ili.., ,Ad to conduct
any business
on the company's behalf,


jurors for the competition,
who will not know the name
of the reporter or the publi-
cation in which the story
was printed.
Last year, some 126 re-
porters from 82 media
houses entered the compe-
tition internationally. The
Biodiversity Reporting
Award was first launched in
Guyana and Guatemala in
1999, and will be offered to
Guyana, Bolivia, Brazil,
Colombia, Madagascar,
Peru and Venezuela in 2005.
Castro said Guyana is the
only country that has seen con-
sistent participation over the
years. He encouraged local
journalists to keep walking in
that direction.
"This is an environmental
contest that has a philosophy


(and) encourages capacity build-
ing," he told the small gathering of
journalists and professionals in the
environmental field.
Executive Director of CI
Guyana, Major General (rtd) Jo-
seph Singh, said the award is aimed
at giving the print media the op-
portunity to vie among them-
selves, participate internationally
and acquire more knowledge about
the environment among other ben-
efits.
Baksh said the competition
has seen increased participation
year after year ever since it was
first launched here in 1999.
Nicosia Smith of Stabroek
copped the first prize for the
2004 competition. She attended
the IUCN World Conservation
Congress in Bandkok, Thai-
land, last year. (Shauna
Jemmott)


.
;, DEMERARA DISTILLERS LIMITED

VACANCIES
Applications are invited from suitably qualified
persons to fill the following vacancies:-


POSITIONS





Forklift Operators


REQUIREMENTS

s Sic'ojects- CXC, Maths
and English inclusive

Sound secondary
education
Must have Tractor
License
At least 2 years
experience driving forklift


We o'cer an attractive salary wilh continuous training
and sltat'l l\ d c lopmi| Int.

liitcrsici pcrsnI I' In send t' l r h ii pplicaiions to:-

Assisltntl (ieicral Mn n ag r-
I I tiniln Resoturitcs
IeneIr:ia l)Dislillcrs I ., i ileld
I'ln station Iiato)t l t

1 .1 7- t.B ald,


Eddie Grant



stamp



unveiled

GUYANA's most internationally acclaimed superstar, Eddie
Grant, is now the face of a beautifully garnished hallmark
to be used for posting mails locally and internationally,
through the Guyana Post Office Corporation (GPOC).
The stamp bearing Grant's image and his Ringbang logo. was
unveiled at an elegant affair staged at the Umana Yana, one of the
country's landmarks in Georgetown, Thursday evening.
The occasion and its purpose represent symbol of
nationhood expressed thr-, university of Guyanaof
__eur1 culture, University of Guyana
Deputy yV;, ,nancellor, Mr. Al Creighton said at the launching.
Creighton pointed out that the project was a form of
collaboration between culture and national effort, in recognition
of a national achievement of an artist.
He said that music of Grant's quality fits neatly into the
historical development of Caribbean music.
"The postal stamp will assist in the celebration of a Guyanese,
Caribbean and International artist." Creighton remarked.
Grant, who delivered a special address, challenged the
Guyanese people to be more supportive of their own.
He said that he started Ring Bang after he realized that
Caribbean people were losing their identity and culture, becoming
second-class Americans, in their quest for money and glory.
"This is why it is important that we have icons of our own
and why people should recognize Ringbang and buy it," Grant
pointed out.
He said Ringbang is a philosophy for those persons who
recognize their value, and should be used to educate and not
oppress human beings.
"Ringbang is our culture; it's what we speak without language;
it's what we understand without education, it's the greatest
awareness that of ourselves and through th is phi I osophy, % e will
be able to stand strong culturally, in a hostile world," the superstar
declared.
He expressed sadness at the fact that although he is recognized
throughout the world, his own people hardly. support his music
He said in his 40 years of singing. more than 2 000 copies of
his music have not been sold loc:,ll, ;and de-cnbed this lack of
interest by Guyanese as a shame and a lost opportunity for
Guyanese to interact with their o,'wn
Grant, who hails from the East Coast village of Plaisance, but
now lives in Barbados, said even if more of his music was sold
here, it had to be pirated, and that, he added, must be stopped.
Chairman of the (foard- G D:'',m 9f the GPOC, Bishop
Juan Edghill, who deputised forActing President Samuel Hinds,
gave an overview of the stamp project. The idea:. he said, was
born only four months ago aftet it % as recoginiscd that "we
(Guyanese) need to make a start some here in honounr.2 our
own".
He pointed out that Grant is a role model. w ho has "cut and
pioneered grounds for Guyanese t. f-w"
The stamps were unveiled to an audience whichc h included
Mayor of Georgetow n Hanuilton Green, Deputn Post Mistres_
General Lynette Amsterdam, NM"i iUniter e'..,, Tnmd.idian
Wendy Fitzwilliam and Bar.i'.j-,. CulturL.l Ambassador MNi.
Anthony Carter 'ppularly known as 'The Mighty Gabby'.
The audience was also culturally entertained by,a 'fusion' of
African and Tassa drummers, during which an Amerindian dance
was performed.
The GPOC/Eddie Grant Ringhang special stamps are
available in denominations of $21. $80, $19l and $41O0.
(Shawnel Cudjoe)


e


r






SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 20, 2005 11




NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

UNSERVED AREAS ELECTRIFICATION PROGRAMME

BEGINNING OF PHASE I

Materials for the Unserved Areas Electrification (UAEP) have been ordered and construction of distribution networks is to commence shortly.
Residents in unserved areas along the coast are reminded of the following:

The projected average cost for the electrification of a household is about G$90,000.
About 75% of this cost is being financed from the loan, which the Government obtained from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), of which about
US$14 million will be used for grid extension.
An estimated 15% of this cost is being provided by the Guyana Power & Light, Inc. (GPL).
As one condition of the loan, each household must provide a small non-refundable contribution to the electrification cost which has been set at G$10,000,
covering about 10% of the average electrification cost. The contribution is only refundable should electrification of the area not occur within nine (9) months.
Construction works will not begin in any area until half or 50% of the households have contributed their G$10,000 during the three month period (Designation
Application Period) listed in the schedule below.
Consumers in the selected areas will have up to three (3) years, once construction is undertaken, to seek connection and meet the requirements under the terms
of the UAEP programme.

The UAEP will be implemented in two phases:
Phase I Extending up to December 30, 2006
Phase 2 Commencing immediately thereafter and extending up to December 2009
All selected unserved areas will have access'to electricity upon completion of the UAEP
Construction of distribution networks is scheduled to commence in the initial areas (listed) no later than May 2005 and electricity connected to all eligible
consumers in these areas by November 30, 2005.

Residents in areas listed must complete the following in order to receive electricity:

'1.Pay the consumer contribution of G$10,000 (per household) to any of the GPL offices (listed) or other temporary offices as may be publicized. While a
one-sum payment is preferable, payments; in amounts of $2,000 or more would also be accepted.
PLEASE NOTE THAT CONSTRUCTION WORKS WILL ONLY COMMENCE WHEN A MINIMUM OF 50% OF HOUSEHOLDS IN
THE SELECTED AREA MAKE FULL PAYMENT.
2. Have your premises wired to the required! specification for the new GPL interface and obtain a Certificate of Inspection from the
Electrical Inspector's Department.
3. Fill out a GPL's application form for the supply of electricity and provide proof of legal occupancy, which includes a title document, allocation
letter from the Ministry of Housing or tenancy agreement.

4. Submit the original Certificate of Inspection to GPL before service connection (Retain a copy in your possession). 'A Security Deposit must be
paid to GPL and will be refunded upon the termination of the service contract with the consumer. This Security Deposit is calculated based on
two times the average monthly charges of $5,000 (for basic lighting and small appliances) whichever is greater

;INITIAL AREAS TO BE ELECTRIFIED IN PHASE 1


Item Villages Estimated Estimated Designated Application Commercial
Potential Occupancy Period Office/Other
Consumers From To Temporary Office
REGION 2
2.01 CHARITY 111 104 Aug 2005 Oct 2005 Anna Regina
2.02 WEST BURY 123 70 Sep 2005 Nov 2005 Tel:771-4391
REGION 3
3.01 1 PREM NAGAR, Meten-Meer-Zorg Nth | 131 128 Aug 2005 Oct 2005 Vreed-en-Hoop, West


3.02 CRANE 599 495 Aug 2005 Oct 2005
3.03 ZEELUGT South 52 40 Sep 2005 Nov 2005
3 04 STEWARTVILLE, Seaview 27 Sep 2005 Nov 2005_


REGION 4


4.01 SOPHIA Block E ( Farmers' Field')


211


211


I20 Feb
2005


4-.02 SOPHIA Block F 157 157 20 Feb
2005
4 C0 SOPHIA Block AA i Plum Park) 1201 10 ; 20 Feb

4 04 LILIENDAAL Block .x('A Field) 637 605 Mar 2o005
4.05 P _PATTENSEN/TURkEYEfJ Area L & R _75 70 Aug 2005__
-1.06 PATTENSEN Section B 1,328 1.262 20 Feb
S_ j 2005
4 0 TUPKEYEN Section C 814 733 1 20 Feb
I 2005 00
-4.08 TUEbhE' ENl Section D 773 620 Jun 2005
4.09 CUIJNiIHNGS LODGE Area Y 875 800 20 Febt
2005
',____ CUMMINGS PARK 557 ". Jul 20u_
i 4.10 FOULIS Block II 62 40 20 Feb
2005
.1 .. 'FO U L IS B lh oc T" I . .. 7 F'i"-, 56 -e 70 ? F .- c .

4. 12 COLDINGEN -147. I 20' O
4t : NC.4 VILLAGE 34 Aug.2005
4.14 PARADISE Area G 49 46 O- Oct 2005
. .1 P FPARADISE Block 9 943 '. 75.0 Au 2005


REGION 6
0 01 CHESiE-E'I r LfCi ,J orth

6.02 YAKUSARI
S6,03 'Hi [ii,
' --1E1 .. ... .


275

! 5
I *


2nL


'0 Fct'b
1Lflu Sl

S20105-.


Demerara (next to
Stelling)
Tel-264-2427


S20 ay 40 Main Street,
2005 J Georoetown.
20 M,1y el: 226-2604
2 005
-C20 May 257/259 middlee Street
-2-1105 Geo)rg, to:*..n
-May 2005 Tel. 227-4447
-Oct 2005
20 Mav I
2005
20 Nay
2005
Auo 2005

20 May
_sep 2:05

2005

2005

Oct 2005
Dec 2005
Oct 20U05


.'1H May

rJa' 2005

Oct 2005


Corrio t[on Cor2intflnt-e
Tel: 339-2228

Hampshire, Corentyne
1 Tel: 337-4731


i ., **C


~~~~~l~l.k~F~~~B~ii~.~T)-+*F~pp~(Jrpl~n~






12 SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 20, 2005


More Canadian flood relief on the way


By Frederick Halley
TORONTO Donations of
emergency drugs and medi-
cal supplies to the tune of
$4M(C) have been procured
by the Guyana Flood Relief
Committee (GFRC) here.
According to an information
bulletin from the GFRC, 4000
kg (8800 lbs) left Toronto last
Monday via Zoom Airlines (at
a discounted cost) for Trinidad
where it was trans-shipped free-
of-charge via Amerijet into
Guyana on Wednesday.
Some 1400 kg (3080 lbs)
were also shipped via BWIA at
a discounted cost while another
7000 kg (15 000 lbs) is in the
Atlas Cargo warehouse for ship-
ment tomorrow.
The committee said it has


also purchased 10 Physicians
Medical Packs, 378 000 Doxy-
cycline tablets which were ex-
pected to be presented over the
weekend to the Ministry of
Health for free distribution in
the flood-affected communities
as a preventative measure
against the deadly Leptospiro-
sis disease.
Meanwhile, a five-member
team of medical professionals
returned to Canada last week
after spending one week in
Guyana, treating more that I
500 patients in flood-affected
communities, the GFRC said.
According to the informa-
tion bulletin, the team treated
patients suffering from vomit-
ing, diarrhoea and skin infec-
tions.
The bulletin pointed out


that the Committee has pledged
to continue its Medical Person-
nel Programme for three months
to assist the Ministry of
Health. During this period the
GFRC is seeking to host an un-
interrupted medical team (con-
sisting of five to ten doctors, re-
tired and registered nurses) in
Guyana. The average stay is ex-
pected to extend from one to
three weeks. Over the course of
the Medical Personnel
Programme, the Committee an-
ticipates that it will send 70-90
medical personnel from North
America to Guyana.
The bulletin disclosed that
transportation and accommoda-
tion will be provided by the
GFRC while the Ministry of
Health will look after logistics
and meals.


it was also stated that on
March 10, a team of 10 medical
professionals from the interna-
tional charity Friends Commit-
ted to Caring will travel to
Guyana for two weeks to assist
in the flood-stricken areas as
part of the Medical Personnel
Programme.
To date, the GFRC
(Canada), which has set a tar-
get of $500 000(C), has raised
$44,750(C), with another
$51,500 (C) pledged. Major do-
nors to date include: Friends of
Enmore ($11,000); Association
of Concerned Guyanese
($10,000); Guyanese Canadian
Charitable Foundation
($10,000); Guyana Festival
Committee ($5,000); Pravna
Hindu Mandir ($2,500); Cana-
dian Softball Cricket Association


($10,000), Enterprise Support
Group ($1,500); Peel Guyanese
Association ($1,500); Guyana
Christian Charities ($1,000),
Jay Brijpaul of Remax West Re-
alty ($1,000); Dhanraj and
Savita Ramnarine ($1,000); UG
Guild of Graduates ($1,000);
No. 2 Sports Club of Sheet An-
chor Primary School ($1,000);
Guyana Berbice Association
($1,000).
Several fund-raising activi-
ties are also planned over the
next two months and Guyanese
and friends of Guyana are urged
to support these events.
The GFRC is applauding
the business community which
it said has responded most gen-
erously through financial dona-
tions, sponsorship, and services
to the various fund-raising ef-


forts.
The Guyana Flood Relief
Committee (Canada) was formed
on January 20, 2005, following an
emergency meeting at the Guyana
Consulate in Toronto, with a man-
date to coordinate the Guyana
flood disaster relief efforts in
Canada. The Committee currently
has 51 members and comprises
representatives from 35 Guyanese
community, religious and alumni
organizations, as well as individu-
als.
Key contacts are: Co-
Chair: Danny Doobay, Hon.
Consul General, Co-Chair
and Finance, Paul Sharma,
Communications, Nancy
Rickford, Fund-Raising, Jay
Brijpaul, Medical Personnel,
June-Ann Sealey, Medical
Supplies, Clifford Rajkumar.


Harris Paints donates


'cleaner' to Education Ministry
PRINCIPAL Education Officer, Georgetown Mr. Nashrullah Khan receives a donation of 75
gallons of cleaner from Sales Manager of Harris Paints Mr. Kevin Welch. '
Harris Paints Guyana Limited on Thursday last donated the cans of Dev Prep 88 high perfor- ,- .
mance biodegradable 'cleaner' to the Ministry to clean schools that were affected by the recent floods. '
Also in picture is Harris Paints Warehouse Supervisor Mr. Sherwin Trotman, District Edu-
cation Officer, Secondary Mr. Marcel Hutson, District Education Officer, Primary, Ms. Marlyn'
Jones and District Education, Nursery Mr. Darriel Krammer.


REPUBLIC BANK HELP: Anna-Maria Garcia-Brooks, Manager of Group Corporate Com-
munications, Republic Bank Limited, left, presents the cheque for G$3M to Denise Dinoo,
Consular Officer of the Guyana Consulate in Trinidad.


..P....

G~rM r


Aerobic Instructor
Previous Experience
Certificate I Revalant Documents
Recommendation

Security Guards
Previous Experience
Recommendation
Police Clearance
Application
Barmen
Previous Experience
Recommendation from last 2 Employers
Polices Clearance
Application

Apply in person to
Buddy's Auto Sales
23 Brickdam, G/Town


.e VACANCIES


nh. F -APT |N


Qualified and experienced Captains are urgently
required for Toolsie Persaud Quarries Inc. operations
,at Providence, East Bank Demerara.

Candidates must have at least six (6) years relevant
experience plus the following:-

*Valid Harbour Licence
*Certificate of Competency
*ST.C.W. Certificate

-A valid Police Clearance Certificate will be required
before employment.

Applications should be. made in person direct t


Marine Superinntendent
Toolsie Persaud Quarries Inc.,
TPL Piovidence Comple',
East Bank Demeiara
Tel. 265-.973-7 E.I. 39


Republic bank


contributes to


Guyana flood relief

REPUBLIC Bank Limited of Trinidad and Tobago recently con-
tributed G$3M to the Georgetown Chamber of Commerce to
provide relief to flood-stricken victims here.
The bank said the funds will be used to purchase foodstuff,
inflatable dinghies, complete drainage mobile pumps, wet weather
wear, water purification chemicals, folding and small kerosene stoves
among other items to assist in Guyana's relief efforts.
Republic Bank has direct links with Guyana through its sub-
sidiary the National Bank of Industry & Commerce (NBIC) and
felt obligated as a responsible regional corporate citizen to provide
assistance it this time of need.
Many business places, schools, courts and government of-
fices in Guyana have suffered from excessive flooding caused
by the heaviest rainfall experienced in Guyana in the past 100
years.


ADVERTISE

IN THE CHRONICLE
IT PAYS! CALL:
226-3243-9 or 225-4475
FOR FURTHER INFO







SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February20 20 2005


I


By Michelle Nurse

IN KEEPING with the
urgency within South
America to put physical
infrastructure in place for
deeper integration, Brazilian
President Luiz Inacio Lula da
Silva- has---restated his
government's commitment to
completing the bridge across
the Takutu River.
The Takutu River borders
Lethem and Roraima and
residents on both sides usually
cross the river by speedboat or
even on foot during the dry
season.
It takes about five minutes
to skim across the river.
The international bridge
across the river is expected to
provide a link to a top class
highway from Bon Fim in
Roraima to the state capital Boa
Vista and a vast road network
to most of Guyana's giant
southern neighboring country.
The Guyana-Brazil road is
linked to the proposed deep
water harbour which the two
countries are working on to give
Brazil easier access to markets
in Europe, the Caribbean and
elsewhere.
The two countries had
talked for some time on bridging
the Takutu River but had taken
halting steps to do so.
In 2000, however,


momentum increased and a visit
here by Governor of Roraima.
Nuevo Campos put operations
in gear.
Erection of two piers on
either side of the Takutu River
started since August 2001. The
contract for the construction of
the span, which is about 230
metres long and 14.2 metres
wide, was awarded to Mr
Quieroz Galvao, a Brazilian
contractor.
However, work on the
bridge on the Brazil side has
been stalled for more than three
years now because of unfulfilled
requirements of the Federal
General Accounting Court.
During his state visit
here last week, President
Lula acknowledged the
importance of the bridge to
both Guyanese and
Brazilians, and gave a
commitment to fulfil the
court's requirements within
90 days.
Once the court gives
clearance, the contract for the
bridge construction will be
renegotiated before work
restarts.
If re-engaging the
construction company proves
problematic, Lula has given the
undertaking to involve the
engineering battalion of the
Brazilian Army in bridge
building.


Vm U

















ST.
I'fT HE























T K T


ALLED: Prime Minister Sam Hinds and top Guyana government officials at the Takulu Bridge construction site in


Brazil in 2001.
It is Lula's view, shared by
other South American countries.
that there can be "no political.
cultural or economic integration
without physical integration."
"It is in Brazil's interest: it
is in the interest of Guyana.
Brazil needs this; Guyana needs
this. That's why we have to
inaugurate the bridge, and that
is a commitment." he told
President Bharrat Jagdeo after
members of the Brazil and
Guyana cabinets signed several
agreements to forge closer
relations.
With Brazilian conunitment
to the completion of the road.
President Jagdeo also pledged
to finalise the construction of a
Customs and Immigration Post
at Lethem during, this year. The
post would be ready for the
completion of the bridge.
And to further boost
communication and
transportation linkages, the two
South American leaders agreed
that measures will be put in
place for the coordination
envisaged in the International
Road Transport Agreement for
Passengers and Cargo between
the two countries.
Road links are not the only
means of communication/
transportation that the two
countries are pursuing.


They are also considering
improving air linkages and
the establishment of a
regular service for maritime
transport.
To this end the Presidents
decided that Minister of
Transport and Hydraulics, Mr.
Anthony Xavier would later
this year hold discussions with
his Brazilian counterpart as well
as with the Brazilian National
Bank for Economic and Social
Development.
With respect to improving


Are you
between

the ages of
18 to 45 years

with a passion
for Success?






We're
interested!
Let's talk!


ties with the rest of the
Caribbean and paving the way
for Guyana to become the bridge
between South American and
the English-speaking Caribbean.
President Jagdeo addressed the
need for the promotion of trade
expansion in goods, services and
investments between Brazil and
Caribbean countries, including
partnerships in infrastructure
works and investment projects.
In this context, he reiterated
his interest in Brazil becoming
associated with the Caribbean


Development Bank (CDB).
President Lula
reaffirmed the priority given
to the integration of the
physical infrastructure of
South America and indicated
that the Brazilian
Government is willing to
receive a technical mission
from- the bank .for an
exchange of information
which would allow for the
further examination of the
matter, a communique at the
end of the visit said.


Suitably motivated and disciplined young men and women
are invited to fill vacancies in a newly established elite
Security Enterprise in the position of:
Security Officer/Supervisors
The applicant must:
+ be in possession of three GCE/CXC passes, one of
which must be English Language or equivalent.

+ possess a clean criminal record and, if selected for
training, provide a Certificate of Good Character issued
by the Police in the last three months.

* be prepared to undergo a programme of training, if
selected, to equip himself/Herself with the necessary
expertise to allow effective job performance,

* provide two testimonials with telephone numbers of
referees.
* Previous service in the military or law enforcement will be
an asset.
Benefits:
+ Attractive remuneration packages,
* Professional development in ancillary disciplines.
* Finest law enforcement and developmental training.
* Medical & Pension Schemes.

Applicants are requested to submit documents to:
The Corporate Secretary
P.O. Box 10530
Georgetown


BORDER CROSSING: a vehicle being washed on the Guyana side o the Takutu as some
people wade over to Brazil.


- C I -L --- --


1 i ,


i~ ,~







14 SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 20, 2005


So It II' h'hene 'er
Caribbean countries
experience hurricanes and
floods. "there is thi: source of
money. we can call on in
order to help the farmers."
He added that at the end of
the das if the fa-mier, do not'
pro ide food. COunilrCes ill
ha\e % 'TIO OUl it I[ *r'ti else.,, I1'i1
\. hic li ill h h elptii-' ill.,
c.- o n> 1 *I l'K ir Il I, .

organisations to come to
Guyana's assistance to offer and
provide veterinary support to
help in the treatment of animals
that have been affected by the
flood situation.
And, shortly after arriving
on Friday, the HCA top official,
accompanied by his wife
Rosanna, Trinidad-based, Dr
Arlington Chesney, Director of
Operations, Caribbean and
Adviser to the Director General.
along with Acting
Representative IICA, Guyana,
Mr. Cromwell Crawford.
presented veterinary drugs
worth $941, 000 to the
Ministry of Agriculture.
The pharmaceuticals will be
used for animal health care.
vaccination and treatment of
animals in flood-stricken areas.

REPOSITIONING AND
STRENGTHENING
AGRICULTURE
The Barbadian-born Dr.


."IIIi id n i [ndeI. hi le.i.dei lnp.
ll" or>r',1iniu,itiolrn u ne % 1sio11 is
to Ir.anItornm IICA into a
dev elopment iagen '\ that
promote the suitaiinable
de elopment of agnculture. food
,ecuro\ and the propenrm of
Itir.al conmmunitte, in the
liieric. .
I IC -1 Is I .Ils 1 1 ll
.uppri *,' i1wt h lepo ,lir ninM,
I ll' i 111, I I,.-pill 1,I i_ rh.LiII LI FC.

Strengthening ol Agriculture in
the Region for Sustainable
Growth and De\elopment'.
spearheaded by President
Bharrat Jagdeo, the CARICOM
head of state who has lead
responsibility for agriculture.
In Suriname, Dr. Brathwaite
and delegation participated in
meetings which were of specific
relevance to the new agriculture
drive.
Asked about IICA's thrust
towards diversification from
traditional crops, the IICA
official said the strategy has
begun to bear fruit.
JMe said organic agriculture
holds great promise for
producing safe food. food that
is free of pesticides and
nutritious. He pointed out that
when pesticides are not used on
agricultural products, the
environment and the soil are not
contaminated.
Remarking that organic
agriculture has great promise for


VACANCY

A Leading Distributor in Guyana has a
VACANCY for the following post at its
Berbice Branch Office:

DRIVER/

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

Qualification and Experience
Sound Secondary Education.
Experience in similar field would be an asset.

Requirement

* A Valid Driver's Licence
is required (Car/Van/Lorry)


Interested persons should send application
along with CV
not later than 1st March, 20051 to:



A-- The Branch Manager,
H DeSinco Trading Limited,
/ 21A Roi h.-jI C ,2rent[,.l Brrtii,-.


i] i c e'-, lln [)r I %hr.il l, id
' I* l. I .i lI i olIl ill I % 111.11
Cpe>'pL .ri In1%I.'oleconul Ililh

'EreNibod\ Nanis to li\'
long and health\ hic and the\
are looking at nutrition more
riticalli these day-' in a way
they ne'er did before." he
posited. and added. "People juis
don'tI ant t10 eat. they "ant o1
eat.l 'oo> d nuirillous ood ih,'t
Ill Allh.I them io \it e ..1 lon,'
11C .11111%, 11l 111.11 h e ll.

today than they were 1( to 2(o
years ago."
A recent World Bank report
stated that Caribbean and Latin
American governments have
been underestimating the
importance of rural industries
such as agriculture to overall
economic growth and poverty
reduction.
The report charged too
that Caribbean countries
need to shift more
development funds to rural
areas to realise the true
potential of agriculture.,
Dr Brathwaite agreed
with the thrust of the
report and remarked that C
the region "must see the
agriculture sector in a
broader context ... L
Agriculture is an exciting i
area, but we have to see it
differently, and we have to t
concentrate on food
security, look for jobs,
link it with the tourist V
industry and begin to see
this sector for what it is,
which is a power house
with great potentials."
He said that IICA has been
doing studies which are in line
with or support the thesis
presented by the World Bank.
One such piece of research was
done last year. It examined 11
countries in Latin America and
looked at the real contribution
of agriculture to development.
According to Dr.
Brathwaite, IICA in its analysis
found that contrary to the
recorded statistics, the
contribution from agriculture
was from three to seven times
more than was reflected.
Using Costa Rica as an
example, he said, statistical data
shows that agriculture
contributed 11 per cent to the


'AGRICULTURE IS AN EXCITING AREA': Director General. Inter-American Institute for
Cooperation on Agriculture (IICA), Dr. Chelston Brathwaite during the interview Friday.


Gross Domestic Product, while
IICA's analysis showed a
contribution of 32 per cent.
He charged that there is that
difference because agriculture is
examined only as a primary


Agriculture is an
exciting area, but we
have to see it differently,
and we have to
concentrate on food
security, look for jobs,
ink it with the tourist
industry and begin to see
his sector for what it is
which is a power house
with great potentials.' -
Dr. Chelston Brathwaite


production. However, lie
pointed out that there is need to
look at all the linkages to other
industries and other activities.
"If you are producing milk
and you are making cheese,
yogurt and ice cream, that is all
part of agriculture because the
milk is coming from the cow
which goes to make the ice
cream or the yogurt or the
cheese, and without the milk
there will be no cheese.
"The real contribution of
agriculture therefore is all of
that: the value-added. It's the
extended," he pointed out.
Dr. Brathwaite used as
another example Jamaica where
several sugar-cane producing


entities claimed they \were
losing money on the production
of sugar.
But the IICA official said
"if they included the production
of rum they were making a
profit, but where does the rum
come from. If there is no sugar-
cane there is no rum. so we
have to take the agriculture
sector in its totality."
He spoke too of the
contributions of storage,
transport, packaging, banking,
the sellers of fertilisers,
tractors, pesticides, all
examples of the extended.
saying if there is no agriculture
they don't have a job.
"The point I'm making is
these are all integrated
industries that arc based on
agriculture and if there is no
agriculture there is no future."
he said and referred to an IICA
research document themned,
'More Than Food on the
Table: Agriculture's True
Contribution to the Economy'.
"...We have made a real
contribution to the dialogue by
doing that study... So we agree
with the World Bank that
agriculture has more to it than
meets the eye," he added.
Further, he said,
countries do not invest in
agriculture because they
think it's a small sector and
when you do not invest in
agriculture, the potential of
agriculture is to contribute to
other sectors. And if we are
looking for jobs and we are
looking to generate
employment opportunities,
you have to look at all these
linkages."


FOR SALE




. MGEE 5459.
hn worki 'gcondiion I
Type self-propelled truck crane
Carrier Data Type cab and frame diesel powered.

The Crane can he inspected (at:l

HOUSTON ESTATE WORKSHOP


On this note. Dr. Brathwaite
remarked that the Caribbean is
still the number one tourist
destination in the developing
world.
"We get 22 million tourists
per year, the cruise liners, the
hotels all of that ...that is in the
Caribbean basin, including the
Dominican Republic and Cuba,
not the Commonwealth
Caribbean.":
He noted that one of the
important things is to find how
we can feed these people when
they come to our shores.
"We have to bring people to
our shore and give them flying
fish. black belly lamb. mango
ice-cream and rum. That's the
paradigm: that's the shift I'm
talking about. We mnust bring
people and give them local
cuisine. If you are not selling
vour country: vou are not
getting the value-added from the
tourist industry."
"This is where the
agriculture linkages with tourism
become a very important
element for us. We begin to look
at opportunities for growth and
for jobs, because one of the
critical things. we have to face in
the future is how are we going
to employ our youth? What are
we going to give them to do?
"And if we are going to
settle for jobs, we have to look
at all these opportunities.
So if we have the tourists
coming to us. we don't have to
export the food. We have to
exploit that captive market right
here giving the tourists rum,
and flying fish and mango ice
cream... will stimulate those
sectors.
He also said the region
needs to begin to find a way to
store foods locally and
encourage farmers to enter the
global marketplace by helping
them to improve their
production, and to be reliable in
supply.
This will, however, call for
irrigation systems and
infrastructure to be in place, for
farmers to be provided with
credit and for there to be
technical help and training so
th,'\ \ ill k eno\\ \ ci l\ \\hat is
r'e0dedl ntc lie market place.
IICA, Dr. Brathwaite said,
is very optimistic and
confident that agriculture
has a bright future. "We are
just hoping that tihe
".(ve'lrnienits will give tihe
0Ia;1116'i.il iiupo't that .i'
I.C'C.SS;I'I to iil kale it
ii.'.sppcU.'.', 5 e .Udded.






SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 20, 2005 '


Film on




Janet Jagan

A FILM on Guyana's former President, Janet Jagan, is to be featured in the USA on Tuesday
as part of the acclaimed 'Independent Lens' series showcased by the Public Broadcasting
Service (PBS).
A production of n thei ike Nih.
ies'(WMM),thefilmonM jl -..,n. idled
'Thunder in Guyana', I. hc .lucdJ I i U
ingonPBS at 10.30PM( 1I ..,i, i "
on Tuesday.
WMMi', n:,ri,.m.d n t--pihl d, ,
tor of films nude' calal'iel's ht and a bout
',,,, eni l .1 l kn,., relc itant
pclhne_2 ael i .tl ri d htcind uLIII 1 I 'J' I
-LC-IIti c MC .'.irl'd. .mcii 2 tin, .1 ti c. -
lease.
'Thunder in Guyanad, a'.,id the relef.oe.
is based on "the remarkable tor'. cof tChi-
cago-born Janet Rosenbur I.'.t% h, '.'. a,
elected President of Guyaa n nIv 1 .", the
first American-born wom.tLI t I- .ea 3 .I -I
tion".
In a biographical sketch ,ot NMrli
Jagan, regarded national! ...i, re,,ln-
ally as the "outstanding rm11I .irch ,,t
the governing People'. Pr,.-:re-, c-
Party (PPP), the release iied th.-t ,he
married Cheddi Jagan in 10-14 in the
USA and returned with tumn to ,tairt 'a Former President, Janet Jagan
socialist revolution" in then British
Guiana.
'Thunder in Guyana' is a production of filmmaker and historian Suzanne Wasserman
who weaves "an amazing story of romance, politics and international intrigue through a
wealth of archival materials, interviews and more recent footage of Janet Jagans dramatic
presidential campaign..."


* I 3

MS. PAULA DOW ONE GSM CELL PHONE


MS. SIMANTHAALLICOCK ONE GSM CELL PHONE
Z - -aom


MS MARILYN ROSE ONE SCOOTER
We solve all your Problems...


MS.~ COLA VELCOME- ONE TV


STALL A BOURDA MARKET. TEL: 227-3404, 223-5262


I I


19flilill"ll:


'11171,147".~3






16 SUNDAY CHRONICLE FebrL


I)- i /,\YiAJ.


Ser-


u-I


ilij z


(From page 2)


Minister Baldwin Spencer, St
Vincent and the Grenadines
Prime Minister Ralph
Gonsalves and St Kitts and
Nevis Prime Minister Denzil
Douglas.
Other heads were repre-
sented by top level officials and
former Commonwealth Secre-
tary General Sir Shridath
Ramphal was among the special
invitees at the ceremony.
Head of the Presidential Sec-
retariat Dr Roger Luncheon, who
outlined the events leading up to
the completion of the secretariat
complex, said yesterday's inau-
guration marked another mile-
stone in CARICOM's history.

SY-3 MoiTi Of L-Ni IT-
Venetiaan. Patterson and
CARICOM Secretary General
Edwin Carrington hailed
Guyana's contribution to forging
regional unity and its determina-
tion to see the project through.
and with Mr. Jagdeo, thanked
the Japanese government for its
support.
The Suriname President said
the US$8M secretariat head-
quarters "symbolises the unity
and aspirationS" of the people
of the community and called its
opening a "joyful moment".
He said the opening of the
secretariat and progress towards
the Caribbean Single Market and
Economy (CSME) and the Car-
ibbean Court of Justice (CCJ)
marked the beginning of a "new
era" in Caribbean integration.
CARICOM is finally
ready to operationalise the
CCJ with all signatory mem-
ber states to its original juris-
diction on board for a sched-
uled April 16 inauguration
ceremony in Port-of-Spain.
The launch is to be followed,
possibly in July this year, of
the CSME, initially with Bar-
bados, Trinidad and Tobago
and Jamaica.
All other CARICOM mem-
bers are committed to readiness
for a single market in 2006.
Patterson noted that some
had questioned the location, of
the community headquarters
here because of geographical fac-
tors but said the decision was
more than justified from an his-
torical perspective and with an
eye to the future.
The presence here of Lagos
and Brazilian President Luiz
Inacio da Silva, who met
CARICOM leaders in
Paramaribo was more than just
coincidence, he said, pointing to
Guyana's unique position as a
bridgehead for greater links be-
tween the Caribbean and South
America.
President- Jagdeo and
.Carrington also. picked up this
theme. ; '


j i i


The Guyanese leader said
the presence of Lagos here yes-
terday "bears testimony to the
amicable bonds of friendship
among CARICOM, Chile and
the peoples of Latin America."
He argued that "as we
seek to strengthen
CARICOM, it is in our collec-
tive interest to create stronger
links with Latin America. The
same way we have accepted
our neighbours to the north so
must we accept and develop
ties with our neighbours in
the south."
"There are abundant oppor-
tunities for expansion of trade.
economic and cultural relations
between our two regions. We
should, therefore, grasp them
fully. The recent engagements be-
tween (Lula) and (Lagos) and
CARICOM leaders attest to this
optimism."
Mr Jagdeo said it was a
happy coincidence that the
CARICOM headquarters should
be sited here.
"Given Guyana's geo-strate-
gic position on the shoulder of
South America, it can serve as an
important gateway between the
two regions", he said.
He called for more vitalised
partnerships with global actors
and institutions, especially with
the proximate states- of Latin
America.
"We must also overcome the
disadvantages of history, small
size and weak economies by af-
firming our common Caribbean
identity and making oui econo-
mies competitive globally. The
challenge to do so is quite for-
midable. But if the history of
CARICOM teaches us anything,
it is that we can achieve the goals
we set ourselves", Mr. Jagdeo
said.

GUYANAASAHUB
Carrington said it was an
open secret that he has always
seen the new secretarial building
as "being the centre of a new de-
velopment thrust in the envi-
rons of greater Georgetown".
He praised the Guyana
Government's far-sightedness in
recognizingg the synergies which
can flow from the proximity of
the secretariat to the University
of Guyana as well as the poten-
tial of the nearby Ogle Airstrip".
This has resulted in the
nucleus of a major development
centre not just for Guyana and
the community "but for the en-
tire region of the shoulder of
South America and the Caribbean
islands", the Secretary-General
said.
"Think, for example, of the
prospect of a quick one hour or
so flight from Port-of-Spain,
Caracas, Paramaribo, Bridgetown,
and northern Brazil, into and out.


of Georgetown, through an en-
hanced Ogle Airstrip; of the
scope for holding conferences,
meetings, business and other in-
teractions using the adjacent new
conference centre (due to be
opened later this year): the na-
tional university and our inter-
national secretariat, and you will
see the tremendous potential it
gives to Guyana to be central to
the next wave of hemlispheric
economic development in this
region."
He also praised Mr. Jagdeo.
foriner Foreign Minister Clem-
ent Rohce (current Trade anod In-
'ernational Cooperation Minis-
ter) and forilter President Janet
Jagan lfor pushing tihe secrteltariat
project ahead.
He said the GuiVanaI Govern-
ment has delivered in full on its
promise and CARICOM has
"acquired a splendid home".
Patterson thanked President
Jagdeo for his "Herculean efforts
in enabling us to reach this june-
ture" and said yesterday was a
"critical milestone" for the com-
munity.
He. however, urged "we
must assert our common inter-
est with a clear and distinctive
voice" and said its leaders must
press ahead with the "mission
of building a people's conunu-
nity".
Mr. Jagdeo said the open-
ing of the permanent head-
quarters complex "represents
another step in the arduous
enterprise of building our
Caribbean nation."
Despite real or perceived
shortcomings, CARICOM has
exhibited the will to endure, he
said, adding that its continued
existence and development was
a telling triumph in its own right.
He said that the completion
of the headquarters building was
just the first phase of the devel-
opmental works earmarked for
the community at Liliendaal.
"It will be complemented by
a modern convention centre, an
upscale international hotel and
the upgrading of the Ogle aero-
drome into a regional airport.
Within a short period of time. the
headquarters, .t. i..eli, as it is to
the University of Guyana and
the Cyril Potter College of edu-
cation, will itself be a centre of
intellectual creativity and hub of
a thriving urban community", the
President said.
He noted that Guyana has
long been convinced that the
achievement of its fundamen-
tal national objectives was
linked to the progress of the
regional integration move-
ment and "whatever its eco-
nomic, social or political for-
tunes, (it) has remained a
committed player in the re-
gional arena." : ...


SECRETARIAT TOUR: from left, President Bharrat Jagdeo, Project Coordinator Walter Willis,
St Vincent and the Grenadines Prime Minister Ralph Gonsalves, Suriname President Ronald
Venetiaan and Trinidad and Tobago Prime Minister Patrick Manning during a tour of the
building. (Winston Oudkerk photo)


-ie4-


-.7


rd, .


'








L .


I'


FRONT ROW: from left, Head of the Presidential Secretariat, Dr Roger Luncheon. SpeaKf
Ralph Ramkarran, Trade and International Cooperation Minister Clement Rohee, Chancel
, President Janet Jagan and Prime Minister Samuel Hinds at the inauguration of the secretary


S page 16 & 17.p65


I






ary 20, 2005 I


I* ]p.


OPENING GROUP: President Bharrat Jagdeo with, from left, Barbados Prime Minister Owen
Arthur, Jamaica Prime Minister P.J. Patterson and St Vincent and Grenadines Prime
Minister Ralph Gonsalves inside the secretariat. (Mike Norville photo)






4 --4


Ilk-.


INAUGURATION GATHERING: diplomats and others at the
secretariat inauguration yesterday. (Winston Oudkerk
photo)


*r of the National Assembly
lor Desiree Bernard, former
at. (Winston Oudkerk photo)


0,. ,1; .A 144
SPECIAL Japanese envoy Tatsuo Arima at the cer iony.
(Mike Norville photo)






1 SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 20, 2005


GT&T contributes more


to Habitat for Humanity

THE Guyana Telephone and Telegraph Co. (GT&T) once again demonstrated its commit-
ment to assisting families in need of better housing when they contributed $1M to Habitat
for Humanity Guyana (HFHG).
Habitat for Humanity Guyana, a non governmental organisation, celebrated its I10lh anniver-
sary recently.
Deputy General Manager, Public Comnmunications of GT&T Mr. Terry Holder at the cer-
emony held at the Georgetown Club said that apart I'l .. -...I'..ring ihich annual Habitat homes,
the phone company would also be doing "hands on work" at the construction sites.
Holder also pointed out that they have donated $6M to HFHG over the past seven years,
which demonstrates a long-term partnership that helps non governmental organizations to budget
. better.
The cheque was accepted by Chairperson of the HFHG Sheila George.
HFHG has built more than 300 houses on the East Coast Demerara, Georgetown, East
Bank Demerara, West Demerara and Linden, a release from the organisation noted.


Workshop participant Juneann James receives her certificate of merit from Mr. James
Campbell of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).


City Council employees


attend solid waste workshop


Chairperson Mrs. Sheila George accepts the cheque from Deputy General Manager,
Public Communications of GT&T Mr. Terry Holder, while Habitat's Resource
Development Coordinator Sinikka Henry and Church Youth and Volunteer Relations
Coordinator Mr. Remmington Nelson look on.


EM IPLOYEES of Georgetown
City Council Solid Waste
Management Department re-
cently participated in a three-
day workshop on Effective
Solid Waste Communication
and Community Relations.
The interactive sessions
were conducted on February 12
to 15 by Guyenterprise Adver-
tising Agency and its affiliate,


PRIMA.
Topics discussed included
Human Psychology and Solid
Waste Issues, Compliance Strat-
egies. Coping Mechanisms in
Natural Disasters. Basic Ele-
ments of Community
Organisation. elements of effec-
tive communication and resolv-
ing misunderstanding about
solid waste.


Rufus Lewis, Head of the
Department, said that al-
though the employees have to
renew sustained efforts at
importing solid waste'man-
agement practices throughout
the city, as well as strict en-
forcement and prosecution,
they should be armed with ef-
fective communication and
community relations skills.


do S0E


SIMPLI Royal has an-
nounced that this year's 'Miss
Mash Queen International'
beauty contest has been can-
celled because of the disas-
trous flood that last month
blanketed parts of Guyana's
coastland, and resulted in the
death of more than thirty
persons.
The beauty shows commit-
tee said the floods here weren't
the only reason for the cancel-
lation of the Caribbean event
this year. Other countries, they
note. have suffered other disas-
ters.


"... Due to the flood situa-
tion in Guyana and disastrous
situations in neighboring com-
munities, we regrettably have to
cancel our event for this year.
The committee feels compelled
at this time to contribute to-
wards flood relief efforts, in uni-
son with the rest of the nation,"
Executive Director Pamela
Dillon said in a recent statement
to the press.
She said her committee is
already making preparations to
stage the beauty show next
year.
The first Miss Mash Inter-


national Queen sh<
staged last year. Miss Ni
Island. Ana Sanchez
won the coveted
crown from a field of
ten delegates at the
National Cultural
Centre in
Georgetown.
Ten foreign
countries were in-
vited to send repre-
sentatives to the
event which mainly
promotes Guyana's
annual Mashramani cele
under the theme 'Brin


o was


ebrations,
aging the


world to Guyana'. Guyana was
represented last year by Ulex


Atwell.
The committee said the


pageant
achieved


and p
Mashrat


's objective was well
d last year. when the el-
egant and talented
beauties from
Anguilla, Barbados,
Colombia. Curacao.
Dominica. Domini-
can Republic.
Margarita Island.
Puerto Rico,
Trinidad and Tobago,
Venezuela and
Guyana. were suc-
cessfully presented
on the local scene.
anticipated in our
nani celebrations.


"These delegates brought
with them diverse cultures,
uniqueness, special talents and
gifts," Simpli Royal stated in the
release.
The pageant received
overwhelming support from
the business community and
the committee extends its
gratitude to Minister of Trade
and Tourism Mr. Manzoor
Nadir, Minister of Youth
Sport and Culture, Ms. Gail
Teixeira, and Ansa McAl
(Carib Beer), and all its sup-
porters and friends. (Shauna
Jemmott)


Alli fr F WbiC-LL to insurance

'Speclat -'-n" hios apply


I bwee.ca./


Syou travel agent or BWV Ait


for %Ill (~iml


N


0 lAi~Ilsl5, '.~5 St W\ItSit ii w ri .'oro t~


"... Due to the flood situation in Guyana
and disastrous situations in neighboring
communities, we regrettably have to
cancel our event for this year. The
committee feels compelled at this time to
contribute towards flood relief efforts, in
unison with the rest of the nation."
Executive Director Pamela Dillon


''*/j ,


T NEW


I I \- ,


~E~


I


il U I l ll_ . ........ . ... ... . ....


froo,





'IIlNAY PONflIP.I F PIhrnIn/ n 20 2005


S--"Copyrighted Ma


cibySyndicated ont

Available from CommerciallNe


Pv


d tour


a-


o e


* - a
a. e -


GRANT OF LICENCE TO THE
LETHEM POWER COMPANY
The public is hereby given notice that a "Licence to
Generate, Distribute and Supply electricity for
Public Purposes" has been granted to the Lethem
Power Company (the Licensee), a company duly
registered under the Companies Act 1991. The
Licence takes effect from January 1, 2005 and is
valid until December 31, 2014.
By virtue of the terms of the Licence, the Licensee
has been authorized to conduct such authorized
business in Rupununi, Region 9, within the
boundaries Quarrie Creek in the South; Monari
Creek in the North; Kanuku Mountain Range in the
East; and the Takatu River in the West.
A copy of the Licence could be inspected at the Office
of the. Prime Minister by any person during normal
working hours. A copy of the Licence could also be
viewed at the website: www.electricity.gov.gy
Issued by Samuel A. Hinds
Prime Minister &
,,, ',- Responsible for the Electricity Sector


i - -


4 0 .S-












terial


ent ____

hwsQoies


auumtnnMU~,rtUUCy1-U





20 SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 20, 2005


Colombians flee to cities


amid refu


crisis


"CopyrightedJ Material

Syndicated Content

ble from Commercial News Pro




n
JjL.


___ m
___ ~ ~ ____
~ ~


riders"


ft.. - -


- D


boNS -arif


a


GUYANA SUGAR CORPORATION INC.


I GUMMA SGAR ORORAIO IN.


400 0.0


Tenders are invited for the
follow ing items:


supply of the


1. MotorCycles
2. 45 HP Tractors
3. 80 HP Tractors
4. 100 HP Tractors
5. 140 HPTractors
6. Rotary Ditchers
Tender documents can be purchased from the
Materials Management Department, Ogle, East
Coast Demerara for a nonrefundable fee of
G$3.000 and can be uplifted from Tuesday,
February 22, 2005.
Tender closes on T/mrsdaY, March 10, 2005 at
1 4 :0 0 h rs ._..-. .


NOTICE
The Guyana Sugar Corporation Inc., through its
Engineering Services Department LBI. E.C.D
wishes to carry out repairs to:-
* ADMIN. HOUSE AT LBI, EAST
DEMERARA ESTATES
Interested contractors are asked to check with the
Engineering Services Department to purchase
tenders by latest Friday,, February 25, 2005.
Site visit at bidder's own expense is arranged for
Tuesday, February 22, 2005 and closing date for
submission of tender is Monday, February 28, 2005.
S: ", Fax. No. 220-2719


a- -


q.Mma l.


41M- asm

sa


-Mm -don Im mmw -
4D dw- -- 4WD a
'MW dml-- 4


4w.'go*m am=
-Mi


Availa

*/'
*4

& U


4 Ll I


- -8 40






SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 20, 2005


6


L


Q Z


NAME -NAME'
ADDRESS' ADDRESS-


a ,S


t- me 1 4=





"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


49D-4 am S ___ WNO mOom 4
a- quam-ml -O 0quuo am -d .dlb
On, M5mamdmmm4M 4b mm-aqu. a





















4b am mum 1. -b400


ACROSS:

2. To testify.
5. Television Channel.
7. Prefix variant spelling
ofen-.
9. This was the state of a
young sportsman who
neglected the advice of
his coach.
10. Determined by or
resembling the moon.
12. Synonym for the word,
clatter.
14. Animals are found
here.
17. Parent.
19. "So shall they fear the
name of the Lord
from the west and his
glory from the rising
of the sun. When the
***** come in like a


A new 'Must-Be-Won'
Crossword puzzle for
$40,000.00 is now presented
to you. Please note, as a
result of the effects of the
flood situation here in
Regions #3,4 and 5, our new
'Republic Day Celebration'
competition will be drawn
on Friday, February 25,
2005. The rule for this
competition is that the best
entry wins the prize money
of $40,000.00. If there is
more than one winner the
prize money will be shared
among the winners.

The additional incentive of
$1,000.00 and $2,000.00 for
the 40+ and 80+ entries
groupings is still in effect.


flood the Spirit of the
Lord shall lift up a
standard against him."
22. Asilvery freshwater
fish.
23. Metric prefix.
24. This was missing from
the musician's
luggage.
'25. Expert.


DOWN:

1. Reproduce.
2. Synonym for the
word, swear.
3. Word used as a
homophone.
4. A snake-like fish with
a slender elongated
body and poorly
developed fins.
6. Personal name.


8. Waterfall on the left
bank of the Essequibo
River.
11. Month of the Gregorian
calendar.
13. A yellow light used as a
cautionary signal
between green for 'go'
and red for'stop'.
15. Prefix within, inside.


16. Word used as a
homophone.
18. Assembly.
20. A fruit used medicinally
to stimulate the
immune system and as
a detoxifying agent.
21. Medium Frequency
(Abbr.)


Ace, amber, aye, clack, clang, clash, CNN, crowd,
damn, darn, December, den, depone. depose,
duplicate, eel, em, en, enemy, eye, February, group,
kilo, loner, loser, lunar, ma, MF, Mona, Mope.
Mora, nano, Narvon, Noni, Norman, Norwin,
NTN, November, Orfe, pa, pair, pear, pen, pico,
pro, replicate, TBN, v iz, zipper, zither.


If you play smart you can win
this offer of $40,000.00. The
more you play the greater is the
possibility of winning. The
amount of entries submitted
must be covered by the
relevant sums of money or
they will not be judged. Then
place those entries in a
Chronicle Crossword box at a
location near to you.

If you need coupons just
purchase a copy of the
Sunday or Wednesday
Chronicle. For extra coupons
purchases can be made at our
offices in Linden, New
Amsterdam and G/Town.
You can also purchase extra
coupons from Mr. Vincent
Mercurius of 11 Section 'E'
D'Edwards,, Rosignol,
Berbice. They cost $40.00 per
pair as they appear in the


Chronicle or $20.00 each.

Players are reminded that no
entry is opened before
12:30.pm on the day the
puzzle is drawn and that
judging does not begin
before 4:30.pm when the last
entry is opened. The solution
to the puzzle is not known
before that time.

This apart our general rules
apply.

We do hope and pray that
our many fans and residents
affected by the flood would
experience quick relief and
resolution to this ongoing
crisis.

Thanks
Crossword Committee


. I'


CROSSWORD.PUZZLE.







22 SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 20, 2005


-*w -o


MTV CHANNEL 14
CABLE 65.

06:45 h Sign On With Bhajan
Melodies
07:00 h Dabi's Musical Hour
07:30 h Bhakti Bhajans
08:00 h Christ For The Nation
(Live)
08:30 h IQ (Islamic Quiz)Live
09:00 h Sunday Morning At
MTV With Renu (Live)
10:00 h Death
Announcements/ In Memoriam
10:05 h News Update (R/B)
10:30 h Indian Movie
13:30 h Avon Video & DVD
Musical Melodies
14:00 h Current Affairs
15:00 h Movie
17:00 h Travelers Extreme
Live With Brian
18:00 h Birthdays & Other
Greetings
18:15 h Death
Announcements/ In Memoriam
18:30 h The Fact
19:00 h The Dairy
19:30 h IBE Highlights
20:30 h Death.
Announcements/ In Memoriam
20:45 h Indian Movie
00:00 h Sign Off


WRHM CHANNEL 7

07:00 h CNN News
08:00 h Today
10:00 h CBS Sunday
11:30 h Mulan 2
13:00 h Ladies Night
15:00 h Championship Boxing
16:30 h PGA Golf: Nissan
Open
19:00 h Eyes On The Issues
19:30 h NBC News
20:00 h 60 Minutes
21:00 h -Close Case
22:00 h- Law & Order
23:00 i- Boston Legal
00:00 h- NBC New


NCN INC. CHANNEL 11

02:00 h NCN News Magazine'.
(R/B)
02:30 h Late Nite With GINA
03:00 h.- Movie
05:00 h Hour Of Potter
S05:30 h BBC News
06:00 h NCN News Magazine
(R/B)


-07:00 h CNN News
08:00 h Lifting Guyana To
greatness
08:30 h The Fact
09:00 h Anmol Geet
10:00 h The Concert For
Guyana Live From London
14:00 h Weekly Digest
14:30 h Catholic Magazine
15:00 h Opening Of
CARICOM Headquarters (R/B)
16:00 h Family Forum
16:30 h Breaking The Silence
17:30 h Guysuco Round Up
18:00 h Between The Lines
18:30 h Kala Milan
19:00 h One On One:
Canadians End Flood
Assessment
19:30 h Island Life
20:00 h Close Up
20:30 h.- Feature
21:30 h Islam For Guyana
22:00 h Movie


NTN CHANNEL 18
CABLE 69

05:00 h Sign On With The
Mahamrtunjaya Mantra
05:10 h Meditation
05:30 h Quran This Morning
*06:00 h R. Gossai General
Store Presents Shiva Bhajans
06:15 h Jetto's Lumber Yard.
Presents Shiva Bhajans
06:45 h Timehri Maha Kali
Shakti Mandir Presents Ma Ki
Shakti Amrit
07:00 h Ramroop's Furniture
Store Presents Religious
Teachings
07:30 h A&S Enterprises
Presents Shiva Bhajans
07:45 h Death Announcement
& In Memoriam
08:05.h SA RE GA MA
(Musical Notes) A Live Call-In
Program
09:5 ih NTN Indian Musical
Interlude
10:00 h Sunday Morning
Services By Pt. Reepu Daman
Persaud
11:00 h To Be Announced
12:00 h Death Announcement
& In Memoriam
13:00 h DVD Movie: EK
PHOOL DO MALI (Eng. Sub.)
Starring Sanjay, Sadhana, Balraj
Sahani & Bobby
16:30 h -Teaching Of Islam
17:00 h IPA Presents... Shiv


Mahapuran (Eng. Sub.)
17:30 h Birthday Greetings/
Anniversary/ Congratulation/
Death Announcement & In
Memoriam
18:00 h Mere Awaaz Suno...
Karaoke Live
19:00 h Gurukula Sandesh
19:30 h Kishore Local Talent
20:00 h Death
Announcements & In
Memoriami
21:00 h Shri Ramcharitamanas
Katha By Shri Praskas Gossai
In Corentyne, Berbice
23:00 h DVD Movie: Jerry
Maguire Starring Tom Cruise
00:00 h Sign Off With The
Gayatri Mantra


RBS CHANNEL 13

09:00 h Hope For Today
10:00 h Revival Crusaders
Hour
10:30 h TBN
12:30 h CNN
13:00 h TBN
14:00 h Charlotte Street
Wesleyan
14:30 h Methodist Church In
Guyana
15:00 h Church Of God In
Guyana
15:30 h Faith & Truth
16:00 h CNN
16:30 h PGA Golf
19:00 h Meet The Parents
21:00 h Extreme Makeover
22:-100 h Desperate
Housewives

DTV CHANNEL 8

08:55 h Sign On
09:00 h Sunday Mass: Our
Lady Of The Angels
10:30 h Sabrina Animated
11:00 h Family Matters
DTV'S Festival Of Biblical
Movies For The Lenten Season"


The Ten Commandments
16:00 h Boy Meets World
Marathon
19:00 h Greetings &
Announcements
19:30 h Faith In Action A
Catholic Series
20:00 h Musical Interlude
20:30 h A Return To God's
Biblical Foundation
21:00 h Fresh Charmed
22:00 h New Desperate
Housewives
23:00 h New Boston Legal
00:00 h Sign Off


HBTV CHANNEL 9

05:50 h Death Announcement
06:00 h Bishop W.D Babb
Presents
06:30 h Gospel Speaks
Ministries
07:00 h Voice Of Ezra
07:30 h Mullings Ministries
08:00 h Islam & You
09:00 h Entrepreneurship
10:00 h House Of Israel Bible
Class
10:30 h Documentary
11:00 h Nation Watch
13:00 h ACDA Presents
14:00 h Dalgety's Africa
15:00 h Birthday Request
15:05 h Expose
16:00 h From The Heart
Church Ministries
17:00 h New Life Ministries
17:30 h Mystery Of The
Gospel
18:00 h Sports Show
19:00 h Birthday Request
19:05 h Sitcom
19:30 h Caribbean Feedback
20:00 h C-Span's: Black
Political Struggles
21:00 h Message By Hon.
Minister Farrakhan
22:00 h Death Announcement
22:30 h Happenings TV
23:30 h Sign Off


Guide subject

to change


without notice





S-eather

^atch s

TODAY'S FORECAST: Partly cloudy to cloudy conditions with
occasional showers and light intermittent rain are expected
to give way to mainly fair weather during the afternoon.
WINDS: Will vary between the Northeast and southeast at 3
to 9' mps.
SEAS: Slight to moderate reaching 1.2m in open waters.
HIGH TIDE:02:25h at (2.43m)'and 13:53h at (2.53m)
LOW TIDE: 07:54h at (1.10m) and 20:48h at (0.87m)
GEORGETOWN TIMEHRI N/AMSTERDAM
SUNRISE: 06:08h Nil Nil
SUNSET: 18:05h Nil Nil
MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE: 28- 33.5C over near inland and
inland regions and 28- 30C along the coast.
MINIMUM TEMPERATURE: 21.0C 24.0C over inland and
interior locations & 25.0C- 26.5C along the coast.
RAINFALL: 11.0mm
RAINFALL ACCUMULATED: 136.9 mm
HIGH TIDE ADVISORY: Nil
MARINE ADVISORY: Nil

FOR WEATHER RELATED QUERIES PLEASE
CALL US AT: TELE 261-2284, 261-2216.


a *


ONNIINO ft.d-
w .m OW
40 m
0 aw -
4b C I 4W
amo -0
G- 4w4m Ndlb.w4


* .- ~



-


-b, -


40 41W 010 e


s a QW, 40-0 .,aO


fod - -

S"Copyrighted Material .e
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


ed -4b









4b 4D -
4m -


______ 44

mm 0* oo


4WD 0 4

"Pw -








qlm w MOW 401

440w -" --d



me mme


DEMERARA HARBOUR BRIDGE CLOSURE TO ROAD
TRAFFIC FOR SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2005


.'?t,.


For Ocean Going Vessels & Trawlers 14:30hrs
For Ocean Going Vessels opening last about l-l'"hrs


MEMEL'mu


~t~ ~e~rz~rR7~i~l~


'P









SUNDAY,CHRONICLE February 20,2005 23


,lump


.,- a _I S


'I- J .. -d..: -A.. -,:-


rr~ '- ,~ ~


- .- ',. r


-. - 2 .;:,z 5 ia".be







IS,


p =-Z4 O- b.. E"fl'.-'- -. .- 0.Ie' v -M L- W


WHOLESALE prices for
potatoes, onions, garlic, split
peas, channa, milk powder, jar
oil Steve's Trading, 35
William St., Campbellville. Tel:
624-6414/225-0688/223-1122,



C-TECH COMPUTER
SERVICES. Think U lost Data,
Hard Drive crash, CD/floppy
damaged? Also repairs/
upgrade, provide Software. and
we handle Network problems.
Please Contact Rickey Tel. #
226-8234/611-4929.
FOR all your computer
repairs, Networking, Website
development, Point of Sale,
computerised accounting,
computer training. Software
sales and computer hardware
imports (at Factory Direct
Pricing). Contact: Ronald #
618-5750, James # 660-7232.



LAND NOT FOR SALE.
The public is hereby notified
that the property (vacant land)
situated at Lot number 182
Duncan Street, Lamaha
Gardens, Georgetown, Guyana
is owned by Phillip Campayne,
TRANSPORT #1900/80. This
land is not for sale, nor transfer,
nor has been bestowed to a
Power of Attorney. The land is
not for sale. This is the second
lot on the left; heading east as
you entered Lamaha Gardens
along Duncan Street,
Georgetown.
The Public is hereby
notified that Renita Natasha
Abrams of 303 Lamaha Park,
East La Penitence Georgetown
is no longer employed as
cashier by Executive Office
Services. She is therefore no
longer authorized to neither
collect any monies on behalf
of the business nor transact any
other business associated with
the said business. Customers
who may have visited our office
during the period November
2004 to January 2005
requesting services should make
immediate contact with the
I vgr/Accountant on
Telephone number 223-8176.



WORK from home for
US$$$$ weekly. Information?
Send stamped envelope to:
Nicola Archer, PO Box- .''4
Georgetown, Guyana."
WORK from home.
Information? Send stamped
envelope to: Bibi Farid, 65
Public Road, Eccles, East Bank
Demerara, Guyana.
HOME-BASED jobs for
profits. Send stamped envelope
to: Donnette Bridgemohan, 46
West Ruimveldt H/Scheme,
Georgetown, Guyana.
TURN your spare-time into
money by filling envelopes. For
info. send stamped envelop to
Jasodra Sarwan, 61 Goed
Bananen Land, East Canje,
Berbice.
WORK from home for
profits. Information? Send
stamped envelope to: Paul
Meusa, 31 Walker Terrace, N/
East La Penitence,
Georgetown, Guyana.
MAIL Business Home
Earner Programme.
Information? Send stamped
envelope to: Donna Meusa, 31
Walker Terrace, N/East La
Penitence, Georgetown,
Guyana. --
CONTROL your income
working from home filling 100
envelopes for USS500 or mrnore
weekly. For information, send
stamped self-addressed
envelope to: Nathaniel
Williams, PO Box: 12154,
Georgetown, Guyana.


EMPLOYERS needing staff
in any category. Call: K.R's
Agency # 225-5362/616-0905,



,.-LtS-GIRLS from country
areas, Domestics/Cleaners,
Carpenters, Plumbers. Call: 225-
5362/616-0905 between 09:00
and 15:00 h.



JEAN offers courses in
Elementary, Intermediate
& Advanced Dressmaking,
also Designing. -153 Barr
St., Kitty. Tel. # 226-9548



MUSIC system, wax ma-
chine. Contact Freddy, 43
Bent Street, Werk-en-Rust.
Tel. 231-7789/621-5984.
Reasonable rates.



ARE you hurt, depressed,
lonely, financially unstable,
demonically possessed,
emotionally stressed and angry?
Kingdom Ministries 223-1930



EXPANDING Hardware
and General Store has career
opportunities for experienced,
hard-working and pleasant
individuals Counter/Billing
Clerk, (male/female), Senior
Confidential Clerk, Porters
(able-bodied). Step up to the
challenge. Apply in person
with written Applications,
References and copies of
certificates, etc. to: The
Manager, Hamson's General
Store, 116 Regent Road,
Bourda, Georgetown.



YOGA for health and
happiness. Call 223-9719/
231-2985.
HOW to check your
battery, overcome obstacles,
win in emergencies, stop
being a victim, avoid mental
t G,sion and old age? Call:
Leonard orn Tel. # 225-
0691/624-1418.



NEED to activate your body
and mental strength? Come for
a well-balanced health
massage, shower available. Call
Mrs. Singh (daily). Tel. 220-
4842/615-6665.
ESCAPE Bodybliss
massages. Alleviate
headaches, insomnia,
muscular pains, tension and
stress. Certified Massage
Therapist Ulelli Verbeke #
226-2669/615-8747


MAGAZINE Worldwide Pen
Friends. Information? Send
stamped envelope CFI, PO Box:
12154, Georgetown, Guyana.
BROTHER MARAJ 28,
invites female single Christian
(21- 28) to correspond. Send
mails to Box 26049 K.Y. G/town.
COMMUNICATE with
interested persons by telephone
for friendship or serious
relations. Call: CFI Telephone
Friendship Link: 261-5079,
Sunday to Saturday, 07:00 to
21:00 h.
PROFESSIONALS and
other employed males and
females for friendship, love,
marriage. Call the Junior/
Senior/Singles Dating Service
18 80 years. Telephone 223-
8237 Mon. Fri. 09:00 -
18:00 hours, Sat. Sun. 10:00
- 14:00 hours (Immediate link).


NOVELS, Story books, text,
etc. Also Novels and other books
on sale from $20 Lip. Telephone
223-8237,


REAHM-LESTATE--
PROPERTIES to rent from
$25 000 upwards. Houses in
residential areas to purchase
from $7M upwards. Call: 225-
5362/616-0905.



ENROL now at Shalom Ent.,
Lot 2 Croal Street, Stabroek,
Georgetown. You could also
obtain an International Driver's
Permit. For information, Call:
227-3869/622-8162.



HERBAL bars, deep cleanse
and scrub, intensive cream. Mon.
- Sat. Tel: 223-8993.
HERBAL Medicines skin
infection, asthma, impotent,
cholesterol, blood pressure,
weight loss, gallstone,
stricture pain, diabetes,
internal cleansing and many
more. Appointment # 220-
7342/614-5650.



INDRA'S Beauty Salon, 122
Oronoque Street, for cold wave,
straightening, facial, manicure,
scalp treatment and design on
nails. Also Beauty Culture
available. Tel. 227-1601.
DOLLY'S Hairdressing
Salon, 175 Middle Street,
C'burg., Georgetown for cold-
waiving, straightening, styling,
colour streak, cut-blow dry,
manicure, pedicure, facial, etc.
Phone: 227-2428.



BEAUTY Queen Perfection
Programme. Do you want to be
a beauty queen or just look like
one? Simpli Royal is proud to
announce registration for its
Beauty Queen Perfection
Programme. A (6) six-week
preparation that puts you on the
cutting edge of pageant
participation. Learn how to
market yourself, your sponsor
and your country F". question
an. g aTiswer skills, prepare a
portfolio, congeniality skills,
modelling, etc., OR if you would
just like a Complete Makeover,
then this programme would be
perfect for you. Classes
commence on March 1, 2005
SMonday, Wednesday &
thursday evenings). Seats are
limited so REGISTER NOW!
Registration ends February 20,
2005. For further information
and registration Call us on Tel.
# 226-3822 or come into us at
140 Quamina Street,
Georgetown (opposite Kings
Jewellery World).


TECHNICIANS available for
appliances repairs washers,
dryers, microwaves, stoves, deep
fryers, etc. Call: 622-4521/263-
0050.
DIESEL INJECTION
SERVICES. For services and
repairs to fuel pumps & injectors
- Tel: 222-5779, 222-2207, Cell:
623-2605.
FOR PROFESSIONAL
COMPUTER Repairs, Sales &
Services Call Kersting's Computer
Repairs & Sales Centre @ 227-
8361/618-8283. Home & Office
services available. 24 hrs.
FOR all your telephone
services, repairs to cable
equipment, rewiring, adjacent,
etc. Contact Qualified
Technician with over 35 years
experience. Don't delay.
Telephone 226-2766/617-0427
anytime.


AIR offers K..yuoard,
guita. rs 'ce training and
piano classes. Call 626-5804/
225-8447.
MURRAY'S PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT & SERVICES.
CALL: 231-3302.
INTERIOR FLIGHT
SERVICES. For flights to
Interior locations Tel: 226-
7516, Cell: 616-5668 .
FOR Honest and Reliable
Security Service with over two
decades of experience. Contact
Mr. Sace Naraine. # 227-3540.
PROFESSIONAL Computer
repairs, sales and Networking.
Reduced prices on brand new'
systems. Tel. 624-5659, 220-6262.


PHONICS Classes for
children 7 years and up. Call
624-8084, 227-8143 anytime.
Individual attention guaranteed.
Ronald.
JOIN THE PHONICS CEN-
TER. We teach your child/chil-
dren the art of reading. See
them develop into good read-
ers. Call 618-2068.
COMPUTER Training Videos
with exam guides: Comptia A+ and
Network +, MCSE, Office 2003,
JavaScript, Mac OS 10, Xhtml.
Also latest software. Call Brian -
660-0845.
UNITECH Computer
School. Enrol now!! & earn your
Diploma for new courses
beginning shortly children and
adult evening and dvay. Tel:
220-0866 --Mail
unicomp03@yahoo.com
DESPAT'S Creative Craft,
311 Rohinital Street, P. Nagar.
Enrol ,ow for courses in Fabric
Designs, Cookery, Sewing,
Curtain Making, Cakes and
Pastries, Cake Decoration and
more. Call Pat Helwig on 227-
0646 or 622-9915.
JEAN offers courses in:
dressmaking, tie dye fabric
designing, bedroom elegance,
soft furnishing, soft toys, curtains,
cushions, crochet, ribbon
embroidery, hand embroidery,
plastic canvas, smocking, floral,
craft, cake decoration. 159 Barr
St., Kitty. # 226-9548.
PRACTICAL electronics
course beginning 21'1 Feb.
Professional instructor teaching
repairs to televisions, microwave
ovens, amplifiers, stereo
systems, etc. evening classes.
Call Abdul's Electronic Services
for further information on Tel.
226-6551 or 225-0391.
Guarantee your future now!
EARN your computer
Certificates and Diploma now at
Computer Training Centre.
Certificates/Diploma courses
Microsoft windows, Word, Excel,
Access, PowerPoint, FrontPage
2003, Adobe Photoshop CS,
Corel Draw, Publisher Diploma
in Computerised Accounting.
QuickBooks Accounting,
Peachtree Accounting, AccPac
Simply Accounting. Repairs &
maintenance, Networking &
ComrnpTIA Network,
A+Certificates. Information
Technology, Computer courses
for children's ages 7 12. We
also repair and services
computers at a low cost.
Software & Games for sale. Visit
our Office nt 58, Upper Robb &
Oronoqile Sts., Bourda,
Georgetown. Tel. # 225-1540.


1 HANDLER/TRUCK
DRIVER. Contact: G&I Sawmill,
PoLideroyen, WBD. Tel: 264-
2524.
PROFESSIONAL Cook,
Assistant Cook and Counter Staff
wanted Apply to: Jerries
Snackette, 228 Camp Street..
VACANCY exists for Porter.
Please apply to: Survival, 16
Duncan St. and Vlissengen Rd.
with application, Tel. # 227-
8505.
SALESG:RLS, Security
Guards, ages 30 to 55 years to
work at hotels/store. MURRAY'S
TEMP AGENCY. Call: 231-3302.
ONE Junior Welder/
Mechanic. Apply with
Application to: Lot I1 Meadow
Bank. East Bank Demerara.
Telephone for enquiry 223-
1229.
FOR experienced Sewing
Machine Operators. Apply to:
Kent Garment Factory Ltd.. 12
Plaisance Public Road, ECD
or Phone. 222-2541.
ONE day shift Handyman
',, I wages). One able-
Security Guard and
Barman. Tel. 226-6527/623-
7242. Tennessee
Entertainment Centre
SALESCLERK 20 30
years, (2) years experience
and must be good at Maths &
English. Apply to Lens, Sheriff
& Fourth Sts., C/ville. Tel.
227-2486.
2 ACCOUNTS Clerks,
Driver/Mechanic, Trainee
Machinist, Machinist Welder/
Fabricator. Send application
to 172 East Field Dr., Nandy
Park, E B Dem.
TWO (2) General
Labourers $1 100, per day.
Apply with documents to Lot
10, Meadow Bank, East Bank
Demerara. Enquiry Call:
Telephone # 225-9304.
VACANCY exists for security
uards with sound Primary
education. Also (one) 1 -
Supervisor with own cycle. Apply
in person with written
application, 80 Seaforth St., C/
vile.
VACANCY Lorry Driver for
7-ton Leyland. References and
Police CIeaince required. Also
one Labourer. Teiles Steel &
Hardware, 74 !-adfie!d St., G/t.
Tel. 226-6771.
APEX EDUCATION.
Vacancy exists for four (4)
cleaners. Must have a pleasant
personality and be able to work
with children. Apply with written
application at 11 Vryheid's Lust
Public Road, ECD.
VACANCY exists for one
Cashier, preferably mature
female individual with previous
experience. Please, apply in
person with written application
to May's Shopping Centre, 98
Regent Street, Georgetown.
PART-TIME Information
Technology Teacher with
experience in dealing with SBA.

Business College, 262 Thomas
St., North Cummin gsburg. Tel:
223-7210/223-7219.
NANDKUMAR BRIJLALL
Welding and Machine Estd., 12
Anna Catherina, West Coast
Demerara, Public Road. 7
Machinists, 5 Welders, 3 -
Apprentices. Contact N, BriTall,
Managing Director. Tel. 276-
0389/276-0011.
EXISTS for one
experienced driver with valid
Licence for car, van, lorry and
mini bus. Must be able bodied
and able to work flexible hours.
Attractive salary offered. Apply
in person to Mav's Shopping
Centre, 98 Regent St.,
Georgetown,
APEX EDUCATION -
vacancies exist for two (2)
security guards and
maintenance officer carpentry,
masonry and plumbing
experience would be an atasset
Salary $7 000 $9 0001 11
Apply in person with 11
application at II Vivlivh'ild' I ii
Puhilic Road, ECD


ONE Cleaner. Apply in
person to Len's, Sheriff &
Fourth Sts., C/ville.
FEMALES (2), male (1) to
woik at car wash. Telephone
231-1786/621-5332.
ONE Office Assistant. Must
have knowledge of Payroll,
NIS, Filing and must be
computer literate. Must be
between the ages of 20 and
30 years old. Must have
knowledge of Maths and
English and at least two (2)
years working experience.
men's Sheriff & Fourth
Streets, C/ville.
APEX EDUCATION -
vacancy exists for teachers in
all subject areas especially
Caribbean History and
Geography in the upper
secondary of the Institution.
Also for one nursery teacher.
Apply with written apDlication
to the Principal Apex
Education. 11 Vryheid's Lust,
Public Road, ECD.
VACANCIES exist in a
reputable, stable, financial
organization for sales
representatives. Applicants
should be mature in age and
possess a minimum of 3 CXC,
GCE subjects or an equivalent
qualification. Send
application to: Unit Manager.
133 Church Street, South
Cummingsburg, Georgetown.
Telephone number: 622-0307.
CASHIER, General Clerk.
Requirements Smart intellect,
Team player, Highly motivated
performance. A smiling face.
Must have own transportation
for the General Clerk Position
Apply in person to Executive
Office Services, 82 Albert
Street, Bourda, Georgetown,
Monday through Friday 09:00
hrs 11:00 hrs or in writing not
later than Monday 28"
February, 2005.



EAST BANK $1.5M &
$3.5M, Kitty $3.5M, & $4.5M.
TEL. 226-8148/625-1624.
LAND FOR SALE OLEAN-
DER GARDENS 89 FT BY
152 FT. PRICE $25M. CALL:
612-0349.
LAND in Georgetown from
$8 million upwards. Call 225-
2626/231-2064 or
tonyreidsrealty@hotmail.com
ONE corner lot in Diamond
Scheme size: 100 x 60 ft -
$2.5M. Contact Tel. # 227-
5238, Cell: 622-8321.
LA UNION/Crane Public
Road, 4 vacant adjacent lots -
50'/120'. $3M each.
Ederson's 226-5496.
PRIME commercial land
for sale 115 ft x 31 ft,
Charlotte Street, Bourda.
Contact owner 226-0683
(anytime).
HOUSE lot for sale Lot 53
Area "H" Earls Court, LBI, ECD -
reasonable offer accepted. Tel.
227-1711 between 17:00 and
20:00 hrs.
TWO transported adja-
cent lots in Earl's Court. LBI
18 080 sq ft total. Please tele-
phone 623-7438 between 6-
8am and 8-10pmr for details.
DUKE St., Kingston: 2
large house lots. 48/117' ideal
school. luxurious hotel,
apartments, storage bond.
$9.5M. Ederson's 226-
5496.
D'URBAN STREET
(MIDDLE DEPTH) VACANT
RESIDENTIAL LAND, 999
YEARS LEASE HOLD, $2M,
HUMPHREY NELSON'S: 22t6-
8937.
GATED comnutnit\. with
4) hours sciulritv. E\xchluisivol\,

W aestBank 'llom hli.i ;.i' 6' 1000
I 1I 000 a1 Its prIcod iom ',' ,M
ImmI edi ltel I i I,"po l
C'onlk ct ci. 1,111 .' k ,


-- F' -


IP---~--~L_-__ ~*Y~P~ILI~qPI~s~B~.*~~ls~lE(~9~Y ---~sL+Y~srrB~qePI~Rt~PTl~p_ -~n~~;;YP~ilP~s~A~~~


P--


tE


.


M- &


IOt1111,


CJ







24 SIINDA IR-HPoICLE; F~btD"'!O052


TRANSPORTED $300
000 $900 000, Queenstown -
$5M, Kitty $4M, Liliendaal -
$4.5M, Lamaha Gardens -
$10M, Earl's Court, LBI $5M,
Alberttown $8M, Diamond -
$1.5M & West Ruimveldt -
$2M. Low cost houses and pre
.an--,ted houses $10 000
monthly. Call 4-6236.
ONE square mile of
registered gold and diamond
land claim. Easy access to
water for all-year work. Ideal
for land dredging operation.
Minimal vegetation. Mining
will not affect environment or
cause river pollution.
Location: Imbaimadai Area -
Upper Mazaruni. Interested
persons please Phone: 614-
9709.



ROOM for single work-
ing female. Telephone:
227-0928
FURNISHED bottom
flat to rent Shell Road,
Kitty. Call: 223-7812.
1 ROOM for single,
decent, working female.
Tel. 231-1786/621-
5332.
SHORT-TERM RENTALS
FOR OVERSEAS VISITORS.
PHONE 225-9944.
3-BEDROOM fully
furnished apartments for rent
immediately. Please Call: 225-
9562.
ONE 3-bedroom top
flat in Kitty. Call: Mala #
227-8998/226-6568/621-
9048.
ONE two-bedroom
apartment to rent in
Liliendaal. Contact Shim on:
222-3475/225-0827.
BEL AIR PARK fur-
nished executive house on
double lot US$1 500. # 223-
5204/612-2766.
ONE 2-bedroom
apartment Lot 1687 Nat. Ave.
South Ruimveldt Park. Tel:
225-0235/269-0299.
ROOMS for rent -
Lamaha Gdns. Single person
or students females only. Tel.
231-7685, 615-0404.
ROOMS Cummings
Lodge and Queenstown $14
000 $18 000. # 226-8261/
624-5082.
COLONIAL style
building upper and or lower
flats parking and telephone,
Queenstown. Call 624-
4225.
(1) ONE two-bedroom
top flat with water tank. Price -
$37 000 per month. Call Tel.
# 223-8943.
EXECUTIVE, furni~;S~
and unfurnished houses and
apartments, offices, bonds,
etc. TEL: 226-8148/625-
1624.
EXECUTIVE furnished
and unfurnished house and
apartments, offices,
bonds, etc. TEL: 226-
8148/625-1624.
FURNISHED ROOM DE-
CENT, SINGLE WORKING FE-
MALE. TEL: 226-5035 (08:00
17:00 HRS).
WHAT a gift for (3) fully
furnished bedrooms only
US$15, per day prime loca-
tion. Phone: 225-0230 or 223-
6900.
EXECUTIVE houses and
apartments, furnished and
unfurnished. Office and
business spaces. Call 225-
6556.
CENTRAL Georgetown -
fully furnished 2-bedroom flats
US$600-US$700. # 233-
2968/613-6674.
CAMPBELLVILLE 3-
bedroom fully furnished, AC,
phone, parking US$400. #
233-2968/613-6674.
ECCLES 2-bedroom -
$35 000; Prashad Nagar -$60
000; Nandy Park $50 000. #
233-2968/613-6674.
BEL AIR PARK fully
furnished, executive-styled 2,
4 & 5-bedroom US$800-
US$1 800. # 233-2968/613-
6674.
TOP flat $45 000; house
by itself $60 000. Phone 225-
2626/231-2064 or email
tonyreidsrealty@hotmail.com
MEADOW BROOK
DRIVE. HOUSE BY ITSELF.
FIVE BEDROOMS,
UNFURNISHED. NELSON'S:
226-8937.


DO You need an honest,
reliable & efficient Real Estate
Agency? Call: UpToTheMinute
Realty. # 225-8097/226-5240.
ONE lower business flat
situated at Lot 1 Non Pariel,
Area A, East Coast Demerara.
Annlv tn Jerome Fredericks at
same location.
FULLY furnished 2-bedroom
bottomT, flat, modern
conveniences, u blic Rd.,
Eccles. Rent $35 000 nim,.
Contact 233-2182.
ROOMS to rent monthly -
self-contained Le Rich
Luxury Rooms 25 Princes
Street $25 000 monthly. Call
# 227-3067.
FURNISHED American-
styled apartment ideal for a
couple or a single person $3
000/$4 000 per day. Call 622-
5776.
2-BEDROOM bottom flat
apartment telephone, light,
water, grilled, parking, tiles, etc.
- in South Ruimveldt. Tel: 218-
1384/623-8852.
SHORT-TERM and long-
term apartment. Call:
MURRAY'MS PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT SERVICES on:
231-3302/614-3884.
LOW-INCOME AREA. NEW
FLAT UNFURNISHED. READY
APRIL 1. 3 BEDROOMS, ETC.
$30 000. NELSON'S: 226-8937.
REGENT St., near
Cummings St: vacant top flat,
ideal general store. If qualified,
move in tomorrow. $85 000 neg.
Ederson's 226-5496.
LOW-INCOME AREA. TOP
FLAT UNFURNISHED, NEARING
COMPLETION, $35 000. THREE
BEDROOMS, ETC. NELSON'S:
226-8937.
BUSINESS flat and/or lease
land (with option to build) in
America Street (opposite
SWANSEA); one complete new
gym set. Call: 616-2849 or 225-
5009.
QUEENSTOWN, fully fur-
nished 1 & 3-bedroom apart-
ment with parking space to rent.
Suitable for overseas visitors on
short term basis. Tel. # 226-
5137/227-1843.
Bottom flat Duncan Street,
formerly Video World, also top
and middle flats and part of
bottom flat in Regent Street.
Tel. 226-2260, 225-2873, 619-
5901.
APARTMENT/FLATS
Eccles $25 000, South $30
000, Prashad Nagar $60 000,
Regent St. $35 000, rooms
(furnished) $9 000 & $10 000 &
12 000. Call 231-6236.
SOUTH Ruimveldt Gardens:
2 1 bedrooms furnished $15
000 each monthly, 1 self-
contained $18 000 monthly.
Ideal students, teachers, nurses.
Ederson's 226-5496.
COMING from overseas?
Check out Sunflower Hotel other
apts. Furnished, long term, short
term 4 hrs 8 hrs., etc. We take
bookings. Call 225-3817 or 223-
2173 or 226-1933.
2-BEDROOM apartment
(downstairs) 189 D'Urban
Backlands $45 000 monthly.
Upstairs (4) bedrooms, (2)
bathrooms $50 000 monthly.
Available April 1, 2005. Call:
June # 233-2175/623-1562 or
227-3067.
JEWANRAM'S REALTY.
"HAVE FAITH IN CHRIST,
TODAY". Beautiful 3-storeyed,
A/c, concrete building -
US$4000. Others from $30 000
to $400 000. JEWANRAM'S
REALTY 270-4470, 623-6431.
FOR immediate lease on
Northern Hogg Island 200
acres of cultivated rice land
along with rice mill complete
with drying floor and dryer.
Also tractor, combine, bull-
-dozer for sale. Contact: 626-
1506/225-2903. Serious en-
quiries only.
TWO-STOREYED building
at 322 New Market Street (opp.
Emergency Unit). 3-Bedroom
upper flat kitchen, living room,
large verandah $75 000;
bottom flat suitable for business
$65 000. No Agents. Tel: 226-
8730. Ask for Jean.
FOR RENTAL LOCATED
IN CENTRAL G/TOWN. NO
FLOODING, BUILDING (165' X
35), WHICH CAN BE USED FOR
BOND, SCHOOL, WORKSHOP,
AUTO SALE, DISTRIBUTION
CENTER, ETC. TEL. 226-0575/
226-0621.


ONE (1) two-storey building in
Queenstown, Georgetown. Four
(4)-bedroom dwelling upstairs,
including an air-conditioned
master bedroom. Spacious air
conditioned office and washroom
on the bottom flat. Available
furnished or unfurnished from
April 1, 2005. Call 226-0693 or
640-0825.
WE have for the CEO,
DIPLOMATS and MANAGERS
secured houses with all
amenities in-highly residential
hi'g',rhood. Also available
are buildings ,
business/office purposes ,,
accommodation for smaller
income families. SUGRIM'S
REAL ESTATE AGENCY. TEL.
226-4362 ANYTIME.
VLISSENGEN ROAD in a
quiet compound a 5-bedroom
executive residence, fully
furnished US$800; BEL AIR
PARK Very nice 3-bedroom -
US$1700 and another 3-
bedroom US$1200; COURIDA
PARK one bedroom furnished
- $50 000, etc., etc. OFFICES:
Middle, Main Water, Hadfield
Street. Call 226-7128/615-6124
- ABSOLUTE REALTY.
FUTURE HOMES REALTY -
# 227-4040/628-0796/611-
3866/616-9598. 3-Bedroom top
flat building (AC), bottom flat for
office in East Street US$1
500; (2) office flats unfurnished
- in North Road $65 000, each;
large office flats in North Road
with AC and generator US$1
500, each; two large bonds: 200
x 150 and 100 x 50 with office
on the East Bank US$8 000;
large bottom flat for office in La
Penitence $150 000; new
bottom in Oronoque Street -
$140 000.
PRIME CITY LOCATION.
BRAND NEW SELF-CON-
TAINED TWO-BEDROOM CON-
CRETE FLATS (GROUND AND
FIRST FLOORS) $45 000
EACH. SLIGHTLY NEGO-
TIABLE. REFERENCES OF
HIGHEST ORDER NEEDED I.E
COMPLETION FIXED FOR 3
WEEKS COMMENCE. VIEW-
ING NOW ETC, IN ORDER TO
HAVE ONE. NUMBER OF
CHILDREN LIMITED. FIRST
COME FIRST SERVED".
HUIMPHREY NELSON'S 226-
8937.
KITTY $35 000;
Campbellville $40 000:
CAMPBELLVILLE THREE
BEDROOMS $45 000:
Queenstown $50 000; D'Urban
backlands furnished $95 000
EXECUTIVE PLACES -
SUIBRYANVILLE, Queenstown,
Bel Air Park, Bel Air Gardens,
Lamaha Gardens, Happy Acres,
Prashad Nagar; OFFICE
BUILDINGS Kingston, Main
Street, Middle Street, Camp
Street; BUSINESS PLACES:
Sheriff Street, Regent Street,
Croal Street and othnei.
MENTORE/SINGH REALTY-
225-1017/623-6136.
FUTURE HOMES REALTY -
# 227-4040/611-3866/616-
9598. 2-Bedroom. bottom flat -
semi-furnished, with parking -
Prashad Nagar $50 000; 2-
bedroom bottom flat -
unfurnished, with parking South
Ruimveldt $45 000; 3-bedroom
top flat unfurnished South
Ruimveldt $50 000; 3-bedroom
house unfurnished Bel Air
Park $100 000, 3-bedroom top
flat unfurnished, with telephone
Prashad Nagar $60 000; 2-
bedroom top flat semi-
furnished in Middle Street $75
000; 2-bedroom top flat -
unfurnished, with parking -
Queenstown $75 000; 2-
bedroom top flat unfurnished -
in Regent Street $40 000; 1-
bedroom bottom flat-
unfurnished in Regent Street -
$35 000.
FUTURE HOMES REALTY -
# 227-4040/628-0796/611-
3866/616-7578. 2-Bedroom fully
furnished bottom flat 'AA'
Eccles US$550; 4-bedroom
fully furnished house (1) master
room Vlissengen Road US$1
200; 2-family, 6-bedroom, fully
furnished house Sec. 'K'
Campbellville US$1 500; 4-
bedroom Bel Air Park house -
study hot & cold, AC, security
alarm, generator US$1 700; 3-
bedroom fully furnished house -
AC, hot & cold, garage Bel Air
Park -US$1 000; 3-bedroom fully
furnished house in New
Providence, East Bank US$1
50,0; 3-bedroom unfurnished
house in New Providence, East
Bank US$1 200; 3-storeyed
building fully furnished house
in Robb St., Bourda US$2 500.


LUXURIOUS HOUSES -
BEL AIR GARDENS: (1) US$2
300 (2) US$2 000 (3) US$2 000
(4) US$3500. BEL AIR
SPRINGS -US$3 000 (2) US$1
800. BEL AIR PARK US$2 300
2) US$900 (3) US$1 500 (4)
$2 000 (5) U$3 000 (6) US$1
500. SUBRYANVILLE -(1) US$2
000 (2) US$1 000. SECTION 'M'
CAMPBELLVILLE US$1 000.
MEADOW BROOK GARDENS -
US$1 200. KINGSTON US$2
500. COURIDA PARK (1) US$4
000 (2) US$3 000 (3) US$1 500.
LILIENDAAL US$1 200.
ATLANTIC GARDENS -(1) US$1
200 (2) US$900. SOUTH
"IMUVELDT GARDENS -
ru .... CCT BANK
US$600. vv- BANK
DEMERARA US'4ou..
PRASHAD NAGAR US$1 300.
CAMPBELLVILLE G$50 000.
LAMAHA GARDENS US$2
000. CONRAD BARROW'S
REALTY: 218-4956/227-3542.



1 HOUSE lot with 4
houses: Persons interested
please call 333-2420 Price
negotiable
(1) CAMPBELLVILLE
property, (2) Success ECD
property. Call: 226-7043 or 613-

2-STOREYED 3-bedroom
business property at Uitvlugt,
WCD. Price $6.5M
negotiable. 624-5397.
PROPERTIES for sale -
one wooden and concrete
building, located at 50E Sher-
iff Street. Tel. 223-1529.
DOUBLE-LOT 3-bedroom
property for sale in Amelia's
ard, Linden. Price
negotiable. Call: 223-4938.
HOUSE & land at
Moblissa, Soesdyke, Linden
Highway. Suitable for farming
and poultry. Price neg.
Contact. 629-6627.
40% REDUCTION on all
properties from $8 million
upwards. Call 225-2626/231-
2064 or
tonyreidsrealty@hotmail.com
(2) TWO-STOREYED busi-
ness/residential properties in
Robb St., Bourda. Tel: 225-
9816, Monday Saturday
(08:00 17:30 hrs).
ONE two-family, three-
bedroom house excellent
condition in Alberttown. Price -
$12M. neg. Call: 227-0289/222-
6996.
ONE two-apartment
building and land for sale (2)
bedrooms each. Price $3
million. Call: 223-1940/624-
2658.
TWO properties Lot 80 -
$11M, Lot 114 $14M, both at
Vreed-en-Hoop, West Coast
Demerara. Phone 233-5755.
FRIENDSHIP Riverside:
Going business, land road to
river, ideal ship wharf, hotel.
$12M. i0. (US$60 000).
Ederson's 226-54,u.
LOT 8 Princes St., Werk-
en-Rust, 2nd building North
of Camp Street suitable for
any business your dream
home going cheap. Call 226-
6017.
ALBERTTOWN 2 storey
55ft x 28ft 10%ft driveway
paved, grilled, telephone,
strictly no flooding rain or
storm. Contact 223-7908. $9
500 000.
2-STOREYED wooden
building, 2-bedroom top flat,
1-bedroom bottom flat with
back lands at Ithaca, W.C.B.
Price $3M negotiable. 624-
5397.
ONE new (2) two-storeyed
concrete building with telephone
and garage $14.9M, neg. -
corner spot, Kiskadee Drive,
South Ruimveldt Gardens. Call:
611-3452.
SOUTH Road, Bourda -
vacant front building (need
repairs), land ideal auto sales,
internet cafe, taxi $9M (US$45
000). Ederson's 226-5496.
CHARLESTOWN: Charles/
Sussex Sts. near school vacant
front building & land, ideal
internet cafe, mechanic shop,
taxi. $4.5M neg. Ederson 226-
5496.
PRINCES St./Camp St.
vacant 2-storeyed 2 5-bedroom
complete apartments, driveway.
$6.5M neg. (US$30 000).
Ederson's 226-5496.
CONCRETE building newly
constituted two-storeyed
concrete building with three
bedroom. Price negotiable. K.
S. RAGHUBIR Agency. Office -
225-0545.


CAMPBELLVILLE: vacant
2-storeyed concrete 4-bedroom
mansion, 3 toilets & baths, large
sitting, library, 4-car parking.
Inspection anytime. $16M.
Ederson's 226-5496.
LEOPOLD St., Werk-en-Rust
- vacant 2-storeyed concrete &
wooden, 3 bedrooms top,
bottom 2 apartments, 1
bedroom each. $5M. (US$25
000). Ederson's 226-5496.
QUEENSTOWN 3 storey
concrete 80'ft x 40ft for
school, offices, retail outlet
any type of operation
strictly no flooding rain or
storm Contact 223-7906-08
must be sold $52 00 000.
REGENT & Cummings Sts.
. ,,iness, top,
- 2-storeyea -,'... ne -^'
vacant ideal general businenb,
future 4-storeyed mall/stores.
$33M. Ederson's 226-5496.
W e b s i t e :
www.edersonsrealty.com
GIFT: New Market St.
Doctors: Investors ideal for
hospital, beer gar'den/food
restaurant, 2-storeyed concrete
& wooden building, from road
to alley. $17.5M (US$85 000).
Ederson's 226-5496.
KINGSTON near seawall:
vacant 3-storeyed 6-bedroom/
office mansion. Ideal luxurious
hotel, executive's offices, 8 cars
parking. If qualified, move in
tomorrow. $40M neg.
Ederson's 226-5496.
KINGSTON & Barracks Sts.
- vacant front 2- storeyed 3-
bedroom complete house, ideal
internet caf6, computer, offices.
$13.5M. Ederson's 226-5496.
E M a i I :
ederson@guyana.net.gy
ONE (1) newly renovated
3-bedroom house telephone
facility, overhead tank, car
park for (2) vehicles -
Drysdale Street, Charlestown.
Tel: 225-9816, Monday Sat-
urday, (08:00 17:30 hrs)
ONE two-storey wooden and
concrete 4- bedroom house,
South Ruimveldt Gardens .
Contact Ronald on 662-5033 or
Samantha on 624-1370. No
reasonable offer refused.
Vacant possession.
1 EXECUTIVE 5-bedroom
master room, three toilets,
three baths, fully filtered, in-
sect-proof, generator, air-condi-
tioned, large yard space with
beautiful gardens, etc. Bel Air
Park. # 225-9816.
17/ ACRES of agricultural
land suitable for rice and cash
crop cultivation along with
house at Industry, Mahaica
Creek. No reasonable offer
refused. Serious enquiries. Call:
226-2963/220-0636/222-6910.
CAMPBELLVILLE (6)
bedrooms, (4) washrooms,
240/110 volts circuit. Ideal
concrete property suits
business, domestic/hotel
purposes. Phons: S. Abraham
# 623-2537/225-1865-7, Ms
Wilson # 226-2650.
ONE iwo-g0Irev wooden and
concrete house" wiiri four-
bedroom, telephone, spacious
yard and parking facility, etc., in
Nandy Park, EBD. Price
negotiable. Serious persons
please. Call Vijay 225-8225/
616-2495.
EXECUTIVE 3-storeyed
concrete structure located in
prime business area No. 78
Corriverton, Berbice. Ideal for
business and or residential
Purposes. Tel. 339-2274/
377/616-1414. Price
negotiable.
FOR sale urgently or to rent
one flat concrete 2-bedroom
house situated at Block 8,
Tuschen, New Scheme, 3
minutes walk from Public Road.
Only serious inquiries. Call: Mrs.
Jhagroo # 260-0376.
CRANE/LA Union Public
Road, WCD vacant 2-storeyed
wooden & concrete 4- bedroom
property. $5M. Back 2-storeyed
4-bedroom concrete building.
$4M. Package $8M neg.
Ederson's 226-5496.
SUBRYANVILLE: over
looking the Atlantic mansion,
active swimming pool, large roof
garden, generator, grilled/
meshed, Sunday overlooking
big lime, food fair/drink $35M
(US$175 000). Ederson's -
226-5496.
DIAMOND Housing
Scheme: new 2-storeyed 3-
bedroom concrete 2 years old
building, with all modern
conveniences, parking. $8M
neg. (US$40 000). Ederson's -
226-5496. Website:
www.edersonsrealty.comn


Mc DOOM River Side: note
road to river, land 47/218' ideal
wharf, large ship, auto sales, 4
stores, mini mall, supermarket.
$22.5M. neg. Ederson's -
226-5496.
URGENTLY needed:
Commercial, I residential
buildings for sale or rent. Kitty,
South Ruimveldt,
Campbellville, Subryanville,
Prashad Nagar, Bel Air Park,
Lamaha Gardens, Atlantic
Gardens. Also land. Ederson's
- 226-5496.
WERK-EN-RUST NEW
FLAT. THREE BEDROOMS,
ETC. (TOP). READY BY APRIL
1. RENT $30 000. CHILDREN
ACCEPTED. 3 MONTHS
INITIALLY. LOW-INCOME
AREA. NELSON'S: 226-8937.
FES I l CITY -
$7.1M, Liliendaal $6.ayv,
Alberttown $9.5M, South
Ruimveldt $9M, Bel Air
Park $19M, Lamaha
Gardens on double lots -
$22M, Prashad Nag-ar,
others. MENTORE/SINGH
REALTY 225-1017/623-
6136.
GIFT: Queenstown: wise
investment 3-storeyed concrete
building top/middle 2 & 3-
bedroom luxurious apartments
for overseas visitors, bottom -
sitting, toilet & bath, 4-car
garage. $18.5M neg. Owner
will give $7.5M financing.
Ederson's 226-5496.
CROAL St., Stabroek -
vacant possession 3-storeyed
fully grilled colonial 5-
bedroom mansion with fire
alarm & security cameras,
monitor by GEB, A/C, 18 KVA
generator, double lot 507110'
$58M. Inspection ok.
Ederson's 226-5496.
W e b s i t e
www.edersonsrealty.com
CHARLESTOWN, corner 3-
bedroom wooden and concrete
(self-contained, hot water,
MM.MC. alarm System.).
Suitable for business
downstairs also 2-bedroom
apartment. Price $20 000 000
negotiable. Tel. # 226-0170
(between 4 pm and 6 pm).
POULTRY FARMS Gar-
den of Eden and Craig Plan-
ning for a bigger yield? We
have pens that can accommo-
date 15 000 birds and lots and
lots of running water we are
situated near to a creek, 1 Ma-
chine Shop Industrial Site with
an extra lot. Call SUCCESS
REALTY 223-6524/628-0747.
OGLE: Large 2-flat on 1.3
acres of land $15M, and
another 2-flat concrete $10M.
FELICITY: 10,800 sq. ft. of land
$6M. QUEENSTOWN: 5-
bedroom with exquisite lawn.
$40M; 2,dl another 6-
bedroom $20M and lots more
all over. Call 226-7128/615-
6124 ABSOLUTE REALTY.
KITTY $3.8M, John St. -
$2.5M, Queenstown $9.5M &
$8.5M, Eccles $6M, South
g0Jimveldt $6M, $11M, &
$14M, A' ~!town $8M &
$11M. Business .-oots:
Vlissengen Rd. (corner) $16M,
Quamina St. (corner) $9.5M,
Barr St. (by Market) $14M,
Sheriff St. $18M, Robb St. -
$18M, Duncan St. ( by Popeye)
$29M, Camp St. $13M,
Alberttown $13M. Call 231-
6236.
LUXURIOUS HOUSES -
BEL AIR SPRINGS $60
million. BEL AIR PARK $80
million, $65 million, $53
million, $40 million, $25
million, $20 million. COURIDA
PARK $90 million. ATLANTIC
GARDENS $35 million.
SECTION 'K'
CAMPBELLVILLE $40
million. ECCLES $13 million.
NEW PROVIDENCE $40
million. CONTINENTAL PARK
$100 million. CONRAD
BARROW'S REALTY # 218-
4956/227-3542.
FIRST TIME BUYERS
DON'T BE DUPED/MISLED BY
FLAT-FOOT UNLICENSED
COMPETITORS SUGRIM'S
REAL ESTATE AGENCY
PROVIDES GUYANA'S MOST
EXTENSIVE RANGE OF
PROPERTY RELATED
SERVICES. We have two-flat
affordable properties in and out
of Georgetown, Canje Nagar
and Parika from $5M to $10M.
We also have for the middle
income from $10M to $20M in
highly residential area and
lands for any application. TEL.
226-4362 ANYTIME.


- --








Niu'JAI. .w!UInUf~uai r~eIs;~+ y 1~+vu~ i~...- -- -


CRANE Old Rd. $8.5M,
Providence $4.5M, Houston
$2.5M, Annandale St. -
$3.2M, Broad St.,
Charlestown $8M. LAND:
Nismes Old Rd. $1.5M
SEEKER'S CHOICE REAL
EST. 223-6346/263-7110.
D'URBAN STREET
(WORTMANVILLE) SIZEABLE
LAND CARRYING TWO BUILD-
INGS. REPAIRS NEEDED
(EACH). TRANSPORTED.
PRICE NEGOTIABLE. (2)
CHARLESTOWN (LAND ONLY)
FRONT. RESIDENTIAL CUM
COMMERCIAL $1.8M. (TRANS-
PORTED). BENT STREET
(NEWBURG) $3.2M
ALBOUYSTOWN $2.5M
PRASHAD NAGAR (4 200 SQ
FT OF LAND INCOMPLETE
BUILDING THEREON $8M
CHANDAR NAGAR STREET
P R A S H A D
AGAR) "AMERICAN"
SCHOOL VICINITY. EXECUTIVE
CATEGORY. FIVE-BEDROOM.
$40M NEGOTIABLE. TELE-
PHONE 226-8937.
BEL AIR PARK huge
property-on double lot, nice
neighbourhood $42M; Bel
Air Park $21M; Duncan
Street $11M and $21M -
(new); Prashad Nagar $9M
to $19M; Lamaha Gardens -
$40M and $25M; Bel Air
Gardens $60M and $75M;
Atlantic Gardens $19.5M
and $28M; Queenstown -
$10M to $25M; 'AA' Eccles
New Housing Scheme $19M
to $25M; Continental Park -
$25M; Republic Park $16M;
Ruimzigt Gardens $13M;
North Road $28M; Croal
Street $25M; South R'veldt.
Park $7.5M to $13.5M;
Anaida Ave., Eccles $12.5M;
Alberttown $12M; 3-storeyed
in Kingston $25M; Middle
and Camp Streets $65M;
Lamaha Street for business
$13M; Providence $10M;
'BB' Eccles $6M; Success,
ECD $2.5M; Charity,
Pomeroon $6M; Carmichael
Street $25M. Future Homes
Realty # 227-4040/628-
0796.



19" & 20" REMOTE
televisions $22 000 & $25
000. Call: 265-3050.
HONDA 450 & 500 cc
ATV 4 x 4 Motor bike.
Tel. 231-4172/623-6243.
DIESEL water pumps -
2 and 3 inch brand n
--Vaaxsee power rerrac
telescope. Telephone No:
223-8636.
(1) Honda Gasolene
generator; (2) Model EX 5500
volts 120/240, key start. Tel.
# 226-2828.
ONE 4-cylinder Bedford
portable welding plan, D.C.
Key start. Tel. # 265-4217.
Call #621-4417.
ONE SET OF 20"
D'VINCI CHROME WHEELS
(6-HOLE) FOR A SUV.
CALL: 623-3122.
NEW Honda generators,
UK standard key manual
start, 2500 watts to 6000 watts.
Call 233-5500.
PUPPIES for sale -
Rottweiler and German
Shepherd (mixed), fully
vaccinated. Tel. No: 223-
0754.
ONE Refrigerator freezer
in excellent condition. Price
$45 000. Telephone number
623-9813.
HOUSEHOLD
FURNITURE. 1 Sofa, 1 3-
piece living room set. Contact
el. # 223-6487 or 642-2981,
ARGON/Co2 Mixed
gas. Also shock treatment for
swimming pools. Phone 227-
4857,- (8 am 4 pm) Mon.
to Fri.
ONE brand new com-
puter with CD Burner, CD
alkmans, car stereo
and DVD Player. Contact
225-4112, 626-9264.
DOBERMAN pups
mixed with Shepherd, 2
years old and pure bred Pit
Bulls, studs. Call W. Browne
266-2796/621-2009.
PARTS for washers/
dryers, thermostats, knobs,
belts, pumps, motors, splines,
etc. Technicians available.
Call 622-5776.


CLOSURE of Secretarial
School. Typewriters selling at
reasonable price. Good
condition. Telephone 231-
7135.
TOYOTA 5E engine,
complete with starter, alternator,
power steering pump, etc. Good
price. Tel. 6 4-9437/267-2364.
POOL table (new),
excellent (neg.); B 12 $230
000 (neg.); AE 91 Sprinter. # 96
New Road, Vreed-en-Hoop. Tel:
254-0171.
PUREBRED mixed-breed
pups Rottweiler and Pit Bull -
6 weeks old. For more info.
Telephone: 233-5482 or 223-
6487.
4 TVs, 1 amplifier, 1 micro-
wave, 3 music sets, 1 TV stand,
2 DVDs, 1 VCR, 1 truck pump, 1
camera, 2 TVs not working.
265-5876.
1 FLOOR model PLAS-
TIC SEALING machine, 1 -
PORTABLE ELECTRIC air
compressor in excellent
condition Tel: 222-4507/
623-7212
HONDA outboard engine -
30Hp, EPA standard and
transformers 45 KVA, Square
'D' (motors). Call # 624-7902 or
624-1170.
FREON Gas: 11, 12, 22,
502, 134A & 404A. Also
Nitrous Oxide, Argon Gas &
Helium for Balloons. Phone
227-4857 8 am 4 pm),
Mon. Fri.
ONE 150 HP & one 250 HP
Yamaha Outboard engines.
Price $700,000 & $1,200,000.
Also parts for 150 HP & 250 HP.
Call 629-6651 anytime.
1 HONDA Prelude (2
doors), excellent condition, with
AC, CD player & mag rims. Price
- $1.1 million. Price negotiable.
Tel: 223-6487 or 642-2981.
FIBREGLASS matting,
resin, jell coating, hardener, 8 x
4 sheets, etc. We also do repairs.
97 Providence, EB Demerara
(near Toolsie Persaud). Tel:
233-5207/614-8095.
OXYGEN and Acetylene
Gases, fast and efficient service.
10 -11 Mc Doom Public Road,
EBD. Phone 223-6533 (8 am -
4 pm), Mon. to Fri. (Sat. 8 am -
12 noon).
QUALITY SWEET POTA-
TOES available in large quan-
tities at very good prices. Place
your orders early for prompt de-
livery. Contact: 621-0371/226-
F--apTiTier; T rirucK pump; i
battery charger; 1 bicycle. Tel.
265-5876.
1 ZENITH 50" High
Definition TV (HDTV) -
brand new, in box, Stereo
Surround Sound picture in
picture. Call: Lionel #
623-7340 or 226-2829.
1 BASE radio with
microphone, 1 antenna with
cable & pipe, 2 hand-held
radios, 1 charger. A package at
a giveaway price. Telephone:
226-6603/641-2355.
SKY Universal for the best
offer in Phillips digital dish.
View up to 125 channels in-
cluding Pay Per View channels
and also Direct TV. Contact:
Gray on Tel. 227-6397/227-
1151 (0), 616-9563.
MARINE SPARES AND
ACCESSORIES SUCH AS
ELECTRONICS, PAINTS,
MACHINES, CHARTS, BOOKS,
ETC. CALL PRUDENTIAL
MARINE EST. TEL./FAX.: 233-
2268/618-84231617-2402
E M A I L :
PMERUP@YAHOO.COM
CELLPHONESI Cellphonesl
Cellphones. Motorola V600,
V66, V505, V60i, Sony Ericsson
T 616 and more. All phones are
going at wholesale prices and
are brand new. Contact Tel. #
621-8225.
John Deer Diesel
Generator, 30KVA, like new.
Also Bay Linder Speedboat
with Yamaha 115 HP outboard
engine, Honda power Washer
3500psi with 13 HP engine
(new). Tel. 225-2319, 225-
2873, 660-1061, 660-1060.
CAUSTIC SODA: 55-lb $3
600; Alum: 55 Ib $4 000; Soda
Ash: 100 Ib $8 000, Sulphuric
Acid: 45-Gal $35 000;
Granular Chlorine, Chlorine
Gas. Phone 227-4857 (8 am -
4 pm) Mon. to Fri.


HONDAAscot engine and body
parts. Complete engine, new C.V.
joints, transmission, complete doors,
bonnet, wheel hubs, trunk,
dashboard, complete suspension,
C.V. joints, wheel hubs, suspension,
radiator, dash board. Price
negotiable. Tel. 614-9437 & 267-
2364.
FOR sale by owner- 2-storeyed
fully concrete house 5 bedrooms,
2 full bathrooms, eating kitchen,
built wardrobe, central air-
conditioner, car garage, front view
to Public Road Lot 6 Nandy Park,
EBD. Interested person only to call.
Day 226-7806, evening 225-
8410.
COMPLETE SERVICE
center equipment, 2-post hoist,
4-post hoist for alignment
machine, in-ground hoist, tyre
change hoist, tyre changer,
wheel balancer, break lather,
breaking press, radiator cleaner,
compressors, alignment
machine, tool kits. Contact 226-
0575, 226-0621.
ONE 15 KVA Kubota water-
cooled diesel generator -
custom-built with security sound
proof casing, no noise or
vibration, hardly used, crank or
battery start, 12V, 110-240V,
mint condition $800 00, neg.;
one 5-ton hydraulic pallet lift
with new spare wheel -$55 000;
two Yale chain hoists: 1-ton $25
000, /2-ton $20 000 English-
made; two small portable
welding plants: 150k 240V -$40
000, 75k 110V $30 000 -
complete with rod holder and
head goggles; plumber tool one
electrical drain and pipe line
cleaner for blockage 110V, 50-
60 Hz, Hp motor complete kit
for $40 000 U.S.A.-made; one
STIHL FS 160 brush cutter -
hardly used, with spares $60
000; 1 Drill press 12-speed,
adjustable table, 110-240V $45
000; 1 large 1-in bore Sears
pressure pump with pressure
tank, 110V-240V $35 000; 3 -
metal English bench lathes: (2)
5-ft $100 000, each and (1) 8-ft
- $150 000; 1 4-ft width sheet
metal roller on steel stand -
heavy-duty, manually operated,
English-made $105 000; 1 -
Dayton indoor an outdoor dry
vacuum industrial and
commercial use, on wheels,
large dust collector bag, U.S.A.-
made $35 000; 1 6-in Delta
electric belt sander on stand -
110V, for wood work $30 000; 1
- machine to do tool shaping -
240V $200 000 (large); 1 -
machine to do cutting of
crankshaft 240V $200 00; 1 -
heavy-duty arc-welding
tr" ,-3,R.-A?- --- $ ,
000. Owner leaving. # 621-4928/
611-8766. A quantity of
electrical panels with circuit
breakers heavy-duty switch-over
panels 110-220V.
A QUANTITY of office wall
dividers $30 000; 3 rolls
upholstery material $16 000; 1
new tent enclosed to
accommodate (4) persons over
night, hunting, U.S.A.-made -
$25 000; 1 Canadian heavy-
duty shredder -fully automatic,
110V $20 000; 1 large wall
divider U.S.A.-made, beautiful
$50 000; 2 secretarial and
typist adjustable chairs on wheels
$5 000, each; 1 executive
large writing desk chair on
wheels $20 000; 1 inverter -
12V to 110V, 400 to 800 watts -
$22 000; 1 Land Ranger cycle
for boy excellent $10 000; 1 -
combination Panasonic double
tape and 5-CD player set along
with (2) speaker boxes and
remote control $55 000 110V-
240V; 1 -large thick egg-shaped
carpet $15 000; 1 4-burner
gas stove (SINGER) with oven
and bottle complete $25 000;
1 piece 10 x12carpet for office
$11 000; 1 Whirlpool freezer -
$45 000 110V; 6 plastic chairs
with 1 round plastic table and
umbrella $15 000; 6 used 4-
drawer filing cabinets -$15 000,
each; 4 used 2-drawer filing
cabinets $10 000, each; 3 -
security Mercury Vapour lamps -
110-240V, complete $5 000,
each; 1 Sharp turntable
microwave 110V $13 000; 1 -
Toshiba combination tape
recorder, radio, tape and CD
player 110-240V $15 000; a
quantity of 50 Meridian phones
M 7310 and M 7324, from (5)
lines to (20) lines phones,
bargain for the lot, could work
hotel, offices, etc.; one new
Peak split AC unit 18 000 BTU,
complete; 2 18 000 BTU Peak
window units $25 000, each.
Owner leaving. # 611-8766/621-
4928.


Brand new 64 JVC flat
screen TV PIP, Xerox 5028
Photocopier Machine, like new.
Split A/C units, (new). Also
Saniserv Cone Machine one-
spout and three-spout, like new.
Yanmar diesel Generator, Honda
5000 watts key start Generator.
Tel. 225-2873, 225-2319, 660-
1061, 660-1060.
TECHNICAL Books on
Aircraft, Electrical Engineering,
Culpins Farm Machinery, Motor
Vehicle, Motor Vehicle
Technology and Practical Work,
Motor Vehicle Engine Servicing,
Stroboscopic Timing Light,
Engine Analyzer, Car Computer
Code Reader, Various
Management Books,
Professional Sign Making,
Complete Welder Home Gym,
Bar Bell, Tools Cupboards,
Vehicle Stands, White
Overcoats, Plastic Aprons,
Rubber Gloves, Chicken Pens on
Legs including Feeders, Oil and
Pressure Gauges, Cylinder
Ridge Reamer, Compression
Testing Gauges, Suspension
Spring Clamps, Air Compressor
Less Motor, Rolling Machine,
Cutting Set Complete with
Bottles and Trolley, Concrete
Electric Vibrator, Vertical Drilling
Machine, lots of miscellaneous
workshop items. Contact Francis
Persaud. Telephone 220-3064.



1 BEDFORD
MODEL M TRUCK. TEL:
455-2303.
1 AE 91 COROLLA,
EXCELLENT CONDITION. TEL.
222-3267.
2 FORD F 150.
CONTACT TEL. # 260-4115/
260-4018.
1 NISSAN Caravan E
24, excellent condition.
Tel. # 220-4782
ONE Bedford TL 7-ton
lorry (not dump). Tel: 227-
1923/616-5679.
1 RZ MINI bus, long
base, excellent condition.
Phone 627-6242.
TOYOTA Extra Cab,
V6, fully powered. $1.3M
neg. Tel. 254-0387.
ONE (1) 590 Massey
Ferguson tractor.
Excellent condition. Tel.
629-4396.
1 SUNNY Nissan B -
12, in excellent
condition. Tel. 227-3540.
TOYOTA SR 5 V6,
manual, excellent
condition $1.9M. Tel:
623-8380.
ONE Honda motor
scooter in good condition.
Contact: Trevor King. Tel:
627-8276.
TOYOTA Tacoma fully
loaded, year 2000 $3M.
Telephone: 623-3921/226-
1638.
AT 170 CARINA stick
gear $750 000. Tel: 223-
218 (David), 226-5546/623-
7805.
ONE four-wheel drive
Sprinter (wagon) car.
Excellent condition. Contact
# 337-2373.
ONE Toyota Surf, good
working condition. Contact A.
King on # 225-4443 or 622-
7628.
ONE Bed Ford truck, good
condition, working. Price neg.
Phone 233-5802, 7 am 9
pm.
ONE AE 100 Corolla -
automatic, fully loaded. Price -
$1 225 000 (neg.). Tel: 623-
7684.
4-WD RANGE Rover Land
Rover with alloy rims & Sony
CD player. Priced to go. # 621-7445.
ONE Toyota 4-Runner, V6
engine, in excellent condition
with music and mags. Tel. 623-
4614/227-7309.
TOYOTA Corona station
wagon, back wheel drive. Price
- $550 000. Call 640-1318/628-
2910.
1 MITSUBISHI Canter (3
tons), enclosed. Contact Tel. #
263-5404 after 16:00 hrs, 618-
9602, anytime.
1 9Suza Pick up. Call
227-7082/223-1456 $700
000.


1 AT 150 Toyota full flare,
exhaust system, 13" mag rims,
newly sprayed. Tel: 626-7686/
229-6491 Vishal.
ONE Toyota Raum wagon,
PJJ series, in immaculate
condition, fully powered
(looking like a RAV 4). Tel. 227-
7109.
ONEAA60 Carina car stick
gear, excellent condition.
Priced for quick sale. Owner
leaving country. Call Tel. # 277-
0194.
AE 100 TOYOTA Sprinter -
fully powered, AC, CD, mags,
spoiler $1.3M, neg. Mike #
615-5075/222-4139/226-6600.
TOYOTA Carina AT 192 -
FP, mags, CD, spoiler, AC, PHH
3060. Price $1.3M, neg. Junior
- # 624-2730/623-6512.
TOYOTA AT 212 Carina, AT
192 Carina, AE 110 Corolla all
excellent condition. Phone:
226-9316/619-9187.
2 TOYOTA pick-ups, 1 2-
door & 1 4-door at reduced
prices. Contact: 225-6759, 274-
0418 after hrs.
ONE TT 131 CORONA in
good condition mag rims, stick
gear, tape deck. Tel: 626-6837
after hours # 220-4316.
ONE AA 60 Carina, in ex-
cellent working condition,
needs body work tape deck, AC
etc. Tel. 617-4063/225-0236.
1 NISSAN Violet. Good
condition, back wheel drive -
$250 000 neg. Tel. 223-7521/
223-7517/233-6532 after hrs.
Sheik Salim.
ONE AT 170 Corona -
automatic, fully powered, mags,
AC, tape deck, etc., in excellent
condition. Tel: 270-4465/623-
8700.
TOYOTA Carina 212,
Toyota Carina 192, 2 gen-
erators: (1) diesel, (1) gas -
6 250 Watts, 110/220 Volts.
Tel: 629-6464. Ask for Sir
Ken.
1 DUMP truck, 1 wa-
ter tender and 330 Timber
Jack Skidder all are in
good working condition.
For more information Con-
tact: 264-2946.
TOYOTA Corona AT 170,
new model, A/C, mags,, power
window, locks, mirrors, like
new. Must be seen. 98 Sheriff
St., C/ville. 223-9687.
(2) 3500 R Fiat combines.
'4-27. -.
ONE RZ Short Base mini-
bus PGG series, working
condition. Asking $690 000,
negotiable. Call: 220-2400 (W),
623-4828 (C), 226-1508 (H) -
Barker.
1 AE 100 Toyota Sprinter
(Late PGG) automatic, fully
powered, AC, never in hire.
Price $1 250 000. Contact
Rocky #621-5902/225-1400.
1 HONDA Vigor
(Executive type 4- door car),
automatic, fully powered, AC,
(PGG series never hire). Price
850 000. Contact Rocky -
#225-1400/621-5902.
1 SV 40 Toyota Camry
(PHH series), automatic, fully
powered, AC, Chrome mag rims,
CD and DVD Player. Price
$2.1M. Contact Rocky #225-
1400/621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Extra cab pick
up (4 x 2) V6 automatic, mags,
excellent condition. Price $950
000 (neg). Contact Rocky -
#225-1400/621-5902.
2 AE 100 Toyota Ceres
(PHH series) automatic, fully
powered, AC, mags, (chrome)
CD. Price $1.2M and $1.4M.
Contact Rocky #225-1400/
6215902.
TOYOTA 4-door EP 82
Starlet immaculate condition
- $1M; Toyota Single and Extra
Cab 4x4 pick-up from $1.3M to
$3.3M. # 227-4040/628-0796/
616-7840.
ONE (1) TOYOTA Hiace
Super GL 14-seater mini bus
diesel engine, four (4)-wheel
drive dual air conditioned, CD
deck, BJJ 1995. Call 225-5274/
226-7665.
ONE Toyota 4x4 pick-up -
Single Cab, GGG series, 2Y
engine, good working condition
- $750 000, negotiable.
Contact: Ameer. Tel. No: 227-
5238, Cell # 622-8321.


I


1


annnowwnu l~LIminizi rJM~


AT 192 Carina, AE 100
Sprinter & Corolla, EP 82
Starlet, Marino & Ceres, AT 170
Carina, CRV Honda. Amar -
226-9691/227-2834/621-
6037.
1 EP 82 Toyota Starlet
(4-door), excellent condition,
automatic, fully powered,
mags, AC, new tyres. (One
owner lady driven) hardly
used. Contact Rocky #621-
5902/225-1400.
1 TOYOTA Land Cruiser,
HJ 60 Model, 4 x 4, AC,
Power Steering, CD Player,
excellent condition. Contact
Shelly Singh at # 227-1241/
227-1284/233-5758/233-
5758/233-5009.
TOYOTA Corolla AE 91
automatic, EFI engine, ful:
powered $750 000; Toyo..
Carina AT 150 -manual geai
$550 000; Toyota Ceres
automatic fully powered -
200 000. Tel: (0) 227-0610
Toyota 4x4 double c;.
pick Diesel engine pric
for quick sale RZ Toy,,
mini bus, mags, music F:
Priced for quick sale 3 i
Canter GHH series. 0O
back. Priced for quick s-
444-3836. Peter.
3 TOYOTA RZ mini bit
(15-seater) longbase, EFI
rims, music. Prices $1.2
$1.4M and $1.8M (nr
Immaculate conditions. (E .
and BHH series). Con;
Rocky # 225-1400/621-5-
1 RX 7 (2-door sports
First Generation), manual,
music set, mag rims, leat
(new engine), immacul
condition, spares include,
Price $900 000. Contact Ro.
#225-1400/621-5902.
1 TQYOTA Land Crui
(4 x 4) with wrench, man-,
fully powered, mags, AC, cr;
bar, CD Player, (1994 mod
Price $4M. Excell
condition. Contact Rocky
#225-1400/621-5902.
1 NISSAN Pathfinc
(PHH series) V6 automatic,f f
powered, mag rims, sun rL
(4 x 4) crash bar, step bo,
roof rack, immacul
condition. Price $2.1M (nm
Contact Rocky #225-14.
621-5902.
1989 NISSAN Max, ..
SE AC, central lock
power windows, po\. r
mirrors, sunroof, antilc. k
brakes, crime control, CD
Player, rims, alarm, etc.
Price negotiable. Call
Roland # 616-4660/226-
-nag rrms, DCEf "Iay.r, ruj
set, alarm, (5-door enclosed) J
step board. Immaculate
condition. Price $2.7.
Contact Rocky #225-1400/
621-5902.
1 TOYOTA Extra cab I
pick up (GJJ series) 4 monq. i
old (2000 model), chr -
rims, automatic, AC, CD
Player, music set, bedliner,
crystal light, step board. Price
$2.9M immaculate condition.
Contact Rocky #225-1400/
621-5902. p
Yamaha R1, cat-eye, like
new. Price to go. Yamaha XT
600cc Dirt bike Scrambler,
also Yamaha Banshee Four-
wheel drive Sports bike,
Honda 250cc Rebel, Honda
90cc ladies Motorcycle. Tel.
225-2873, 225-2319, 660-
1061, 660-1060.
TOYOTA EP 91 4-o,., -
Glanza auto and f
powered, AC, mags, CD pL,_
superb condition -$1.6M, neg.;
Toyota EP 82 Starlet P-H
series $1.3M; Toyota EP 32
4-door Starlet $1M. K anc N
Auto Sales # 227-4040/6 '3-
0796/616-7840.
Honda Delsol Sports r,
PJJ series, like new; To', '
Ceres, fully powered, AC. .a
new; GMC Sierra Extra ,.
diesel 4 x 4 pick-up, 1 t
model, like new; Land R. -
110 County diesel Tu
Nissan Pathfinder. Tel. '
1061, 660-1060, 225-2
225-2319.
AT 170 Full light (t v
loaded) $950 000; B
Sunny gear, fully power
$550 000; 4 Runner, fi
Ic 'ff' ~ -- =p
Sl n..o.. y .. . ,ou 01'...
Toyota Ray 4, fully load,'J
(PHH)- $3M; 1-4x4 Pick
- $550 000; AE 81 Spri,
(Automatic) $550 0'
Contact Rocky Auto Sales -
#225-1400/621-5902.







26 SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 20; 2005


ONE Toyota Mark II GX 71
fully powered, automatic,
power windows, power steering,
power mirror, music, mags,
spoiler $750 000 neg. Tel.
220-4058/623-3193.
TOYOTA RAV 4 auto and
fully powered, PHH series, (one
owner), immaculate condition
$3.0M, neg.; Honda CRV -
$3.3M, neg.; Toyota 4 Runner
(V6 engine), manual, (one
owner) $2.3M; Toyota 4
Runner (3 doors), automatic -
$1.6M. K and N Auto Sales #
227-4040/616-7840/611-3866.
FOR the best in factory
reconditioned Japanese
vehicles: IRZ mini bus, AT 192
Carina, fully loaded; Hilux Surf
4 Runner; T. Extra Cab 4 WD
Pick Ups; Toyota T 100, Super
Truck Carina wagon. Trade-in
and credit terms available @
Paul Camacho Auto Sales,111
Croal St., Stabroek, G/town,
bet. Albert and Oronoque Sts.
Tel. 225-0773/621-5869.
1 G-TOURING wagon -
automatic, 1 Mercedes Benz -
$1.5 million; 1 KE 76 Corolla
wagon $250 000 needs some
repairs; PJJ series AT 192 -
automatic, 15" mags, air-
conditioned, CD player, fully
loaded, dash and interior neon
lights, etc. $1 375 000, neg.;
AT 150 Corona $350 000, neg.
Contact: Mr. Khan, 28 'BB'
Eccles New Housing Scheme,
EBD. Tel: 233-2336/623-9972/
617-8944.
CERES mags, music, Mint
$1 175 000; Mark 11 Grande -
$ 2 million neg.; 110 Corolla -
$1 100 000 neg.; 176 Carina
wagon $650 000; AA 60
Wagon $550 000; small bus -
$550 000; AT 190 Corona -
$1450 000; IRZ mini bus $950
000, $600 000 down; 4 x 4
Hilux pick $800 000, $750
000, $900 000 $2.2 million, $2
million. Harry & Sons Auto
Sales. Maraj Building,
Charlotte & King Sts.
Telephone 227-1881/227-
0265/628-0439.
AT 192 $1.350M; AE 110
Sprinter $1.5M, neg.; EV 13
Nissan Bluebird (Ark) new
model -$1.1M, neg.; Toyota
Mark II (GX 90) $1.9M; SV 30
Camy mint condition $1.5M;
AE 100 Corolla $1.3M; SV 40
Camry $2M; Toyota Ceres -
PJJ series $1.375; AT 170
Corona $1M; AT 170 Carina -
$775 000: Nissan March
(Sports) $900 000; Toyota MR
II (round shape) manual Sports
car superb condition $1.9M:
AT 212 Carina S1.9M. AE 91
Corolla and Sprinter S600
000. K and N Auto Sales #
'?.7-4040/628-0796/616-7840.
NEW SHIPMENT
I RECONDITIONED VEHICLES.
irs: Sprinter AE 110; Starlet
alanza Turbo EP 91; Carina
\T 192; Lancer CK 2A; Cynos
Sports Couple EL 54; Toyota
r 'vnos Convertible. Wagons:
--Ila AE 100 G-Tourirg;
bishi RVR N 23 W, fully
load~fl. Pick Ups: (4x4) Toyota
Hilux (N 100. Trucks: enclosed,
freezer, open tray Mitsubishi
Canter; used Carina AT 170,
Mark II GX 81. DEO MARAJ
AUTO SALES 207 SHERIFF
AND SIXTH STREETS,
CAMPBELLVILLE. 226-4939. A
NAME AND A SERVICE YOU
CA TRUST.
212 CARINA $1.6M -
min mum down payment
available; 100 Corolla $1.2M;
212 Carina -$1.6M; GX 90 Mark
$1.8M; Mitsubishi Lancer -
'.M 15" mags & system;
*er 2.2M DVD & 17"
i: AE 81, AT 170 Carina &
I L,, ,na $800 000 & $850 000;
Ceres $1.1M, $1.3M, & $1.4M;
AE 91 Sprinter 17" rims &
system $750 000; EP 71
Starlet $700 000; EP 82
Starlet $1M; 4 Runner Surf -
I 1.2M manual, PGG; 4
Runner $1.4M automatic,
HH; Hilux 5 L engine $3.5M;
RV $3.3M PJJ; Tacoma -
jear 2000 -$3.5M; Single Cab
-.k-up $1.5M. G & I Auto
,le # 218-1095/622-5853/
5-9947/660-1267.



HOMES WANTED! $$$$.
,'EYHOMES # 223-4267
RESPONSIBLE HIRE CAR
I r)RIVFo0 T-r=,' FpH-"'- 1-
41
WAITRESS wanted
gently -t Veebee's Bar
Sanc Babb St., Kitty.
ONE Cook to make Puri,
S egg ball. Call Lee's
Snackette. Tel. 226-6649


ONE experienced Taxi
Driver living in South Ruimveldt
or nearby. Tel: 623-8852/218-
1384.
1 FULLY experienced
Coles crane operator.
Contact # 233-2774/623-
0957.
WANTED contract cars
for a reliable Taxi Service.
Tel. # 223-8655/227-3037.
WAITRESS, Cook. Apply
to Play Boy's Hide Out Bar,
Success, ECD. Tel. 220-4719.
ONE Florist. Must know to
work with fresh flowers. For
further information Tel: 225-
2023.
GIRLS with over 5 yrs.
Factory experience to as-
semble ladies garments.
Call Sharmie 225-2598.
SALESCLERK for store -
male/female. Must live in
Georgetown. Flexible hours. Call
625-2710.
ONE tbuck driver. (Dump).
Contact R. Narine, 49 Public Rd.,
Kitty. Tel. 227-1923. Cell 616-
5679.
REGENT STREET.
ESTABLISHED COMMERCIAL
BUILDING. HUMPHREY
NELSON'S REALTY. TEL: 226-
8937.
OLD Dutch & English
bottles, onions, mallets and
in. Tel: 260-0059, 612-2188,
6:00 to 22:00 h only.
LABOURERS. Apply in
person to Dalip Trading Ltd., 11-
14 Broad St., Charlestown. Tel:
225-0239.
DOMESTIC 17 TO 21
YEARS NO COOKING, (4) DAYS
A WEEK. TELEPHONE: 227-
3233.
WANTED. LIVE-IN
DOMESTIC 17 TO 21 YEARS -
NO COOKING. TELEPHONE:
226-5299.
ONE Arc and Acetylene
Welder. Must know grill work.
Contact: 21 Broad Street,
Charlestown. Tel: 225-2835.
LET your vehicle work for
you. Harbour Lights Taxi
Service is now accepting
contract cars. Call 227-1188/
227-1199.
WANTED urgently. One
Nissan Cabstar Canter truck any
condition to buy. Call Cell #
613-6979 or 618-4239.
SALESGIRL, kitchen staff,
live-in girl from country area.
Nazeema Deli 318 East St., N/C/
Burg. 226-9654/618-2902.
APARTMENTS flats.
houses to rent from $25 000
to US$2500 in/around
Georgetown. Prestige Realty -
231-5304
APARTMENT/FLAT $15
000 $40 000 monthly. Get 12
months advance rent (on
contract) & loan to do repairs.
Call 231-6236.
WANTED at Survival
Supermarket Porters. Must have
Secondary School Education.
Apply with an application. Contact
Tel. # 227-8506.
EXPERIENCED Hairdresser.
Must know to do manicure,
pedicure, facial and hairstyles,
etc. Also chairs to rent. Please
contact. Tel. 223-5252 or 628-3415.
URGENTLY one honest
male person, 50 years, plus for
live-in and light security duties.
Driving an asset. Very good rates.
For more info. Tel. 227-1830.
TWO live-in Domestics
between the ages of 17 and 20
years from the country areas. Also
one live-in boy to do Handyman
work around yard and bond.# 621-
4928.
1 ASSISTANT to Produc-
tion Manager, 1 -Machine Op-
erator to work night shift and 1 -
Machine Operator to work day.
Call: 615-9752 between 13:00
and 16:00 hrs.
1 MECHANIC to work in
Interior. Must know to repair Perkins,
Bedford & gasoline engines.
Knowledge to excavate an asset.
Tel: 624-2653/623-2605/223-1609.
FEMALE Office Assistant -
18 25 years. For Part-Time
duties in small library in West
Ruimveldt. Call Telephone 223-
8237 10:00 14:00 hours, Sat.
& Sun. 09:00 15:00 hours
weekdays.
ONE Manager between the
ages of 30 and 45 years to work
at Hotel Purple Heart, Charity,
Essequibo Coast. Must have
knowledge of the night club and
hotel business. Call: 225-2535
from 09:00 15:00 h.


ONE mature live-in
Domestic worker to work in
Georgetown area. Contact: 629-
4679.
1 MALE COUNTER/
DELIVERY CLERK WITH SOUND
KNOWLEDGE IN ENGLISH AND
MATHS. APPLY IN PERSON WITH
WRITTEN APPLICATION AT
BACCHUS DRUG STORE, 24
SAFFON & HOWES STS.
TELEPHONE 227-0230.
ONE Mechanic to work in
interior. Must know to repair,
Perkins Bedford Excavator
engine and hydraulics and pick
up. Full knowledge of excavator
would be an asset. All
accommodation provided. Call
223-1609 and 624-2653.
WANTED urgently Security
Guards and Ice Plant Operators.
Must have (2) recent References,
valid Police Clearance, Identifica-
tion and NIS cards. Apply in per-
son to: The Manager, BM Enter-
prise Inc., GFL Wharf, Houston,
East Bank Demerara.
WANTED MOST URGENTLY5TO
10 ACRES OF UNCULTIVATED LAND
POSSESSED OF SEASIDE ADVAN-
TAGE FROM PARKATO VREEDN-
HOOP ALSO ATANY PART OF EAST
BANK OF DBVERARA TRANSPORT
MUST BE FREE OF COMPLICA-
TION. TELEPHONE 226-8937.
WANTED FOR RUNNING
OF CHINESE RESTAURANT
CLEAN HYGIENIC COMMER-
CIAL SECTOR AT BUSY
AREA. NOT AT A MADDENING
RENTAL HUMPHREY
NELSON'S REALTY 226-8937
ALSO PURCHASING WISE OF-
FICE BUILDING AT DOWNTOWN
GEORGETOWN TELEPHONE
HUMPHREY NELSON'S 226-8937.
TRUCK: DRIVERS to drive
heavy and light-duty trucks.
Attractive remuneration package
offered. Apply in person with
written Application, (2)
Recommendations, valid
Driver's Licence and Police
Clearance. PORTERS apply in
person with Application, (2)
Recommendations, valid Police
Clearance to: The Personnel
Manager, National Hardware
(Guyana) Limited, 17 19A
Water Street, South
Cummingsburg, Georgetown.


ICC to launch


Associates and


Affiliates Umpires Panel

... Guyanese Brijcoomar among 20 shortlisted


TORONTO, Canada Cana-
dian-based Guyanese Ashook
Brijcoomar is among 20 um-
pires shortlisted by the Inter-
national Cricket Council
(ICC) as the first step to-
wards the development of an
Associates and Affiliates Um-
pires Panel.
Brijcoomar. who hails from
Corentyne, Berbice, is one of
the leading umpires in the
Toronto and District Cricket
Association (T&DCA) League
here. He has also officiated in
first division cricket in Guyana
over the past few years.
As part of the ICC's ongo-
ing commitment to raising the
standards of decision-making in
international cricket, the 20 um-
pires from the ICC's Associate
and Affiliate member countries
have been invited to attend the
ICC WCQS Division 2 tourna-
ment in Malaysia from Febru-
ary 21.
The umpires will take
part in a two-day seminar
with Darrell Hair from the
Emirates Elite Panel of ICC
Umpires and the ICC Um-
pires and Referees Manager.
Chris Kelly. before being as-
sessed on their performances
in the tournament.
The most promising


umpires from the event will be
invited to join the ICC
Associates and Affiliates
Umpires Panel from which
members will be appointed to
ICC Intercontinental Cup
matches and other Associate and
Affiliate tournaments.
The Panel members will
also be eligible for ICC events
including the ICC Trophy and
the ICC Under-19 Cricket
World Cup and could even be
invited to be involved in the
ICC Champions Trophy and
ICC Cricket World Cup.
Members of the ICC Asso-
ciates and Affiliates Umpires
Panel will be asked to take a role
in the training and development
of other umpires within their
country and region.
The WCQS Division 2 tour-
nament in Malaysia will see the
Cayman Islands. Fiji, Italy, Ku-
wait, Nepal, Papua New
Guinea, Qatar and Zambia chas-
ing the final qualifying place for
the ICC Trophy 2005 in Ireland
from July 1 to 13.
With the five highest ranked
teams from the ICC Trophy
2005 in Ireland gaining auto-
matic qualification for the ICC
Cricket World Cup 2007 in the


West Indies, the stakes are high
for the teams and the officials
taking part in the Malaysia
event.
According to the ICC,
less than three years after
the introduction of the Emir-
ates Elite Panel of ICC Um-
pires as an independent
panel for Test match and
One-Day International
cricket, the ICC has opened
up the pathway to top level
umpiring for officials from its
82 Associate and Affiliate
Member countries.
ICC General Manager -
Cricket, David Richardson, said
that it was necessary to provide
opportunities for officials from
outside the ICC Full Member
countries to develop their skills.
"It is important that we
provide the same development
opportunities for umpires from
nations outside the Test-playing
nations as we do for the teams
from these countries," said
Richardson.
"This initiative will give
us an opportunity to work
with these officials and help
us identify candidates to of-
ficiate at future events."
(Frederick Halley)


vTe oe m


Mr. G Wynter on 333-3154/333-6628 .. .
or Mr. Clifford Stanley on 618.6538/232-005

S -- -,


CHURCH View Hotel.
Main and King Streets, NA.
Tel: 333-2880. Gift Flower
and Souvenir Shop, Main &
Vryheid Streets. # 333-3927



CIRCUIT City Internet
Cafe and Computer School,
Lot 2 D'Edward Village, W/
C/B. All Internet facilities,
photocopying, Scanning
and Fax Services. Tel. #
330-2762/2830 or 625-
7189.



One Ransom 3-Disc
Plough, one pair MF 35-
cage wheel, one 35 MF
back blade, one steel rake
Call Tel: 333-3460 .
OXYGEN and
acetylene industrial
cases. # 58 Village,
orentyne, Berbice.
Phone: 338-2221 (David
Subnauth).
3-STOREYED building
located in New Amsterdam;
pool tables, ice maker
machine, 1 comple-te
qym, 1 Lister generator.
Call- 333-2457/231-
5171.
1 LITTLE Giant
dragline with 371 engine;
1 48" x 36" pitch
propeller; (1) 3/2" dia. x 13
ft 6 ins. propeller shaft;
1 Perkins marine with
transmission; 1 Bedford
engine block with
standard crank shaft and
head; all sizes of 3-
phase motors; cutting
torch; one complete gas
welding set; one 371
GM engine. Tel: 333-
3226.


TV/VCR Repairs. Rosignol
Market Stelling Road.
Telephone # 621-2256



DANZIE'S: Brand name
footwear for all. Stall # D
9 N/A Market. Tel: 333-
4685



UPPER flat of two-storeyed
building for business purposes
- located in Coburg Street
(next to Police Headquarters).
Call Telephone # 618-6634.



WOODWORKS Door Store,
panel doors, cupboard doors,
windows and mouldings. Pitt
Street & Republic Road, N/A.
Tel.333-2558.



PRIME business
property located at Main
and Kent Streets, New
Amsterdam. Call: 225-
7747, weekdays.
1 3-STOREYED building,
newly built in the heart of
New Amsterdam. Price
reduced drastically. Call
333-2457, 337-2348.
(1) 2-BEDROOM house at
Whim, Corentyne price -
US$40 000. Phone: 220-6115.
Ideal for businessperson or
lawyer.
2-STOREY prime
residential property situated
in Canefield Canje Public
Road. Price $20 million,
negotiable. Contact Tel. 327-
7164.


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


4 -


A, ~ -'


I.- *' - . b j e ,It


k"' ...l








tSport Chronicle


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


- - 0-


S LU N R I S E I g
FEBRUAR~Y 1141-7
'JLt U S E T 2
j.-.tqU4R 'i'2 0 4tS

BASMATI ROSELYN
SINGH ot .I-; V'ei s
P u i -i p~ Er- 0 i

th thi-) -A ,rttI I n e
r .i--tu E ii ni ? .


S. -
0 -~
-.~ -







~ - ~ S ~
- ~ -
____ S



1~iwA~ ~~u/


The children and other relatives of the late
MRS. VAUNDA ELAINE WELCH wish
to acknowledge their deep appreciation and
heartfelt thanks to all those persons who
sympathised with them during the time of
their bereavement.
Your expressions of sympathy and kindness
by way of expression, prayers, telephone
calls and cards, and your presence were
highly appreciated.


Windies sponsor


Digicel regrets...

(From back page)
made unjustified demands of the players which were not
covered by the agreement between WIPA and the board."
The five-year deal with Digicel is the biggest in West Indies
cricket history.
The WICB will meet in Barbados today to discuss the contents
of the memo in a scheduled post-tour de-brief.
The announcement of the Digicel deal prompted a pre-tour
dispute between the board and the players, which was eventually
resolved after a judge was appointed to arbitrate.
West Indies won only one of their six VB Series matches
in Australia and failed to qualify for the final, a marked
contrast to their performance in winning the ICC Champions
Trophy last September. (BBC Sport)




'ij In loving memory of ..
',. WINNIE MAPP *, ,*
DORRA (Aunt ;
,.Winnie) who fell '
asleep on Februar 13 -
2002 '
Death leaves an
Sheartache no one can
,' heal Y
S l e m r i e s r e
treasures no ,one can
steal
Some nma ijret I ou
now that y ou are goie
But we will remember -
no matter how long
Loved and remembered in everyway
No tears, no words can ever say -
How much we miss you everyday
"The Lord gave and the Lord has taken
Blessed is the name of the Lord".
S Sadly missed by your loving mother
aunt, nieces, cousins and all those
Whose livesyou touched. ,"
S le Sleep on beloved.
^, May your soul continue ,
^, ,to rest in peace. -'


~Ly,-, r,-,I kV r cd Tr),e '.1: ?
Ior hr r inl min, W'tiea .3, andi1wrt.,dido rt gotIc.
U ntu~.isn owljt..-enriri- MWfof
Ba IA atSmiry7Hc.apidalA ;peniaIiMani. you to ~
all In


SINGH: In sad
and loving memory
of our beloved
husband and father
POORAN SINGH
of Crane Village,
West Coast
Demerara who
departed this life o .'
February 18, 1995.
We never asked for
miracles
But today just one
would do
To see the door pushing open
And see you walking through
If we.could have one lifetime wish
One-dream that could come through
We would wish with all our hearts
SFor yester years and you
There is a bridge of memories .'
From here to heaven above
That keeps you very close to us
It's called the bridge of love
If memories could build a stairway
And remembrance makes a lane
We'd walk the long road to reach you
And bring you home again
There is a link that death can'tsever
Love and remembrance last forever
God broke our hearts to prove
He only takes the best
May Lord Shiva grant his soul eternal rest
Will always be remembered by his loving
wife, children and all other relatives.


SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 20, 2005 z


.


_, ,...


a.
- A


,- .
V

l~l





SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 20, 2005


Amies
- II I -


victory


"Copyrighted Material -


.Syndic'ated Content 4


Available from Commercial News Providers"


.~ ;~j~jj~ ~
~-


Foreign Exchange Market Activities
Sunmmarvy Indicators
Friday, February 11, 2005 Thursday, February 17, 2005
1. EXCHANGE RATES


~-~--~


Buying Rate Selling Rate
A. US Dollar NOTES OTHER NOTES OTHER
Bank of Baroda 197.00 t18.00 201,00 203.(00
Bank of Nova Scotia 189,00 19800 201.00 204.00
Citizens Bank 192.00 197,00 203.00 204.00
Demerara Bank 195.00 197.00 201,00 202.00
GBTI 190,00 195.00 201.00 201.00
B* 198.00 198.00 202.00 204.00
* Bank Average 193.50 197. 17 201.50 203.00
Nonbank Cambios Av. (5 largest) 199.56 202.70

BoG Average Market Exchange Rate: US$1.0 = G$199.75
B. Canadian Dollar
Bank Average 133.33 142,00 148.33 157.00
C. Pound Sterling
Bank Average 316.33 344.67 349.17 366.83
SD. Euro
wiiid 40 i,ii. 216.75- 236.67 243.25 254.67
E. Selected Caricom Exchange F. LIBOR US$ G. Prime Rate
Rates London Interbank Offered
Rate For Thur., Feb. 17.2005
Tr$= G$28.73
Bdos$ = G$ 92.21 3 months 2 '2000'; US 5.5%
J$ = G$ 4.45 6 months 3.04000% Guyana 14,54%
EC$= G$ 65.80
BelizeS = G$ 93,97


MINISTRY OF CULTURE, YOUTH AND SPORT
SKILLS TRAINING
The Ministry of Culture, Youth and Sport invites applications from young persons for participation
in its NON-RESIDENTIAL TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL SKILLS TRAINING PROGRAMME
scheduled to commence Monday 18th April, 2005 at its Sophia Training Centre, Dennis Street,
Sophia, Georgetown. Training extends over a six month period (April to October 2005).
Applicants must be between 16 and 25 years and reside preferably in areas close to the training
centre. Training will be offered in the following skills:


Catering
Office Procedures and Information Technology
Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning
Straw Craft
Welding and Fabrication


20 persons (full-time)
20 persons (full-time)
20 persons (full-time)
20 persons (full-time)
15. persons (part-time)
15 persons (full-time)


-Application forms are available from Sophia Training Centre between 09:00 hours and 15:00 hours
Monday to Fridays. Successful applicants will be required to complete an entry-level test and
medical check prior to enrolment on the programme.
Closing date for applications is Friday, 18th March, 2005. Completed application forms are to be
returned to the Centre not later than 10:00 hours Friday, 18th March, 2005. The entrance test will
be held at Sophia Training Centre on Wednesday, 23rd March, 2005. Interviews and medical
checks are programmed for 4th to 8th April, 2005.
Government ads can be viewed on


c


lib .


8 O


PI"M








>Sport Chronicle*


-~ I
>1


/ J


Peter Ramsaroop -



New Godfather of



Sports in Guyana


By Allan La Rose


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Provid


4111110 411M-



-. 0 omumWm-ft AMN



40 Alb N WOD-


4M. N WN- --


ON a ow,4b ow 4. 4


Sports Club, replacing the only
other patron, the late President
Desmond Hoyte.
This year, he created quite
a stir within sporting circles
when he announced that he
would be putting up three tro-
phies for different sports disci-
plines in honour of three past
Presidents of Guyana. The
"Roop' said the initiative was
mainly with the younger genera-
tion in mind so that they could
know and remember the former
heads-of-state and their contri-
butions to the nation.
The President Burnham
Cup for the softball cricket
will be contested today while
the President Hoyte Cu() will
feature women's cricket and
the President Jagan Cup. vol-
levyball. Eery )ca'r different
sport will be played.
Recently\ I the Roop' has
takn Guyana/West Indies all-
routllcr Indomalic (Go1ordialt
under his wings. In a recent
interview Ramsaroop reiterated
that "the 19-Vear-old Unity
villager is a perfect role model
for our younger girls and her
educational and sporting
achievements are gold standards
for other.,s to follow".
R.mllsaroop has also reached
ut to tlhe sport of boxing.
iteamini g up \\ ilh I promoter
Cariwyn Holland to establish the
Holland-lRoop Proinotlions
\\ which will manage Land protmiote
young professional boxers. At
the momenll tilee Roop is
working with concerned paLtM
lfooltballers towards cslablishing
a Masters Football Association
"and also on a new iniliati\e to


create a Guyana Sporting Hall
of Fame by the end of the year.
The chairman of the Roop
Group of Companies has been
contributing towards other
sponsorships and thinks that
by being involved he is offering
opportunities for the youths
who are the future.
Ramsaroop added that pro-
moting Guyana to the wider
world through sports has a fu-


ture, direct, economic benefit on
the nation as potential investors
will see the competitiveness of
our people which could en-
lighten their interest from a busi-
ness perspective.
Surely in the short time
'the Roop' has carved a name
for himself which could fit-
tingly be described as the
New Godfather for sports in
Guyana.


T -1


JUST over a year ago he was
- well-known as the articulate
flashy politician, but since
his sensational walking away
- from politics he has been fo-
cusing his energies on youth
development especially in
sports in a significant way,
much to the delight of all
concerned, and hoping for
success.
Peter Ramsaroop. also
known within the sporting fra-
ternity as 'the Roop', has cer-
tainly impacted on the younger
generation and nation at large
xwith his comnlltittled it\ olvmctentit
Land contilnuous c nribitlions
over the last yea.ll
The Cari-Air CiO F lituined
the Cit\ l'ootball coitmmmulit\
last VCar \\lien tie cr eaktd his-I
itoi\ b pulling up till large t
single prize monc\ of ,I;I1 fIort
the winner of the Georgelownx
Football League (GFL) top di-
vision competition which was
dormant for two years.
ders" He has also adopted one of'
the lop teams in the country.
Already, hi,; C:ari-Air Western
Tigers team has made tlum proud
by winning the Fruta Cup and
making it to the Mayor's Cup
final to be played later.
According to th'e Roop' he is
working \\ ith the club froni all
aspects of ensuring the team
members work to\\ards
education and economy ic
development.
After establishing the
Guyana Youth Vision 2020 as
a spin-off to his well read
book "Hope for our Nation
Vision 2020" published last
year, 'the Roop' brought to-
gether a number of youth and
sports leaders from through-
out the country for a work-
shop on 'Economic Develop-
ment'.
Last year also saw
Ramsaroop being selected as
* patron of the award-winning
Rose Hall Town Youth and


NOTICE



PLANTATION VERSAILLES & SCHOOL ORD LTD.


(IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION)


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an Annual General Meeting of
the above company wilHbe held on March 1, 2005 at 14:00 hours
at Houston Estates, Houston, East Bank Demerara.

In accordance with the company's Articles, a member is entitled to
appoint a proxy to attend and vote on his/her behalf. A proxy need
not be a member. ,,

All proxies should be lodged with the Liquidator at least two working
days before the meeting.

Dated this 24th day of January, 2005


", I l t, , t f '',t l I ," ', ,,,,- -" ,


Unu n, U***I t, M -e 'uCJy C.L' v


cc~


.0


-0~ *-


miuny rNn~iLF- t-.hiiq/ 20200


at


1~


. - .


Pt IE t amsaroop nolas me i-ores turnnam I ropny tnat
will be up for grabs in today's softball cricket competition.
(Winston Oudkerk photo)


8


~---r----~




SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 20, 2005


rrwly take

Ju5s -53


"Copyrighte(


l Syndicated
Available from Commerc


I Material ,,,

Content, 219 for

ial News Providers"


Windwards


_- low


GUYANA CO-OPERATIVE FINANCIAL SERVICES
(GCFS)
Lot 77 Croal Street & Winter Place, Stabroek, Georgetown
Telephone Nos.: 225-6974/225-8800 & 227-7114
The following clients listed hereunder are asked to contact the
above named institution on or before 24" February, 2005.


Client Name
Brian & Nicole Van Slythman
trading as D&V Mining
Enterprise Ltd
Anthony Bookie
SClaude O.Adams
IJoseph Auguste
Kenrick Cort
Leroy Bagot
Lyndon La Bennett

Marion Charles
Maxie lan Chung
Patrick Williams
Ramchand Jewan
:Samuel Baker
Samuel Henry
Stephen Boyce
Francis & Liloutie Alert
We ieyAlleyne
Wilton James trading as
Wilcon Associates


Address
Lot 89 Section K Campbellville, Georgetown

E1 214 Da Silva Street, Kitty, Georgetown
A-100, Barima Avenue, Bel Air Park, Georgetown
Lot 7 Industry, East Coast Demerara
77 Denis Street, Campbellville, Georgetown
Lot 22, Phillipi Farm, Corentyne, Berbice
c/o Prairie International Hotel, 11 South
Hall, Coverden, EBD
34 Hadfield Street, Lodge, Georgetown
209 Silver Hill, Mablisa, Linden Highway
38 Kuru Kururu, Linden Highway
48 Sheriff Street, Campbellville, Georgetown
Republic Park
Nabaclis Village, East Coast Demerara
84 Wisrock Park, Wismar, Linden
Kwakwani Water Front, Berbice River
282-84 Republic Park, East Bank Demerara
230Aubrey Barker Street, South Ruimveldt Park,
Georgetown


v-i


pirob impty


,-. 0 -


,,


11






SUNDAY CHRONICLE, February 20, 2005 31


a
CIL


I.


-,port Chronicle1


.'a


',,


Turning Point


turn on heat to


dethrone F&H


Supremes


TURNING Point turned on
the heat in the second round
of the Oscar Shew Memorial
dominoes competition to
emerge winners in last
Sunday's hotly contested
tournament, played at the
Everest Cricket Club pavil-
ion, Camp Road, Ge6rgetown.
Starting the second round of
the special two-way aggregate
points system 15-team compe-
tition, some 23 points behind
frontrunners F&H Supremes
(194) and also trailing four
other teams. Turning Point tal-
lied a whopping 191 to romp
home clear with 362 points.
Canal 6, who started with
174 points, showed consistent
form to score 176 in the sec-
ond to occupy the second spot
with 350 points while Future
placed third with 348. De-
fending champions F&H
Supremes faltered badly in
the second round, adding 153
to their previous 194 to end
with 347 and a disappointing
fourth.
Of the other contenders,
Professional 6 got 342, Titans
332, Mean Machine 325, One
Love 321, Rage 316, Taliban
315, Shop Girl 303. Matrix 305,
International Six 297, Segundo
283 and Desperados 260.
The winners carted off $60
000 and the winning trophy,
second place 42 000 and tro-
phy, third 30 000 and trophy.
A minute's silence was
observed before the action got
under way while Health
Chairman of the South
Georgetown Lions Club,
Godfrey Tai-oy-Yong, spoke
on the life and work of Os-
car Shew who passed away on
February 15, 1999. Tai-oy-
Yong's deputy Ms Dearlove
also spoke glowingly on the
life of the late Melvin Jones
(25 years service in Lionism)
awardee.
This year -marked the fifth
occasion since the tournament is
being held by Manniram Shew,
son of the late businessman and
former prominent Lions mem-


ber. He was ably assisted by
Roderick Harry of F&H
Supremes. Shew gave the un-
dertaking that the tournament
will continue on an annual ba-
sis whether he's in or out of
Guyana.
Orin Boston, office manager
of USAID/Family Health Inter-
national. Guyana HIV/AIDS
programme was the emcee
while John Dundas of
CARICOM was responsible
for the scoring of the points
system.
The points system rules
developed by Shew were
used for Sunday's show-
down and are as follows:
for each 6 games made the
team will gain 15 points,
for each 5 games made the
team gains 10 points, for
each 4 games made the
team gains 8 points, for
each 3 games made the
team gains 6 points, for
each 2 games made the
team gains 4 points, for ev-
ery 1 game made the team
gains 1 point, for each love
the team receives the team
loses 5 points.


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


NEW CHAMPS: Captain of the victorious Turning Point receives the Oscar E. Shew first
prize trophy and cash incentive from Manniram Shew with team-mates and organizers
looking on approvingly. (Cullen Bess-Nelson photo)


Pakistan can still win


INJURED pace bowler Shoaib
Akhtar says Pakistan have
the potential to win their
forthcoming Test series in
India even though he is
unavailable.
"They have great players
and if they put it together we
have a great chance to win,"
Shoaib told BBC Asian
Network.
"Our team is a strong unit
after being beaten by Australia
- we learnt a lot from that and
that will help us."
Shoaib, who is suffering a
hamstring injury, said it was too
soon to know if he would be fit
for tie oneday se ,es,- I-I'
. '--.'m there .to serve, my
country as best I could -but if


I'm fully fit I can do a better
job," he explained.
Pakistan lost their home


Test series against their arch-
rivals 3-1 a year ago.
Shoaib has missed 30 of
the 66 Tests Pakistan have
played since he made his
debut in November 1997.
He admitted he was only
half-fit on the recent tour of
Australia, where Pakistan lost
all three Tests.
"We always take chances,
we always play with niggles
and with injuries. I don't
know a fast bowler who
doesn't," he said.
"But what people don't
understand is a fast bowler can't
play every game because it's too
hard to do.-thai- .
' "The',nmouni oif enkel. we
are playing nowadays is not


Shoaib

easy at all."
Shoaib expressed his
frustration at missing the tour,
Pakistan's first to India since
1999.

"I always look for the
bigger tours and the bigger
games to perform," he added.
"That was such an
opportunity. You do
something and you make
yourself a big name. If you
don't do it you make
yourself a bad name.
"I had a good chat with
my consultant and doctors
and they asked me to rest
because hamstring problems
always. take.a bit longer than.
you think." (BBC Sport)


A


-~-~-~---~~ -----~--~~~- ~ ~ ~ ~~-~~~~- ~~---- ~








SPORT








Rain wipes out

second day's play


WEST Indies sponsor Digicel
says it regrets the publishing
of a memo that criticised the
behaviour of players.
And the telecom company
reaffirmed its commitment to a
$20m (10.56m) contract with
the West Indies Cricket Board
(WICB).
A statement said it was
"disappointed that an internal
memo, given to the WICB as a
confidential communication has
reached the public domain".
It added: "We are
enthusiastic about developing
the many initiatives which will
support the growth of the
game."
West Indies Players'
Association (WIPA) has


threatened legal action after the
memo, relating to the tour of
Australia, was published in a
newspaper.
In it, sponsorship liaison
Richard Nowell described the
side as "the poorest
ambassadors from any
representative team I've come
across".
President Dinanath
Ramnarine said WIPA is:
"fully prepared to resort to
legal measures to protect
itself and its members'
professional reputations."
Ramnarine particularly
resented Nowell calling them a
"terrorist players' association".
Nowell, who has toured
with England in a similar


capacity in the past, was also
critical of the off-field activities
of unnamed players.
He also accused players,
many of whom have personal
sponsorship deals with Cable
and Wireless, of being
uncooperative and lethargic.
|" ^^^^^^^


Ramnarine added: "The
players have fulfilled all
their contractual obligations
as specified in the tour
contract.
"Digicel had on that tour

(Please page 27)


WEST Indies players were accused of being
uncooperative to sponsors.


THERE was lavish entertain-.
ment for all of the pre-lunch
session at the Albion Commu-
nity Development ground yes-
terday.
Regrettably none ,of it was
on the field of play nor was it
directly related to cricket on the
second day of the Carib Beer Se-
ries game between home boys
Guyana and Jamaica.
The Paragon Sound System
pounded mostly reggae tunes,
apparently to appease the Jamai-
cans after overnight, early morn-
ing and midday rains forced the
umpires to abandon cricket for
the day and hope for a 09:30 h
start today.
Large poodles of water
were almost in every area of
the outfield and in the ab-
sence of any technology be-
yond two small pieces of
sponge umpires Clancy Mack
and Davetirth Anandjit made
their sensible decision five
minutes after lunch.
The scores remained as they
were at the end of day one with
Guyana on 221 for 3 led by 97
from Ramnaresh Sarwan and an
unbeaten 80 from left-hander
Narsingh Deonarine.
With an entire day lost,
plus an additional hour and 20


minutes on the first day the
battle will almost certainly be
for first innings points as an
outright result is unlikely.
(Imran Khan)


NARSINGH DEONARINE



GUYANA first innings
S. Chattergoon Ibw Hinds 21
R. Ramdass c Lambert b Taylor 7
R. Sarwan c Hinds b Lambert 97
N. Deonarine not out 80
A. Fudadin not out 5
Extras: (w-2, nb-8, lb-1) 11
Total: (for 3 wickets, 69 overs) 221
Fall of wickets: 1-25,2-43,3-200.
Bowling: Taylor 12-247-1 (nb-6, w-
1), Washington 11-3-40-0, Bernard
9-4-22-0 (nb-2), Hinds11-3-26-1 (w-
1), Miller 11-0-46-0, Brown 6-1-25-0,
Lambert 9-2-14-1.


; ,- *
,;','^
.1.2.'


LEdward B. Beharry
& Company Ltd.


COURSE Director.
American Carmen
Williamson (right) being
presented with a gift
from General Secretary
of the Guyana Olympic
Association Ivor
O'Brien for his out-
standing 10-day course
work with Amateur
Boxing referees/judges,
which ended on Fridas
Winston Oudkerk
photo)


"-O'- '


'.P.


5; ,~, !k


4 1k Arrange Your Insurance
r topo-ion Today!o


ANN RGIA 592) 771-4310 NE AMSTERDAM 159:1fi 2~ PORT riOuRANT 1592) 336 6155 '13.7693~
UNE 5921 624 2662 444.2B48- PARIKA 15921 201 4Q74'1. GEORGETOWNJ!(59.12 26 22l


.ip
W -c x ** *^o/y v
.Website: clico.com/quyan,/--i'.'f-":':'"" ,.. "-:.7. 7- .' -.-'
' ."" . '.*. ... -' .-" t l -.'l' . ':: -.: *" '- ., .


Pi-inted and Published by Guyana National Newspapers Limited, Lama Avenue, Bel Air Park, Georgetown. Telephone 226-3243-9,227-5204,227-5216.Fax 227-5208 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2005
................ :...,.....-.,i- ...................................


''






i6 tobe sold sparately-


ml


i 111 I


fA IIL J/ b


~c4.


Chronicle photographer, Mike Norville caught this
beautiful rainbow on Wednesday shortly after a heavy
shower of rain. -
The sight of the rainbow is particularly meaningful to
coastlanders who are now trying to put the pieces of their
lives back together after devastating floods.
Unprecedented rainfall in Guyana between January 12
and 22, coupled with poor drainage resulted in floods on
the East Coast and Georgetown. -
God entered a covenant with man that the rainbow
would be a symbol that He would never destroy the world
.. .... .. .*" t I,' .


*]


IF-=
F"4


WE


1e


**


* l 1*


~ -rplla 4'IPLI~#~~;_"IZd~a~l~tirY


CENTRE


-_. ,l..


I"


,






Sunday Chronicle February 20, 2005


MONEY. se and :irumnients .are a. the root otf mos couples-
discontent. SherrY Dixon rackies the most common relanonship
problems

Aifl PARTNER'S HA.4ING AN AFFAR. IS THIS THE
END OF OUR RELATIONSHIP?
'I'le discovered m) husband', been unfaithful %\iih one of our
closest inends The past few da. s ha\e been j horrendous niiture
of rows. ears and recnminations He sas- he still loses me, and I
sill lose hum. but eser.one I know tells me to just walk av.a\. Is
there an\ hope for us1

Sharon

Infidelity doesn't have to spell the end for a relationship Yes,
some partners hate affairs because the\ want out of the relation-
ship. but for most people, an affair is a w.ike-up call. It's a signal
that they're not happ), but if the relationship changed they would
stay. In some cases, a relationship is strengthened by an affair as
both partners have had to face and work through the problems in
their relationship.


Secondly. ,ou aoid discussing the issue ~o'd re reallN upset
aboul one or both of ,ou reels urious bul either doesn't reahlie
iI. or is too scared to admit 11

Stop arguing action plan

Disccer the hidden resentments that ate lurking under the
surface, sonietimes dcknowsledgement alone clears them up

Discuss together if necessary with the help of a counsellor -
any long-standing i-sues. things )ou jusi can It orgie

Deselop waNs of nipping .an argument in the bud bs breaking
the mood %ith a hug. a joke or an apology

Learn the skills of negonation to resol e things that you can'i
agice on in a wa. that leaves both of you feeling good


Head off building resentments
by taking time every day to bring
up differences and disagreements
and clear the air.


Affair action plan MYPARTNER'S GONE
OFF SEX. DOES IT MEAN
News that your partner has had an affair will shock. Don't HE HAS GONE OFF ME?
make any hasty decisions about your future, however much other 'At the beginning of our rela-
people pressure you to do so. tionshipi, sex was non-stop. But
oveirthepast si months, my part-
.* Your partner needs to agree to stop seeing his (or her) lo6er er seems td have lost all interest
if they refuse, walk away. in se6. IHe never initiates sex. and
Snone of my efforts to entice him into bed are working. He says he
Once you're over the shock and can talk calmly wilh you ",still loves me. but I don't believe him.'
partner, try and talk through the reasons for the infidelity.
Teresa


Think about the question, what needs to change in your rela-
tonship for infidelity neter to happen again"'


Couples counselling can provide a neutral and iuppormie en-
vironment to talk these difficult issues through.


WE KEEP HAVING THE SAME OLD ARGUMENTS.
HOWDO WE STOP GOING ROUND IN CIRCLES?
'We are always arguing and it's al way s about the same things
We try to work things out, but one oi us alas loses >our temper -
and to be honest, I'm losing faith that we v. ill ever get things soned
How can we stop these rows?'


Angela


Sexual desire naturally dips in any'relationship. However, when
desire completely dies away. there is something wrong. It's not nec-
essanly due to problems in the relationship. Desire can fade through
physical causes, such as illness or medication and mental causes
such Is stress or depression.


I LOVE MY PARTNER- BUT I CAN'T GET ONWITH
HIS CHILDREN,
:'We've' beeii.together for nearly a year, and everything's won-
derfuil except for the w weekends when-he sees his children. I haven't
got children of m) own and feel uneasy \\%ith his They resent me
.because they want him to get back with their NMum. The whole
weekend's stressful and after the children hase gone home we al-
ways end up rowing

SLucille

Being a step-parentii can create all kinds of problems. Your part-
ner %\ants to do the best for his kids and in principle you agree
with him. In practice, you feel left out and often hurt by the
children's hostility tov.ards you This emotional tug-of-war creates
strain in your relationship

':',Step-parenting action plan

Expect the children to come first when your partner sees them;
Sdn't fight them for his attention or put him in an emotional tug-
of-wa".:

hen you're w% ith the children, be yourself; they'll spot false
altteipls to 'w in them round.


As to childcare. support yoiurpartner.'s way of interacting
with his children he may feel as unskilled as you are about coping
There are two key. causes of arguments. Firstly. you may not with them ,
have the necessary skills to resolve serious conflicts, Whilst Vau. .
.:Were fine in the early part of your relationship. Nhen therevas Don't c pect his children to like you, they may never do.
nothing serious to argue about, now your differences of opinion are Buit remeniber that their dislike isn't personal,; they don't know
apparent, you struggle to resolve issues and can't cope. ,' yo their anger is really aimed at their father


If you really find it hard to be with your partner's children,
stay away. It's vital that he gets good quality time with them you
have him the rest of the time!

WE NEVER AGREE ABOUT MONEY. HELP!
'My partner and I just have .completely different attitudes to
money. He seems incapable of keeping track and as a result we
sometimes get overdrawn. I'm much more careful, to the point where
he often accuses me of being miserly. I feel so out of control when
he spends too much,- and he says he feels nagged and controlled
when I try to get him to cut back We're not too bad at the start of
the month? but by, the end we're:at each other's throats.'

Gabrielle

Money plays an important part of life, but the thing to remem-
ber is that money is never just about money. It can be a real power
issue in a relationship, with each partner wanting to organise and
spend their money their own way. The problems start with our
different attitudes we've all inherited different spending patterns
from our parents and the different ways we deal with it can lead to
problems.

Cash: action plan

Look back at how you were taught to handle money then
swap notes. The,more you appreciate each other's attitudes to
money, the less you'll row.

If one of you is earning far more than the other, they shouldn't
therefore hold all the control; value each partner's contributions,
whether they are financial or not.

Work out a way of managing your finances that gives you
both some m onevy that you alone control such as a joint account
for housekeeping plus '"pending money'.

If neihet of you is good at budgcung, seek expert help.

If money Nrguilent have suddenly erupted, ask why; how
has the power balance in your relationship altered in recent months?
This could be whtn's triggering die arguments
Read: Stop fighting about money by Corinne Sweet,
(Hodder & Stoughtlon Publishers).


"Paoe II


1~Jh~


.L s .- - .


Immmg





IPA901-1111


NO


PRIZE


Our daughter, 29. is trying to decide whether to give her
ex-boyfriend another chance. After a two-year relationship, he
cheated on her with his ex-girlfriend. He said he had to find out
if his ex was the one. A year later, his ex cheated on him, and he
went back to our daughter and asked for a second chance.
Our daughter was devastated by his infidelity. It was heart-
breaking. We sent her to counselling for months. We are dis-
traught about her giving this man a second chance. In her loneli-
ness she is caught in the myth of getting older and doubting
there will ever be someone else.
Our daughter's friends agree he is not her equal in educa-
tion, manners, or maturity, though he is good-looking. She says
she forgave him, but she admits trust is the issue. She tells us,
"I have tried, but no one else even looks at me twice."
She knows we distrust him. The timing of his return is
mostly a reaction to his ex-girlfriend doing to him what he did
to our daughter. She wants to recover what was, but we believe
it cannot be. We don't want to control her future, but the old
saying "once a cheater always a cheater" rings in our minds.
TOM & KATE
Tom & Kate, your daughter might be willing to break off
with this man if you could give her the exact date and time the
right man will show up. But since you cannot give her that, she
won't believe it can happen.
Often when a woman clings to an inappropriate man, there
is one thing about the man which is a peg she can hang her hat
on. Most commonly that peg is physical attractiveness. Your
daughter pictures herself entering a room on his arm. That al-
lows her to ignore his cheating, though it also makes him at-
tractive to other women.
Your letter tells us how much you love your daughter. All
you can do is be there for her. Whatever rational reasons you
give her for ending the relationship will go unheeded because
her irrational fear is telling her it is him or no one. Faced with a
life alone, with no other man ever, she clings to a man who
cheated on her and feeds her low self-esteem.
WAYNE & TAMARA

Send letters to: Direct Answers,
PO Box 964, Springfield,
MO 65801 or email: -
DirectAnswers@WayneAndTamara.com.


I had a five-month
relationship with a
gentleman and thought
we were oddly made for
each other. He would call
me every morning and
sing to me over the phone
while I walked the dog.
When he took me out to
dinner, he brought me
small plants or flowers.
Last Saturday while in
my bathroom he got a call
from someone, obviously a
woman by the tone in his
voice. He tells her he is
washing his hands and will
call her back when he is free,
meaning when he is out of
my house. The lie falls from
his lips so easily I am
shocked. He comes out of
the bathroom and grabs my
hand to walk him to his car.
As we leave the house, I
say, "Don't forget to call her
back." He says, "Oh, that
was just some real estate
lady."
He kisses me like he's
my uncle. When 1 ask why
the perfunctory kiss, he
says he doesn't know. Did
I not read the signs
correctly? I haven't heard
from him since.
FAITH
Faith, maybe you
missed the early signs, but
calling the relationship
"oddly" right suggests you
sensed something was
amiss. The blitzkrieg
pursuit may have felt like
he was trying to accomplish
something rather than
express something which
came naturally.
Trusting your natural
instincts led you to
confront him. He
disappeared. You hit the
nail on the head. Many
women would have let that
go by, hoping to win him
like a Kewpie doll. You
knew better.
WAYNE & TAMARA


BROADCASTS TO SCHOOLS: TIME TABLE
NCN Radio 13:30 14:00 hrs February 21'- 25th, 2005


MONDAY
February 21st

SGrade 6
English
ILanguage

DIRECT
SPEECH




Science

ADAPTATION
IN ANIMALS -
MOUTH PARTS
OFANIMALS
(BIRDS &
INSECTS)


TUESDAY
February 22nd

Grade 4
Mathematics


LENGTH -
NON-
STANDARD
UNITS


WEDNESDAY
FEBRUARY 23rd
Republic Holiday


REPUBLIC -
HOLIDAY


Science

ROOTS DIFFER REPUBLIC
HOLIDAY


THURSDAY
February 24th

Grade 3
Mathematics


ADDITIONS -
HUNDREDS,
TENS, ONES


Social
Studies

FAMILY
RELATIONS
AND THEIR
STORY


FRIDAY
February 25th

Grade 6
Social
Studies


FLOODS -
EFFECTS
DAMAGES
AND:
RECOVERY.
Mathematics


FRACTIONS
- ADDITION
OF MIXED
NUMBERS
WITHLIKN.. ,
DENOMINATORS


''Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content 4 r i
Available from Commercial News Providers"


r=---o-n - -"- 9 Ia

TRAIN FOR YOUR
professional
I 8 8 accredited I
S UCCESS PrCertificate
or Dip orrsa, ,
SIN200o5! ___a,
Invest in accredited qua;; ..n and" to |
secure a bright future, good career and '.
'-.,"*0.g YOU need for success is : vided;
T. .., Materials, Guidance, Extms, Award.
International Diplomas. i130 or U$5250)
*Accounting. Hotels, Tourism. !,' -;rs, Enis
S* Business. Management, Stores Pero:nne- Markating
i*Advertising, insurance Secr'eary, :. PR
|Advanced. Honours & Graduate Diplomas and MBAs
S*Business, Account, Marketinr, Finance, Iersor ne
I For a FREE ProspectsLI';[ .:.:. ,o,. book contact:
ICAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE I
I PO Box 53, Southampton, S014 OYP, Britain |
i Fax:+44 2380 337200
| Website: www.cambridge.:-le j co.uk
I ermri info@cambridgetraining.com j
o0 ;i i, and post :his seco, t n ou' na-e, a.dress & a:s




I Professional accredited British Careers Training *


b BARAMA COMPANY LIMITED

- -PUBLIC NOTICE

As a major corporate entity in the forestry sector of Guyana, Barama is
deeply conscious of its environmental, social and economic responsibilities
and is committed to sustainable forest management practices to ensure that
the forest remains a resource in perpetuity for Guyana and also positively
impacting Guyana's economy.

To strengthen Barama's commitment to sustainable forest management the
company is pursuing Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Forest
Management and Chain of Custody Certification for its forest and
manufacturing operations. This process has been ongoing for the past 3
years and requires third party audit and verification by FSC accredited
certifiers. Consequently Barama has retained the services of
SGS/QUALIFOR, a FSC accredited certifier to conduct the main
assessment. This assessment is scheduled to be conducted from 28th
February 2005 to 4"' March 2005.

Interested parties wishing to comment on this process can obtain a
stakeholder comment's form oi" get additional information from:

Dr. Gary Clarke
Clarke Environment Consulting
22 Bel Voir Court
Bel Air
Georgetown
Tel,: 615-896


M',196


Now


* -
. *






PI^*V^ . .. Sun hrncle F^r 0 200
BiyOCW.N~' Clflvll UKiR MffCH


4b -


* -0 -
~-4W 41- -


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"
aw 4w -0 WOM -fto
400 dhowIWll0000


- -


a.-.. _
~. a. ___
- -
a. a. a.

a a. -


WOIIDEIUlUI


000 D 4


q o .


- -| - - - - ---- -'^ - -

I ||

I QUESTION
I am receiving Invalidity Benefit from NIS but cannot receive Medi
Care as I was never qualified for Sickness Benefit. My drugs cost a
lot of money, and I am a poor person. Why can't I get Medical Care
from NIS.


I ANSWER I

i You can receive maintenance drugs for your condition provided ....
1-youregistcr with-the-Medical Section-of-NIS.- -

I Note, that Medical Care is attached to Sickness Benefit, and-a
Invalidity Benefit. .. Q


Do you have a question.on N.I.S? Then write/call.


I
I


NIS MAIL BAG
C/O Dianne Lewis Baxter
Publicity and Public Relations Officer (ag)
National Insurance Scheme
Brickdam and Winter Place
P.O. Box. 101135
E-mail: pr_nis@solution2000.net
Tel: 227-3461.


.I
I


I

N
Al
.1~'
I


I - - -- .- -- *- -- ----, - -
I,


GEORGETOWN PUBLIC
HOSPITAL CORPORATION


Applications are being invited from suitably qualified persons to fill
the following vacancies within the Corporation.
MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIST-
Applicants should possess the following:
. Associate Degree/Diploma. irv.Medical Technologyiornmihe.......
University of Guyana or any other recognized University.
PHARMACIST
Applicants should possess the following:
* Associate Degree/Diploma in Pharmacy or equivalent from the
University of Guyana or any other recognized University,
Applications, along with two (2) references and a recent police
clearance can be sent to:
Leslie Cadogan
Director, Administrative Services
Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation
New Market Street
North Cummingsburg
Georgetown
Deadline for applications is Friday 25th February, 2005.


PaglelV--


7Sunda' -Chi-onile -. Fbruary -20, 2005-


qb





Sunday Chronicle February 20, 2005


TOOTH





SENSITIVITY


following place
ment of a filling is
fairly common. A
tooth may be sensitive to pres-
sure, air. sweet foods, or tem-
perature. Usually, the sensitiv-
ity resolves on its own within
a few weeks. During this time,
avoid those things that are caus-
ing the sensitivity. Pain reliev-
ers are generally not required.
The general reason why
teeth may become sensitive af-
ter being filled is because of the
drilling and cutting of nerves
which are done during the
preparation of the cavity for fill-
ing. Remember the tooth is alive
and needs some time to heal.
But there are several other ex-
planations for pain around fill-
ings.
For example, there may be
pain you experience when you
bite down which may be ob-
served soon after the anaesthe-
sia wears off and continues over
time. In this case, the filling is
interfering with your bite. You
will need to return to your den-
tist and have the filling reshaped.
Then there is pain when your
teeth touch. This pain is a very
sharp pain that occurs only
when your teeth touch. The
pain is likely caused by the
touching of two different metal
surfaces (for example, the silver
amalgam in a newly filled tooth
and a gold crown on another
tooth with which it touches).
Sometimes the teeth may even
be some distance apart. The
two metals form the poles of a
"battery" with the saliva being
the electrolyte. The pain is re-
ally from galvanic shock gener-
ated by the resulting electrical
current. Sometimes the pain dis-
appears by itself after a week


The Dentist Advises
g),ggypg I3


or so.
If the decay was very deep
to the pulp (nerve) of the tooth
there may be a "tooth-ache"
pain. This response may indi-
cate that this tissue is no longer
healthy, or the body has not re-
acted as it should. In either case
a root canal treatment is re-
quired.
Then there is what is known
as referred pain. With this type
of pain, you experience pain or
sensitivity in other teeth besides
the one that received the filling.
With this particular sensation,
there is likely nothing wrong
with your teeth. The filled
tooth is simply passing along
"pain signals" it is receiving to
other teeth. This pain should
decrease on its own over one to
two weeks.
Allergic reactions to
silver fillings are rare. In
fact, there are less than a
hundred cases reported in
over two centuries according
to the American Dental
Association. In these rare
circumstances, mercury or
one of the metals used in an
amalgam restoration is
thought to trigger the allergic
response. Symptoms of
amalgam allergy are similar
to those experienced in a
typical skin allergy and
include skin rashes and
itching. Patients who suffer
amalgam allergies typically
have a medical or family
history of allergies to metals.
Once an allergy is confirmed,
another restoration material
can be used.
Constant pressure from


chewing, grinding or clenching
can cause dental fillings to wear
may cause an abscessed tooth.
This can lead to terrible pain,
loss of the tooth and even death
from Vincent's angina or en-
cephalitis.
If the filling is large or the
recurrent decay is extensive.
there may not be enough tooth
structure remaining to support
a replacement filling. In these
cases, your dentist may need to
replace the filling with a crown.
Although you may not be able
to tell that your filling is wearing
down, your dentist can identify
weaknesses in your restorations
during a regular check-up. If the
seal between your filling and the
tooth enamel breaks down, food
particles and decay-causing
bacteria can work their way
under the filling. This is called
seepage or recidivism. You then
run the risk of developing
additional decay in that tooth.
Decay that is left untreated can
progress to infect the dental
pulp.
New fillings that fall out
are probably the result of
improper cavity preparation,
contamination of the prepa-
ration prior to placement of
the restoration or a fracture
of the restoration from bite
or chewing trauma. Older fill-
ings will generally be lost
due to decay or fracturing of
the remaining tooth struc-
ture. Finally, whatever un-
desirable symptoms or
doubts you may have after
having a filling done, it's best
to check back with your den-
tist.


Bly eremy Laurence
COLCHESTER, England (Reuters) It is the home of Humpty Dumpty, Old King Cole and
Camelot or so legend has it.
But archeologists raking over the past can now go one better for the English city of
Colchester.
After painstaking excavation work they have proof of real heroes from the ancient world.
Last month they revealed the remains of a Roman Circus or chariot racing track.
In the past 30 years archeologists in the city have unearthed evidence dating back to
Roman rule over 2,000 years ago, rewriting British history along the way. The circus under-
lines the city's importance as a provincial Roman outpost.
In its heyday the track would have made an awesome sight with a straight measuring
about 350 yards and stands for some 8,000 people, more than the population of the town
itself.
Formerly Colonia Victricensis, meaning 'City of the Victorious', Colchester is Britain's
oldest recorded town and its first capital.


MINISTRY OF EDUCATION


-~ -r--


ICE


Applications are invited for entry into Carnegie School of Home Economics to pursue
studies in the following programmes: Catering and Hospitality
CONDITIONS FOR ENTRY
Catering and Hospitality applicant must attain the age of eighteen (18) years by the 31"
January, 2005.
QUALIFICATIONS
Minimum qualification: CSEC in Food and Nutrition and Home Economics Management.
Applicants with good scores at S.S.P.E. Parts 1 & 2 would be considered if space is
available.
Application forms can be obtained from the Carnegie School of Home Economics,
D'Urban and High Streets. Werk-en-Rust at a cost of $100 00.
Completed forms must be returned to the School by Friday, 1" March, 2005
Applicants are required to report to the Carnegie School of Home Economics for an
Entrance test on Friday, 4'h March, 2005 at 08:30 hrs.
ED Caesar
Chief Education Officer




INVITATION TO TENDER


r
Guyana Trade and Investment Support Project (GTIS)

The GTIS project is looking for firms/individuals with
experience in information management, design, set up
and support of IT systems.

The firm or individual will have as its main functions:

1. Identifying IT needs
2. Selecting and ordering hardware and software
3. Configuring and installing hardware and software
4. Establishing network
5. Providing post-installation support.

Expressions of Interest should arrive no later than February
25, 2005. Interested firms or individuals are requested to send
company profile/CV to the GTIS Project, 12 Earl's Avenue,
Subryanville, Georgetown. Phone: 223-7144 Fax: 223-
7143, Email: .' -- ..,



5" O.r.* ;,c rA9 Zv [o wO-: U }S[ SI-CA^ \'
*.-., -M IH ,1 ,- .^ .-,,1.to SA1AN.-.- "I "


TENDERS ARE INVITED FOR THE
PURCHASE OF


REGISTRATION PDD 3343.

SEATING CAPACITY 46 PERSONS.

TO BE SOLD AS IS AND WHERE IS.
INSPECTION CAN BE MADE AT
GNIC's PREMISES BETWEEN
08:00 H AND 16:00 H

TENDERS MUST BE PLACED IN
THE TENDER BOX AT GUYANA NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL
COMPANY'S HEAD OFFICE 1 9 LOMBARD STREET,
CHARLESTOWN ON OR BEFORE
MARCH 4, 2005 AT 16:00 H.

Please note: the company will not necessarily
.accept the s'g.es 7Bos.1


2/18/2005. 7:14 PM


Page V


~9n~09n~ciTe--fy~-S1Q~-~~FI





"IBIlPagetBF~- VI SundayPD~~s9Y Choil Ferur 20,Q1~ 2005 --IY~~ ----~ C sl II-~


NATIONAL BANK
OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE LIMITED
A Subsidiary of Republic Bank Limited


~!L#)ILZ#


THE PROMENADE GARDENS REHABILITATION PROJECT

FELLOW CITIZENS OF GUYANA:

We wish to take this opportunity to report to you, on the progress that has been
achieved in our effort to contribute to the restoration and preservation of this important
historical site.

PHASE I FENCING OF THE PERIMETERS OF THE GARDENS

This was successfully completed in October, 2004 at a cost of approximately $12m.

PHASE II DESIGN, LANDSCAPE AND ENGINEERING WORKS

The second phase covered the design, landscape and engineering works intended to
restore the gardens to its pristine glory. In this connection, the Bank retained the
services of a well established design firm to proceed with the horticulture activity. It
embarked on this phase and was set to work assiduously to bring it to the desired
conclusion. However, considerable difficulty was experienced in getting the
necessary co-operation from officers of the Mayor and City Council from whom
conflicting signals were at times given and which amounted to an obstruction of the
work of the design firm.


Much energy was consumed in meetings in order to decide
resolve differences, but at times decisions reached at
subsequently unilaterally varied or even reversed, thus causing


on desired goals and
some meetings were
unnecessary delays.


* *.~ ~


The good intentions to carry out this phase having been frustrated, NBIC has
reluctantly decided that in the circumstances its efforts will not at this time result in the
achievement of the original goals and worthy standards that propelled the Bank to
embark on this undertaking.

In the premises, NBIC has regrettably decided to suspend its participation in this phase
of the project. It is hoped that in the right atmosphere and in a spirit of goodwill and
cohesion, the objectives of this important Phase could sometime soon be brought to a
successful conclusion.
: ' v .. '. *' */ -:* ;1- 1. ;- ;: -. .' ^ U i -; ^ -ji


'N


WON


Page VI


Sunday Chronicle February 20, 2005


,







Sunday Chronicle February 20, 2005


" C




SC:






co



w0 .0
4-a) V
L-'a)


Page VII


4))L
4) (
E 0
> -
LUU)>,0


.-)-


.0
U0C. -0

-0 4) 0) a



0 00 C


w z z
c (U


CL
0'o~




.02



004

C


0 000
.0A -.= 3



.0 0 0' r 0

~0-


Mc Cc= w

m En
00 (D~

0 U) C,4

-oc






I 0 (Da



2.;a -aU


'0 0U-0~-




2 cn8..E0 E-500) 0-
w- E co E0--o
-cn


0 E Uc(U 04E
E Sw Eb _.








(D CU E c 0
0 o CU
(U


o.- =(U 203*U)o
04)F -0




C ~0 0) 0



4-- a) -.

4) -%. cara )


o: v- 0



a) 0 E,,c

E wU ...0 40(


cu




(u






cu



ww

0 U)LCD -


(U

E


Co. (U
Co U)
(U




X_-CC, .c (0) a




-'0U 4) ~(D q) )(

:3 c -C v
(U -
4-.
0 E


0. 4
Sro

0t

Cs



S0 -



VEZ


0 'o,
c" o '3



o .o


c o









0 0 a)
:.0








- 0 ,,


'( ",



(U y5 ^'--^^^-


0.)

0( (





0)


C'>

C
4.&
W-.-

cyA


:3 0



o a)4-~
4- >~U)
.cn (UC:. co

a) UC. 0
co Ur


0





(U



-0
(U


C
'0

_c




I-


om
aac




.0 0
:( O U
. w .2





:0


-4-0 =' 0 = 0 (m o
4)0 ,4.0' -0 r.L



.00 00
LL, m 0 0
lu 40



CD >





a 0. 4)0.

c~ 0U "a =~
.6CE0o u(U
0 0 0 0


(0

.2
U)
0)
0
01


C
0
4-.

C
w ~

~ U.i
I
I- ~
0
- C')


4- o

o








. ..0
10.'




- (



0) <
C .
---CO
4-*- .45.

(Uc:
'-C 0







(0


4.(U


U)



o oc

cu 0 C _


(D



C o
;E?
-C
0 0
z M,.,


o C-(



4-C0
0)C


co -


.D O ..
4- I ..

4- .









0 m-
0'- 0 .0 -



O. -
0 U^S^S


U
-eQ
(U"C



.c0)
(U.-
~1~
~
(U'=
(U 4-
.Cci)
(U 4-
L. 4-
0)0 2
.C ~
0
0)
cc c
~

*E 5 ~ .~ ~

(U :~= U)
0"0
St. (U N- ~ ~
E


4-
0
(U
x
0)
(U
-'-
,4-


4--
0
-o
(U




*-c
.-_
(0

(Uf
<-)
4-
C




-t:


UCL


-oU)
S0.


(U 4-
(n
"2


0(U
0CL

EU.

02(
0 ca


ca


cu
(0







C
-0
3:>
tO


(0
(0
-'U


^- 0-


0
o









E>
4- >
cuw

(U.








u cC




(U.J


e. 'o
(A

I
0
0S


ca(U


(>


. LZ


-0) c

OCU
0 -






0.


0E
-cu
QU: U


-c
4-'
U).

0
0
0)
C
'(U
U)
V
C

(U
4- L..
~3o

(U .~
-C
4- C


'r


i










Sunday Chronicle .ebr .y20,, 2005


0


(D
(DCD C
0) BD

CD


"0
C/)


"a"






CD



=r"


rCD"


CD


0 cO.
CDM
0(a

CD


0-



CD,


a:;

CL


=r" 0i) CD l)
0 *
aD c5'0) CD (n G) r-
CD =r"= =3' CD CD 0)
(aCD ~CD
(D Q_ WCD CD
=CDo 60(

m 0"3 a-~?
0.0 Co a )P3

o M 00


CD CD 0- 0C
CL 0rCD


C(D


=r3" '< =r o
CD0 M" :-3 -
CD CL 0-C=r
Co> ~CD
> o ~0
m2~-
3 p ~
8 0


0- l0) :r"
(DO D ~"~ 3 5(D


(D (

0~w0
0 :"CD0
(a (A : CD CD C:
~0) -0449


00
CD -,, ::ro

(.0 0


:E (D CDCOO


0) = .-US'000 C/) 0)3
M 0. 3 c



a 3 (~wD =


.-a x 0 3 5O a0) "m:3(n" 0
"0 "0 3-5 w0 m *" 0
M a: : MCa 0-0"9CA


M 0 CD O
G. 0) R: 6 o tD C0
<3-0 --ft O

F; M m cr 0000)0%C5

0 CA M 0 C 0 4 ) 0
-%- h r r, -.0) =A


CD CD'<):J5
(D ~ '0 0' C

o C: 0


COC-Da
< Q) CD9.3.


) 0 C



m3 0 (D t-
U):3:3-
U)4. ) (1) 0)

*"0 B0
0 0 -CD.t

0 0 c :3:E0~

c ( r( 3C
"9 :r0C-w. to (D C


~1


OCD CD Cn CO






--h 0,05,-

CD a)D


0 M. -n I -
0 'CD0 .0=
(D 0
0 M"CD 03
3 _0 3 C0S;2


SD .0

,R0 30f.
0 )CD M0
-00 M <-


Page VIII


...,..


(D c: -



(D~


02


~"DCD
0~





0)5
Ca.CD


CL. :3
5.0 (J


::r CD"


~(CD


(a C. "CL

O0.


~3:3

o) 0)

0


w CD
CD





CD
6 =
0.. CD


Cl
(D

CD
M3
0
CD

CD

0I
CD



=r

CD


=:3"0

#.0.








SCQ.
o CD


CD ~CD
CD=
-CD0
00a
aa4

cn .


CD C
*0-
5:CD






5D =


C:
:3
CL

0
M3







0*


CD






:3


0


w.5
0~


CD


-CD-




CD 0. C
cL a c"



(D

03- -


CD




CD

:3"


00

(D
0- -
0)
-00C

CE s. =;
:)0~
(Cl-


0)C

(DCD


00
OCDC

(D0)
C:3
0


0.0
0 =r



57 CD



0)
0.00


:3
"r0

-0 <

CD


0

CC)


*0

~0









CD


a) 0
0xO

C0
CL


Oak..


~bsr~3',


... .................. ...


~0CD



SCD
,o CD

CD -~CD

"CD

CD m

CD

:0


CD 0)

CD .


ID CD~
=rCD -1 (J)
0 CD 0
00)C



CD 1 3
0
:3- 0 )

t< CD w

CD '
0 0)




3 O"



R C
















IN 1971, Frank Sookram whether the accused acted in
went on trial for wounding self-defence.
Chatarpaul, Panchu with in- Delivering the main judg-
tent. At the trial, Panchu's ment, Chancellor Luckhoo noted
lawyers led evidence that that the appellant stood his trial
suggested self-defence which for the felony of unlawfully and
could have entitled the ac- maliciously wounding
caused to a verdict of the lesser Chatarpaul Panchu with intent
count of unlawful wounding .to cause him grievous bodily
or an acquittal, harm or to maim, disfigure or
But because the trial judge disable him on November 10,
misunderstood the defence, he 1970, for which he was liable to
left it for the jury to decide penal servitude for life, and to
whether self defence had arisen, whipping or flogging.
resulting in the accused being There was no count for the,
found guilty as charged. misdemeanor of unlawful and
On appeal, the Guyana malicious wounding, for which
on conviction the punishment
was no greater than a sentence
of five years.


By George Barclay

Court of Appeal, presided over But according to accepted
by Court of Appeal Chancellor practice, the Chancellor said,
E. V. Luckhoo with Justices of where the facts so permit, a
Appeal Guya Persaud and Vic- jury is allowed to consider the
tor Crane, allowed the appeal alternative of convicting for the
by a majority judgment. Justice lesser offence of unlawful
of Appeal Guya Persaud dis- wounding, on the basis that:
sented. "Every count shall be
The conviction and sen- deemed divisable; and if the
tence were set aside and a new commission of the offence
trial was ordered. charged, as is described in the
At the hearing of the appeal, enactment creating the offence,
Senior Counsel, Mr. C. Lloyd the accused person may be con-
Luckhoo, appeared for the ap- victed 'of any offence so in-
pellant while Crown Prosecutor cluded which is proved, al-
Mr. W. G. Persaud prosecuted, though the whole offence
The facts disclosed that the charged is not proved, or he may
appellant was charged with be convicted of any attempt to
wounding with intent. The sub- commit any offence so included,
stance of his defence was that It was disclosed from the
he was attacked with a knife by evidence that the appellant
the virtual complainant, and that and the injured man Panchu
he blocked the blows which were not on speaking terms
were being aimed at him with a because of some family dis-
cutlass, as he was unable to run pute about lands. They came
away. into conflict with each other
The trial judge, in summing on the day in question when
up to the jury, dealt with the apparently no one was around
defence on two bases: first, that and Panchu suffered the fol-
the appellant did not admit that lowing injuries:
he inflicted the wounds; and, 1. A lacerated
secondly, that he wounded, but wound about two inches long on
in self-defence. the front portion of the scalp.
In dealing with self-defence, 2. A lacerated
the judge left it to the jury to wound two inches long over the
find whether that defence arose. right elbow region.
The Appellate Court held 3. A lacerated
that the trial judge wound over the right palm about
(i) had misunderstood three inches long with nearly
the defence; amputated third,' fourth and
(ii) that whether there fifth right fingers.
is sufficient evidence to support 4. A lacerated
an issue of self-defence is within wound about two inches long
the province of the judge to de- over the right axillary, left arm
cide, and not for the jury; but and left forearm.
it is for the jury to decide These injuries, said the




VACANCIES
exist for one



over 35 yrs, at least 5 years experience, knowledge in
construction field would be an asset.


4 CXC subjects.
Apply in person to:
Amjad Reasat Construction Services Company
Lot 52 Nootenzuil, ECD
Tel: 256-0730 or 624-6597


Chancellor, in his judgment.
could ha% e caused disalbilitI and
diihigureinent and w ere though
b;, the medical officer to10 be dan-
gerous to life because of the se-
vere bleeding at the time.
For the prosecution,
Panchu gave this account:
"I saw the accused walking
coming towards me; he was
about five rods from me. When
we were about four feet apart
he brought his hand forward. He
had a cutila's and he said he
would chop off my neck. He.
had the cutlass in his right hand.
"He made a chop at
me and I raised my left hand
which had a hand-bag. The


hand-bag chopped off and fell
to the ground.
"Fie Inude a second
chop and' I received a blow on
n,' left elbo\ region, .
", He made ,a' third
chop and I recci', ed a wound on
m) left uppci :irin
': then rushed: into,
him and the twvo of us fell into
the trench. I fell inside the
trench and l braced a little on the
road.
"The accused then
chopped me on my head and I
became unconscious.,
"When I regained
consciousness, the accused
brother spoke to me. I then


walked out of the trench and I
%\eni and sat under a sapodilla
tree. ..
S"hen regained
consciousness, I. found I had
other wounds 'including one at
the back of my right elbow,
right hand, upper left shoulder
and one under my left arm.":
Panchu denied such sugges-
tions that he was the aggressor
and that he was armed with. a
knife with which he had at-
tacked the appellant;
At the close of the case for
the prosecution, therefore, a
case of wounding with intent
was made out and the trial
judge's direction on the effect of


Panchu's evidence could not be
seriously questioned, the Chan-
cellor had said.
The Chancellor went on
to say that the appellant
elected to make a statement
from the dock at his trial in
which, he said: "Sir,
Chatarpaul attacked me with
an Eddie Polo knife. and
throw me in the trench, and
started to choke me. Then I
scrambled out the trench. He
bore me with the knife in my
hand. My cutlass was on the
ground and I picked it up. He
started firing blows at me,

(Please see page XII)


SuPi. rize ue8 s .aii- t wiwurn a sic aih Prwz




M AR A MOTOR SCOOTER HOUSE





4 ThiPFORITN1E0EUR 250,0001NIEIURY ERFOR2(AA[)





RRDASH $0 H OME TER YfFM


-I''-,-- .


ORIN FREE PURCHASE
(WuiERiWNBTN






Guyana Chronic


Mahadai


1954


by Petamber Persaud

DEATH could not
silence her, a
voice exploring
debilitating eth-
nic and gender issues, a voice
coming to grips with identi-
ties Guyanese consciousness
and Indian sensibility, but
more importantly, a voice of
anticipation and hope.
Such was the essentially
volatile life of Mahadai Das. At
the time of writing, about two
years after her tragic demise, a
book is being prepared to cel-
ebrate that remarkable life. The
name of that forthcoming anthol-
ogy is 'A Leaf in his Ear: Se-
lected Poems'. This project
started with the poetess, before


all its attendant atrocities espe-
cially in respect to maltreatment
Indian women and the power
struggle of local politics that
failed to really address the wel-
fare of all Guyanese women. So
the struggles of Mahadai Das
were significant in that they
were the victories of women in
Guyana, especially Indian
women.
In 1972, she became part of
the 'Messenger Group' with
Janet Naidu, Rooplall Monar
and others. It was Rajkumari
Singh who initiated the forma-
tion of the organisation "dedi-
cated to bringing to public notice
that 'Coolie art forms' were
equally a part of the Guyanese
tradition". Later that same year,
Das took part in the Caribbean


.but her Bones will 'continue to jangle' and
'sing their buoyant images of resurrection' for
My Finer Steal Will Grow because I Want To Be
A Poetess Of My People...


her death, discussing same with
the Jeremy Poynting of Peepal
Tree Press and is nearing comple-
tion with the cooperation of one
of the writer's sisters.
'Selected Poems' remains ef-
fectively Mahadai Das for she
left instructions on what the
book must portray, a map of her
struggles, her shortcomings and
her triumphs, of her use of lit-
erature to lobby the cause of the
marginalised, the subjugated and
the disempowered.
Das' life was one of crises.
Crises she transformed into chal-
lenges. Challenges of which some
were pyrrhic victories.
Born in Eccles, East Bank of
Demerara, Guyana, on October
22, 1954, Mahadai Das left her
footprints in Uitvlugt, West
Coast Demerara, lived for a
number of years in the USA and
died on April 3, 2003 in Barba-
dos where her mortal remains
were laid to rest.
Oldest of ten children, she
burdened with the concomitant
of a female first child and visited
by numerous trials. When Das
was only 17, her mother died,
leaving Das to care for her nine
siblings. All of this was happen-
ing while Das was still at Sec-
ondary School, aiming for the
higher education the Univer-
sity of Guyana aiming to break
the mould of the disadvantaged
woman, the disadvantaged Indo-
Guyanese woman.:-
This was the, 1970s, when
Das had moved into .the public
domain, facing 'the challenges
head-on; no longer .content to
fight on the fringe. It'must be
noted that she was b at a time
of interesting political citation:
the tail end of colopialisrm wh


Festival of Arts, Carifesta; held
in Guyana.
In October of 1973, she was
crowned queen of Maha Sabha
Dewali Jalsa in the midst of tur-
moil at home, another evidence
of the seesaw effect of her ex-
istence. During that same period,
Das performed her poem in ver-
nacular 'Chile is who yuh foolin'
at the Theatre Guild as the
'Messenger Group' staged a
three-day celebration of the
Coolie Art Forms.
Between 1973 and 1975, she
was a significant part of the
Guyana National Service, serv-
ing in its Cultural Division, burn-
ing with patriotic fervour and
idealistic revolutionary imagina-
tion. This showed up in her first
collection of poems 'I Want to
be a Poetess of my People',
1976. This collection also traced
her roots from indenture to in-
dependence and included her
most performed poem 'They
Came In Ships'.
Das was fortunate that she
was able to move on with her
literary development. Many
other writers swayed by ideal-
istic revolutionary and revolu-
tionary cliches fell by the
wayside and were alienated.
Those radical ratings
-couldn't sustain their literary
aspirations. In:fact, that pe-
riod may have done more
harm than good' to the devel-
opment of Guyanese litera-
ture, what was published and
foisted on the public was not
necessarily the best.:
A few years later, although'
she became disillusioned with
the policy of the then govern-
.ment of the day; her patriotic
4' fenropr did noi diminish. In fact,


Das


eferences:
Jeremy Poynting's essay 'East Indian Wornen in the
Caribbean: Experiences and Voice'
0, A Fraser's online tribute to Das
Conversations with Das'sister, Sandra, and with Rooplall
Monar
N res-TaKen-711 a7MUUT?,-= as, staged by Castellani
House in June 2003
Guyana Chronicle 1973
Stabroek News 2003

Comments please contact this author telephone
# 226-0065, Email: oraltradition2002@yahoQ.com


she was more mature in her
thinking when she joined the
Working People's Alliance. Here,
she came under the influence of
Walter Rodney but when he was
killed in 1980, she was forced to
flee to the USA, leaving behind
her homeland but not its poli-
tics.
Das' second book of poems
'My Finer Steal Will Grow',
1982, is a better crafted work
than her first. Here she moved
to another level of conscious-
ness: metaphysically exploring
the importance of politics
through the relationship of man
and woman, how personal rela-
tionships were compromised
due to political despair and frus-
tration. This book also por-
trayed her still nursing wounds
of her disillusionment with the
then government of the day but
appreciably singling her out as a
fresh new voice to be reckoned
with.
Her poems could be found
in local journals like
'Kykoveral', and 'Kaie'.
While at Columbia University,
she published in student
magazines like 'Common
Ground' and 'Black Heights'.
Of great significance also is
that her poems have found
their way onto the syllabi of
Caribbean, North American
and European universities.
That alone speaks volumes of
the quality, content and im-
port of her writing.
'I came to India', one of Das'
poems, was selected by interna-
tionally renowned scholar
George Lamming of Barbados, as
one of three pieces exploring
ethnicity and identity in the
Caribbean, from which he built
the fourth annual Cheddi Jagan
lecture in York, Canada. The
other two were an untitled poem
by Trinidadian writer, Lawrence
Scott, and 'Far Cry from Africa',
by Nobel laureate Derek
Walcott, stated 0. R. Fraser in
his tribute to Das.
In 1988, she published her
most accomplished collection
'Bones', confirming her indi-
viduality and her place as a top
crafter of verse.
Alim Hosein lecturer in En-
glish at the University of
Guyana described her poetry as
getting progressively better.
Vanda Radzik, activist for gen-
der equity, saw the poet's work
this way, "completely unique in
vision and craftsmanship...will
be remembered for the balance of
her craft".
Mahadai Das was educated.
at Bishop's High School in
Georgetown before moving on to'
the University of Guyana and
then the University of the West
Indies. She gained a B.A. in phi-
losophy at Columbi University


by Norman Faria

L AL Balkaran pulls a small text from among a wall
of books in the half completed library/office in the
basement of his Scarborough, Ontario townhouse.
Running his fingers over its leathery cover, he tells you
it is 'Apostle of the Indians, an 1888 biography of a Rev. William
Henry Brett by fellow cleric Rev. F.P.L Josa.
It is one of hundreds of books by Guyanese and non-Guyanese
writers on Guyana and other subjects included in Balkaran's recently
published 'Bibliography of Guyana and Guyanese writers, 1596-
2004'.
The bulk of the 1 300 titles in what acclaimed Guyanese writer
and academic Jan Carew describes in the Foreword as an "invalu-
able and priceless resource" were obtained from Canada's National
Library and from the Internet. The annual Guyana National Bibliog-
raphy published by the National Library in Guyana, was also con-
sulted. .
Balkaran, who emigrated to Toronto in 1987, says it was "hard,
patient research". Remarkably, the bringing together of the authors
for the first edition was done in only two years.
Balkaran set himself precise parameters on what was to go in
the collection which was launched this year at Guyana's 38th Inde-
pendence Festival organised by the Consulate-General's office in
Toronto for the Guyanese-Canadian community. For one thing, books
published after 1966 had to have an International Standard Book
Number (ISBN).
"I got a few requests! as to why some obscure pamphlet wasn't
included. But you have 'to draw the line somewhere as is the prac-
tice with serious bibliographies," he said.
This is the only collection of all books on or about Guyana. There
are 820 authors listed, starting with Ovid Abrams' 'Metegee: The
History and Culture ol Guvana" to Jose Alberto Zanmbarno V'elaco'>
'The Essequibo: Our HiiloncciClaim' .. .... .,


The latter book is a 1982 pdt
eign Relations in Caracas but as I
Balkaran presents book titles with
for example, the complete works
Burnham who, despite-the observe
social commentary that the two pt
parties with philosophically differed
are Burnham's speeches in 'A De
Nascimento and R. A. Burrowes,
Visiting Guyana's Forbes Burnham
An attraction for the serious
the "primary" -audience) and e
significant and useful work is tha
Guyana published abroad. Whil
listings at the National Library
are largely restricted to material
the listings of works published a
Reapers: Chinese Indentures Im
Sue-A-Quan and published in
Press)
Once on vacation on the Essequ
cardboard box at Asif Ackbar's bo(
ket and dug up a 'dog-eared', dust
copy of David Attenborough's 'Zo
published in Britain by Pilot Boo
long out of print despite Attenboro
erator of the excellent BBC TV pn
life and nature. A testimony to Bal
was there (on page 14) in the Biblic
Reader-friendly features of Lal
author and by subject matter. So, if
Ralegh (sometimes spelt Raleigh" B
of spelling) ever wrote a book on
ings and .you wiU tind 'The'Disc


'Labour of love' by Canadian-,


and a M.A. in the same subject
at the University of Chicago.
While awaiting her Ph. D
candidature, she underwent
open-heart surgery from which
she never fully recovered, trun-
cating her academic career in
1987. A career that was fraught
with so many obstacles, battles
that she overcame only to lose
the war. Undaunted, still reso-
lute, she cried out for attention,
"I mourn unflowered words, un-
born children, inside me.. .absent
water can has never lent itself to
flowers'"
So when 'Millicent' (so
fondly called by her relatives and
friends) became unwell, many of


her colleagues rallied to her as-
sistance. It is unclear how tan-
gible was that effort: Parvati
Persaud-Edwards recalled the at-
tempt at fund-raising, David
Dabydeen acknowledged he had
been approached, and F.
Yvonne-Jackson, in a letter to the
local press, revealed that contri-
butions were made and placed
into a bank account bearing Das'
name.
Mahadai Das dyed her
name in the country's literary
heritage because she was in
that first ripple of women writ-
ers of Indian ancestry staking
a claim to the word
'Guyanese'.


- 2003


Aa-


; *


'Al -;z~-






,le FebruarYt20, 2005


w.


11/;


I


FIVE story-tellers from
Trinidad will be in
Guyana for several
performances this
weekend of 'Talk Tent...
where talks is art'
Talk Tent is clean
quality comedy with
humour, storytelling and
social commentary and
suitable for all ages.
Guyana experienced the
'Talk Tent' last June for the
first time. Then, the five
story-tellers from Trinidad,
led by, international story-
teller, Paul Keens Douglas
entertained the audience
with varying styles and
forms of story-telling.
This year, Paul Keens
will be accompanied by
Miguel Brown and Felix
Edinborough (Pierrot)
who performed here last
year, along with Farida
Chapman and Wendy
Brewster who will be
performing here for the
first time. Teaming up
with them will be Mignon
Lowe, Henry Rodney and
The Mighty Rebel.
'Talk Tent' was born in
Trinidad 22 years ago and it
is staged the weekend after
Carnival. It usually runs for
two weekends.
Talk Tent producer,
creator and director, Paul
Keens Douglas and local
producer and host of GEMS


Y'


Theatre Productions,, Gem
Madhoo-Nascimento have
decided to make this an
annual event in the Guyanese
calendar of theatre events.
Talk Tent will be
performed in Guyana the
weekend after it is finished in
Trinidad, hence it will
coincide with the period
when Mashramani in Guyana
is celebrated.
Many storytellers and
performers from 'Talk
Tent' have found their
niche in the international
arena. Paul Keens Douglas
is no stranger to Guyana,
as he has been performing
to Guyanese audiences
since in the 70's.
The story-tellers' flight
to Guyana is made possible
with assistance from BWIA
and accommodation courtesy
of Le Meridien Pegasus
Hotel.
This year most of the
performances will be held at
Le Meridien with one at the
Marion Academy auditorium
in Carifesta Avenue, since the
National Cultural Centre is
.not functioning.
The first performance
will be on Friday, February
25 at Le Meridien Poolside.
The others will be at
Marion Academy on
Saturday and in the
Savannah Suite on
Sunday.


Felix Edinborough (I


uyanese should inspire others


location of the Ministry of For-
)efitting his scholarly approach,
different viewpoints. There are,
Af Dr. Cheddi Jagan and Forbes
nations of ill-informed or willful
rties are basically the same, led
t programmes. In this vein, there
-tiny to Mould' (Edited by C.A.
1970) and 'A Mouldy Destiny:

(Balkaran sees Guyanese as
ven the casual reader of this
t it contains works on or about
e Balkaran pays tribute to the
of Guyana, he notes that they
published in Guyana. Among
broad are, for example, 'Cane
migration in Guyana' (Trevor
Vancouver, Canada by Cane

ibo Coast, I foraged in the G$100
storee in the Anna Regina Mar-
-covered and otherwise battered
Quest to Guyana'. It had been
cs in 1956 .and must have been
ugh being the high profile mod-
igrammes on international wild-
caran's fine-combed research, it,
graphy.
's work are the two indexes: by,
you:ever wondered if Sir Walter
alkaran uses the old English type
Guyana, look up under 'R' list-
)yeries of the Large. Rich a94,.


The Mighty Rebel
Beautiful Empyre of Guiana' -(The title, in the original old English. -
spelling, is from the first edition published by Robert Robinson in
London in 1596). It is also found under the History section of the
Subject Index. _
Aside from the libraries, the Internet and helpful individuals such
as Bernard Heydorn sending in lists of their own books, Balkaran- '>-
scoured the second hand book shops and 'flea markets'. That's where .
he got Rev. Josa's book ("For one Canadian Dollar!" he tells you '
exultantly). HAPPY wedding
Balkaran is an accountant by profession and his book in- ,-nniversaNar eetingii'
eludes several titles on the subject including 'A Practical Guide .' extended .."- tnd I
to Auditing and Related Terms'. He served two terms as Presi- o i i -
dent of the Toronto Chapter of the Canadian Institute of Inter- Mrs. Rmlochan of .
nal Auditors. Garnlett Street.
What is Lal Balkaran reading these days, aside from updating his Cainpbell I lle u i ho
computer programmes on such topics as accounting, South American celebrated 4S \ eai
history, mui:ic and the hemisphere's aboriginal peoples (the 'Indi-
ans')? He doesn't actually have many of the books listed in the bib- o l
liography. He limits his purchases these days to anthropological works Gi meeting lom tn l\hI o t O
and bibliography references. children, I\\o
He's also kept busy 'with his own publishing firm LBA Pub- gi andchildren, grandson-
lications. It will shortly bring out 'A Photo Journal of Guyanese in-law, oithe relatives
Amerindians' to complement his already published 'Dictionary '
of Guyanese Amerindians and other South American Native and friends. May Loid i
Terms'. Shiva bless them
It isn't a commercial enterprise. Balkaran, who hails from always.
Goed Fortuin on the I)emerara River's west bank in Guyana,"
says he barely covers his costs. He hopes his."labour of love"
will benefit others. In the case of the bibliography, he would
like it to inspire others in circum-Caribbean countries to comrn-
pile their own collections.
Norman Faria, Guyana's Honorary Consul in Barbados, re- /.
'.,cenfly visN d ,Torp"(ol>, .'.:.. ............ -


_ __


%C~b






SundayChronicle February 20, 2005


WHAT ISALL THE FUSS


ABOUT FIBRE?


EXCESSIVE FIBRE
INTAKES :
Diei- coni-mining e\ce~s-ive
amounts ot diei.u\ fibre can be
less benefic iJl Ior cen,un groups
if people. \iz. infants/children.
the malnourished or elderly
persons. Due to the high sati-
ety vilue of dietary fibre, con-
suming a large quantity of high-
fibre foods may prevent such
persons from being able to eat.
enough food to provide them
with adequate energy and nutri-
ents before feeling full. Sec-
ondly, the naturally occurring.-
substance found in dietary fibre
known as Phytate may interfere
with the absorption of nutrients/
minerals when fibrous foods are
taken in excess. Phytate is re-
sponsible for binding certain
nutrients and carrying them into,
the stool an example of this
is the reduced absorption of cal-
cium, which may eventually
lead to bone loss.
How much fibre is needed to
keep the digestive system
healthy with outside effects?
Older children and adults
need about 20-40 grams of di-
etary fibre per day. This means
that everyday, they need at
least:
2 servings of fruits, such
as orange, mango or grapefruit
+ 1 serving of vegetables
e.g. V cup of cooked callaloo or


pinchh
+ 1 serving (1/2 cup,
cooked) peas or beans with the
'kin on
+ 2-3 portions of staples
e.g. 1 large potato, 2 finger green
banana (fig), half of a medium-
sized plantain, and 2 slices of
bread.
Persons who increase their
intake of high-fibre foods rap-,
idly may experience abdominal
discomfort such as gas and
bloating. To avoid these you
should increase your intake of
dietary fibre gradually and to a
level just enough to ensure regu-
lar bowel movements.
Consumption of high-fibre
foods can also be accompanied
by constipation if enough fluids
are not taken. Fluid helps to
produce soft, smooth faecal ma-
terial that will be passed easily,
as opposed to hard, dry masses,
which will cause eventual dam-
age of the intestinal tissue and
result in conditions such as
Hemorrhoids (piles).
The following table shows
you examples of the amounts of
fibrous foods needs daily to
promote a healthy digestive
system:
The amount of fibre in some
of the foods we eat regularly
HIGH FIBRE (5-8 GRAMS)
V2 cup all bran cereal, shred-
ded wheat


/2 cup cooked
dried peas and bean
1 cup cooked 'tu
meal (cornmeal mus
100g (3/2 oz) g
plantain, breadfruit
00g (32 oz)
spinach/callaloo/das
100g (3 oz) bo
1OOg (3 oz) ca
(bannmmy)
lOOg (31/2 oz) d
raisins, prunes
30g (1 oz) pa
with seeds, dried co
MODERATE FI
GRAMS
1OOg (3/2 oz) fr
pawpaw, mango, gua
1 medium size
apple
1 large ripe bana
100g (31/2 oz) r
cabbage, watercress
100g (32 oz) b
pumpkin, string bea
100g (3/2 oz) av
eggplant, beets
2 slices wheat b:
3 cups popcorn
1 cup cooked oa
V2 cup carrots, bi
liflower, canned grei
30g (1 oz) pear
butter, almonds
1 small Irish or
tato (eaten with skin
LOW FIB
l00g (3 oz)


--


S SAID ." .
-." .W S FRCM THE AMERiCAN PE-'PLE .' .'' '


Democratic Consolidation & Conflict Resolution Proj
Civil Society Organization Strengthening Initiative
The Guyana Democratic Consolidation and Conflict Resolution (GDCCR) Project; a,Joint
Government of Guyana U S Government Project is inviting Civil Society and' Non-'
Governmental Organizations (CSO's/NGO's' to submit applications for the Civil Society
Organization Strengthening Initiative

The GDCCR project is comprised of three broad components, which, when taken
together are essential for the consolidation of democracy in Guyana.

These are

Increasing citizen participation in policy making;
Improving transparency and accountability in governance;
Reducing the vulnerability to ethno-political conflict.

T'-e objective of this Initiative is to build the capacity and credibility of national and sub-.
national CSO's/NGO's that are already working with different communities throughout
Guyana. The CSO/NGO's must operate in, an informed, impartial, transparent and
accountable manner.

A set of criteria have been established for CSO's/NGO's as a standard for consideration.
Ti-ese include a wide geographic scope of activities, focus on governance, advocacy and
ir easingg self-reliance and sustainability after project funding has ended.

DC adline for the receipt of applications is the 28"' February, 2005.

T apply orto receive additional information, please contact:

C vil Society Specialist
C TCCR Project
R '1 International
8 Carmichael Street
C orgetown
F Box 101513
O'ail
e mail csim.n0s.@.t9 i org


Tel: (592)227-8402


I

I
I
I
I


CONTINUED FROM LAST WEEK ,


or canned canned pineapple, lychee, tan- ':
s gerine. grapefruit, peach. pear,
turned' corn- inatermelon. cantaloupe, straw- | i
h) berry ' ,
reen or ripe 60g (2 oz) tomato, sweet
pepper, squash, lettuce, cucum- i t
"'greens' ber, radish l
heeii leaves (Source: 'Nutrition made
oiled corn simple' CFNI, 2002)
issava bread *Wheat bread includes i
both white bread and whole (
Iried fruit wheat bread, the whole f
wheat having the higher fibre w
ssion fruit content. l a
conut High fibre foods not only h
add bulk to the diet, but are also
BRE (2-4 both economical and nutritious. r
) You don't have to spend on t
resh fruits special products or fibre i
ava supplements. All you need t
ed orange, to do is be sure to include
whole-grain breads and cere- i
aa als, plenty of fresh fruits and |
raw/cooked vegetables (with edible skins a
turnip tops and seeds), legumes and per- s
boiled yam, haps some nuts in everyday f
ns meals. Encourage the family to l
'ocado pear, eat more of these foods and i
less of the refined sugar prod- l
read* ucts such as soft drinks, sweets, c
biscuits, cakes and desserts. g
ats Most of these are made using a 4
broccoli, cau- lot of sugar and also a lot of
en peas highly refined and processed a
nuts, peanut flours. a
If you follow these rules,
r sweet po- you'll get enough fibre at the
n) local market and at a price d
that's within your normal o
RE budget. Make sure that you t
fresh or get just enough, neither un-
der-supplying nor over-sup- r
plying so as to reap the best


benefits and avoid the side ef-- r
fects. As with most things4 I
"everything in moderation" I
is once again the key to over-
all good health." (NYAM j
News) t(


Gwi


Judge


misunderstood


the defence...


and me barring off the blows with my cutlass. All the time
me shouting for help and I could not see no ope and I not able
to run away. Sir I hase nothing more to say." : .
Going on, the Chancellor added: "I am, therefore. condurained
o the firm view that the trial judge misdirected ihe jun when he
eft it for them to decide' as a preliminary question whether self-
defence arose as an issue.
"There should have been a ruling (1) that self-defence was an
ssue which was fit for consideration; (2) that it was for the jury to
decide from the evidence on the whole case (and not from the de-
fence only) whether the accused inflicted the injuries, and if so
whether it was in self-defence, having regard to the principles of
aw relating thereto, and the burden of proof which the prosecution
had to discharge.
"Although-self-defence does not appear from the case for the
prosecution nevertheless it was a grave mistake to say, in effect,
hat it could arise from the defence only if the appellant was say-
ng that he had caused the wounds. The fact that he had inflicted
he wounds could have been found from the case for the prosecu-
ion, and the justification thereof, if at all, from the defence.
"It seems to me that two further aspects of the summing
up ought to be mentioned. The first is that too little was said
is to how or in what circumstances the lack of intent to con-
;titute the lesser offence of unlawful wounding might be in-
ferred, e.g., that if excessive force was used when the appel-
ant was primarily engaged in defending himself, and that if
t was not through revenge but more recklessness, that un-
awful wounding and not wounding with intent will have been
committed. The consequence of a state of mind which did not
go beyond recklessness was never indicated," the Chancellor
pointed out.
After alluding to other aspects of the case and citing certain
authorities which show that the accused had a chance of complete
acquittal with a fair trial, the learned Chancellor added:
"I would, therefore, propose that the conviction and sentence
be set aside, and that a new trial be ordered in order to allow the
lefence to be put in its proper perspective, and to give the jury an
opportunity of assessing what arises naturally therefrom. The in-
erests of justice so require.
"Accordingly the conviction and sentence are set aside and a
new trial ordered".
Justice of Appeal Crane concurred with the Chancellor's judg-
ment and added: "The defence was misconceived by the trial judge.
think it is only fair that the jury should have the opportunity of
having it properly explained to them.
Dissenting, Justice of Appeal Guya Persaud had begun his
judgment with the words, "I regret that it has fallen to my lot
o dissent from my learned and esteemed brothers".


GUYANA WATER INC.


Vacancy


Guyana Water Inc. is inviting applications from suitably qualified
persons to fill the vacant post of Health and Safety Officer.

The' successful candidate will have responsibility for the promotion of
occupational safety and health standards across the Company to
sustain a safe and healthy working environment and for ensuring
compliance with the Occupational Safety and Health Act.

Candidates for this position should possess:

* A Diploma in Occupational Safety and Health from a recognized
institution.
* Knowledge of the Occupational Safety and Health Act.
* Good planning and organizing skills.
* Good interpersonal skills.
* Good communication skills, both oral and written.
* Ability to analyze hazardous candidates and conduct accident
investigations.
* Experience of developing health and safety policies, processes,
and procedures.
* Experience of designing and conducting relevant training
programmes.

Interested persons should send applications along with curriculum
vitae to reach the Managing Director, Guyana Water Inc., 10 Fort
Street, Kingston, Georgetown by February 24, 2005.


Page XII


U


Fax: (592)227-7136






Sun .QI ypniclej February 20, 2005


0
.4-


(0

0
I-











~ (i) ~


-o .. (0 o

(D)0

a)= MQ00

-Z -a-2 w E


0i (0.:3 0 cm .

0 (D


0(
>1 w = 0

0.2V :a(00c
(D3CC CU(
V0)0C 0


0a
E
(0
U)
0



.c
E:
4-

:3
0
. *
(03
0)
C





mQ)
4-




.0
E


.53
'f-

(DI

(D-0
'm


~0 )
gCo

Co



0 -



CL


-e E
V0


0.2 o

-V

CsE.



0.1: C-
0.-
00S

(0-


cu 0) 0:
M C):3a)0


(04



.0 3:0.

0E3) U) -0 -L


C3: C: C=
0 0

0C >~
ca 04
0 Co :3

Cr
S01
.-0Uo


0) 0) C 4 (,0 -C- CO D -a ) Q)

C: t) Co C



Z ct(0L 0-
10 o0c (
Z3 ~ COZ 0 1)
Q) to00






0 0co co0t:7)0CO


to o "

N C O

C C -0 C -



-0



0


7E








Cd)(

l(0


11


(0fl~

+ Ce.)C
(0o4


It


(LO'

.0 (00


(0
m 0LO

CF) (00


Co)









ae)




0

w00
0 -, c


cc

-C




0
c)C



co
0
0)



:3





C'O C(00


:4)

00C




EZE
E04- C



.- Enc 3(00


E 06z c0 Lo
(0 0 U*
-0 0 4>N (
4)0
E-~) 1C


oE
OD0
%--C14

LM0














00 0
a-' coE


Cl)


C) f)
(o N u-)N 0LO 04N

CO LO>CqM v-0C%


(0 00


tt0) 10-..
+ + + X

X I. '-+


+ U'
>+ N- +(0X +0 X
6mCO0) x CDLO C\jNr- CN

U)i LO E &


0 0 C) U




>6I 6 04 i. ) 00


0)


0



0+
CC




MV4 -(.0
45 XXo

n + + "
X: +





0 0
+ XVo+
(0 t-



a + .D
U 0) N X CN L
4cu
0 .0
0^ ,NC


4*-
Q)



( 00 0
wL m CO (,0 o-
..(OOVU) .0)1:T
0.006i V c 0 d>)c
U) -Q0( 0 -0 a? 4 o)-


ci )



C.6


0) 0






0(0
MCL



'oE




Co C
0 .-w 0



x 0


t0< (a)
-04 0



0 0
0- a)r

da 0





0.00
C. U) .C:


cc'U
0 ~E


0


CO (1)


4-c


0*0a)- Q
0 3:fl U



m0 > c i



-~ 0 ~0 (D
0-0

> c: .1. i
<.. (0(0l0-0
(.\i oi 6ui
cu.~ ~ -o~
Q)0*-


.00





C >

EU.



r..

E0a


00


"0


co
E0
20



LL -
cr0M


=3
(0

a): .
-E



00
0)
U)

==CL


~j0

EE


WIVo1:


4-




E0


E E~





CY)



0 c
EE
:30


U)
C
0
E
0
E
0
U)
C
0
'4-.

1...
a)
0 ~
U)(0
1:



0
0(0
L..
00

I~0)
-C
(N
:3
0


ca







-C
2
E

-0




CE
V




Vt
0m .

. C



0





I
3
0





o
C

0




b
.0
0)

(0


(0


0f)


CD


E

-0


0) 0
cc




.0


0U) U
U)LO (N
E~ C'C',
0) >I

E
0


2/18/2005, 5:08 PM


C
Q

(D




0


.0
C5
45








0









c
U0)








00
C3

0)
'4-<

C

-0



CO(0
0


c,..

~CJ



(0

t0C6



NCO


i. ~ ~ TIT I-3T y ll --iT v T jtw vywi~ ~


. pa 0I ev 4 Vo r v v*


wr .vp warth'4't' 'tr










FD zCD 00
(D CD CO.( C


=rCDU)-C/

U)CD


0




-0 0 CD

(D CD < ~


0) CO CD
-0 e- ,-n

(D 'a- C D


CD CD CL-
0. W a Y,4T<0


(D
CL

0 =
CD






*CD
U)
CD

(D
CL


CD
*n
CD
CD







08
CL

=CL

=3



(0


-4

=0
3 o







-o
CD.
(D




0
CD
(D

0
0

0
0
6-



1


CL


CD r



(0)<


CD

CD


4-


C0



MD CD



CLC



OCD
0.


0 CD

CD



3 cDCDCD

(D (n =~
CC



0D D
w, ~ CL



CD, D c


Sunday Chronicle February 20, 2005


0




or
CD




3 '
0





0
8-

2'


(1) (


CL
0 C7 .:#1(a --%


=D 0 CC
El. &.0

2) M,0 W' W CD


CD :*,CD CL Q) !
cl o 0 -

CD< 0

~.=r CD


wU(CDM I U)


0. 0 0 pz, 1 ()0. = 0
4.*00. bl.%< CD C
Ir m 0). CD 0. =., .CDw
.< 0 ~ ~ .2.0-<4. 'o Cl )

CCD CL 0CL CD
0) :3 WCC <. =3 M-CA) CDD(
-1 2 =r CD:9.0 CD< D
=L( C >CD CD ~C03 0C:-,.--
0CDO CD CA 0 CD

cO .( ..=r to:nCD 0CrD ) D )- = (D I0U
CD 0 ol -0 iF 0
.= C, CD A L0)C
(D CL CL


0 ( SD "o CD C-W CL0 CD
0 0) (N~ D "- .' = (
(1) =3 o 0 (q-D CLCD =rD:,c 2'LL.

0 0N) 0 0)

CA)~ .


a ). CL a-


., .N )


0)-0
=r


c00


OD0





0
.0
CD
0

.CD
CID


(ID

CD l C0A

0 CD

(D-CD.



CD,




SCo
UCD S




0CD


C4 C3N) ND-


0) 4 :, .).(1
r8

(0-4


=r
(D

CD



(CD
cvD
CD


CO
0
Er.




COO CL


M" (JI
CD
CD
=r.
CD
(0D(


00)

N-CO w

-1 +
-"--' N)



(0 X
4(0

CD





CD


CD,


0


0



-o0

CL0" c -

o) (A CL13



t~o






00


0 '0

CD


0
640
(DS
(D

CD CD

a -I





-0

CDO
(D:
(D0


0 5CD

C)DN -40 00-






WCD.
CO D


CD

CD


CD
-h
-9
CD
0~
0


CL 0.0 cDM
C)w .%.
-4 -
0;4 (
40 Ch )


0) (D










.0

-.(a CD









0


CD


P~a~w4.XIV_


-C.

CD

CD 0~C


r 00.





CD0
(C).
CD
(D C


OCD
-I.
-CD


OCD


-o
~5.
CD
''0
CD
CD
CD
-o
CD
CD
CD
0)


~!'T"'


i


..


: ~


- - - - - - - - - - -- --:






Sunday Chronicle February 20, 2005


Page XV


wit 'Is a. warmeHrmwornlrd, but ldoerstatArmagerddon?


That's the nub of a debate
over the human impact on glo-
bal warming that pits scientists
who say such anomalies are
signs of impending doom
against those who say they are
evidence that the earth's climate
has always been chaotic.
Amid those signs of warm-
ing, for instance, Algeria had its


The ERC and You

There are some further functions of the ERC


*o Encouraging
educational and
training
programmes and
research projects
which provide for


and encourage ethnic peace and harmony;

Encouraging and creating respect for reli-
S: gious, cultural and other forms of diversity in
a plural society;

Promoting arbitration, conciliation, mediation
and like forms of dispute resolution in order
to secure ethnic harmony and peace;

Recommending to the National Assembly the
criteria to be considered for the purposes of
deciding whether any person has committed
acts of discrimination on the ground of
ethnicity;

o* Investigating complaints of racial discrimina-
tion and making recommendations on the
measures to be taken if such complaints are
valid, and where there is justification there-
fore referring matters to the Human Rights
Commission or other relevant authorities for
further action to be taken.



MINISTRY OF LEGAL AFFAIRS



VACANCIES
Applications are invited from suitably qualified
persons to fill the following positions:

I. Solicitor General
2. Deputy Solicitor General
3. Principal Parliamentary Counsel
4. Senior Parliamentary Counsel
5. Senior Legal Adviser (2 positions)

Salary: Negotiable

Applications should be sent to:

Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Legal Affairs
And Attorney General's Chambers
95 Carmichael Street
Georgetown

UJob Description and Job Specification' can be
obtainedd from the Personnel Department, Ministry
odf Legal Affairs.
Closing date: 2005/03/11


By Alister Doyle, Environ-
ment Correspondent

OSLO (Reuters) When
bears wake early from hiberna-
tion, Australia suffers its worst
drought in 100 years and mul-
tiple hurricanes hammer Florida
should we believe The End is
nigh?


TI-OIVISOINI

EDUCATION DIRECT
Choose one course only.
ASSOCIATE IN SPECIALIZED
BUSINESS DEGREE PROGRAMS
61 Accounting
64 Applied Computer Science
60 Business Management
406 Criminal Justice NEW
405 Early Childhood Education NEW
81 Finance
80 Marketing
401 Paralegal Studies NEW
ASSOCIATE IN SPECIALIZED
TECHNOLOGY DEGREE PROGRAMS
63 Civil Engineering Technology
404 E-CommerceAdministration NEW
65 Electrical Engineering Technology
403 Internet Multimedia & Design NEW
67 Electronics Technology
62: Mechanical Engineering Technology
402 Web Programming NEW


PHONE


worst snow in 50 years last
month.
This month 141 countries
will attempt the best effort to
arrest a forecasted continued
rise of global temperatures by
bringing into force the Kyoto
protocol. The treaty is an agree-
ment aimed at curbing emissions
of gases from cars and industry,
blamed for trapping the earth's
heat.
"Dealing with (global warm-
ing) will not be easy. Ignoring it
will be worse," the United Na-
tions says.
At issue is how humanity
should deal with global warm-
ing, the risks of which are not
yet fully understood despite
broad consensus among scien-
tists that people are heating the
planet with the emission of such
heat-trapping gases as carbon
dioxide.
Not everyone is convinced
of Kyoto's importance. Presi-
dent Bush pulled the United
States out of Kyoto in 2001,
reckoning it will be too costly
and that it wrongly excludes de-


veloping countries from cuts in
emissions until 2012.
Bush accepts there are risks
from climate change but says
more research is needed exas-
perating even allies who say that
the time for Kyoto-style caps
on emissions is now.
"We're talking about spend-
ing perhaps $150 billion a year
on Kyoto with fairly little ben-
efit," said Bjorn Lomborg, Dan-
ish author of'The Skeptical En-
vironmentalist'.
Lomborg said that money
would be better spent on com-
bating AIDS and malaria, malnu-
trition and promoting fair global
trade.

BIGGEST THREAT?
Many climate scientists say
that floods, storms and droughts
will become more frequent and
that climate change is the most
severe long-term threat to the
planet's life support systems.
Rising temperatures could
force up ocean levels, swamp-
ing coasts and low-lying Pacific
islands and drive thousands of


Education Direct, Dept. AEES35Y
Representative Guyana Educational Services, Inc.
PO Box 10434, Lot 3 Alexander Street & Shell Road
Kitty, Georgetown, Guyana Fax: 592-2-69866


CAREER DIPLOMA COURSES
32 Artist
04 Auto Repair Technician
390 Bookkeeping
104 Carpenter
59 Catering/Gourmet Cooking
03 Child Day Care Management
55 Diesel Mechanics
395 Dog Obedience Trainer/Instructor
42 Dressmaking & Design
06 Electrician
79 Electronics Technician
400 English: Reading & Writing
30 Floral Design
384 Furniture and Cabinet Maker
05 Hotel/Restaurant Management
14 HVAC Technician
12 Interior Decorator
. 381 Medical Coding and Billing NEW
23 Medical Office Assistant


33 Motorcycle Repair Technician
383 Occupational Therapy Aide
27 PC Repair NEW
38 PC Specialist
84 Pharmacy Technician
40 Photographer
146 Physical Therapy Aide
58 Private investigator
160 Professional Bridal Consultant NEW
102 Professional Landscaper
13 Professional Secretary
26 Teacher Aide
387 Telecommunications Technician
35 Travel Agent
87 TVIVCR Repair
07 U.S. High School Diploma-
88 Veterinary Assistant or
83 Web Page Designer .
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING
01 Programming in BASIC
37 Visual Basic& .NET
36 Visual C#e .NET

... AGE.. __....


''F"


POSTAL CODE


E-MAIL


ACCREDITATIONS AND APPROVALS. Educaion o Dctc is an accredited member of the Distance Education ind Training Counci and is approved as an
Audorized Provider of continuing education and training programs by the International Association for Continuing Educatuon and Training


species to extinction by 2100.
But full proof is elusive.
A Caribbean hurricane sea-
son last year, when Florida was
the first U.S. state to be hit by
four hurricanes in one season
since 1886, might be a fluke.
Bears are waking in Estonia in
the warmest winter in two cen-
turies, again a possible climate
freak.
"Imagine a pot of boiling
water on the stove. If 1 turn up
the heat I can't say that each
bubble is from the extra heat,"
said Mike MacCracken, chief
scientist for climate change
programmes at the Climate In-
stitute, a Washington think-tank.
"But there are more bubbles
and they're larger," he said,
adding it was best to act now
rather than risk disaster.
The warmest year at the
world's surface since records
began in the 1860s was 1998,
followed by 2002, 2003 and
2004, according to the U.N.'s
World Meteorological
Organisation.
World surface temperatures


have risen by 0.6 degrees centi-
grade (1.1 degrees Fahrenheit)
since the late 1800s when the
Industrial Revolution started in
Europe.
The Intergovernmental
Panel on Climate Change, a
group of 2,000 scientists which
advises the United Nations,
projects a further-rise of 1.4-5.,.
degrees centigrade by 2100.
Even the lowest forecast would
be the biggest century-long rise
in 10,000 years.

BEYOND DOUBT?
Yet the evidence for a hu-
man impact on the climate falls
short of being "beyond a reason-
able doubt,"'the standard of
proof needed in a criminal court.
"It is really for a legal mind
to decide whether the scientific-
consensus of the IPCC pro-
vides findings that are beyond
reasonable doubt," said IPCC
chairman Rajendra Pachauri.
Many so-called skeptics
(Please turn
to page XVI)


Become. more valuable to your ernpoyer and.' '

Make more on I


Get marketable skills with at-home training.
lit-. n i.'11 11' I n' li]. l i" t' ii'r-'ipl i,\t..r I I' M.ir 1in 0 nI |\ h 4.11I



I'd %' r nisi us oi l in Mt k ww .Id U 1ir t-int.l 'm L

,Wi111.11-eTiln 'I ll n Il n '% L, r..1\ [. l lIl1 o:ntii. nler' "1 11p.'11, l \r. rl.
"i' Hdlh'1 i ,'1 1 ) 1 ,:1 ;t ll- .,ll' '.i. l : l Il k'
,L' Ir 'in r JIn"A or, .lu, r % i -;Ihr".i. r ,' l [l'ip l '|in ,. l it V0.I-tk )h.I
- r'n.t ll IlILL [11T l I' l j ,l l t r% iu 'r :1 i r:II inIlit I n ,i-.1.. O 1,,.d l!
F,,-r FRI'F i'im i.ilrii .'f irl'i no iihlh-g:iion. % I ,1 r ,.hlIh'l Ir I
0 l i l[ ltl e iund r,-"i ti hlM.'lli', 0 I'HI, l',1"I iL'\ ir lI.1l

Visit us online at www.EduDirect-intl.com
When online enter ID# AEES35Y


Get FREE Information MAIL OR FAX ENTIRE AD TO
Write the number of the one career that' interests you
MR / MRS/MISS _<_
(Plone prnt clearly) "
ADDRESS

CITY/COUNTRY


I





A bc~


0~~i


IA#T'






ilk XvS


t's a warmer world, but


loes that mean...


concede that carbon dioxide stokes global warming but say U.N. models of what will hap-
,i in 2100 are about as reliable as tomorrow's weather forecast.
Other factors, like variations in the sun's radiation, ash from volcanoes or other natural effects
y have a bigger role, they say. The IPCC tries to account for all such effects.
"My bottom line is that natural variations are much larger than the human component," said
'orge Taylor, state climatologist for Oregon state.
B.ickert. of Kyoto say it is a blueprint for regulating the climate by cutting rich nations' emis-
.,.ns of carbon dioxide by 5.2 percent below 1990 levels by 2008-12. Supporters say that much
ckieper cuts will be needed after 2012.
In a landmark phrase in 1995, the IPCC said that the balance of evidence suggested a discernible
human influence on the global climate. And its 2001 report spoke of "new and stronger" evidence
that humans had caused warming in the past 50 years.
Pachauri said that he hoped the next report, in 2007. would fill in gaps in knowledge. But Wash-
ei:gton has given no signs of being won over to Kyoto, preferring to focus on funding new clean
rhnIogie'. like hydrogen.
The Environmental Protection Agency says:
"The fundamental scientific uncertainties are these: How much more warming will oc-
ir? How fast will this warming occur? And what are the potential adverse and beneficial
Iects? These uncertainties will be with us for some time, perhaps decades."




IVNISTRY OF HEALTH

applicationss are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following positions:

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Requirements
A Diploma/Certificate in Public, Business or Personnel Administration or equivalent plus two (2) to
three (3) years related experience.
OR
Graduate qualifications in Public, Business or Personnel Administration

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIST
NATIONAL BLOOD TRANSFUSION SERVICE

Requirements
An Associate of Science Degree in Medical Technology or equivalent qualification from a
recognized university

PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICER
NATIONAL BLOOD TRANSFUSION SERVICE

Requirements
A Diploma/Certificate in Public Relations, Public Communication/Social Work plus two years
experience, as a Public Relations Officer.
OR
Considerable/varied work experience in hospital services plus three (3) years supervisory
experience with an aptitude for Public Relations duties.

STATISTICAL CLERK 11
NATIONAL BLOOD TRANSFUSION SERVICE

Requirements
Four subjects GCE "0" level with grades not lower that "C" or four subjects CXC (General) with
grades not lower than 111 and Basic not lower than Grade 1. A pass in Mathematics and computer
training is desirable.

NATIONAL BLOOD DONOR ORGANISER
NATIONAL BLOOD TRANSFUSION SERVICE

Requirements
The candidates should be or have been a Medical Technologist, Medex or equivalent media or
Public Relations practitioners with appropriate qualifications/training in respective fields and a
minimum of seven (7) years' approved experience in the relevant field.

STAFF NURSE
NATIONAL BLOOD TRANSFUSION SERVICE

Requirements
A qualification in nursing registrable with the General Nursing Council of Guyana.

Further information as it relates to conditions of employment could be obtained from the Ministry of
Health, Personnel Division on 227-0215.

Applications should be sent to:
Permanent Secretary,
Ministry of Health,
Brickda a ernetWM'a%." ** ... -,-i '00 5` 9
Government ads can be viewecon
*^-- ..l l--'i- ft-.-l~)*l*^*^~nl.B -- -- -*.fiT~'mflffifffl~jrf, nn*..


To reach no later ithnal L-UL-LUU


*


-
e


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content U

Available from Commercial News Providers"


l


- 40 ______Gmlqpmlo
41mom- 4.--40 .0


MACKENZIE, LINDEN

VACANCY
NETWORK AND HARDWARE TECHNICIAN

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the
position of Network and Hardware Technician.

Responsibility:

The successful applicant will be responsible for performing the
repairs, maintenance and upgrading of the computer network
system hardware and software and also writing of computer
programmes.

Requirements:

Certification in Computer Science to the Diploma/Degree Level
with special training in network system, hardware and software
repairs and maintenance also a knowledge of computer
programming together with at least five (5) years experience.

Applications with "Network & Hardware Technician" written at
the top, right-hand corner of the envelope should be sent not later
than February 28,.2005 to the following address:

Personnel Officer
Omai Bauxite Minina Inc.
C/o 176 'D' Middle Street
GEORGETOWN
orFebruary 15,2005

February IS, 2005


I (Fom age V)


Sunday Chronicle February 20, 2005


e XVI


: c


. . .


- *


I Il L r..l I ,, vr.y I,, cLy.y -, .y .y







Sunday Chronile- February 20, 2005


P A .jeI fl


iNTRODUCTION
Watermelon (Citrullus
lanatus)_ is a popular dessert
vegetable in Guyana, with year-
round, availability. Fruit vary in
shape from globular to oblong.
External rind color varies from
light to dark green and may be
solid, .striped, or marbled. Pulp
color of most commercial variet-
ies is red. The leading cultivar
grown is Mickylee, which has a
round shape, solid light-green
skin color, and typically weighs
between 2.3 to 3.6 kg (5 to 8
lbs). Lesser amounts of the large
elongated light-green skinned
'Charleston Gray are also grown.
Postharvest handling recom-
mendations are identical for all
w a t e r -m e I o n
cultivars.Watermelon harvesting
and handling systems are rela-
tively simple in comparison to
the procedures used for many
other fruits and vegetables. Nev-
ertheless, attention to manage-
ment in all steps in the system is
needed to restrict postharvest
losses, maintain quality, and in-
crease profitability. Watermelon
harvest quality is retained by
careful handling and transport,
proper grading, and cool tem-
perature storage.

HARVEST MATURITY
INDICES
Several different maturity in-
" dicators can be used to determine
when to harvest watermelon
fruit. Watermelons should be
harvested at full maturity to en-
sure that good quality fruit are
delivered to the market. The fruit
do not develop internal color or
increase in sugar content after be-
ing removed from the vine.
Commonly used non-de-
--structive maturity-indicators-in--
elude fruit size, skin color, the
amount of surface shine or waxi-
ness, the color of the ground
spot, the sound of the fruit when
tapped, and the condition of the
tendril at the first node above the
fruit. Each of these individual
indicators by themselves is not
a foolproof determinant of fruit
-ripeness. It is advisable touse.at-


least 3 or more of the above indi-
cators to have more confidence
in the harvest maturity state.
Growers should also become fa-
miliar with the changes in exterl-
nal appearance of the fruit-of the,
particular cultivargrown as it
nears maturity in order to de-
velop more confidence in-the'bes
,stage for harvesting. Each culti-
var has a known average fruit
size, controlled by the genetic
make-up of the cultivar and in-;
fluenced by environmental con-i
editions. Based on this previously'
established average fruit size, the'
timing of harvest can be approxi-
mated. As the fruit approach'
harvest maturity the surface may
become a bit irregular and dull
'rather than glossy. The ground
spot (the portion of the melon
resting on the soil) changes from
pale white to a creamy yellow at
the proper harvest maturity. The
ground spot color is easily re,-
vealed by gently rolling the fruit
over to one side while still at-
tached to the vine. Very experi-
enced workers can determine
ripeness stage based on the
sound produced when the fruit
is thumped or rapped with the
knuckles. Immature fruit will
give off a metallic ringing sound
whereas mature fruit will sound
dull or hollow. Another reliable
- -indicator of fruit ripeness is-the
condition of the tendril (small
curly appendage attached to the
fruit stem slightly above the
fruit). As the fruit become ma-
ture, the tendril will wilt and
change from a healthy green color
to a partially desiccated brown
color. Several destructive indices
can be used on randomly se-
lected fruit to predict harvest
maturity of the remaining fruit
---in the field of-similar-size: When -
the fruit is cut in half longitudi-
nally, the entire flesh should be
well-colored and uniform red
(unless it is a yellow-flesh type).
Immature melons have pink
flesh, mature melons have red to
dark red flesh, and over-mature
fruit have reddish-orange flesh.
For seeded cultivars, maturity is
reached when the gelatinous cov-


ering around the seed is no longer
apparent and the seed coat is
hard and either black or brown
in color. Melon. fruit that have
,an abundance of white seeds are
not mature. The soluble solids.
content of the juice is another
commonly used index of harvest
maturity. Soluble solids in wa-
termelon consist mostly of sug-
ars. A soluble solids content in
the
center of the fruit of at least
10% is an indicator of proper
maturity. Soluble solids is deter-
mined by squeezing a few drops
of juice on a hand-held refracto-
meter In addition, the flesh of
mature fruit should be firm,
crisp, and free of hollow heart.

HARVEST METHODS
The harvest operation .is a
manual process which is the
most labor-intensive part of pro-
ducing watermelons. Due to their
large size and susceptibility to
splitting or cracking under me-
chanical stress, watermelons *
should not be harvested in the
early morning when they are
most turgid. Avoid picking wet
fruit, as the dirt on the water-
melon surface will be smeared
during handling. This will result
in an unattractive appearance.
The surface of the watermelon
fruit should be cleanod-with a
soft cloth or cotton gloves to re-
move any stains or adhering dirt.
Typically, the ground spot will
have soil attached. If the fruit
surface is dry, it is easy to manu-
ally rub off the surface dirt. In
some cases, it may be necessary
to use a damp cloth to rub off
the dirt particles. When the fruit
surface is very dirty, it will be
necessary to put it in a wash
-tank and scrub-it -with -a- soft-
bristled brush or by hand.
Watermelon stems do not
separate freely from the fruit,
therefore they should be cut off
with a sharp knife. A short length
of stem, about 2.5 cm (1 inch)
should be left attached to the
fruit when it is cut from the vine
to deter against stem end rot. The
fruit should not be pulled,


Post Havest m iI* In



WAT SML


twisted, or broken off the vine,
which can result in the removal
of a small piece, or plug, of rind
tissue. A plugged fruit is likely
to decay around the damaged
area. Bacterial soft rot is a com-
'mon -postharvest rot of water-
melons with open wounds.
Large sized watermelons are
usually put in rows in the field
prior to'being. picked up with a
transport vehicle.: Alternately, a,
group of'workers anu go through "
the field and toss the melons
from one worked" to the next,
eventually arriviig to j person
on the transport Ivehicle. Fruit
of small sized cul ivars (i.e. less
than 5 kg [II pounds] per fruit)
can be put in strong wooden field
containers and carried out of the
field. Usually 3 td 5 fruit are put
in a field cortainer. Field sacks
should not be usedifor transport-
ing the fruit out ofithe field, since
they do not provide protection
against bruising injury. Water-
melons should belhandled gen-
tly ,to avoid bruising. Any fruit
that is dropped during handling
should not be loaded, even if it
did not break 'when it was
.dropped. Watermelons are eas-
ily bruised and flesh softening
occurs soon after impact. Also,
people should not walk or ride
on top .of a load of watermelons.
:Harvested watermelons should
I .. . t i


be removed from the field as
quickly as possible. Exposure to
direct sunlight in the heat of the
afternoon can result in sunburn
of the-fruit. surface within a few
hours. The,damage is more evi-
dent in varieties with dark rinds.
Field application of a sun
-prptectant about-a week priorto
harvest can help reduce the inci-
dence'of sunburn. Materials used
as' suri protectants include a
slurry of. calcium carbonate
(whitewash) or a suspension of
clay powder. During harvesting
and handling the whitewash or
clay 'powder dan be wiped or
washed off the fruit.' This does
not create a marketing problem
%unless a surfactant is used when
the protectant is applied, which
makes the powder stick to the
fruit surface. Buyers may object
to the presence of residue or rind
staining. Preliminary grading of
market quality fruit should be
done in the field at the time of
harvest. Deformed, insect dam-
aged, partially decayed, or
cracked fruit should not be loaded
for transport to market. Water-
melons should not be stacked on
the stem end or blossom end
during transport. The internal
flesh is more: susceptible to vi-
'brational damage if the fruit are
stacked in this manner. They
should be loaded on their sides.


'Vacancies
MISS

Applicants are invited from suitably qualified persons to fill the positions of

AUTOCAD Technician
Planning Officer..

Requirements



AUTOCAD Technician

Five (5) CXC/GCE '0' Level passes which must include English
Language, Mathematics and Technical Drawing not lower than
Grade II/Grade B, plus two (2) years experience in AUTOCAD design
applications.

or
Technical Certificate in Architectural Drawing from the Government
Technical Institute or any other recognized institution, plus one (1) year
experience inAUTOCAD design.

Certificate in.Building and Civil Construction (Parts 1 and 11) from the
Government Technical Institute or any other recognized institutitution,
plus one (1) year experience in AUTOCAD design.

Planning Officer

A University Degree in Geography, Environmental Studies and or other
related field.

-Details of duties could be obtained from the Administrative Officer.

Applications including curriculum vitae should be addressed to:

The Chief Executive Officer
Central Housing and Planning Authority
41 Brickdam & United Nations Place
Stabroek
Georgetown

To reach no later than February 21,2005..


Fruit bruising during transport
can also be minimized by keep-
ing the depth of the stack to less
than 1 meter (3.3 feet). Depend-
ing on market destination, wa-
termelons may be loaded di-
rectly for transport to a domes-
tic market destination, or
brought to a packinghouse to be
graded for export. Watermelons
are generally transported in open
trucks or inside un-refrigerated
vans. However, neither of these
transport methods is ideal for
maintaining fruit quality. The
fruit on top of the load in open
trucks are subject to sunburn.
Fruit loaded inside enclosed vans
are subject to overheating if
transport occurs during hot
sunny afternoons.


VACANCIES

Applications are-invited from suitably qualified and experienced persons
to fill the following vacancies:


QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE:
A University Degree in Agriculture Science or Economics or Food
Technology or Chemistry from a recognized University plus two (2) years
working experience.
OR
A Diploma in Agriculture Science plus five (5) years working experience


For our North West Operations we are looking for a Diesel Mechanic
Our Bebice operations requires a Diesel Mechanic/Electrician
Please send resume accompanied with written application to:-

THE ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER
AMAZON CARIBBEAN GUYANA LIMITED
46 FIRST AVENUE
SUBRYANVILLE
GEORGETOWN
Closing date for applications.is 18.February, 2005








Guyana Trade and Investment Support Project (GTIS)
in collaboration with
Guyana Manufacturers Association
invites the Business Community to a Seminar/Workshop
Business Opportunities From Liberalising Services in the
CSME (CARICOM Single Market and Economy).

Speaker:
Mr. Ivor Carryl
CSME Programme Manager.

GTIS is a joint Government of Guyana/U.S. Government Project.

Venue: Hotel Tower
Date: February 28, 2005
Time: 10 am to 1 pm (Lunch included).


GTIS Project
Phone: 223-7144, Fax: 223-7143
RSVP February 23, 2005
E-mail: jwilliams(@)carana.com


"I

.~IIupl


I4ORMSiCPF


SAID
FROM THE AMERICAN PEOPLE


... .. -- . .. .






INVITATION FOR BIDS




SUPPLY OF: METER
BOXES/ENCLOSURES & ACCESSORIES
The Government of Guyana iGoG) has received financing from the Inter-American
Development Bank |IDB) towards the cosI of the Unserved Areas Electrification Programme
(UAEP) It is intended that part of thri financing will be applied to eligible payments tor the
SGoods for Electrical Distribution Systems for the Projected areas Bidding will be conducted
through the international competitive bidding procedures the inter-American Development
Bank (IDB)

Q ruyiani-Power &-LughLLteefre invites sealed bids from eligible bidders for the supply of
meter boxeslenclosures & accessories. Interested bidders may obtain further information
j from, inspect and acquire bidding documents at the office of
The Procurement Officer
Guyana Power & Light, Inc.
257/9 Middle Street,
Georgetown, Guyana
Tel:592-225-5252, Fax 592-225-5255
.-. omplele set lo bniddirq documents mlay De purchased b', eliqitble bidder-r
on submission of a .ritnlen application and upon pa'.meri of a non-refundablei
fee cf :515 00(i or equi'.aleni aTmount in J US dollar : I a[ ini 'f-ic .:'i
The Contracts & Supplies Manager
Guyana Power & Light, Inc.
40 Main Street,
Georgetown, Guyana
0 Tel: 592-226-9598. Fax 592-225-7398
Li Bidds must be delivered ior mailed on or before 09:00h on Tuesday 5th
April, 2005 to the Tender Box located at the address below and muct be
accompanied by a bid security of not less than ?o% of the Iolal price in Guyana
... dollars tor equnialent amount in US dollars They must be labeled
UNSERVED AREAS ELECTRIFICATION PROGRAMME
Bid for the supply of goods for Electrical Distribution Systems
for the Guyana Power & Light Inc.
Central Tender Board, Ministry of Finance.
Main & Urquhart Streets
Georgetown, Guyana, South America.
Bids will be- open at a public cer-mnon'/ at 09.00h on Tuesday 5 April, 2005
at the address gi.en for submission of bids Bidders and or their
representatives mav attend
Bidders registered in Guyana must submit Inland Revenue and National
Insurance compliance certificales along with their bids
The Purchaser is not responsible for bids not received on or before the time
and date specified for reception of )ids Late birls will be re.tected and

^^^^^^4 Il~is^


"Copyrighted Material

SSyndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"



'1


I


-


4m -
qS - qS


- S


--40 -S


- S


- mm S .5


.0w-.W- 4agomp0 -
s- 4 0%a -0 -dom moomm '

0 4b.- qw w A p


- -a


a Ot -e
S



-


-Sbhdd Chroniclnele' ,Fvbn u*29,0:,20005


Pagse XVIII


o


r


40-10
41W -
400---4










EEMIMSi OF OalDER PPPIME cAlIS


MEATS, cottage
cheese, milk or
table scraps
may be added for palatability
and to supply additional pro-
teins, but should not exceed
25 per cent of the total daily
ration. This does not include
pastry, candy, potatoes, greasy
food, splintery bones and
other indigestible morsels.
Many of breeders of large-
boned breeds believe it is advan-
tageous to add vitamin and min-
eral supplements, including cal-
cium, phosphorous and Vitamin
D, to a puppy's diet. When
feeding a preparation already
formulated to meet the needs of
a growing puppy there is dan-
ger of inducing a meiabolic bone
disorder by over supple.
mentation.
If your puppy is .1
poor eater and you think
he may need supple-
ments, discuss this k iLth
your veterinarian he t .ore
you undertake an remedi.ial
action.

FEEDINGADL-LT
An older dog iiIl be
kept trim by feeding once
a day. Caloric require-
ments differ from do-g to


dog, are less as the dog grows
older, and are less in warm
weather and during periods of
inactivity. Information on the
dog food packages can be used
as a guide to feeding but these
are only rough estimates and not
always applicable to the type of
breed or individual dog you
own. Nutrition for elderly dogs
will be discussed when we write
about Canine Geriatrics.
Examine your dog to see if
his body fat is in correct pro-
portion to his height and bone.
There should be a layer of sub-
cutaneous fat over the ribs,
thick enough to provide some


T9uIp S7


7Ar


WViTh.


padding and insulation, but not
too thick. You should be able to
feel (but not see) the ribs as in-
dividual structures.
Weigh your dog from time
to time so as to establish his
ideal weight and then maintain
him at that level.
Obesity in the adult dog is
usually due to feeding snacks
and treats between meals Most
of these .are high in sugar and
Iherefi:re are er, pal.itable
Use table scraps sparingly)
Feed them only as a special treat
and a\oid fattl) or spicN foods
iliat can upset our dei'- 't.Ioul-
. o len mor hh n
Fo learn niore :.Kib.il do,,2 nul-


Ei4


trition, read The Collins Guide
to Dog Nutrition, published by
Howell Book House, Inc, 230
Park Avenue, New York, N.Y.
10169.
Please implement disease
preventative measures (vacci-
nations, routine dewormings,
monthly anti-Heartworm
medication, etc) and adopt-a-
pet from the GSPCA's Ani-
mal Clinic and Shelter at
Robb Street and Orange
\\alk, if sou haie the where-
withal to care well for the
animals. Also. find out more
about the Society's free spay
and neutering programme by
calling 226-4237.























":..


.. .. ... ....






*ft nos --a .o I Qm **as :

-II 'ii ii i

M "Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


CHAMPION


ookery Corner
Welcome to the 333rd edition of
"Champion Cookery Corner". a
weekly feature giving recipes and
tips on cooking in Guyana.


'i


I0 AntpasoPst Sldi


I Ib Cihanmpion Mini Mac Pasta, cooked
I green pepper, julienned
15 oz. can garbanzo beans, rinsed & drained
4 oz. Edam cheese, julienned
4 oz. Mozzarella cheese, julienned
4 oz. Cheddar cheese. julienned
I bunch seasoning, sliced
4 oz. hard salami, thin sliced, julienned
2-1/4 oz. sliced ripe olives, drained
3 oz. thinly sliced pepperoni
I or 2 Tbsp fresh chives, minced
2 tomatoes, sliced and halved
.'PO.NORI="D B) iT

Baking Powder
CuStard Powder P
Black Pepper


Basil Vinaigrette:
2/3 cup oil
1/3 cup red wine vinegar
' Tbsp minced fresh basil or l I hsp dncd .
I garlic clove, minced
1/4 tsp salt


In j lirge .jILd hi,% I coi nhiii fii t I 2 ingredients.
Combine dressingingredients in a small bowl.
Pouroversalad; osstoscpat. Co, er .n.lrein.er.ice
, "..'Toss.before serviig...

t .11I I ICt T 'RI:RS 1 .
A43MPION F IN 616^
SCurry Pbwder
C O.m Mdsala


Sparkling Lemon Picnic Cake .


I 3/4.cups flour.
3/4 il'- Champion Baking Powder
3/4.t. ,baking soda
I 1/4. cups .sugar
I 1 cup butter, softened
I A cuip elegc.ihCl oil
2 tsp grated fresh lemon zest (from 2-3 lemons)
4 large eggs
I large egg.y lk
2 ltip vnilli extract
1 ii.up soutir t.ream
Glitze: 2 I 4 cup icing sugar
Vs.cup fresh lemon juice (from 2-3 lemons)
Heat oven to 350F. Lightly grease and flour 9 x. 13.
inch baking pan. JIn medium bowl, stir together the
flour, Chapipion Baking Powder and b.d.i ng ,'d.i.
Set aside. In large bowl with mixer on high 1si'cd.
' beat'llic sugar, butter, oil and lemon /esit unii.
1n tooth, .iboul 30 *.c.ciml- Add 2 of the egL ,iil ile'
egg yoll. iind heal oiin iuhi for 30 seconds S.nipe .
h ;. owl and aidd reini.inngy 2 eggs and mill.h Citract
' i L'. I on I1 h for -I iu ., until lin i ,a ,I.l .1 LII lli
di l,,ii'd TIo 1 .1e liic1 d illiiti0 0 1. .itd h.ill ci t ii i :d "
Singiediit.' ll iia d 'cup if'som .I'L'IIII


Mix on medium speed for 30 seconds. Scraipe be.O I
well. Add 1' iih .211 ilIL. edlciil- JIdJ -our" ciji. n
M ix ci, I' i .... iino lthi 1li hi bh,iei n hiL'h -.p l.
for I minuii -...i 1,- 1u telll. Poim Illo plepilled
pan and bake for 25-30 minull or until center just
starts to spring back 'when toudchedl.op of cake
should be a light golden .'roloi. While cake bakes,
make theglaze. ( >..IIbiL II ci'ii: L shnI jl a ilt JItC ,II l juJce
in medium mix.;, hIo\ I W\ lh .h. Iii *it0 r 1 II ll '.1c',
smooth and opaque.
Reimoiie a.kc li oiii uo en did immediately poke small
licls, into c ike ustiiI .1 i toothpliick Slou ly pout hall of
ie' glu. e i, ei .ke, s.preidin l .,l1 l, ii ciier entlne
-iirlice 1 i ike .ih,-oib 1 gl/c. ihen slo,'.ls p.irw
i'ii.1iiiinlil 1 l.i.e o \el cake All, clke t le ici
ilniulte' .,id .l's, i 1 tglii/e
liii ll on o\ eni bioiler iid bloil eike unilIl ii e l! l
i,- tin 1O UI' I'.l ,andi c tike lop' i,. oildlen ,intn
i >l ii lk i hl. ir h ll'ie tilmi w Du rit .illh
'IhJd li I il i 11 iL.i lib t"lc.. 1.' 1%0 1 ilei l I 1 fl .de ne0


~Ysle ~ ----~___________I .-.i -'U(t(pl 8~6Ia4M I M. --"- IPY-^~*- --a .--p- 4


I.


ThisWee


Mahamn Pci


I I


I I i


,-,Sunday C~hronicle. February 20, 2005


m


rF


P~age XIX











e t Q Q -


* - ~-

-~ -


-4b -


- mo 0 ma 0 b nom


~ m _____ -

m sow


44m 0 00


* e -


- ~ -

- -~

* ~
a - ~

-
_________ a
-- m -


"Copyrighted Materialq



-- n lvnli nat cl '*Cnnt _n '1t'1


U JEU ~ ~ ~


*Available from Commercial News Providers"







mmm low


a
-
*
0 ____

a
___ - ~
* - -
- .- .
0 ~ -


414ota-- ,- Q


4-M0MI. -4WD 0 a mmw.4m


-Row -
lob.~


-
a -


- a


- -
~. a- -~ ~
a ~
~ a .
U ~ a
a ~ -~
0 ~ -
-


a - -

a. -


- - m


L


,19


.-b..mom
4w


- a


e -NEW& 4110




w 0 mm w



op- *- .
ob. 41M.


qm-





%No a Gnom N


0




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs