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Group Title: Bulletin
Title: Florida crops
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088902/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida crops what and when to plant
Alternate Title: New series bulletin - Florida State Department of Agriculture ; 1
Physical Description: 68 p., 3 leaves of plates : ill. (some col.), map ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Brooks, T. J ( Thomas Joseph ), b. 1870
Publisher: State of Florida, Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Fla.
Publication Date: September, 1953
 Subjects
Subject: Crops -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Horticulture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Vegetable gardening -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by T.J. Brooks.
General Note: "September, 1953."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00088902
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKD9378
oclc - 24176283
alephbibnum - 001962701

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Photograpgh
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Photograph
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Photograph
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34-35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
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        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
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Full Text



/O )BY
















DAIR
ICiiETH
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BULLETIN No. 1


Fa






C:7


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4


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-7


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a-/.A. yA a A A


testing se
tempera
The san
-ties of tf


SONS OF BEARING

he various crops vary
ainfall that no definil
1 last much longer wh
n differ as to length of


g to varying
testingg datl
'ferent date
Rnneh hear


It will be noted that the number of days from planting to maturity varies much


ot these variations.


CROPS GROWN IN NORTH FLORIDA, WHEN PLANTED
AND HARVESTED

th Florida comprises Alachua, Baker, Bay, Bradford, Calhoun, Clay, (
rival, Escambia, Franklin, Flagler, Gadsden, Gilchrist, Gulf, Hamilton


it. Johns, Suwannee, T
i, 14,414,560 acres.

ier after crop indicates
withering maturity if non


tables
............................ M ar., A pril,
............................. Feb., Mar.,.
OUTS ............. Jan., Feb., S
..................... ......O ct. to F eb
.....................-..... Feb., M ar..
.............................M ar., A pril
harvest


lor, IUnion, Walton, Washington, Wakullh


, Sept. .......
, Oct., Nov.
Nov ...


op. No de'


i5 to 80
)0

30


P:., LMar., Nov......
!b., Mar., Nov .....


TI
season!
can be
Differ


OUUIIL

TI
maturi



BEANS
BEETS
BRUSS
CABBA
CARRC
CASSA'





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Vegetables When Planted

RADISHES ................................... Jan., Feb., Mar., April, Sept., Oct., Nov..
D ec. ...................................... ................
RUTABAGA ................................Feb., Mar., April, Aug., Sept., Oct. .............
SPINACH ................................... Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct. ....................................
SQUASH ..................................... Mar., April, May, Aug. ..................................
SWEET POTATOES ...................April, May. June ........................................
TURNIPS .....................................Jan., Feb., Mar., April, Aug., Sept., Oct ....
TOMATOES ...............................Mar., April, May, June, July. Aug ................


When Harvested

27
50 to 80
50 to 60
60 to 80
100
45
73to 82


Fruits
PEACH ......................
PEAR ........................
PLUM ......................


When Planted


......................Jan., Feb.


P ER SIM M O N ................................ ................................
F IG .................................................. ..................................
SA T SU M A ...................................... ..................................
WATERMELON ............................ar., Apr .................................
G R A P E S ......................... ................ .................................
CA N TA LO U P ES ............................ "..................................


Field Crops
CORN ......................................... Feb., Mar., April ..................
CO T TO N ........................................M ar., A pril ..............................
PEANUTS ......................................Mar., April, May, June, July .
SUGARCANE ..............................Feb., Mar ........................
H A Y ..... ......-... ......- ....--.- ...- .....
TOBACCO .................................... Mar., April .............................
JAPAN CLOVER ................-....... May, June, July ...................
CARPET GRASS ..........................Mar. to July ................................
VELVET BEANS ..........................Mar., April, May .....................
RYE ........................................ Jan., Feb., Oct., Nov., Dec.
RAPE ....................................... Jan., Feb., Oct., Nov., Dec ....
SORGHUM .................................... Mar., April, May, June ............
VETCH .................--................ Nov., Dec. ..........................
COWPEAS .......................................Mar. to July .............................
BEGGARWEED ............................May to July .....................
KUDZU ....................................... Dec.. Jan., Feb ........................
CROTALARIA ..... ................... May, June ..............................
BERMUDA GRASS ............... Mar.. April, May, June. July
SOY BEANS ....................-----......... Mar.. April, May .....................

Berries
BLUEBERRIES ........................ Dec. to Mar. ..............................
BLACKBERRIES .......................... Jan., Feb., Mar. ......................
DEWBERRIES ...........................Jan., Feb., Mar. ......................
STRAWBERRIES ........................ May and June, Sept. and Oct.
YOUNG BERRIES ......................Nov. to May ..............................


Nuts


PECANS .....
TUNG NUT


-Dec. to Feb.
-Dec. to Feb..


When Harvested
........... 2 to 3 years
.......... 3 to 4 years
......-.... 3 to 4 years
........... 3 to 4 years
-......... 2 to 4 years
.......... 3 to 5 years
--..-.-... 83 to 93 days
..... to 2 years
85 days


Days
75 to 90
180
120 to 150
210

100 to 120






160

90 to 120





90 to 100


2 to 3 years
1 to 2 years
1 to 2 years
_Mar. to June
1 to 2 years


4 to 6 years
4 to 6 years















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IRISH POTATOES




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CELERY






FLORIDA CROPS


CROPS GROWN IN CENT
AND


Central Florida comprises Brevai
Marion, Orange, Osceola, Pasco, Pin(
4rea, 9,164,800 acres.

The number after each crop in,
edible maturity, or gathering maturity,



Vegetables
3RUSSELS SPROUTS ................Jan., Feb.,
BEANS ...................... Feb., Mar.,
3EETS .................................... Jan., Feb.,
CABBAGE .................................... Jan., Feb.,
:ANTALOUPES ..........................Feb., Mar.
:ASSAVA ....................................Mar., Apri
CAULIFLOWER ..........................Jan. (seed)
Sept.,
CUCUMBER ...............................Sept. to M
COLLARDS ....................................Jan., Feb.,
Nov., I
:ELERY .....................................June (seed
)ASHEENS .....................................Mar., Apri.
EGGPLANT .........................Jan., Feb. (
ESCAROLE ..................................Oct. to Fe]
ENGLISH PEAS ..................... Sept. to M
RISH POTATOES .....------..........Sept. (fall
springj
COHL-RABI .................................. Mar., April
'ALE .................................... .. Feb., M ar.,
.EEK --......................----..................----Jan., Feb.,
.ETTUCE ......................................Jan., Feb.,
IUSTARD ......................................Jan., Feb.,
Nov. -
)NIONS ............... ..................... Jan., Feb.,
Nov. ..
)KRA --- ..................................Feb., Mar.
'ARSLEY ..................................... Feb., Mar.,
*ARSNIPS ......................................Feb., M ar.,
'UM PKINS .................................... M ay. June,
'EPPERS ....... ............. Jan.. Feb., ]
( fall c:
[ADISHES ....................................--------an, Feb., i
]UTABAGAS ................ ...... Feb., Mar.,
'OMATOES ............................-.... Sept. to Ma
'URNIPS .................................... Jan., Feb.,
Dec. -


LORIDA, WHEN PLANTED
ESTED


is, Hernando, Hillsborough, Lake, I
1k, Seminole, Sumter, Volusia Coun



the number of days required to r
-edible.



Planted When Harvest
pt., Oct., Nov. ......--. .... 90 to 120
.......................................... 65
pt., Oct., Nov. ............. 60
i., Dec. ............................ 65 to 80
......................................... 85
....................................... 100 to 200
une (seed) ; July, Aug.,
.............- ........................... 5 5
.......................................... 6 4
pril, May, Aug., Sept.,
.......................................... 85
seed) ; Sept. to Feb .... 120 to 150
..........................................
op) ; July, (fall crop) -. 84
................... ...................... 50 to 60
-............... ...... .............. 62
ov. to Mar.,
............... ......................... 100 to 120
........................................ 60 to 80
pt., Oct., Nov., Dec. ....... 90 to 120
At., Oct., Dec. --............ 100 to 115
:t., Nov., Dec ................ 75 to 83
pril, Aug., Sept., Oct.,
..........................................I
pril, Aug., Sept., Oct.,
1......................................... 00
.......e, July.............................. 40
me, July ........................ 40 to 80


vlar., April, Sept., Oct ............
Sept. to Dec. .......................
-., July ................................----
Mar., April, Aug., Sept., Nov.,
-........-------.-.--....----.-.-....------..------------


lu to 18u

100 to 140
28
50to 80
73 to 82

45


-------------


.............




















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FLORIDA CROPS


Fruits


When Planted


ORANGES ......................................Dec., Jan., Feb.
TANGERINES ..............................
GRAPEFRUIT .............................. "
LEM O N S ..................................... -
LIMES ......................................... "
MANGOES ...................................Sept. and Oct...
AVOCADOS ....................................Sept. and Oct...
WATERMELONS ........................Jan. to March ..
PAPAYA .................................... Feb. to June ....
GUAVAS .....................................Oct., Nov., Feb.
CANTALOUPES ...........................Feb. to Mar.....
GRAPES .......................................... Jan. and Feb.....


Years to Production

........ 4to6
........ 4 to 6
........ 4to 6
........ 3 to 5
........ 3 to 5
........ 4to6
....... 4 to 6

........ 12 to 15 mos.
.-.-...- 2 to 4yrs.


When Harvested

October to June
October to March
October to May
Depends on Variety
Depends on Variety
June, July
July to January
83 to 4)3


85
1 to 2 yrs. June and July


Berries
STRAWBERRIES .......................... May and June, Sept. and Oct.......


Field Crops
COTTON ................. ......Feb., Mar., April ...........................
CORN ..............----- .................. Jan. (early) ; Feb., Mar., April .
OATS ........... ............... Jan., Nov., Dec ............................
SUGARCANE ................................Jan. and Feb ..................................
HAY (Native) ...-......... ....---..----- ............ .....
CH UFAS ..................................... M ar., April, M ay ............................
COW PEAS ..................................A.. pril to July ....................................
SORGHUM ....................................April, May, June ............................
PEANUTS .....................................April, May, June ............................
VELVET BEANS ....................... Mar., April, May --...--................


TOBACCO ........-.....
SOY BEANS ...............
R Y E ...............................
R A PE ......................
VETCI ..........................
BEGGARWEED ..........
KUDZU ..........................
NAPIER GRASS ..........
MEEKER GRASS ........
BERMUDA GRASS ....



Nuts
TUNG NUT ..................
PECANS .... .............


.................. Mar., April .......................
----.................. Mar., April, May .........-
-----.--..........Jan., Feb., Oct. to Dec....
........---..........Jan., Feb., Oct. to Dec....
..................Oct. to Jan ................
-----.................pril, May, June -..
..................Nov., Dec., Jan ...............
.................Jan. to Mar ..................
.................Jan. to Mar. ...................


............ Decemb,-r to April


....-.-.. 150 to 180O
............... 75 to 90


.... ............ October and Nov.
-.-...-- .. July and August
-- -.- Oct., Nov., Dec.

.................. July, Aug., Sept.
................. July, Aug., Sept.
--- ... ... Sept., Oct., Nov.
................. June, July
.................. 90 to 100


Mar., April, May, June, July, Aug., Sept.,
Oct. ....-------------


..........Dec., Jan., Feb.
..........Dec. and Jan ...


4 to 6 years October and Nov.
. 4 to 6 years October and Nov.


S.... .. .. .



































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FLORIDA CROPS


CROPS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA, WHEN PLANTED
AND HARVESTED


South Florida comprises Broward, Charlotte, Collier, Dade, DeSoto, Glades.
Hardee, Hendry, Highlands, Indian River, Lee, Manatee, Martin, Monroe, Okeechobee,
Pahn Beach, Sarasota, St. Lucie Counties. Area, 11,376, 680 acres.


Vegetables


When Planted


BEANS ............................................Sept. to April; June, butter beans ................
BEETS .....................Jan.. Feb., Mar., Sept., Oct., Nov. ................
B R O C C O LI ...............................................................................
BRUSSELS SPROUTS ................an., Feb., Mar., Sept., Oct., Nov ............
CUCUMBERS ..............................Sept. to Mar. .............................................
CABBAGE ....................................Oct. to Feb. .......................................
CORN ........................................ Fan. to Ma. .................. --......................
CARROTS ......................................an., Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov ................
CAULIFLOWER .............. ........ lan. (seed) ; Feb., Mar., Aug. (seed) ; Sept.
COLLARDS ....................................an., Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov., Dec. ....
CANTALOUPES ..........................Feb., Mar ........................................----
DASHEENS ...................................Jan. to April ................................. ......
EGGPLANT ....................................Jan., Feb. (spring crop) ; July, Aug.
(fall crop) ........................................
ENGLISH PEAS ..........................Sept. to Mar ...............-.......................
IRISH POTATOES ................... Nov. to Mar. (spring crop) ; Sept.
(fall crop) .............................................
KALE .......... ............................ Jan., Feb., Mar., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov ....
KOHL-RABI .................................Jan., April, Aug. ................ ....
LETTUCE ............................... Sept. to Jan. ........................................
MUSTARD ..................Jan., Mar., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov., Dec. ....
OK RA .................... ...... .............. Feb., M ar., Sept. ........................................
ONIONS .........................................Jan. (seed) ; Feb., Mar., April, Aug., Sept.,
Oct., Nov., Dec. ........................................


PEPPERS .........

PUMPKINS ......
RADISHES .....
RUTABAGAS ..
SQUASH ..........

SPINACH ..........
SWEET POTATO
TOMATOES ...
TURNIPS ...........


..............................Jan., Feb. (spring crop) ; July to Oct.
(fall crop) ........................................
-----...-..........-- ...... Mar., April, May, June, July .....................
..............................Jan., Feb., Mar., Sept., Oct., Nov., Dec. ....
.............................. Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov. .................................
............................. Feb., Mar., April, May, June, July, Aug..
Sept. ..................................................
---...........--..................Jan., Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov. .........-.-
OES ................... April, May, June, July ....... ...................
.............................Sept. to Feb.; July for fall crop ....................
---.------------------...... Jan. to Oct. .............. ....................


When Harvested
65
60

90 to 120
64
65 to 80
75 to 90

55
85

85

84
62

100 to 120
90 to 120
60 to 80
75 to 83

60

100

100 to 140
150 to 180
28
50 to 80

60 to 80
50 to 60
100
73 to 82
45






























































w - 'C- ** ? -"a- ;*






-- *,' .- *- ;

PINEAPPLE







14 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


TIME TABLE OF FLORIDA FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPMENTS

In the following table is shown names of some of Florida's most important
products and the months that they are available for market.

July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June I
Avocados ................................ x x x x x


Beans ....................---........- x

Beans-Lima ---............---------.... x
Broccoli ..........---. .----......-. ..--

Cabbage ................................--

Carrots ..........---------....--.........-..-.....-----

Celery ....-........---.........------------........-..--.

Celery-Cabbage -----......------

Cucumbers ..--------.... x
Corn-Green ....... ...-------

Collards .................................
Dasheens ----------.....-..---...-- x

Mangoes .................................. x x

Eggplant .......-- -----. ........... x x

Escarole ........--.............--------..

Grapes .................................... x x

Greens ..----...........................------..

Grapefruit .............................. x x

Oranges ---.........--.-........---- x
Mixed Citrus .....................-- x

Lemons ...............................----

Limes ............----- ....--.-... x x x x

Lettuce --................... ....... ...

Tangerines ...---.....................---
Satsumas --------- ---.....................
Mixed-Deciduous ...................-
Mixed Vegetables .................... x x x
Okra ......--...........--..........--...------- x x x x
Peas-Green ................. ----
Peppers .....................--------- x

Potatoes ...................--...------ x
Radishes ...........-......-------................-
Strawberries .--------------................
Squash ................................. x x x
Sweet Potatoes ....................... x x
Tomatoes .....---------.................... x
Watermelons ......................... x


x x x x x x x x


x


x x x x








x

x
x x x x


X X X

x


x x x


X x X


x X
X x x x


x x
x x


x x


x X
x
X x


X X
x x


x X
x X
x x
X x


X x


X X X


x


x x
x x

x X


x x


x x x x
x X


x x
X x
x
x x


x x


x x
x x





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Crops of


0


Tree
-ice H(
Box Consu

ars 1,000 1


alue of
.11 Sales
-Tree 2


52,180
63,450
59,250
61,630
45,530
36,500





TMENT OF AGRIC


7cet& of 7fteafwue

The following Standard Units of Measurement are used in ascertaining the value
of each product as listed below:

Acre-All crops listed as Feed.

Bushel-Alyce Clover Seed, Corn, Chayotes, Chufas, Dasheens, Irish Potatoes. Oats,
Peanuts, Peaches, Pop Corn, Rice, Rutabaga, Sweet Potatoes, Soy Beans, Velvet
Beans, Wheat.

Gallon-Milk, Sugar Cane Syrup, Sorghum Syrup.

Quart-Strawberries, Blueberries.

Pound- Cheese, Chestnuts, Black Walnuts, Beeswax, Butter. Deer Tongue, Frogs.
Grapes, Honey, Papayas, Pecans, Tung Oil. Wool.

Barrel-Pears.

Crate-Avocado Pears, Assorted Berries, Beets, Beans (string), Breadfruit. Broccoli,
Cabbage, Celery, Cucumbers, Carrots, Collards, Cherries, Cantaloupes, English
Peas, Eggplant, Ferns, Grapefruit, Guavas, Japanese, Persimmons, Kumquats,
Lettuce, Lima Beans, Lemons, Limes, Loquats, Mangoes, Mustard, Pepper, Parsley,
Plums, Pineapples, Pomegranates, Radishes, Rhubarb, Rape, Romaine, Okra,
Oranges, Sapodillas, Sugar Apples, Spinach, Squashes, Tomatoes, Turnips, Tan-
gerines, Young Berries, Onions.

Per Head or Each-All Livestock and Poultry, Pet Animals and Birds. Pumpkins
and Cocoanuts.

Per Ton-Hay and Forage, Kaffir Corn, Cassava, Sugar (short ton), Broomn Corn,
Silage.

Per Bunch-Bananas.

Per Bale-Cotton.

Per Carload-Watermelons.

Per Dozen-Eggs, Cut Flowers, Flowering Bulbs.

Per Lot-Farm Machinery.

Per Stand-Bees.

Per Tree-All Fruit- and Nut-Bearing Trees (Nursery Stock and Non-Bearing Trees
have not been valued).





~sC












Compiled from Annual Reports of State Marketing Bureau
Estimates on Cannary Citrus Fruits Used in Florida





ORANGES
Gross Total Net
Seasons Boxes Per Box Total Gross Per Box To Grower
1935-36 140,000 $1.00 $ 140,000.00 $ .40 $ 56,000.00
1936-37 620,185 1.25 774,231.00 .68 419,726.00
1937-38 1.055.399 .36 379,944.00 .15 158,310.00: ;
1938-39 1.186,689 .41 486,543.00 .05 59,334.00..
1939-40 4.170,134 .19 792,325.00 .33''" 1,376,144.00
1940-41 3.941,261 .80 3.153.009.00 .25 985,315.00
1941.42 4.197.299 1.08 4,623.745.00 .44 1,846,812.00
1942-43 6,438,274 1.70 10.945,065.00 1.00 6,438,274.00
1943-44 11,010,841 2.02 22,244,898.00 1.22 13,433,226.00
1944-45 14,344,000 2.60 37,294,400.00 1.65 23,667,600.00
1945-46 19,219,412 2.83 54.390,936.00 1.88 36,132,484.00
1946-47 19,825,485 .82 16.256,898.00 .05:: 991,274.00:'--
1947-48 30,376,340 .80 24,301,072.00 .03 911,290.00
1948-49 26,851,646 1.51 40,545,985.00 .66 17,722,086.00
1949-50 34.657,323 2.35 82,484,425.00 1.43 49,559,972.00
1950-51 67.300,000 2.33 156.526,275.00 .93 62,825,443.00
1951-52 78.600,000 1.59 124.879.214.00 .27 19,604,723.00





GRAPEFRUIT

1935-36 3,760.000 .73 2.744,800.00 .19 714,400.00
1936-37 6.685.327 .55 3.676,930.00 .10 668,533.00
1937-38 5.793.097 .48 2.780,687.00 .03:: 173,793.00*'
1938-39 8.395.348 .22 1,846,977.00 .20: 1,679,070.00"::
1939-40 8.800,274 .33 2,904,090.00 .14 1.320,041.00""
1940-41 13,870,966 .37 5,132,257.00 .11: 1.525,806.00'2 :
1941-42 10.142.575 .71 7.201,228.00 .12 1,222,109.00
1942-43 17.584,025 1.05 18.463,226.00 .44 7,736,971.00
1943-44 20,445,648 1.53 31,281,896.00 .88 17,992,169.00
1944-45 15,136,000 1.91 29,909,760.00 1.29 19,525,440.00
1945-46 22,136,149 1.39 30.769,247.00 .59 13,060,328.00
1946-47 15,864.346 .65 10.311,825.00 .04 634,573.00':' "
1947-48 19,448,586 .34 6.612,519.00 .19: 3,695,231.00!....
1948-49 16.305.830 .57 9.234.317.00 .08"-:t 1,344,466.00:
1949-50 13,486,200 1.87 25,218,194.00 1.22 16,453,164.00
I.-n -1 -9 -n ... 1 -1 ... .11 .. 11 -n -~ I., -


























Ad thru the courtesy of C. C. Ra
Canners' Association.
ce and frozen concentrate oral
al packs in the State of Flori.



O 1951-52 INCLUSIVE

'rozen Concentrated Frozen
Orange Juice Concentral
(Gallons)






226,000
559,000







































,p will go into







COUNTY ACREAGES FOR HARVEST OF COMMODITIES BY SEASONS


1945-46 1946-47 1947-48


1948-49 1949-50 1950-51 1951-52


OTHER COUNTIES


Baby Limas and Butterbeans ..............
Lim a Beans ........................................
Snap Beans ...................-....................-
Cabbage .................................... --...---.
Cantaloupes ............-------------........................
Carrots .......................-- ....-------.........---- ....
Cauliflower .....................-------............-----......-
Celery ........................................-------...-
Corn, Sweet .........................-------..............----
Cucumbers ----------.......................................----------
Eggplant .............................. .... ...
Escarole .......................................-----------------------------
Lettuce ...................-.................... ---..---
Peas, Green ........................................----
Peppers ........... -------------......-.........-...--
Potatoes ......................... ... -----..... ---....--
Squash ............--- .... ........- ............ ..... .. ---
Strawberries ........--.-------.....- ...----------
Tomatoes ....................................... ....
Watermelons ................--------------........ ..................
TOTAL .... .......... ...


1,300
90
510
60
40
25
20
85


....- 230
..-.- 195

...... 15

--- 120
-.-- 100

--- 125
-...- 160
.-- 150
.. 3.225


1,000
150
450
100
50
25
20
10

250
200
40
70

150
250

200
175
100
3.240


1.650
75
300
100
25
25
50
65
110
125
30
50
25
50
95
75
250
25
250
325
3.700


1,500
125
200
150
175
20
50
25
250
300
125
35
20
55
100
100
150
50
225
250
3.905


a I!abj linIa and Ib l ltt(rI..a-lli i-. ili' l d un111011 1on t -it various. L(ountit.s in i .1951-5i 2. 1uin nol in jlnriv ion year..
h/ Includes baby limas and hutterbeans.


Commodity


1.150
100
250
100
150

25
50
350
125
175
50
50
75
175
85
150
75
400
600
4,135


1,700
25
200
125
75

25

550
40
110
50
100
25
150
100
225
50
200
300
4,050


a/
b/500
600
75
225

25

525
100
125
40
85

175
125
125
100
300
1,200
4.325










GROSS PACKED VALUE OF FLORIDA CITRUS
1951-1952 SEASON
Total Total
Units Economic Units
Produced Abandonment Harvested Total Gross
Type in Boxes in Boxes in Boxes FOB Value
Oranges ............... 78,600,000 78,600,000 $124,879,00C
Grapefruit ........... 36,000,000 3,000,000 33,000,000 50,282,00C
Tangerines .......... 4,500,000 400,000 4,100,000 14,962,000
Total .................... 119,100,000 3,400,000 115,700,000 $190,123,000
For the ninth consecutive season Florida citrus production topped all other States.
When citrus production is given in terms of pounds, rather than in boxes of various
sizes, Florida production is greater than production in all other States of the
nation combined.
SOURCE: Florida State Marketing Bureau, and Bureau of Agricultural Economics.

Compiled and published by March, 1953
The Florida State Chamber of Commerce 427-Agriculture
GROSS PACKED VALUE OF FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
1951-1952 SEASON
Total Citrus (See card 426-Citrus) ........ .................- ......................... $190,123,000
Total miscellaneous fruits ............................... ......................................... 18,259,000
Total vegetables ....................................................................................... 158,754,000
Tomatoes .......-.......................-.....-............... $50,670,000
All beans ... ..................................... .............. 19,581,000
Irish potatoes .................................... 18,523,000
C elery ............................... .................................... 14,735,000
Peppers ............ ......... ............................... 10,200,000
C ucum bers ........................................................... 9,999,000
Cabbage ..........................................................-.- .... 9,644,000
Green Corn ..................................................... 8,955,000
Squash ......................................... ............ ...... 2,911,000
Escarole-endive .............. .. .................................... 2,646,000
Eggplant .............. ........................................ .... 1,657,000
Lettuce ............................................ ............... 1,120,000
Radishes ...... .................................. 1,044.000
Miscellaneous vegetables .................................... 7,069,000
Grand Total ............................................ .................................................... $367,136,000
SOURCE: Florida State Marketing Bureau.

Compiled and published by March, 1953
The Florida State Chamber of Commerce 428-Livestock

FLORIDA'S CATTLE RANK AS OF JANUARY 1, 1953
BEEF
A. 1st in Southeast (10 States)
B. 3rd in South (Texas and Oklahoma) (14 States)
C. 13th in Nation
D. 2nd East of Mississippi River (Illinois)
ALL DAIRY (1)
A. 5th in Southeast A. 9th in Southeast
B. 8th in South B. 13th in South
C. 25th in Nation C. 34th in Nation
D. 12th East of Mississippi River
Numbers in Florida: Beef 1,376,000; Dairy 286,000; Total 1,662,000. Total farm
value $152,904,000.
SOURCE: Bureau of Agricultural Economics, Orlando. (1) Revised estimate 1952,
Florida rank: 8th, 12th, 33rd.


~






DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

RECORD OF INTERSTATE CITRUS SHIPMENTS BY CARS
SEASON 1948-49


Week
Ending

September ..---------------------..-. ...--- 3
10
17
25
October -...-------..---.....------..--------..... 2
9
16
23
30
November .----..-----------------..............-- 6
13
20
27
December ..----.--------------- ------ 4
11
18
25
January ......-------..------------- .. 1
8
15
22
29
February ...----.---------..--...........--- 5
12
19
26
M arch ............------------------------.. .- 5
12
19
26
A pril .................- ..---------- .....- ..----- 2
9
16
23
30
M ay ..........................- ....- ..--- 7
14
21
28
June ................-------..................---------------- 4
11
18
25
Ju ly ....... .................................... 2
9
16
23
30
August .......---------....---------.....................------ 6
13

TOTALS .....................----------------....
SEASONS
1947-48 ................. . ....... ......
1946-47....... ............ .................----
1945-46-............................-----
1944-45............... .... ........... .. ... ..
1943-44 ............................ ....
NOTE: Interstate shipments compiled
the approximate cars if shipped as fresh.


Oranges Grapefruit Tangerines

72
380
35 268
14 276
72 394
307 634
845 745 5
1,105 730 11
943 547 121
1,181 380 301
1,286 444 367
1,275 498 520
1,196 478 417
1,773 567 460
2,279 439 668
3,069 626 884
1,617 503 574
56 24 17
2,467 498 500
2,212 674 430
1,761 749 244
1,414 606 155
1,552 642 83
2,118 769 48
1,758 854 30
1,955 1,098 52
2,152 1,085 91
2,044 970 94
1,793 1,074 121
1,710 1,118 79
1,680 936 80
1,737 872 47
1,914 958 63
1,727 893 26
1,637 702 22
1,627 614 16
1,700 610 9
1,544 476 10
1,321 326 5
1,064 179 4
892 174 5
715 170 1
374 92
111 29
60 11
39 3
27 5
14 5
1


58,174


25,450


51,715 17,744
62,118 19,505
57,656 17,642
53,429 12,822
67,095 19,129
from records of Florida Citrus


6,546


5,449
5,346
6,988
7,693
7,066
Exchange. Cars indicate





FLORIDA CROPS


RECORD OF CITRUS CANNED BY BOXES AND CARS
SEASON 1948-49


Week
Ending

September .........



October ...........




November .........



December .......



January ...........




February ..........



L M arch -.... -----



A pril .................




May ...................



June .. .. .......



July .... .....




August .............


ORANGES

Boxes


................ 3
10
17
25
...... .. ...... 2
9
16
23
30
...... -. ...... 6
13
20
27
................ 4
11
18
25
................ 1
8
15
22
29
................ 5
12
19
26
................ 5
12
19
26
................ 2
9
16
23
30
............... 7
14
21
28
................ 4
11
18
25
................ 2
9
16
23
30
6
13


TOTALS ..........
SEASONS
1947-48-....-.-.
1946-47.............
1945-46 .............
1944-45 ......
1943-44 .............


502
1,894
16,917
21,016
253,636
282,212
439,899
559,164
568,731
463,947
608,749
679,175
882,945
756,979
736,767
1,034,252
1,029,200
1,127,870
1,197,003
1,055,243
1,174,815
1,311,029
1,166,283
1,028,271
1,050,943
977,535
854,059
849,055
711,878
657,894
625,338
728,647
734,584
693,724
616,605
543,520
467,919
389,697
284,027
121,550
27,881
6,745
8,901
4,473
880
43
99

26,812,496

30,376,340
19,825,485
19,183,860
14,223,889
10,912,352


TANGERINES


GRAPEFRUIT


Boxes Cars Boxes Cars


3,260
44,656
1 37,886
4 41,121
33 71,271
159 89,447
497 254,945
553 373,085
863 422,614
1,096 480,727
1,115 604,830
910 503,633
1,194 555,254
1,332 605,780
1,731 571,054
1,484 409,914
1,445 511,086
2,028 746,200
2,018 695,926
2,212 772,645
2,347 839,613
2,069 811,053
2,304 738,646
2,571 686,715
2,287 706,255
2,016 606,236
2,061 595,591
1,917 653,182
1,675 537,769
1,665 453,684
1,396 367,345
1,290 331,512
1,226 210,700
1,429 179,431
1,440 127,650
1,360 114,242
1,209 96,875
1,066 86,455
917 74,650
764 73,960
557 61,621
238 51,125
55 48,706
13 14,922
17 21,103
9 15,116
1 4,501
1,486
340

52,575 16,305,820


63,284
41,303
39,965
27,730
22,270


19,448,586
15,864,346
22,124,436
15,133,817
20,429,173


7
89
76
82
143
179
510
746 18,463 40
845 65,148 142
961 73,846 161
1,210 77,483 168
1,007 53,880 117
1,111 65,747 143
1,212 73,187 159
1,142 108,479 236
820 89,723 195
1,022 10,952 24
1,496 82,822 180
1,392 91,733 199
1,545 85,071 185
1,679 45,598 99
1,622 28,840 63
1,477 5,389 12
1,373 8,652 19
1,412 2,807 6
1,212 1,357 3
1,191 1,918 4
1,306 2,408 5
1,076 1,799 4
907 228
735 778 2
663 569 1
421 1,910 4
359 378 1
255
228 50
194 27
173 112
149
148
123
102
97
30
42
30
9
3
1

32,612 999,354 2,172

39,691 598,505 1,273
32,376 930,751 1,980
44,177 515,606 1,072
29,684 2,728 5
41,692 -


NOTE: Canning data from Florida Citrus Commission records.





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


THE FOLLOWING STATISTICS ARE FROM 1947-48 REPORTS:

AGRICULTURE
F ruits ...............$. ................................................................................ $126,000,000
L ive Stock .................. .....- .. .....----- ....-..- ................--..- ..- ........-... ....- .. 53,000,000
V vegetables ................. .....................................................................-............ 95,000,000
MANUFACTURING


Forest Products ......................
Food Products ........................


NAVAL STORES
270,000 (Barrels)

FISH
Fish caught for food, (pounds) .....................................
Non-food fish, (pounds) ................................................


MINERALS
M inerals of all kinds ..........................................................................

AIRPLANE
A airplane freight to the value of ............................................................
EXPORTS by waterports and IMPORTS
10 Waterports handle, (tons) ........................................ ......


$140,000,000
150,000,000


................ 91,600,000
................ 137,000,000


$ 25,000,000


$ 60,000,000

20,000,000


FLUE-CURED TOBACCO

SEASON AV. PRICE % DISTRIBUTION
6& EXPORT VALUE OF DISAPPEARANCE
% OF 1934-38 % eo I ::::::::::::

S Price l E l l 1


U. S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


1950 1935 1940 1945 1950
YEAR BEGINNING JULY
NEG. 48264-XX BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


200




100






























IA C
















































producers received
may be because the
lal container. Then
second place for the
hen they sell whole min
ced in Florida and g
icouraging.

does not show up so
,f the consumers' dol





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


0cmpetit e aftrdet

By NEILL RHODES
Commissioner
OF FLORIDA STATE MARKETING BUREAU

BEAN COMPETITION
Competition.-The competition given by other States to Florida bean ship
ments is the greatest in the early fall and late spring period of the Florida shipping
season. Domestic competition is the least in the period December, January, February
and March, and latter November and early April might be included since normally
bean shipments from other States are comparatively light in these part months. Bean
shipments are made from Louisiana and Texas in more months of the Florida season
than from other states, but Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia
ship beans in October ahead of initial shipments from Florida, and shipments from
Arkansas, Georgia, Maryland, New Jersey and Tennessee continue after the Florid:;
season closes in June. Consequently, early Florida fall shipments if made before
killing frost largely eliminates shipments from other States, and the late Florida
spring shipments if continued after a number of other States are shipping heavily,
must bring proportionately lower prices.

Import competition of beans, principally Limas, to Florida offerings comes
mainly from Cuba in the period of the Florida shipping season, December through
March, the total volume annually amounting normally to 4-5% of the Florida rail and
boat shipments. Mexico with less on the average than a dozen cars annually, gives
negligible competition in the eastern territory. The few cars from Puerto Rico are less
in volume than the Mexican imports. The Lima bean import competition in the months
of December, January, February and March is considerably greater to Florida ship-
ments than the domestic volume supplied by other States, and being placed largely
on a few eastern port markets is still more competitive than if distributed to a number
of inland markets.

Competition.--The Florida Lima bean shipping season extends from Novem-
ber with l.c.l. lots, and December through June in carlot volume. Georgia and the
Carolinas offer competition to Florida shipments except in the winter and early
spring months, but Cuban competition offered from latter October through April is
more severe, especially since the shipments are made chiefly to New York and eastern
port markets. Mexico and Puerto Rico also offer import competition, but thie volume
is negligible compared to that from Cuba. The trade agreement with Cuba, reducing
the duty from December through May, tends to encourage competition from that
source in the Florida shipping season. Information showing the Florida rail and boat
shipments, the U. S. shipments and imports in each of the months of the Florida
shipping season, is unavailable. Cuban shipments very light during war and up to date.

TOMATO COMPETITION
Competition.-While only a few cars of tomatoes are shipped from Florida
as the season begins in October, they must meet competition with offerings from
California, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, and other States. In November
and December the fresh domestic competition comes mainly from California and





FLORIDA CROPS


Texas carlot shipments. By January the domestic competition has practically faded
out. Texas and California shipping out a few cars in this month some seasons. In
February and March Florida continues to supply most of the domestic tomato ship-
ments. In April, Texas is shipping fresh tomatoes in fair carlot volume. In May,
Texas shipments increase tremendously and reach their peak. Mississippi, Georgia,
Louisiana and South Carolina begin carlot shipments in May, reaching peak volume
in June. In June, Arkansas, California, Maryland, North Carolina, Tennessee and
other States are also shipping out tomatoes, the total U. S. shipments reaching the
heaviest volume of all months in June, and second heaviest in May.

Import competition is very pronounced on tomatoes. Cuba and Mexico are the
chief sources of import competition--Bahamas, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands and other
countries shipping in only a few cars each season. The import season runs with that
of Florida beginning in November, continuing in each following month until the
import season ends in May. The Cuban imports are heaviest in December, January
and February, those from Mexico usually after the Cuban peak has passed, in March
and April. Cuban shipments very light during the war but picking up in 1946-47
season.

POTATO COMPETITION
Competition.-A good many years ago the Florida potato shipping season
began in the latter part of March and extended well into June. With the opening up
of and increase in the production of Bliss potatoes in South Florida, the Florida ship-
ping season now begins in November and continues through June. Florida potato
shipments have heavy competition with old stock from late, and with new crop potatoes
from early producing States. The two largest potato shipping States, Maine and
Idaho, place potatoes on the market in carlot volume every month in the year, and
so do the States of California, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Wisconsin and other
States. While the old crop competition extends throughout the Florida shipping
season, the new crop competition comes mostly in May and June. New crop potatoes
are shipped from Texas in about the same months of the Florida season-November
through June, peak in April. Louisiana ships new stock from March to July, reaching
peak shipments in May. Alabama and Mississippi ship from April to July, and South
Carolina mostly in May and June. Georgia and North Carolina ship out new stock in
May, June and July. Alabama, Louisiana and South Carolina shipments reach peak
in May, and North Carolina in June.

In the eight years, 1933-40, April was the peak month of Florida shipments with
two exceptions-May ranked first in 1935 and again in 1940. California, since 1942,
has been giving increasing competition in May and June.

STRAWBERRY COMPETITION
Competition.-The Florida strawberry carlot shipping season begins in Decem-
ber. and in the period from the latter part of November through the following February,
Florida strawberry shipments have little competition. In March and sometimes in
February, Louisiana begins its carlot shipping season, and this State gives Florida
strawberries the strongest competition. Louisiana ranks first among all the States in
carlot shipments of strawberries. The shipping season usually reaches peak in April





























CHA


'OTES


-.o


Z
"" -
";
kl
i





V LORIDA CROPS


iipments Irom Louisiana continue heavy into lVlay. texas ships out a relatively tew
irs also in March and April. The Alabama shipping season begins in the latter part
f March and continues through April and into May. Mississippi and North Carolina
egin their season in April, and ship also in May. In some seasons Tennessee also
lips out a few cars in April, and moves out a heavy volume in May. In addition to the
:ates above named, Arkansas, California, Delaware, Illinois, Kentucky, Maryland,
.issouri and Virginia are all shipping strawberries in carlot volume in May.


PEPPER COMPETITION
Competitive Shipments.--August and September are the two months of the
relve in which the lightest total United States shipments are made. The importing
actions ordinarily place no carlots of peppers on the U. S. markets until November.
he Florida carlot shipping season begins with considerable carlot competition in
ctober, California, New Jersey and Texas shipping; in November, California, Georgia,
ew Jersey and Texas are shipping; and in December supplies are more limited, mainly
om Texas. Imports begin from Cuba, Mexico and Puerto Rico in December. Texas
is few cars out in January, but with that exception Florida supplies the total carlot
)mestic pepper shipments from January through February, March and April, to May
which month shipments begin from Louisiana which give Florida peppers the only
)mestic competition in this month. In June the season is under way in several States
-Georgia, Louisiana (peak shipments), Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina
-which States ship in July and the New Jersey season starts in July. The imports
crease in January, February, and reach peak in March, then start declining in April,
May, about fade out in June, seldom any imports in July. Thus in the first four
months of the year Florida supplies its own domestic competition, and has only the
sports to offer competition, which are timed to meet the least competition in the
stern markets. In the five years 1932-36 Florida shipments averaged the heaviest
May, in 1934, 1935, 1936 increasing March over February, April over March and
ay over April. No State, nor any section from which peppers are brought into the
united States, has a shipping season common entirely to that of Florida. Mexico and
iba are our principal foreign competitors.


GREEN PEA COMPETITION
Competitive Shipments.-Shipments of green peas from California far exceed
e shipments from any other State, about 58'/ of the total United States shipments
oving from California. This competition continues with Florida during every month
its shipping season, and with other States every month of the year. Mentioned in
e order of the quantity of green peas they ship, the States of the South and East
mpetitive to Florida are North Carolina, Mississippi, South Carolina and Texas.
orida has import competition, Mexico principally, shipping December through
arch, January and February the peak months. Puerto Rico averages about 2 cars
xr month in January, February and March, beginning shipments in November.
ississippi ships in April and May, North Carolina April and principally May, South
irolina April and May, Texas from December through March, Alabama and Georgia
;casionally have carlots out in April. Virginia carlot shipments do not begin until
ay. In the season proper Florida competition comes therefore mostly from Cali-
rnia. Texas and Mexico, at least until April. Florida production is less and less,
little importance in 1946-47 season.


































































nGGPLANI'


IL -1






Minh..


i:'
~_ :I"'%:' j
--
ii

~3~~~ r

















I 1U




FLORIDA LROPS


LETTUCE COMPETITION
Competitive Shipments.-Florida is outranked in lettuce shipments by several
states, and has very strong competition. California, shipping more than 70% of the
total U. S. lettuce, is the strongest competitor, and moves more lettuce in every month
of the year than Florida ships in the entire season. Arizona has about the same ship-
ping season as Florida, but much heavier volume. The Iceberg type of lettuce shipped
by California and Arizona is well established, and preferred by most of the trade.
Georgia occasionally ships a few cars in March or April and May. North Carolina
and South Carolina ship in March, April and May in good carlot volume, and Texas
has a few cars in January or February. Most of the southern states ship the Big
Boston type, Romaine and some Iceberg type.


EGGPLANT COMPETITION
Competitive Shipments.-Since Florida has in the five years 1932-1936
shipped more than nine-tenths of the total U. S. rail and boat supplies, it appears that
Florida eggplant, especially during its shipping season, controls the market. Domestic
carlot competition is negligible until Virginia shipments begin in June and July, as the
few cars from Texas, Louisiana or South Carolina are not serious. However, imports
account for about 45% (in the yearly average 1932-1936) of the total rail and boat
supply, the total U. S. shipments amounting to only 55% of the total. Cuba is the
chief competitor, Mexico next and occasionally Puerto Rico places eggplant on the
U. S. markets. Cuban shipments usually begin in December, or latter November,
increase in January, and in February, to reach the peak in March. The Cuban receipts
drop off sharply in April, and end in May. Mexico ships mostly in the period January
to May inclusive, but in much less volume than Cuba. Cuban shipments have been light
since 1942 on account of war and the lack of boat transportation.


CELERY COMPETITION
Competition.-Florida celery shipments in the first months of the season
must compete with new crop, and also storage shipments, though in far more
limited proportions. Celery shipments from California are placed on the markets from
either the northern, southern or central districts of that State in not only every month
of the Florida shipping season, but in every month of the calendar year. Florida
celery is shipped in carlot volume from December through June with no carlot ship-
ments out in the five months July through November. California shipments are the
heaviest in December, and second largest in November, so that Florida shipments
are placed on markets well supplied with California November shipments, and must
meet the heaviest month's shipments of the entire California season in December.
California celery shipments reach peak in the month in which the Florida celery ship-
ping season begins. California ships out its lowest monthly volume in April, and the
United States total celery shipments are the lowest in order, in July and August.
Louisiana ships comparatively few cars of celery in May and June, and Virginia less
than 75 cars in June in recent seasons.
Competition from old crop or late celery comes chiefly from New York, and
secondly from Michigan in December and January. The imports are of little conse-
quence. Bermuda occasionally ships out a few cars to the United States.




.54 -.)EPAITMENT OF AGRICULTURE FLORIDA CROPS 35


SCHEDULE OF WHEN VEGETABLES SOLD-THIRTEEN STATE FARMERS MARKETS

CC u' )cnL
ca "U 0 z (j 6 V"
cc) 0 < d, LU -~-0- '. i "r-":
Q a ~Q ca _j=~
1- Q :D O

BROOKER IIi BROOKERtl
FLORIDA CITY I 1FLORIDA CITYII
FORT PIERCE I i FORT PIERCE

FORTMYERS I FORT MYERS - -

iMMOKALEFJ I 1 IMMOKALEE t
PACIOKEE PAHOUEW HRAD
PALATKA PALATKA
PA o I M-P-TTPALMETTO

PLmNTCITY PLANTCITY fl..
POMPANO POMANO
SANFORD SAN FORDNx

5TAPKF I 5 TARKE
WALCILArII WALICULA
r4UMBER MAIRKET 7 HANDLI1 S S X~;,~;NG r=ACH1 1 361 0 21 11 9 11 2 11 1
COMMODIT 44 3~ : W 3.. .

(K) Variety of Other commodities also j& Primary Crop
MONTHS OF OPERATION--BY MARKET COMMODITIES SOLD--BY MARKETS t
Bonifay handles crops and livestock in season--melons, pecans, etc. Ft. Mr1yers and Ft. Pierce handled considerable sweet potatoes from February thru July.

















U


M. I


,a r


Clbnpbr.s


ism






r t -_ f -


CABBAGE COMPETITION
Competitive Shipments.-Many of the Florida vegetables have onl) the new
.op competition, but cabbage has not only the new crop, but the shipments from the
te States and storage stock with which it must compete. Cabbage from Louisiana,
south Carolina and Texas is shipped in almost every month of the Florida season,
id storage stock from New York and Wisconsin competes with Florida offerings
practically every month from December through April. Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi,
id North Carolina place new cabbage on the market in April and May, and Tennessee
id Virginia in May. There are shipments from other States that at some time


Import competition is not
United States, usually in F4
ie Netherlands, usually in
increasingly important altl.
et.


WATERMELON
ive Shipments.-There ,
iited States in the months c
ry few cars are reported ir


rlous. Luba occasionally expor
uary. Less than 30 cars per se,
, period January to April. Ari
gh the large volume in Texas



COMPETITIONN
no domestic carlot shipments
November, December, January, 1
October, occasionally cars from


ily State shipping watermelons, does not itself ship in April every season, and has no
petitionn from domestic sources, and only few cars from imports from Cuba. In
.ay, California starts shipping in volume, and Texas, a more serious competitor.
begins the melon season. Cuba and Mexico account for few scattering cars in May
tough the volume is limited. June is the peak month of Florida shipments, and ship-
ents begin in June, continue through July, and into August from Alabama, Georgia,
Le largest producing States, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and California
id Texas continue. In addition to these designated States in July, Arkansas, Missouri,
orth Carolina, and others are shipping melons in good carlot volume. In August
practically every watermelon producing state north of Florida is in season.


CU<
ive Shipmen
all domestic
grown local ,
rida ships in
from Cuba ai
ecember reacl
1-36, from 24
iry and Marc]
he Cuban and
second in Fel
April, but larf
marks the b(
ent from whicl
!orgia cucumb
June must m
:as, Virginia,
--.L- 0 "-- T- 1_


r season starts in
Georgia, New
)lies fade out fi
the domestic vol
iited way in Nove
imports ranging i
'lorida has comp
inly from Illinoi,
are heaviest of t
th an average of
i the first three i
tic shipments frc
hiring May, Alabaj
the Florida cucu
rom Arkansas, I
A 1-I -L ___ r1- -






j "j


TVT -w


*-aill ii


oci' KI


lll IT ............










3etitive Shi
t markets. C
om Californi


FLORIDA CROPS


CITRUS COMPETITION
ents.-From other states occurs most i
rnia Valencias move in volume from M,
egin to move in November and contir
compete with California lemons. Grape
droughts to compete in the fall and wint
coast states are on the market in limited(
lorida. In August and September, occa


itly banned in the United States, but are permitted i
petitionn likewise exists between processed citrus f:
during states. Frozen orange concentrate was proc
al scale in Florida in 1945, and its popularity has
Dn is now being encountered from California, ho
fruit juices and canned grapefruit segments are beinF
,. and processed lemon juice from California is very
Florida is able to withstand competition for most of it


n(
ror
luc
ri
we
P'
po
ts F:










FLORIDA CROPS


Approximate con
food groups*; 1












1909 ............ 388 35
1910 ----------- 367 37
1911 ........... 3 55 40
1912 ----------- 398 37
1913 ............ 388 36
1914 ............ 371 36
1915 ............ 369 38
1916 ........... 366 36
1917 ............ 376 34
1918 ............ 404 34
1919 ............ 380 36
1920 ............ 389 36
1921 ............ 388 36
1922 ............ 385 38
1923 ............ 373 39
1924 ............ 381 39
1925 ............ 381 38
1926 ............ 381 41
1927 ............ 380 41
1928 ............ 382 41
1929 .......... 387 40
1930 ............ 385 40
1931 ............ 382 40
1932 ............ 385 38
1933 ............ 385 36
1934 ........... 375 35
1935 .. ......... 380 34
1936 ........... 385 35
1937 ........... 386 37
1938 ...-........ 386 37
1939 ............ 391 38
1940 ............ 391 38
1941 ............ 401 38
1942 ............ 419 38
1943 ............ 448 42
1944 .......... 459 42
1945 ............ 471 48
1946 ......... 470 45
1944 ..... lb. lb. 4
1909 388..... 35 4
1910 36..... 70 37
















1947 ............ 444 46
1948 .......... 432 47
1949 ........... 429 46

SOURCE: Above ta



The consumption of
importance, as the estim
the per capital consumpt
trains as much, more,-o]

The greatest increaE
to 1949 was for citrus f:
potatoes, the per capital
products, from 296 poun4
of increase or decrease ol


iumptio
total in



b.

0-s 0'







159
153
r




150
Ilb.


14861
143
1469
143
14850
148
143


141
146
143
1483
148


146
145
141
140
139
137
13748
142
149
12941
140
136
137
137


142
149
1294
1403
164
16835
16642
16849
154
153
164

168
166
168
168
158
159

ken from



food pr(
ited tots
on of th
less-ol

e in the
units and
consum
s per cal
the oth(


Florida State Mar



n of food per cai
pounds and in con


cd
-l a l
5 0
C), ye' 3 5





57 10 191 4"'M
o^ t- s a*
.00






59 10 204 4
59 10 206 4
60 10 168 4
57 10 191 4
58 10 194 4
61 10 171 5
61 10 192 5
61 9 154 4
56 12 168 5
60 12 185 4
61 10 169 5
57 12 162 5
57 19 168 5
62 10 170 5
66 10 181 6
65 13 164 6
65 13 160 5
65 13 141 5
65 14 156 6
67 14 164 5
67 14 165 6
67 16 144 6
66 14 1650 6
66 14 156 6
66 13 151 6
66 15 152 6:
60 14 158 7
64 16 142 7
64 15 138 8
65 17 144 8
68 16 132 9
70 16 138 9
70 16 139 9
66 19 140 10
67 18 145 10
66 16 140 11
60 17 138 11
64 18 138 11
65 14 132 11
66 15 118 10
66 16 116 9

Miscellaneous Publi



ducts in Florida ho
.1 in millions of pour
he entire United Star
f our products.

United States per ca
tomatoes, up 122.75
option dropped 43%
)ita in 1909 to 173 p(
!r groups was: Dairy


S, Commission

kketing Bureau


pita, retail-weight e
nparison with 1935-




4 773 32
W 0
C U >S -


b. Ii I i., Il




4 69 216 286
8 73 203 281






0 76 202 280
8 83 202 253
2 76 202 268
2 88 224 253
5 73 185 240
1 81 225 246
0 77 209 241
3 84 218 237
9 81 210 232
9 83 237 235
a .o ta


. lb. lb. lb.








4 7689 209 23596
4 7384 22704 294
4 69 216 23486
6 788 21628 23084
9 72 201 22584
2 72 20422 215
1 75 222198 2709
8 73 19203 20581
0 76 202 280
8 9183 21402 2307
2 7698 202 268
2 88107 224 203
5 73 185 240







1 8104 2234 20046
0 77 209 241







3 8104 23418 237198
9 8104 23810 232199
9 83119 22837 2300
0 89116 206 2308
6 84122 227 240191
8 1392 217 20034
0 88129 25316 230
9 92113 231 22174
6 92 204 215






7 86 198 209171
8 9 3 198 20173
7 96 222 203






cation No. 691, U.S.D.207










me markets is of inte
0 98 234 202
5 107 224 203
8 104 234 200
4 104 234 198
9 104 238 199
1 119 228 200
3 116 206 208
5 122 225 191
8 133 237 200










nds indicates. Of grea
tes, whether the house(


pits consumption of t]
Y. The greatest decree
from 1909 2to3 1949,
3 113 239 174
6 117 237 171
8 111 235 173

cation No. 691. U.S.D..



me markets is of inte
ods indicates. Of gres
;es, whether the house.


pita consumption of 11
o,. The greatest decree
from 1909 to 1949,
pounds in 1949, or a dec
products, butter exclu


equivalent by major
.39 average 1/ 10/



." Total

'0 a Ic





lb Ilb. lb. Ili.
84 10 1,576 104
86 10 1,544 102
*'. siC ...a -







88 9 1,504 99
86 11 1 ,576 104
92 10 1,540 101
900 1,528 101




87 11 1,534 101
87 12 1,476 97
88 14 1,499 99
89 13 1,531 101
Ols C a BEsi Ji
lb. lb. lb. lb.




8104 13 1,51976 104
1086 10 1,53244 102
10088 913 1,46504 99
1186 11 1,54576 104
1092 10 1,52840 101
1190 10 1,54528 101
1187 11 1,51734 101
1187 12 1,533476 9701




118 13 1,522 100
1288 14 1,499 99102
1189 13 1,55031 101
104 13 1,52219 100
101 13 1,532 101
100 13 1,495 97
118 13 1,477 97102
109 14 1,4728 10197
110 13 1,498 99102
118 12 1,50017 10099
11809 14 1,51433 101
118 13 1,522 100
12013 13 1,55349 102
11207 14 1,556 102





116 18 1,592 105
10724 13 1,60522 100
11499 14 1,634 101
109 13 1,49667 11098
11092 14 1,69477 1197
109 1320 1,704 1127
110 18 1,498 99108
112 16 1,500 99




109 19 1,5914 100
108 16 1,527 101
113A., Septe17 1.53 1020.









crest, and the aggregate of
ter significance however is
ewife's market basket con-


he above groups from 1909
107 17 1,556 103




















ase was potatoes and sweet
followed closely by grain
line116 18 1.5%92 The percent10
ed,107 1 1,60.5% over106
99 14 10%. 630 107
108 16 1,667 110
92 37 1,697 112
92 20 1,704 112
110 18 1,636 108
106 19 1,591 105
100 19 1,573 104

A.. September 1950.



rest, and the aggregate of
ter significance however is
swife's market basket con-


he above groups from 1909
ose was potatoes and sweet
followed closely by grain
*line of 41.5%. The percent
ded, cop in 1949 10.5% over
5 0%.


























-al Organization for
2.3 billion people on


undernouriE
f one-third


ie present population and more cc
- I, 1 ._ -11 A. A 1,. ,.,1 ,


ULI








PACKS OF CERTAIN FLORIDA CITRUS PRODUCTS-1935-36 to 1947-48

Canned Canned Canned Canned Canned Canned
Grapefruit Citrus Grapefruit Orange Blended Tangerine
Sections Salad Juice Juice Juice Juice


65
88
85
131
85
330
274
None
None
None
None
300
1,1568


1,000 eases
1,758
3,918
3,370
6,190
4,682
10,647
6,180
15,193
16,778
12,025
15,089
8.583
7.987


(Basis 24 No. 2 Cans)
162 85
498 272
806 547
926 699
2,851 1,403
3,078 2,537
3,466 2,305
2,429 3,676
7,076 6,176
13,935 7,745
18.421 12,267
17,294 10,034
25,593 11,894


Total
Cases



4.322
8,834
8,277
12,052
13,165
19,732
16.836
22,186
30.973
34.116
48,709
42,6569
50,635


FLORIDA PRODUCTION OF CERTAIN CITRUS PRODUCTS AND BY-PRODUCTS 1940-41 to 1947-48


Concentrated
Orange
Season Juice


"Bottlers Citrus
Base" Feed


Citrus Oils
Molasses Orange Grapefruit Tangerine Lime Limonene


1940-41 ....
1941-42 ....
1942-43 ....
1943-44 ...
1944-45 ....
1945-46 ....
1946-47 ....
1947-48 ....


(gallons)
65,900-a
94,300-a
1,882,245-b
1,282,742-c
240,000-a
469,689-d
2,006,150-f
3,690,074-e


(gallons)
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
60,000
2,487
N.A.


(tons)
32,731
29,697
47,376
67,130
68,725
108,470
96,225
154,182


(tons)
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
14.496
19,261
44,169
58,034
65.887


(pounds)
N.A.
N.A.
170,150
198,509
244,553
281,991
N.A.
N.A.


(pounds)
N.A.
N.A.
51.650
53,460
29,106
73.7569
N.A.
N.A.


Note: "N.A." Data not available.
a. Estimated on basis of recovery of .588 gallons of concentrate per field box of oranges.
b. Government purchases, 1,882,245 gallons; civilian sales, 50.000 gallons (estimated).
c. Government purchases, 1,232,743 gallons; civilian sales, 50,000 gallons (estimated).
d. 656 Brix-244,006 gallons; 42 Brix 2256,684 gallons.
e. 650 Brix-1,779,665 gallons; Frozen 1,910,409 gallons.
f. 65 Brix-1,446,841 gallons; Frozen-4-fold-518,478 gallons; 3-fold-Frozen-40,831 gallons.
g. Preliminary.
U. S. Department of Agricultural Economics, J. C. Townsend, Jr., Statistician, Orlando, Florida.


1935-36 .......
1936-37 .......
1937-38 .........
1938-39 ........
1939-40 ......
1940-41 ..
1941-42 .........
1942-43 .........
1943-44 .........
1944-45 ........
1945-46 ........
1946-47 .........
*1947-48 .....

*Preliminary


............... 2,262
............. 4,058
............... 3,419
............... 4,106
............... 4,134
............... 3,140
............... 4,611
............... 888
.............. 943
............. 411
............. 2.407
5.............. ,098
........... 3,158


(pounds)
N.A.
N.A.
5,000
2,986
2,730
10,415
N.A.
N.A.


(pounds)
N.A.
N.A.

1,060
475
100
N.A.
N.A.


(pounds)
N.A.
N.A.

18,977
13,249
5,831
N.A.
N.A.





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


FRUITS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA

Avocado Mamey
Ambarella Mamoncill
Akee Mango
Banana Papaya
Custard Apple Para Guava
Canistel Peach
Coco Plum Persimmon (Japanese)
Citrus Pineapple
Ceriman Pitaya
Cereus (Pitayz) Pomegranate
Carob Plum Prickly Pear
Cashew Rhubarb
Carissa Rose Apple
Carambol Roselle
Cacao Sapodilla
Fig Sapote
Granadilla Seagrape
Grapes Sour Sop
Guava Star Apple
llama Sugar Apple
Jaboticaba Surinam Cherry
Jackfruit Tamarind
Jujube Umkokolo
Ketembilla Watermelon
Litchi White Sapote
Loquat


VEGETABLES GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA

Beans (Limas) Lettuce
Beans (String) Mustard (Greens)
Beets (Roots) Mustard (Chinese)
Beets (Greens) Parsley
Broccoli Peas (English) (Field) (Pigeon)
Brussels Sprouts Pepper (Sweet)
Cabbage Pepper (Red)
Cabbage (Chinese) Potato (White or Red) (Sweet) ( Yam)
Carrots Okra
Cassava Onion
Cauliflower Rape
Chayote Radish
Collards Rutabaga
Corn (Sweet) Sorrel
Cucumber Spinach
Dasheen Squash (Chinese)
Eggplant Squash
Endive Swiss Chard
Escarole Turnips (Roots)
Greens (Turnips) Tomatoes
Kale Watercress
Kohl-Rabi






FLORIDA CROPS 45




IMPORTANT CONSTITUENTS AND PROPERTIES OF PLANTS IN
PRIMARY LIST

No. of
Plant* Constituents
1. Oil, sein, bitters ...................................... Diuretic, emmenagogue
2. Methyl Salicylate and derivatives ..-..---..Flavor, antiseptic, analgesic
3. Oil, Resin ------.............-----------.........Internal-stimulant: external-vesicant
4. Oil ....................------- -..............---Internal-stimulant, condiment, diaphor-
etic; external-rebufacient
5. Oil .------------------------------------- -- ..... Anthelmintic, vermifuge
6. Camphor .............------................----- Internal-antiseptic
7. Oil ------------....--------.. ----------. .-- Carminative, stimulant
8. Oil ....-------................------------------..----........... ..Flavor
9. Oil .....--------..---.-- --......-------.........-------... Flavor
10. Oil and atropine ...................------------------Narcotic, anodyne, mydriatic
11. Hairs; oil .....---------..--..--...................----------------------- Absorbent, protective; demulcent
12. Balsam ...........----------- .............. .. ---------------Stimulant, expectorant, diuretic, antiseptic


14. Oil --..---.

15. Thymol ..--.......--
16. Rosin ...--..........----------
Turpentine .----...

17. Resin ----...

18. Amygdalin, emu
prussic acid ....
19. Pelletereine tanr
20. Tannin ---...........
21. Castor oil ----.......
22. Oils, resins, sug
23. Bitters, oil, resii
24. Oil, resin, glucos
25. Vanillin ..--.


Isin, bitters,


ates ...--- ...........




irs ----- ..----
is --.. .----......-----........ ...
ide



. .... .I.


Carminative, flavor
.Antiseptic, anthelmir
.Base in plasters, etc.
.Antiseptic, anthelmi
expectorant, antise
Cathartic, cholagogu.


Pectoral, tonic
.Anthelmintic
.Astringent, diuretic
.Purgative
.Sedative, diuretic
.Anthelmintic
Expectorant, emetic,
.Perfumery, flavor


ic


itic; terpin hydrate,
tic, terebene, inhalant













axative



S. l T -


N0(. 01 rlanI on Irns list corresDonUs Lo Mte one ofl LCe Iollowina rrlmarv List.






46 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

PRIMARY LIST OF MEDICINAL PLANTS GROWING IN FLORIDA

Symbols A, B, C, D, E, F, G after the name of the plant refer to the region of the
State in which this plant occurs, as indicated on the accompanying map (Page 58).

Name of Plant Common Name Locality Official
1. Aristolochia Serpentaria Snake Root D U.S.P.*
2. Betula lenta Sweet birch A U.S.P.
3. Capsicum frutescens Cayenne pepper F, G U.S.P.
4. Brassica nigra Black mustard E U.S.P.
5. Chenopodium ambrosioides
var. anthelminticum American wormseed F, G U.S.P.
6. Cinnamomum camphora Camphor D, E U.S.P.
7. Cinnamomum cassia Cassia cinnamon E U.S.P.
8. Citrus medical, var. Limonum Lemon E, F, G U.S.P.
9. Citrus aurantium Sweet orange D, E, F, G U.S.P.
10. Datura Stramonium Jimson weed E, G U.S.P.
11. Gossypium herbaceum Cotton A, B, C, D U.S.P.
12. Liquidambar styraciflua Sweet gum A, B, C, D, E U.S.P.
13. Mentha spicata Spearmint E U.S.P.
14. Mentha piperita Peppermint E U.S.P.
15. Monarda punctata Horsemint B, C, D, E ---
16. Pinus palustris and other Long leaved pine,
species loblolly pine, etc. A, B, C, D, E U.S.P.
17. Podophyllum peltatum Mandrake D, E U.S.P.
18. Prunus serotina Wild cherry A, B U.S.P.
19. Punica granatum Pomegranate E, F, G U.S.P.
20. Rhus galbra Sumac berries B U.S.P.
21. Ricinus communis Castor bean A, B, D, E U.S.P.
22. Serenoa serrulata Saw palmetto, Sabal A, B, C, D, E N.F.:i:
23. Spigelia marilandica Pink root --------........
24. Stillingia sylvatica Queen's root A, B, D, E N.F.
25. Vanilla planifolia Vanilla bean D, E N.F.
26. Vera aloe

"U.S.P. United States Pharmacopoeia.
iN.F.-National Formulary.






ILA.J~tlflh 'jflvJ


ii a


BD H








I L..









i::r



(Fag. 9) ~Ap of or;d






ijranllh ivir.iN i uI KIfLLLU Uil.


Annona Reticulata (Bullock's Heart)

SECONDARY LIST OF MEDICINAL PLANTS GROWING I'


region of the State in which the plant o

Name of Plant Commo.
1. Amanita muscaria Fly Agari

2. Aletris farinosa Star Gras

3. Apocynum Cannabinum Canadian

4. Aralia spinosa Spignet
5. Asclepias tuberosa Pleurisy r

6. Baptisia tinctoria Wild Ind:
7. Carica papaya Papaya
8. Chionanthus virginica Fringe tr(

9. Cocos nucifera Coco pair

10. Conocarpus erecta Button-wo

11. Cornus Florida Dogwood

12. Cymbopogon citratus Lemon gr

13. Delphininum consolida Larkspur

14. Dioscorea villosa Wild Yam
15. Drosera rotundifolia Sundew

16. Eupatorium perfoliatum Boneset

17. Eryngium aquaticum Water ern
Rnttnn


n Name Official Locality
Antisp;

s N.F. B Uterinm

Hemp N.F. E Diureti

N.F. A,B,C,D,E Stimuli

oot N.F. B,C,D,E, Diapho
igo N.F. Stimuli

E,F,G Digeste
ee N.F. A,B,D Alterat

n E Demul(

od -- Charco

N.F. A.B,C.D Astring

ass B,E Perfum

N.F. B Parasit
I N.F. A,B Diapho
N.F. E Expecti

N.F. B Stimuli

ygo,
snakeroot E Diapho


RIDA

und in the
e Fig. 19).
ies




retic

ioretic

)ectorant




icide


ent


- ...F--- J-1-1- 1AD.CU.".112, ervine






r LUIIUA -lKU)Pb






















Bell Pepper

. Hedeoma pulegoides Pennyroyal E Stimulant, emmenagogue
. Hydrangea arborescens Seven barks N.F. A Diuretic
.Ipomoea pandurata Ipomoea B,D Diuretic. cathartic
. Iris versicolor Blue flag N.F. A,B,C,D,E Cholagogue
. Lobelia cardinalis Cardinal flower B,D,E Anthelmintic
. Marrubium vulgare Horehound Stimulant
. Myrica cerifera Wax Myrtle N.F. A,B,C,D,E Alterative, cholagogue
. Papaver somniferum Opium Poppy U.S.P. A.B,C,D,E Analgesic. somniferent
. Panax quinquefolium Ginseng Stimulant, stomachic
. Phytolacca decandra Pokeroot N.F. B Alterative
. Polygala polygama Bitter Polygala E Tonic, laxative
. Rumex crispus Dock N.F. E Astringent
. Salix nigra Pussy willow U.S.P. Charcoal
. Sambucus canadensis Elder flowers N.F. A,B,D.E.F Carminative, diaphoretic
. Sanguinaria canadensis Blood root N.F. A,B Stimulating expectorant
. Sassafras variifolium Sassafras N.F. A.B,C.D.E Alterative
. Scutellaria lateriafolia Skullcap N.F. E Tonic Nervine
* Senecio aureus Life root plant N.F. E Stimulant, diuretic
. Solanum carolinense Horse nettle berry N.F. B,E Tonic antitetanic
* Tamarindus indica Tamarind N.F. E,F Refrigerant
. Trilisa odoratissima Deer tongue B,D Perfume, flavor
. Ulmus fulva Slippery Elm Bark U.S.P. A Demulcent
. Verbascum Thapsu.s Mullein N.F. B Pectoral. demulcent
. Xanthoxylum Clava-
Hercules Prickly ash N.F. B.C.D,E Alterative, sialogogue






ARTMENT OF AGI


lorida crops can be classified as fruits, vegetables, field crops, berri


con















cert
froi
Flo:
The
a se


From the
!s the folio

I

(


i
P


(
I


From the
ils are not,
South Ar
da and art
e two vari
ious limiti






(
<.


iea tycnee
Cinnamon Citrus
Apricot Rice
Rhubarb Cotton
Buck Wheat Eggplant


Dasheen
Mangosteen
Endive
Barley
Shallot
Fig
Date
English Walnut
WTI.T


Pomegranate Rye
Grape


vision o t forage Lrops and Diseases ot the 5tat(
ng list:

'ce Clover (Alysicarpus vagina
rrowleaf lupine (Lupinus angustifo]
)talaria- (C. spectabilis)
(C. striata)
(C. intermedia)
strian winter field pea (Pisum arvense)
pier grass (Pennisetum purpu
iia grass (Paspalum notatum
itipede grass (Eremochloa ophiu
-a grass (Panicum barbinod
Ilis grass (Paspalum dilatatu

vision of Cereal Crops and Diseases comes the
rive in Florida but that Victory and Bond oats, br
rica and Australia, have "some possibility for
leing used successfully in breeding better oats fo
es are highly resistant to crown rust and smut.,
factor in growing the crop in the State."


ORIGIN OF LEADING WORLD CROP!
EDIBLE INDIGENES OF ASIA

ces Soy Bea
r__ X7__.


ireum )

roides)
e)
m)

suggestion that mi
ought in respective,
use in themselves
r Florida condition:
the first of which



S


n


Li
PE
Ct
Al
01
At
Gi





%LT-~a


I


'OTATO~






IRTMENT OF AGR


CVrn- C T-nT.-rCCv. n-r A -I


toliee
Spinach
Cantaloupe



EDIBLE INDII


Gooseberry Asp


elery
ee
hestnut
ilbert
arrot
ettuce





EANICA


nanana



EDIBLE INDIGENES OF NORTH AMERICA

Sapodilla
Sweet Potato
Chayote
Blueberry


st Indies)
eliciosa (West Indic


s Pepper


cherry


Ca
Ri
K(
Br
Br


Avocado
Allspice
Vanilla


S1omatoes
Peanut
Cocoa
Cassava
fl-. 1







FLORIDA CROPS




VINES FOR SOUTH


COMMON NAME


American Bittersweet

Japanese Evergreen
Bittersweet
Clematis

Purplebell Cobaea

Dutchmans Pipe

Grape (various)

Hall Honeysuckle
Japanese Hop

English Ivy

Japanese or Boston Ivy

Kudzu-vine

Moonflower

Morning-glory

Silverfleece-vine

Trumpet Creeper

Virginia Creeper

Wisteria

Blood-red Begonia

Bougainvillea

Bowervine (Pandorea)

Catsclaw



Climbing Fig

Cup-of-Gold

Distictis

Hardenbergia

Primrose Jasmine

Spanish Jasmine

Star Jasmine

Orange Glory
(Thumbergia)

Paradise-flower

Rosa-de-Montana


HEIGHT FLOWER


10'

15-20'

8-20'

tall

tall

tall

tall
tall

tall

tall

tall

tall

tall

10-20'

tall

tall

tall

tall

tall

10-15'

tall



tall

tall

20'

10-15'

8'

10-15'

10-15'

7-10'

15'

15'


inconspicuous

inconspicuous

white, purple, pink,
red
rosy purple

chocolate, not
showy
inconspicuous

white turns yellow
inconspicuous

inconspicuous

inconspicuous

inconspicuous

white

blue, purple, and
white
white

orange-scarlet

inconspicuous

purple, lavender,
white
blood-red

purple, crimson,
rose
white, purple
blotch
bright yellow



inconspicuous

yellow

purple to white

pea-like, violet

soft yellow

white, very
fragrant
fragrant, white

orange

pale blue

soft rose


METHOD OF
CLIMBING

twining on wir
trellis


rootlets cling to
masonry
twining on trellis

tendrils cling to wire
or trellis
twining on wire

tendrils on trellis

twining
twining on wire

clings by rootlets to
masonry or wood
clings to masonry
or wood
twining

twining on trellis
or wire
twining

twining

ties on stems help it
cling to masonry
tendrils cling to
masonry and wood
twining on trellis

tendrils

must be tied to
supports
twining

twining



clings to masonry

must be tied to
support
tendrils

twining on wire

tie to support

tie to support

twining

twining

twining

tendrils


USES


e or grown for showy orange
fruits


popular hardy evergreen

many kinds grown for ex-
quisite flowers
grown from seeds sown in
pots in March
covers large area quickly

excellent foliage; Crimson
Gloryvine is best
covers unsightliness
very rapid; useful to cover
unsightly places
Baltic Ivy is hardiest form

shining foliage, turns red
and purple in fall
one of the most rapid of
all vines
treated as annual, sown
each year in pots in March
popular annuals sown each
spring
earlier and showier than
Japanese Clematis
gay, large flowers

gorgeous red and yellow in
fall
buy grafted plants to get
bloom on young plants
good on roofs and high
walls
plant newer varieties rather
than old magenta sort
full sun and fertile soil

give full sun; wants to
bloom high up so keep
pruning to make it bloom
low
evergreen, close clinging
foliage
large flowers; will cover a
large area
likes some shade; best in
summer
tiny flowers in great pro-
fusion
prune to keep them from
becoming straggly shrubs
prune to keep them from
becoming straggly shrubs
excellent lustrous foliage;
give a little shade
likes sun; best in spring
and summer
full sun: prune vigorously

flowers look like begonias,
dies to soil each year






















MALA-Coffee,

.VADOR-Coffee


e, bullion, sugar, hen

gold and silver, c(


3zen and cnieoa
t extract, butter:
- F-'- 1--


act, cotton,


mercury,
quen, ixt

Thp









.7.


PEANUT PICKER IN OPERATION


ll-






56 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


URUGUAY-Wool, hides, skins, meat extract, preserved meats, frozen and chille
meats, tallow and beef fat, residuary animal products, wheat, flour, linseed, san
and stone.
VENEZUELA-Petroleum, coffee, gold, cacao, rubber, balata, goat-skins, asphal
cattle hides, live cattle, heron plumes, dividivi, fruits and pearls.



FOODS THE AMERICAS BUY AND SELL
AGRICULTURE IN THE AMERICAS
Published monthly by the Office of Foreign Agricultural Relations of the
United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
By F. H. RAWLS

Latin America is both an important market for the food products of the Unite
States and one of this country's chief suppliers of foodstuffs. The Latin America
Republics sell one kind of food products to the United States, buy another.

In the past 15 years from 20 to 25 percent of all the foods the United Stat(
has sold for export have gone to Latin America. During the war period it has becorr
cven more important as a market for us. There is every prospect-if both North an
South Americans approach the problem with understanding-that its value to Unite
States producers will continue to increase.

T_ lo n -_,, t*-t-l , T -,_; A--t--,,71 0 -..,,1- A-,,]].t -^n;^^ 1.11,,


uUl LtuU uCAUvUILn I
fourth of our total
in food with ever'
separate products.

Of course, it
the chief export c
meat products, cot
Greatest returns to
of United States i
The American wo
best customer.

At the same t
lightly. While in
starch and rolled
and wheat flour, 1
trade in 1940. Sc
recent years have
infants' food, drie'

In foodstuffs
a market for the I
use that we do not
r 11 11 1 ._


atmn America were valued at 04 million do
ipments of food to all countries of the w
ne of the other 20 American Republics,


uld be recognized that Latin America is n
s of the United States, since, in general,
cotton, and tobacco in Latin America fi
lited States farmers will come indirectly t
istry that will result from increased trad
r, steadily employed, has always been t


, our foodstuffs trade with Latin America
ye part it consists of specialty products


oats to chewing gum and
ard, and rice accounted foi


such sta
is of out


'me ot mue most notable increases in expoi
been in soybean oil, malt liquors, milled
d whole milk, yeast, and hops.

trade, Latin America is even more import
Jnited States. It furnishes roughly 50 per(
produce on our own farms, and foodstuffs
Y. _-* A


liars, or well over c
orld. We did busir
selling them some


lot a major market
production of wh
Ils local requireme
through the stimulate
e with Latin Amer
;he American farm


a is not to ie regar
that range from cc
ple products as wt
r Latin American f,


ts to Latin Air
rice, malted n


ant as a source
cent of all the f
account for net










But when you come to analyzing this flow of foodstuffs into
from the forests and fields of its southern neighbors, you quickly (
faults: First, we buy from too few countries; and, second, we pun
modities. In 1939, the last pre-war year, 5 of the 20 Republics an(
sented five-sixths of our food imports from Latin America.

This lack of diversity is no one's fault especially. Other prodl
been available, nor have other Latin American countries been in I
trade. The war and the great concern of all of us for more W


the United State
cover two major
iase too few corn
5 products repre


ats simply haven'
ie market for ou
stern HemisDher,


oti CCtnUlll lol.lll g 1.
Far East have been
of our trade with I
that it is here, we
I


cut on oy tne snipj
.atin America may
'. '. .I


oriner sources oI un
ing shortage caused b)
in a sense have been


Look at it like this. We buy five-sixths of our 1
from Cuba, Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, and Guatemala,
countries that are our best foodstuffs customers are
little of our business and are accordingly hard pressed
they need to continue trading with us.

Five-sixths of our food budget in Latin America is
bananas, cocoa beans, and canned beef.



MINERAL PRODUCTS-STATES THI
(Data from the U. S. Bureau of


MINERAL CHIEF STATES MINER
Aluminum ......................------ N.Y., N.C., Tenn. Magnesite (er
Antimony ore ............. Idaho Magnesium -_
Arsenious oxide .............. Nev., Utah, Mont., S.D. Magnesium ch
Asbestos ........................ Md., Cal., Ga., Ariz. Magnesium su
Asphalt .......................... Cal., Tex., Ill., Ky., Utah, Manganese or.
Okla. Manganiferous
Barytex (crude) ............ Ga., Mo., Tenn., Va. Manganiferous
Bauxite ...........................- Ark., Ga., Tenn., Ala. Mica .............
Borates .......................... Cal., Nev. Millstones ....
Bromine ....................... Mich., W.Va., Ohio Mineral paints
Cadmium ........................ Not separable by States Mineral water
Calcium magnes chloride Mich., W.Va., Ohio Natural gas ...
Cement ............................ Pa., Cal., Ind., Mich. Natural gas g
Chromite ........................ Md., Cal., Ore. Oilstones, etc.
Clay products ................ Ohio, Pa., N.J., Ill. Peat ..............
Clay, raw ....................... Petroleum ....
Coal: N.J., Pa., Mo., Ga. Phosphate roc
Bituminous ................ Pa., W.Va., Ill., Ky. Platinum & all
Anthracite ................ Pa. Potash (K20)
Coke .............................. Pa., Ind., Ohio, Ill., Ala. Pumice
Copper ............-......- .... Ariz., Mont., Utah, M ich. Pyrites .........
Diatomaceous Earth ...... Cal., Okla., Ill., Mo. Quicksilver
Emery ............................ Va., N.Y. Salt ............
Feldspar (crude) ........... N.C., Me., N.H., N.Y. Sand and grav(
Ferroalloys .................... Pa.. N.Y., Md., Ohio Sand lime brie
Fluospar .................-- Ill., Ky., Col., N.M. Silicia (quartz
Fuller's earth ................ Fla.. Ga., Tex., Ill. Silver
Garnet, abrasive ............ N.Y., N.H., N.C. Slver ------
Gold .............................. Cal., Col., S.D., Alaska Slate
Graphite .......- ............ Ala., Tex., R.I., Mich. Stone


ron, pig ---- .
.ead --....
,ime ......


Ill., Ind., Ala.
o, Utah, Okla.
Mass.. Mo.


tea rates supply in tne
the war. Diversification
forced upon us, but now
vantage of all countries


American food products
t order. Yet among the
which enjoy relatively
id the foreign exchange


OM




IIEF STATES
Vash.
%Mich.
Cal.
Wash., Cal.
Ark., Va., Col.
Wis., Mich., Cc
NT.H., N.M., Va
Va., N.C., N.H.
I., Col., Ohio
N.Y., Cal., Me.
Pa., Okla., C.
Cal., Tex., W.V
nd., Ohio, N.H.
J., Cal., Ind.
Cal., Tex., Art
enn., Idaho, Ky
re., Alaska, Uta
Id., Pa., Ind.
Nieb., Cal., Utal
a., N.Y., Wis.
ex., Nev., Ore.
N.Y., Ohio, Kai
Y., Ind., Mich.
Mass., Wis., N.
dd., Cal., Nev.
Month Nev., Ida
t., N.Y., Me.
d., Ohio, N.Y.
,a., Nev., Utah
Ia., Vt., Cal.
a.
'al., Col., S.D.
Col.
Kan., N.J., Mor


---------







58 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE



AREA AND POPULATION OF FLORIDA BY COUNTIES

SHOWING TOTAL AND RURAL POPULATION

PER SQUARE MILE



(Note--lIn this table all incorporated towns are classed as urban.)



Total Rural
Area Total Population Rural Population
COUNTIES Square Mile Population per Sq. Mile Population per Sq. Mile
1945 1945 1945 1945 1945

Total for State ................----------.......... 54,861 2,250,061 41.01 813,635 14.7


Alachua ............ ................................ 906 38,245 42.2 16,990 18.7
Baker .........5.....-------------- .......... 593 6,326 10.6 5,044 8.5
Bay ......................................................... 781 43,188 55.2 16,973 21.7
Bradford ................................... 291 10,730 36.8 7,649 26.2
Brevard .......................... 1,026 19,339 18.8 5,172 5.0
Broward ..... ............................. 1,212 50,442 41.6 6,984 5.7
Calhoun .................................................. 531 8,225 15.4 6,203 11.6
Charlotte ....................... .................... 697 4,220 6.0 2,136 3.0
Citrus ...................................................... 620 5,427 8.7 3,247 5.2
Clay ......... ............................ 615 10,038 16.3 5,917 9.6
Collier ............................... --------- 2,042 4.957 2.4 3,352 1.6
Colum bia .. ............................................ 792 17,139 21.6 10,532 13.2
D ade .......................................... .............. 2,019 315,138 156.0 56,963 28.2
De Soto .................................................... 640 6,854 10.7 2,398 3.7
D ixie .................. .......................... 710 4,926 7.0 3,107 4.3
Duval ...................................................... 782 273,843 362.9 58,290 74.4
Escambia ................................................ 657 105,26.2 160.2 61,968 94.3
Flagler ..... ............ ....................... 491 2,652 5.4 1,452 2.9
Franklin .................................................. 541 8,026 14.8 1,856 3.4
Gadsden 5................................ ... 40 992 57.3 16,464 30.4
Gilehrist .................................................. 351 3,466 9.8 2,571 7.3
Glades ............................................. 764 2,281 2.9 1,682 2.2
G ulf ............................. .............. ....... 558 7,010 13.2 3,404 6.1
Ham ilton ..................................... ...... 528 8,731 16.5 5,886 11.1
H ardee ....... ........................................ 632 8,585 13.5 4,695 7.4
H endry .................................................... 1,171 5,066 4.3 2,301 1.9
H ernando ................................................ 497 5,672 11.4 3,917 7.8
Highlands .. .......................... ........... 1,021 16,220 15.8 5,602 5.4
Hillsborough ..................................... 1,036 207,844 200.6 73,725 71.1
Holmes .................................................... 473 14,627 30.9 12,165 25.6
Indian River .......................................... 497 9,079 18.2 3,812 7.6
Jackson ................................................. 939 34,509 36.7 24,720 26.3
Jefferson ................................................ 530 11,066 20.8 8,788 16.5
Lafayette ............................................... 553 3,995 7.2 3,118 5.6
Lake ...................................................... 1,047 27,946 26.6 9,826 9.3
Lee .......................................................... 818 23.593 28.8 7,404 9.1
Leon ........................................................ 715 35,451 49.5 17,346 24.2
Levy ........................................................ 1,148 9,902 8.8 5,905 5.1
Liberty ......... ................................ 823 3,193 3.8 3,193 3.8
M adison .. ............................................... 774 15,537 20.0 11,644 15.3
Manatee ......... ......................... 823 26,803 32.5 10,891 13.2
Marion .. .................................. 1,647 35,132 21.3 21,973 13.3
Martin ................................................... 598 6,094 10.3 3,578 5.9
M onroe .................................................... 1,100 19,018 17.2 4,772 4.3
N assau ................................................... 630 10,859 17.2 6,421 10.2
Oklaoosa .............. ........................... 956 16,1655 16.7 7,910 8.2
Okeechobee ............................................ 747 2,919 3.9 1,484 1.9
Orange .................................................... 929 86,782 98.4 26,219 28.2
Osceola ...................... ............................ 1,356 10,562 7.8 5,350 3.9
Palm Beach ...............1 ......................... 1,940 112,311 57.8 38,576 19.8
Pasco ...................................................... 767 13,729 17.8 8,146 10.6
Pinellas ............................................... 293 130,268 444.6 16,434 56.0
Polk . .............................................. 1,907 112,429 58.9 40,081 21.0
Putnam ............... ..................................... 752 17,837 23.7 9,008 11.9
St. Johns ................................................ 608 21,596 35.5 8,020 13.1
St. Lucie .................................................. 580 12,958 22.3 3,476 5.9'
Santa Rosa ..................... .................... 1,025 16,986 16.7 13,828 12.5
Sarasota .................................................. 514 19,202 37.3 4,501 8.7
Sem inole ...................... ....................... 321 24,660 67.0 9,854 30.6
Sum ter .................................................... 583 10,417 17.8 5,331 9.1
Suwannee ................................................ 692 17,602 25.4 12,865 18.5
Taylor .................................................... 1,045 10.738 10.2 7,139 6.8
U nion .................................................... 248 6,051 24.3 5,046 20.3
Volusia ........................................ 1,123 58,492 52.0 13,359 11.8
Wakulla ...................................... .. 602 5,059 8.4 5,059 8.4
W alton .................................................... 1,095 13.871 12.6 11,247 10.2
W ashington ........................................... 620 11,889 19.1 8,676 13.9




























































',569 5,248














U. S. FARM CENSUS 1945




Farms, Acreage and Land Area

..... ............. ....................................num ber....

land area .................................................................................. acres....
on in farms ....................................... ...... ........... percent
s ..................................................................................................... .. acres....
by operator .................................. .................................................acres..
iy operator ........................................................................................acres....

of farm ...................................................................................... acres ....

is according to use:
Sharvested ..........--................................... ...farms reporting....
acres...

ms reporting by acres harvested:
1 to 9 acres ........................---................ ...... --- ..... number....
10 to 19 acres ..................................... .. ... ....- num ber....
20 to 29 acres ..................................... ...... ...... ...... num ber....
30 to 49 acres ....................................... ........................... number.
0 to 99 acres ...................................... .......----....... number....
)0 to 199 acres ............--- ................. ....... .................number.
)0 acres and over ----............................ ..-- --- .....number....
200 to 499 acres ................................--.......... number...
500 to 999 acres ..................................------.. .. number....
1,000 acres and over ......... ---..................--.......... ...number..
ilure .........................-....-.......-------..-..- ... .......farm s reporting....
acres....
d idle or fallow ......................................--- .............. farms reporting....







FLORIDA CROPS




U. S. FARM CENSUS 1945-Conttinued




Value of Farm Property


Value of farms (land and buildings)
Average per farm:
All farm s .................................
Farms of 30 acres and over -
Average per acre, all farms ..........

Value of implements and machinery .


.......................................... dollars..

-.......--..--..... ..... .......... .......dollars..
.......... .................................. dollars..
............................................... dollars..

..................................farm s reporting..
dollars..


Farms reporting by value of implements and machinery:
$1 to $99 ......... .. ..... ... .. .................... ............... n. .... num ber. -
$1 to $49 ................. --.................................................... ............. num ber..
$50 to $99 ....................................... -.......number...
$100 to $249 ...---..............................----. ..................................... number...
$250 to $499 ........ --................................ ................................... num ber
$500 to $749 ..................---- .....................---- ..-- ...... number...
$750 to $999 ................--- ........................ ... ... .....--- ........ num ber
$1,000 to $2,499 ....................................... -- .--- ......... number..
$1,000 to $1,499 .......................--........... ----- ... number
$1,500 to $2,499 --. ..........-- ....... ................ ...................... number...
$2,500 and over .........--....................... .... .-- .....--number
$2,500 to $4,999 ....-----....- ...----..--.. ........................... number-.-
$5,000 to $9,999 ......... ............. ...... ....... ................. num ber...
$10,000 and over ............................. . .... .... ...... ........ ....... ... ....... num ber

Value of livestock on farm s .................. ....................................... dollars


Farm Dwellings and Population


Dwellings on farms ............

Occupied .......................

Unoccupied ............---....


Occupied dwellings on farms with 2 or more occupied
dwellings ................................ ...... ........... ..... ......... fa

Farm population (persons living in occupied dwellings on farms)
Average per occupied dwelling ...................................
Under 14 years old ........................................ -------.............
Boys .... -------................... .. .. ----... ... ............
Girls ........ .......................-- ......-- ..-- ---
14 years old and over ........................................ --- .....--
M en and boys ........................................ ....................
W omen and girls ........................................
For farms with 2 or more occupied dwellings ..........................
Average per occupied dwelling .............................------...........--
Under 14 years old .............................................................
Boys ---. -------.------ -- ............
Girls ...................------ ----- ..................
14 years old and over ..........................- ... ........- ....--- ... -- -
M en and boys ....................................... --- ........
Women and girls -----........................................


.............................. farms reporting ....
number....
...................-- .... farms reporting....
number....
....... .......................farms reporting....
number....


rms reporting....
number....
.......persons....
..- ...-persons ...
.......-. persons....
..........persons....
......... persons...
........ persons....
..........persons....
.......persons....
..........persons....
..........persons....
..........persons..
..........persons....
.........persons....
..........persons....
..........persons.
......... persons...


498,399,612

8,149
11,469
38.09

44,082
36,675,961


15,670
9,355
6,315
9,589
4,605
3,818
1,491
5,772
2,764
3,008
3,137
1,930
748
459

67,956,078



55,480
76,558
54,239
67,415
6,236
9,143

6,563
19,739
244,336
3.62
81,245
41,507
39,738
163,091
79,660
83,431
61,602
3.12
20,094
10,226
9,868
41,508
20,534
20,974


Census
of
1945
(Jan. 1)








































































inner..






FLORIDA CROPS


Estimate
of Citrus
Season Boxes Canned


886-87 1,260,000 ...........
893-94 5,055,307 ....................................................................................... ... .......


iU7,iJ-,U .I ,1VV DeLweell 10j-yuo anu I_1J-,o
1902-03 1,147,491 the U. S. Thermometer registered
1915-16 8,330,045 Lower than 27 deg. six times in Kissimmee
1916-17 7,648,995 Freeze Feb. 3rd ...........................................
1917-18 5,581,610 Jan. 5, 1918 ............................ ..... ...............
1918-19 8,770,610 None H hurricane ................................................
1925-26 13,781,660 None Hurricane ................................................
1926-27 16,605,168 Freeze Jan. 12 .................................................................
1927-28 14,435,360 No record Hurricane Sept. ........................................
1928-29 24,422,280 M edfly ...... ...........................................................
1929-30 14,314,600 N one ......... .............................................................
1930-31 29,869,945 N one ............................................................................
1931-32 21,439,685 N one ............................................................... .
1932-33 23,186,930 N one .... .............................................. .
1933-34 24,135,890 N one ......... ...................................................... ...........
1934-35 24,488,921 Freeze Dec. llth, Hurricane Oct ...................................
1935-36 23,002,052 N one ...... ............................................................. .. ........
1936-37 30,774,852 Freeze Dec. 7th ........................................
1937-38 31,584,937 Freeze Jan. 27th ................................
1938-39 42,133,127 Freeze Jan. 20th ............................
1939-40 28,074,986 Freeze Jan. 28th ......................................
1940-41 34,507,849 Freeze Nov. 14th ...............................
1941-42 31,477,148 N one ..................................................................................
1942-43 41,582,596 Freeze Feb. 15th and 16th and light freeze Feb. 28th
and March 4th ........................................................
1943-44 43,208,560 .......................................................... .. ...... .....
1944-45 35,524,200 None-Hurricane Oct. ...............................................
1945-46 42,680,517 None-Hurricane Sept .....................................................
1946-47 42,020,625 Freeze Feb. 6th, 10th and 1lth-Hurricane Oct .........
1947-48 36,338,040 Freeze Jan. 15th ......................................
1948-49 43,807,124 None, Hurricane Aug ................
1949-50 94,000,000 N one ...............................................................................

Ch



FLORIDA CANNED CITRUS PACK, 1949-1950 Sl

Numbe
G rapefruit sections ..--.- ..- ..------ --- --......... -................................
G rapefruit juice -...- ....---- ------ .. .....--- -----------..... --................
O range sections --- ........--. .---------. .- --.. -----.......................
O range juice .....--- -..- -....- .. ---................... .................................
T angerine juice -.- ...- ..- ....... ..------. ------- ---... --.. ---------........................
B len ded juices ---------..... ... . ... .. ...... .... ....... -........................
C itru s salad ..- ..----- .. -- ..--------- ...........................................
Total -........-------------....-......................
Field boxes of fruit consumed in above pack: grapefruit 11,510,458; orat
tangerines 1,485,366.
XTZ n_'. T)- f-- -4--t, ,, ,,..1, 1 ~,,


........... 600,000
........... 1,527,320
........... 1,710,000
... ..... 2,954,056
966,533
........... 2,800,000
2,667,000
.......... 5,781,933
3,900,000
.......... 7,305,512
.......... 6,848,496
.......... 9,582,037
.......... 12,970,408
.......... 17,812,227
14,399,844

.......... 24,022,299
......... 31,456,480
.......... 29,493,000
.......... 41,871,161
.......... 36,620,582
.......... 50,413,431
.......... 44,117,850
60,000,000

is. A. Garrett
eb. 13, 1950


,ASON

So Cases (24/2)
3,379,357
7,894,334
10,074
17,419,271
1,489,471
7,066,956
422,694
37,682,130





FLORIDA CROPS


FLORIDA STATISTICS


ACRES IN STATE ........................................
A CRES IN CROPS -..........- ...- ..------.......... ....
CULTIVATED ACRES IN PASTURE .................
ACRES IN TIMBER AND OPEN RANGE -.....--
ACRES IN WATER AND WASTE LAND .........


Leading Tax-Income Items of the State of Florida:


Gasoline .......
Beverage .......
Sales Tax ....
Cigarettes ..
Racing .........
License Tags .


1950
.............................. $50,836,322
.---.- ...- ....-...- 23,830,159
......--...--.......--............ 23,569,081
-- ......... 15,180,236
......................------........ 13,191,749
...........--................... 19,763,079


There is no state bonded debt
No state tax on land
No state income tax
No poll tax
No tax on homesteads up to value of $5,000
Partial sales tax


Total income all sources .
Tourists ............................
Basic Resources .........-- ..


1950
...... $2,570,000,000
...... 750,000,000
...... 1,820,000,000


Fish:


Total catch of food fish
Non-food fish .........---
Value


1950
..... 91,825,097 LB.
..... 50,588,237 LB.
.... $35.000.000


----.........- 35,000,000
.-...-.- ... 3,000,000
............. 4,000,000
.....-..-.. 22,000,000
............. 5,000.00()






DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


ESTIMATED BEARING AND NON-BEARING ORANGE TREES
PLANTED IN FLORIDA FOR COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION,
BY COUNTIES, (1948) 1*


ORANGES
Early and Midseason
Bearing Non-Bearing


COUNTY


Alachua .......
Brevard .......
Broward .......
Charlotte .....
Citrus ...........
Dade .............
De Soto .......
Hardee .........
Hendry .......
Hernando ...
Highlands .
Hillsborough
Indian River
Lake ............
Lee ...............
Manatee .......
Marion ........
Martin ......
Orange .........
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco ......
Pinellas .......
Polk ............
Putnam .......
Sarasota .......
Seminole .....
St. Lucie .....
Sumter .........
Volusia .......
Other Counti


1,000
37,000
30,000
4,000
4,000
11,000
17,000
37,000
2*'*
7,000
81,000
94,000
27,000
178,000
8,000
12,000
18,000
4,000
273,000
15,000
13,000
37,000
23,000
347,000
8,000
4,000
22,000
163,000

20,000
8.000


10,537,000 1,503,000


ORANGES
Late
Bearing Non-Bearing


3,000
249,000
215,000
14,000
5,000
67,000
123,000
189,000
30,000
32,000
426,000
399,000
234,000
712,000
102,000
128,000
56,000
9,000
991,000
70,000
55,000
305,000
238,000
2,174,000
43,000
91,000
100,000
369,000
9,000
230,000
28,000

7,696,000


1,000
18,000
47,000
3,000
260
6,000
16,000
19,000
5,000
2,000
65,000
60,000
18,000
98,000
5,000
8,000
9,000
1,000
191,000
7,000
6,000
86,000
17,000
251,000
2,000
2,000
9,000
63,000
2*"
10,000
9.000


1,034,000 20,770,000


1' Plantings for 1946-47 and 1947-48 preliminary
2** Less than 500
Compiled from State Plant Board records (f movement of trees out of nurseries 1!V28-29 through
1947-48, adjusted for replacements by Bureau of Agricultural Economics, University of Florida; with
allowances made for trees planted prior to 1928-29, based on Florida Citrus Tree Survey, U.S.D.A. 1934.


-.-.....-...... 46,000
-.-..- ........ 496,000
................. 57,000
................ 33,000
................. 38,000
--...-.--.......- 29,000
................. 305,000
................. 436,000
................. 23,000
-...-.-........- 58,000
................. 231,000
................ 564,000
--...-.-....- 221,000
.. .. ..... 1,329,000
-.........-.-.- 84,000
--....--...- .. 133,000
....-..-....- .- 590,000
....-. ........ 48,000
.-..-..-.-......- 1,708,000
.-.-...-....- .... 160,000
................ 32,000
................. 310,000
................ 216,000
................. 1,838,000
.-.-.-.-. ..-.- 232,000
.......... ..... 61,000
................. 353,000
................. 275,000
................. 59,000
-........- 543,000
es ............ 29,000


STATE TOTAL


TOTAL
ORANGES



51,000
800,000
349,000
54,000
47,000
113,000
461,000
681,000
58,000
99,000
803,000
1,117,000
500,000
2,317,000
199,000
281,000
673,000
62,000
3,163,000
252,000
106,000
738,000
494,000
4,610,000
285,000
158,000
484,000
870,000
68,000
803,000
74.000












ESTIMATED BEARII
PLANTED IN FLU
]


GRAP
Sq,


uuu 'fUUUU laq


A CROPS












ESTIMATED BEARING AND NON-BEARING TANGERINE TREES
PLANTED IN FLORIDA FOR COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION,
BY COUNTIES, (1948) 1*


TANGERINES TANGERINES
COUNTY Bearing Non-Bearing


Alachua ........................ 5,000 2.' 5,000
Brevard ......................- 32,000 2" 32,000
Broward ........................ 5,000 1,000 6,000
Charlotte ...................... 2 22: 2"*
Citrus ............................ 4,000 2"- 4,000
Dade ........................... 11,000 2,000 13,000
De Soto ........................ 38,000 2;::" 38,000
Hardee .......................... 46,000 2 46,000
Hendry ........................ 1,000 2 1,000
Hernando .................... 60,000 2 .. 60,000
Highlands .................... 51,000 3,000 54,000
Hillshorough .............. 77,000 3,000 80,000
Indian River .............. 27,000 2V- 27,000
Lake .............................. 154,000 3,000 157,000
Lee ...................--------....... 6,000 2" 6,000
Manatee ........................ 7,000 2*' 7.000
Marion .........................---. 45,000 2:" 45,000
Martin .......................... 2,000 2* 2.000
Orange ........................ 200,000 8,000 208,000


Usceola ...........
Palm Beach ...
Pasco ...............
Pinellas ...........
Polk .................
Putnam ...........
Sarasota .........
Seminole .........
St. Lucie .......
Sumter .............
Volusia ....


............. LO,UI u zt,UUU
............. 8,000 2': 8,000
............. 32,000 3,000 35,000
............. 38,000 1,000 39,000
............. 350,000 4,000 354,000
............. 40,000 2... 40,000
............. 2,000 2': 2,000
............. 54,000 1,000 55,000
............. 54,000 2":::: 54,000
............. 3000 22 :;:: 3,000
........ 154.000 1.000 155.000


OR \NGE
GRAPEFRUIT anm
TANGERINE TREI


59,000
1,060.000
389,000
70.000
56,000
234,000
593,000
783,000
72.000
183.000
1,205.000
1,421.000
1,152.000
3,104,000
346.000
583.000
777.000
85.000
3,725.000
326.000
148.000
925.000
1,022.000
6,863.,000
350,000
226,000
588,000
1,407,000
75,000
1,053,000




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