Group Title: Bulletin
Title: Florida crops
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088901/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida crops what and when to plant
Alternate Title: New series bulletin - Florida State Department of Agriculture ; 1
Physical Description: 79 p., 3 leaves of plates : ill. (some col.), map ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Brooks, T. J ( Thomas Joseph ), b. 1870
Publisher: State of Florida, Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Fla.
Publication Date: September, 1951
Copyright Date: 1951
 Subjects
Subject: Crops -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Horticulture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Vegetable gardening -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by T.J. Brooks.
General Note: "September, 1951."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00088901
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AMR5648
oclc - 44069540
alephbibnum - 002549451

Full Text








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bulletin No. 1 New Series September, 1951


FLORIDA CROPS





W, t and WAwz.

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By T. J. BROOKS











STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA


NATHAN MAYO, Commissioner


bulletin No. 1


New Series


September, 1951


















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SHADE TOBACCO








FLORIDA CROPS

WHAT AND WHEN TO PLANT



SEASONS OF BEARING
The harvesting seasons for the various crops vary so greatly owing to
varying seasons as to temperature and rainfall that no definite length of
harvesting dates can be given. The same crop will last much longer when
planted on different dates. Different varieties of the same crop differ as
to length of gathering days. Bunch beans do not bear as long as pole
beans, and pole butter beans bear longest of all.
It will be noted that the number of days from planting to maturity
varies much more in some crops than in others. Weather and soil con-
ditions are the cause in the main of these variations.

CROPS GROWN IN NORTH FLORIDA, WHEN PLANTED
AND HARVESTED
SNorth Florida comprises Alachua, Baker, Bay, Bradford, Calhoun, Clay,
olumbia, Dixie, Duval, Escambia, Franklin, Flagler, Gadsden, Gilchrist,
Gulf, Hamilton, Holmes, Jackson, Jefferson, Lafayette, Leon, Liberty, Mad-
son, Nassau, Okaloosa, Putnam, Santa Rosa, St. Johns, Suwannee, Taylor,
union, Walton, Washington, Wakulla Counties. Area, 14,414,560 acres.
^ The number after crop indicates the number of days required to reach
Edible maturity, or gathering maturity if non-edible.

SVegetables When Planted When Harvested
EANS............... ..... Mar., April, May, Aug., Sept............. 65
BEETS ....... ...... Feb., Mar., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov ........ 60
BRUSSELS SPROUTS......... Jan., Feb., Sept., Oct., Nov.............. 90 to 120
CABBAGE ................... Oct. to Feb ........................... 65 to 80
CARROTS.................... Feb., Mar............................. 100
CASSAVA................... Mar., April-a root crop. No definite har-
vest date......... .... ............ 180
CAULIFLOWER .............. Jan., Sept., Oct.......... .. . .. ......... 55
COLLARDS. .................. Jan., Feb., Mar., Nov........... ... ... 85
CUCUMBERS ................ Feb., Mar., April........................ 64
EGGPLANT. ................. Feb., Mar., April, July, Aug ............. 84
IRISH POTATOES ........... Jan., Feb., Mar., April, Aug., Sept.,Oct.... 100 to 120
KALE ................. .... Mar., Sept., Oct., Nov .................. 90 to 120
KERSHAW ................... Mar., April ............................ 150 to 180
KOHL-RABI .................. Mar., April, Aug........ ............. 60 to 80
LEEK .................. ... Jan., Feb., Sept., Oct........... ..... 100 to 115
LETTUCE................... Jan., Feb., Sept., Oct., Nov., Dec......... 75 to 83
MUSTARD ................... Sept., Oct., Feb., Mar .................. 30
OKRA ....................... Mar., April, May, Aug ................. 60
ONIONS. .................... Jan., Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov., Dec.... 100
PARSLEY ................... Feb., Mar., April....................... 40 to 80
PARSNIPS ................... Feb., Mar., April, Oct., Nov............. 125 to 160
PEAS (English)................ Sept., Oct., Feb ....................... 45





4 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Vegetables When Planted
RADISHES................... Jan., Feb., Mar., April, Sept., Oct., Nov.,
Dec...............................
RUTABAGA ................. Feb., Mar., April, Aug., Sept., Oct........
SPINACH ................... Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct ..................
SQUASH ..................... Mar., April, May, Aug .................
SWEET POTATOES........... April, May, June ......................
TURNIPS. .................... Jan., Feb., Mar., April, Aug., Sept., Oct...
TOMATOES .................. Mar., April, May, June, July, Aug........


Fruits
PEACH ...................... Jan., Feb.
PEAR ..................... .
PLUM ..................... .
PERSIMMON................. "
FIG .................. ... . "
SATSUMA ....................
WATERMELON .............. Mar., Apr.
GRAPES..................... "
CANTALOUPES.............. "


When Planted
. .. . . .. .. . .. .. .
. . . . .. . . . . .. .
. . . . .. .. . .. . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . .. . . . . .
.. . . . . . . . . . .
. . .. .. . . . . .. .
. . . . . . . . . ..


When Harvested


27
50 to 80
50 to 60
60 to 80
100
45
73 to 82


When Harvested
2 to 3 years
3 to 4 years
3 to 4 years
3 to 4 years
2 to 4 years
3 to 5 years
83 to 93 days
1 to 2 years
85 days


Field Crops
CORN ....................... Feb., Mar., April .....................
COTTON ..................... Mar., April ..........................
PEANUTS. ..................... Mar., April, May, June, July ............
SUGARCANE ................ Feb., Mar .............................
HAY. ........................
TOBACCO. ................. Mar., April ............................
JAPAN CLOVER.............. May, June, July......................
CARPET GRASS.............. Mar. to July ............... ..........
VELVET BEANS.............. Mar., April, May......................
RYE......................... Jan., Feb., Oct., Nov., Dec...............
RAPE ................... .... Jan., Feb., Oct., Nov., Dec...............
SORGHUM.................. Mar., April, May, June .................
VETCH ...................... Oct., Nov., Dec ........................
COWPEAS ................... Mar. to July .......................
BEGGARWEED ..............May to July................... .......
KUDZU ................... .. Dec., Jan., Feb.. ....................
CROTALARIA ................ May, June ................. ......
BERMUDA GRASS ........... Mar., April, May, June, July ............
SOY BEANS.................. Mar., April, May.................. ....


Berries
BLUEBERRIES..............Dec. to Mar ..........................
BLACKBERRIES ............ Jan., Feb., Mar......................
DEWBERRIES ............... Jan., Feb., Mar.......................
STRAWBERRIES ............ May and June, Sept. and Oct............
YOUNG BERRIES......... .. Nov. to May .........................


Nuts
PECANS ......................Dec. to Feb ............................
TUNG NUT.................. Dec. to Feb...........................


Days
75 to 90
180
120 to 150
210

100 to 120






160

90 to 120





90 to 100



2 to 3 years
1 to 2 years
1 to 2 years
Mar. to June
1 to 2 years



4 to 6 years
4 to 6 years










































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IRISH POTATOES


RCuM






FLORIDA CROPS


CROPS GROWN IN CENTRAL FLORIDA, WHEN PLANTED
AND HARVESTED:

Central Florida comprises Brevard, Citrus, Hernando, Hillsborough,
4ake, Levy, Marion, Orange, Osceola, Pasco, Pinellas, Polk, Seminole,
;umter, Volusia Counties. Area, 9,164,800 acres.

The number after each crop indicates the number of days required to
'each edible maturity, or gathering maturity if non-edible.


Vegetables When Planted
RUSSELS SPROUTS......... Jan., Feb., Mar., Sept., Oct., Nov.........
EANS.................... .. Feb., M ar., Sept....... ......... ....
EETS .......... ... ...... Jan., Feb., Mar., Sept., Oct., Nov ........
ABBAGE ................... Jan., Feb., Oct., Nov., Dec...............
ANTALOUPES .............. Feb., Mar.........................
ASSAVA .................... M ar., April ............................
AULIFLOWER ............. Jan. (seed); Mar., June (seed); July, Aug.,
Sept., Oct ...........................
UCUM BER .................. Sept. to M ar ..........................
.OLLARDS ................. Jan., Feb., Mar., April, May, Aug., Sept.,
Nov., Dec................ .........
'ELERY ..................... June (seed); July (seed); Sept. to Feb.... .
:ASHEENS.................. Mar., April.............. .........
,GGPLANT ................. Jan., Feb. (spring crop); July, (fall crop)..
;SCAROLE ................... Oct. to Feb.................... .......
NGLISH PEAS.............. Sept. to Mar ............... .......
RISH POTATOES ........... Sept. (fall crop); Nov. to Mar.,
(spring crop) .........................
.OHL-RABI .................. Mar., April, Aug ............. ......
:ALE ........................ Feb., Mar., Aug., Sept. Oct., Nov., Dec ..
EEK ........................ Jan., Feb., Mar., Sept., Oct., Dec.........
ETTUCE.................... Jan., Feb., Sept., Oct., Nov., Dec.........
IUSTARD ................... Jan., Feb., Mar., April, Aug., Sept., Oct..
Nov .... ........................
NIONS. .................... Jan., Feb., Mar., April, Aug., Sept., Oct.,
Nov..............................
KRA........................ Feb., Mar ................ .........
ARSLEY. ................. Feb., Mar., April, June, July............
ARSNIPS. .................. Feb., Mar., April, Sept., Oct., Nov.. .
UMPKINS.................. May. June, July ....................
EPPERS ................... Jan.. Feb.. Mar. (spring crop); July to
Oct. (fall crop) ................ ... .
ADISHES................... Jan., Feb., Mar., April, Sept., Oct... ...
UTABAGAS ................Feb, Mar., Sept. to Dec........ ..
OMATOES ................. Sept. to Mar., July............... .
URNIPS.................... Jan.. Feb., Mar., April, Aug., Sept,
N ov., D ec.......................


When Harvested
90 to 120
65
60
65 to 80
85
100 to 200

55
64

85
120 to 150

84
50 to 60
62

100 to 120
60 to 80
90 to 120
100 to 115
75 to 83



100
40
40 to 80
125 to 160
150 to 180

100 to 140,
28
50 to 80
73 to 82































44





4S




pp, V


*1 -


~K4.


PRODUCTS OF NORTH FLORIDA






FLORIDA CROPS


Fruits When Planted
ORANGES .................... Dec., Jan., Feb.
TANGERINES ................
GRAPEFRUIT................ ,
LEMONS. ..................... i i
LIMES. .................. .... "
MANGOES ................... Sept. and Oct....
AVOCADOS .................. Sept. and Oct....
WATERMELONS ............ Jan. to March...
PAPAYA .....................Feb. to June.....
GUAVAS .................. ..Oct., Nov.. Feb...
CANTALOUPES ............. Feb. to Mar......
GRAPES......................Jan. and Feb.....


Years to Production
.. 4to 6
.. 4to 6
4 to 6
3 to 5
3 to 5
.. 4to 6
.4 to 6

12 to 15 mos.
2 to 4 yrs

to 2yrs......


Berries
STRAWBERRIES. ............ May and June, Sept. and Oct............

Field Crops
COTTON .................. . Feb., M ar., April .......................
CORN ....................... Jan. (early); Feb., Mar., April...........
OATS ........................ Jan., Nov., Dec ........................
SUGARCANE ................. Jan. and Feb.......................
HAY (Native) .......... .. .... ............. ........ ........
CH UFAS .................. M ar., April, M ay............ ........
COW PEAS ................... April to July ...........................
SORGHUM ................ .. April, May, June. ................... ..
PEANUTS. ................... April, May, June... . ............
VELVET BEANS ........... .. Mar., April, May ......................
TOBACCO .................... M ar., April................. .........
SOY BEANS .................. M ar., April, M ay............. ........
RYE ................... ..... Jan., Feb., Oct. to Dec..................
RAPE ....................... Jan., Feb., Oct. to Dec .................
VET CH ................... ... Oct. to Jan............................
BEGGARWEED .............. April, May, June.....................
K UD ZU ...................... N ov., D ec., Jan......................
NAPIER GRASS.............. Jan. to Mar ..........................
MEEKER GRASS............. Jan. to Mar .........................
BERMUDA GRASS ........... Mar., April, May, June, July, Aug.,
Sept., Oct....... ...............


Nuts
TUNG NUT .................. Dec., Jan., Feb.....
PECANS ................... Dec. and Jan.......


4 to 6 years
4 to 6 years


When Harvested
October to June
October to March
October to May
Depends on Variety
Depends on Variety
June, July
July to January
83to 93


85
June and July


December to April


150 to 180
75 to 90

October and Nov.
July and August
Oct., Nov., Dec.

July, Aug., Sept.
July, Aug., Sept.
Sept., Oct., Nov.
June, July
90 to 100


October and Nov.
October and Nov.




















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FLORIDA CROPS 11



CROPS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA, WHEN PLANTED
AND HARVESTED:

South Florida comprises Broward, Charlotte, Collier, Dade, DeSoto,
Glades, Hardee, Hendry, Highlands, Indian River, Lee, Manatee, Martin,
Monroe, Okeechobee, Palm Beach, Sarasota, St. Lucie. Area, 11,376,680
acres.


Vegetables When Planted
BEANS................. . Sept. to April; June, butter beans ........
BEETS .............. ..... Jan., Feb., Mar., Sept., Oct., Nov .........
BROCCOLI ... ................ ......... . ...................
BRUSSELS SPROUTS......... Jan., Feb., Mar., Sept., Oct., Nov........
CUCUMBERS ............... Sept. to Mar ..........................
CABBAGE ................... Oct. to Feb............................
CORN ...................... Jan. to Mar ...........................
CARROTS .................... Jan., Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov.........
CAULIFLOWER ................ Jan. (seed); Feb., Mar., Aug. (seed); Sept..
COLLARDS .................. Jan., Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov., Dec....
CANTALOUPES .............. Feb., Mar ............... ..........
DASHEENS .................. Jan. to April ............... .... .....
EGGPLANT ................. Jan., Feb. (spring crop); July, Aug.
(fall crop)...........................
ENGLISH PEAS.............. Sept. to M ar ...........................
IRISH POTATOES ............ Nov. to Mar. (spring crop); Sept.
(fall crop)...........................
KALE ........................ Jan., Feb., Mar., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov...
KOHL-RABI ................. Jan., April, Aug ......................
LETTUCE ................... Sept. to Jan ...........................
MUSTARD .................. Jan., Mar., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov., Dec...
OKRA ....................... Feb., Mar., Sept.............. .....
ONIONS................... Jan. (seed); Feb., Mar., April, Aug., Sept.,
Oct., Nov., Dec .....................
PEPPERS .................. Jan., Feb. (spring crop): July to Oct.
(fall crop) ............. .......
PUMPKINS .................. Mar., April, May, June, July ............
RADISHES .................. Jan., Feb., Mar., Sept., Oct., Nov., Dec...
RUTABAGAS. ................ Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov ................ .
SQUASH..... .... ... .. Feb., Mar., April, May, June, July, Aug.,
Sept..............................
SPINACH .................. Jan., Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov ...... .
SWEET POTATOES........... April, May, June, July .................
TOMATOES .................. Sept. to Feb.: July for fall crop ..........
TURNIPS ..................J. Jan. to Oct. ...........................


When Harvested
65
60

90 to 120
64
65 to 80
75 to 90

55
85

85

84
62

100 to 120
90 to 120
60 to 80
75 to 83

60

100

100 to 140
150 to 180
28
50 to 80

60 to 80
50 to 60
100
73 to 82
45





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Fruits When Planted
TANGERINES................ Dec., Jan., Feb.,. . .... ........
ORANGES ................... ...... ..
GRAPEFRUIT ............... ...................
LEM ONS. ................... .... ..... ... ..
LIM ES...................... .. " ........ ..
BANANAS ................. .. Any Time ................. ..........
PAPAYAS ................... Feb. to June .......................
MANGOES ................... Sept., Oct., Nov ......................
AVACADO PEARS............ ... .....
SAPODILLAS................. ...... ........
GUAVAS .................. .. Oct., Nov., Feb .......................
CHAYOTE ................... Nov. to Feb ............. ........
COCOANUTS ................ Any Time ..........................
CANTALOUPES-
WATERMELONS ........... Jan. and Feb...... .....................

Field Crops
SORGHUM FORAGE.......... Mar. to June ..........................
PARA GRASS................. Any Time..........................
NATAL GRASS...............
NAPIER GRASS.............. Any Time ............................
BERMUDA GRASS ........... (Seed) Oct. to Feb .....................
CARPET GRASS.............. (Seed) Oct. to Feb .....................
ST. AUGUSTINE GRASS...... (Seed) Any Time .....................
COW PEAS ................... M ar. to July ...........................
M ILLET ................. .. Feb. to June .. ........................
SUGARCANE..... ...... .. Nov. to April ...................... ..
PINEAPPLES.............. .. .Aug. and Sept .........................


When Harvested
4 to 6 years
4 to 6 years
4 to 6 years
3 to 5 years
3 to 5 years
12 to 18 months
12 to 15 months
4 to 6 years
4 to 6 years
6 to 10 years
2 to 4 years
4 to 5 months
5 to 8 years

3 months


3 to 4 months









Nov. to April
18 to 20 months


PLTIPlaniG HHarwstinG
PLANTING AND HARVESTING




































































PINEAPPLE





14 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


TIME TABLE OF FLORIDA FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPMENTS
In the following table is shown names of some of Florida's most im-
portant products and the months that they are available for market.
July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June
Avocados X X X X X
Beans X X X X X X X X X


Beans-Lima
Broccoli
Cabbage
Carrots
Celery
Celery-Cabbage
Cucumbers
Corn-Green
Collards
Dasheens
Mangoes
Eggplant
Escarole
Grapes
Greens
Grapefruit
Oranges
Mixed Citrus
Lemons
Limes
Lettuce
Tangerines
Satsumas
Mixed-Deciduous
Mixed Vegetables
Okra
Peas-Green
Peppers
Potatoes
Radishes
Strawberries
Squash
Sweet Potatoes
Tomatoes
Watermelons


X X
X

X X


X
X X X
X X X X
X
X X X
X
X X X X X
X
X
X X X X X


X X
X


X X X
X X
X X
X
X X X X X
X
X X
X
xx


X X
X X X

X
X


X X
X X
X
X


X X
X
X
X

X

X X

X


X
X X X


X X X
X X X
X X X


X X X
X X X
X X

X X X

X X X
X X X
X X X
X X X
XXX














X X X
X X X
XXX
XXx










X X
X X X
XXX
XXX
XXX


X X
X X
X X


X X X

X X X
X X X


X
X X
X
X
X
X X
X X
X X

X X
X
X


X X X X
X X
X X
X X X X
X X X X


X X
X X X
X
X X X
X
xx


































lot A.
T~~~~L.'4 .g'. 7 St-


PAPAYA






16 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE



SEASON AVERAGE PRICES RECEIVED BY FARMERS FOR
SPECIFIED COMMODITIES*

Sweet
Cotton Tobacco Potatoes Potatoes Corn Wheat Hay Cottonseed
Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Dollars Dollars Truck
Crop Year per lb. per lb. per bu. per bu. per bu. per bu. per ton per ton Crops
Aug.-July .... July-June July-June Oct.-Sept. July-June July-June July-June ..
Av.Aug.,1909-
July, 1914. 12.4 10.0 69.7 87.6 64.2 88.4 11.87 22.55
1924........... 22.9 19.0 68.6 149.6 106.3 124.7 12.66 33.25
1925.......... 19.6 16.8 170.5 165.1 69.9 143.7 12.77 31.59
1926.......... 12.5 17.9 131.4 117.4 74.5 121.7 13.24 22.04
1927.......... 20.2 20.7 101.9 109.0 85.0 119.0 10.29 34.83
1928.......... 18.0 20.0 53.2 118.0 84.0 99.8 11.22 34.17
1929........... 16.8 18.3 131.6 117.1 79.9 103.6 10.90 30.92 ..
1930........... 9.5 12.8 91.2 108.1 59.8 67.1 11.06 22.04
1931.......... 5.7 8.2 46.0 72.6 32.0 39.0 8 69 8.97
1932........... 6.5 10.5 38.0 54.2 31.9 38 2 6.20 10.33
1933.......... 10.2 13.0 82.4 69.4 52.2 74.4 8.09 12.88
1934.......... 12.4 21.3 44.6 79.8 81.5 84.8 13.2@ 33.00
1935.......... 11.1 18.4 59.3 70.3 65.5 83.2 7.52 30.54
1936.......... 12.4 23.6 114.2 92.9 104 4 102.5 11.20 33.36
1937.......... 8.4 20.4 52.9 82.0 51.8 96.2 8.74 19.51
1938.......... 8.6 19.6 55.7 73.0 48.6 56.2 6.78 21.79
1939.......... 9.1 15.4 69.7 74.9 56.8 69.1 7.94 21.17
1940.......... 9.9 16.0 54.1 85.5 61.8 68.2 7.58 21.73
1941.... ..... 17.0 26.4 80.7 94.0 75.1 94.4 9.67 47.65
1942......... 19.0 36.9 117.0 119.0 91.7 110.0 10.80 45.61 .
1943.......... 19.9 40.5 131.0 204.0 112.0 136.0 14.80 52.10
1944. ........ 20.7 42.0 149.0 192.0 109.0 141.0 16.40 52.70
1945.......... 22.5 36.6 143.0 204.0 127.0 150.0 15.10 51.10
1946.......... 32.6 38.2 122.0 218.0 156.0 191.0 16.70 71.90 ..
1947.......... 31.3 38.0 156.0 215.0 235.0 241.0 17.30 85.40
1948 June.... 35.22 41.7 187.0 246.0 216.0 211.0 17.90 92.20 ....
July.... 32.99 43.6 166.0 262.0 202.0 203.0 18.20 96.00 ....
August... 30.41 47.4 158.0 265.0 191.0 196.0 17.80 76.60 ....
Sept..... 30.94 46.7 153.0 232.0 178.0 197.0 18.00 68.10 ..
October.. 31.07 50.6 142.0 207.0 138.0 198.0 18.40 63.70
Nov..... 30.52 42.8 144.0 198.0 121.0 204.0 18.40 69.00
Dec...... 29.63 45.7 154.0 219.0 123.0 205.0 19.10 68.80
1949 January.. 29.27 42.9 166.0 236.0 125.0 202.0 19.80 65.70
February. 29.14 29.5 172.0 244.0 112.0 194.0 20.50 53.40
March... 28.74 31.9 174.0 254.0 118.0 198.0 20.00 51.40
April..... 29.91 24.7 181.0 275.0 122.0 200.0 19.00 50.30
May..... 29.97 32.5 181.0 273.0 122.0 200.0 17.70 50.40 ....

Index Number (Aug., 1909-July, 1914-100)
1924.......... 185 190 98 170 166 141 107 147 143
1925.......... 158 168 245 188 109 163 108 140 143
1926.......... 101 179 189 134 116 138 112 98 139
1927.......... 163 207 146 124 132 135 87 154 127
1928.......... 145 200 76 134 131 113 95 152 154
1929.......... 135 183 189 133 124 117 92 137 137
1930.......... 77 128 131 123 93 76 93 98 129
1931......... 46 82 66 83 50 44 73 40 115
1932........ 52 105 55 62 50 43 52 46 102
1933.......... 82 130 118 79 81 84 68 57 91
1934.......... 100 213 64 91 127 96 111 146 95
1935.......... 90 184 85 80 102 94 63 135 119
1936.......... 100 236 164 106 163 116 94 148 104
1937.......... 68 204 76 93 81 109 74 87 110
1938.......... 69 196 80 83 76 64 57 97 88
1939 ......... 73 154 100 85 88 78 67 94 91
1940........... 80 160 78 97 96 77 64 96 111
1941.......... 137 264 116 107 117 107 81 211 129
1942.......... 153 369 168 136 143 124 91 202 163
1943........... 160 405 188 232 174 154 125 231 245
1944.......... 167 420 214 219 170 160 138 234 212
1945.......... 181 366 205 232 198 170 127 227 224
1946........... 263 382 175 249 212 209 141 319 204
1947.......... 252 380 224 245 366 273 146 379 249
1948 June..... 284 417 288 280 336 239 151 409 213
July .... 266 436 238 298 315 230 153 428 213
August... 245 474 227 302 298 222 150 340 172
Sept..... 250 467 220 264 277 223 152 302 150
October.. 251 506 204 236 215 224 155 282 176
Nov...... 246 428 207 226 188 231 155 306 186
Dec...... 239 457 220 250 192 232 161 305 209
1949 January.. 236 429 238 269 195 229 169 291 282
February. 235 295 249 279 174 219 173 237 285
March... 232 319 250 290 184 224 168 228 263
April.... 241 247 260 314 190 226 160 223 236
May.... 242 325 260 312 190 226 149 224 213


































PRODUCTS OF CENTRAL FLORIDA


-;. *
V- '


1


E~t~







FLORIDA CROPS 17



WHOLESALE PRICES OF AMMONIATES

Fish scrap, Tankage High grade
dried 11% ground
11-12% ammonia, blood,
ammonia, 15% bone ammonia,
Nitrate Sulphate Cottonseed 15% bone phosphate, 16-17%
of soda of ammonia meal phosphate, f.o.b. Chi- Chicago,
bulk per bulk per S. E. Mills f.o.b. factory cago, bulk bulk,
unit N unit N per unit N bulk per unit N per unit N per unit N
1910-14............. $2.68 $2.85 $3.50 53.53 $3.37 $3.52
1924 ............... 2.99 2.44 5.87 5.02 3.60 4.25
1925................ 3.11 2.47 5.41 5.34 3.97 4.75
1926.... ........... 3.06 2.41 4.40 4.95 4.36 4.90
1927................ 3.01 2.26 5.07 5.87 4.32 5.70
1928................ 2.67 2.30 7.06 6.63 4.92 6.00
1929................ 2.57 2.04 5.64 5.00 4.61 5.72
1930................ 2.47 1.81 4.78 4.96 3.79 4.58
1931 ................ 2.34 1.46 3.10 3.95 2.11 2.46
1932................ 1.87 1.04 2.18 2.18 1.21 1.36
1933................ 1.52 1.12 2.95 2.86 2.06 2.46
1934................ 1.52 1.20 4.46 3.15 2.67 3.27
1935................ 1.47 1.15 4.59 3.10 3.06 3.65
1936................ 1.53 1.23 4.17 3.42 3.58 4.25
1937................ 1.63 1.32 4.91 4.66 4.04 4.80
1938.. ............. 1.69 1.38 3.69 3.76 3.15 3.53
1939................ 1.69 1.35 4.02 4.41 3.87 3.90
1940................ 1.69 1.36 4.64 4.36 3.33 3.39
1941.. ............. 1.69 1.41 5.50 5.32 3.76 4.43
1942.......... 1.74 1.41 6.11 5.77 5.04 6.76
1943...... .. .. 1.75 1.42 6.30 5.77 4.86 6.62
1944...... .. 1.75 1.42 7.68 5.77 4.86 6.71
1945................ 1.75 1.42 7.81 5.77 4.86 6.71
1946................ 1.97 1.44 11.04 7.38 6.60 9.33
1947............. .. 2.50 1.60 12.72 10.66 12.63 10.46
1948 June........... 2.78 1.90 14.69 9.11 8.23 8.24
July ........... 2.78 2.07 14.56 9.22 8.80 8.73
August......... 2.91 2.10 10.91 9.76 8.92 8.98
Sept........... 3.00 2.20 10.70 9.87 9.18 9.03
October......... 3.00 2.20 9.31 9.98 9.41 9.48
Nov............. 3.00 2.20 11.00 10.31 10.44 10.68
Dec............ 3.00 2.20 11.52 11.65 11.39 11.46
1949 January........ 3.15 2.23 10.29 8.68 11.53 11.53
February... .... 3.19 2.27 9.44 12.36 10.78 10.70
March.......... 3.19 2.27 9.27 12.36 9.64 9.71
April........... 3.19 2.27 9.22 12.36 9.71 9.87
May........... 3.19 2.27 9.43 12.36 9.71 9.11

Index Numbers (1910-14=100)

1924................ 111 86 168 142 107 121
1925 ... ............ 115 87 155 151 117 135
1926................ 113 84 126 140 129 139
1927................ 112 79 145 166 128 162
1928 ............... 100 81 202 188 146 170
1929................ 96 72 161 142 137 162
1930................ 92 64 137 141 12 130
1931................ 88 51 89 112 63 70
1932................ 71 36 62 62 36 39
1933.... ........... 59 39 84 81 97 71
1934................ 59 42 127 89 79 93
1935 ... 57 40 131 88 91 104
1936................ 59 43 119 97 106 131
1937................ 61 46 140 132 120 122
1938 ............... 63 48 105 106 93 100
1939...... ........ 63 47 115 125 115 111
1940...... ....... 63 48 133 124 99 96
1941................ 63 49 157 151 112 126
1942 ................ 65 49 175 163 150 192
1943................ 65 50 180 163 144 189
1944................ 65 50 219 163 144 191
1945.... ........... 65 50 223 163 144 191
1946................ 74 51 315 209 196 265
1947 ............... 93 56 363 302 374 297
1948 June........... 104 67 420 258 244 234
July ........... 104 73 416 261 261 248
August......... 109 74 312 276 265 255
Sept............ 112 77 306 280 272 257
October ........ 112 77 266 283 279 269
Nov..... ...... 112 77 314 292 310 303
Dec............ 112 77 329 330 338 326
1949 January........ 118 78 294 246 342 328
February ....... 119 80 270 350 320 304
March.......... 119 80 265 350 286 276
April. ......... 119 80 263 350 288 280
May........... 119 80 269 350 288 259







18 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE



WHOLESALE PRICES OF PHOSPHATES AND POTASH *

Tennessee Muriate Sulphate Sulphate Manure
phosphate of potash of potash of potash salts
Super- Florida rock, bulk, in bags, magnesia, bulk,
phosphate land pebble 75% f.o.b. per unit, per unit, per ton, per unit,
Balti- 68% f.o.b. mines, c.i.f. At- c.i.f. At- c.i.f. At- c.i.f. At-
more, mines, bulk, bulk, lantie and lantic and lantic and lantic and
per unit per ton per ton Gulf ports Gulf ports Gulf ports Gulf ports
1910-14. .......... 0.536 $3 61 $4.88 $0.714 $0.953 $24.18 $0.657
1924........ ...... .502 2.31 6.60 .582 .860 23.72 .472
1925.... ......... .600 2 44 6.16 .584 .860 23.72 .483
1926.... .......... .598 3.20 5.57 .596 .854 23.58 .537
1927............. .525 3.09 5.50 .646 .924 25.55 .586
1928..... ........ .580 3.12 5 50 .669 .957 26.46 .607
1929........... ... .609 3.18 5.50 .672 .962 26.59 .610
1930....... ....... .542 3.18 5.50 681 .973 26.92 .618
1931............... .485 3.18 5.50 .681 .973 26.92 .618
1932............... .458 3 18 5 50 .681 .9C3 26.90 .618
1933............... .434 3.11 5.50 .632 .834 25.10 .101
1934............... .487 3.14 5.67 .486 .751 22.49 .483
1935............... .492 3.30 5.69 .415 .684 21.44 .444
1936.............. .476 1.85 5.50 .464 .708 22.94 .505
1937............... .510 1.85 5.50 .508 .757 24.70 .556
1938............... .492 1.85 5.50 .523 .774 15.17 .572
1939............... .478 1.90 5.50 .521 .751 24.52 .570
1940............... .516 1.90 5.50 .517 .730 24.75 .573
1941............. .547 1.94 5.64 .522 7h0 25.55 .3671
1942............... .600 2.13 6.29 .522 .810 25 74 .205
1943 .............. :631 2 00 5.93 522 .786 25.35 .195
1944.............. .645 2.10 6.10 .522 .777 25.35 .195
1945............... .650 2.20 6.23 .522 .777 25.35 .195
1946............... .671 2.41 6.50 .508 .769 24 70 .190
1947............... .746 3.05 6.60 .498 .70fi 18.93 .195
1948 June......... .760 4.61 6.60 .330 .63 11 12 761 .176
July.......... .770 4.61 6.60 353 676 13. 3 .188
August........ .770 4.61 6.60 .353 .678 13.63 .188
September..... .770 4.61 6.60 353 .678 13.63 .188
October....... .763 4.61 6.60 .375 .720 14 50 .200
November..... .770 4.61 6.60 .375 .720 14.50 .200
December..... .770 4.61 6.60 .375 .720 14.50 .200
1949 January....... .770 4.61 6.60 .375 .720 14.50 .200
February..... 770 4.61 6.60 .375 .72) 14.50 .200
March........ .770 3.85 7.06 .375 .720 14.5) .200
April.... .770 3.85 7.06 .375 .720 14.50 .200
May........ 770 3.85 7.06 .375 .720 14.50 .200


Index Number (1910-14=100)

1924 ............... 94 64 135 82 90 98 72
1925............... 110 68 126 82 90 98 74
1926...... ........ 112 88 114 83 90 98 82
1927....... ....... 100 86 113 90 97 106 89
1928.... .......... 108 86 113 94 100 109 92
1929..... ......... 114 88 113 94 101 110 93
1930................ 101 88 113 95 102 111 94
1931.............. 90 88 113 95 102 111 94
1932............... 85 88 113 95 101 111 94
1933.............. 81 86 113 93 91 104 91
1934............... 91 87 110 68 79 93 74
1935 ........... .. 92 91 117 58 72 89 68
1936 .............. 89 51 113 65 74 95 77
1937 ...... ........ 95 51 113 71 79 102 85
1938 ............. 92 51 113 73 81 104 87
1939 .............. 89 53 113 73 79 101 87
1940............... 96 53 113 72 77 102 87
1941. ........... 102 54 110 73 82 106 87
1942. ........... 112 59 129 73 85 106 84
1943......... .. 117 55 121 73 82 105 83
1944...... ...... 120 58 125 73 82 105 83
1945 ....... ..... 121 61 128 73 82 105 83
1946........ ...... 125 67 133 71 81 102 82
1947 ........... . 139 84 135 70 74 78 83
1948 June......... 142 128 135 62 67 53 80
July...... 144 128 135 65 71 56 82
August........ 144 128 135 65 71 56 82
September. 144 128 135 65 71 56 82
October...... 142 128 135 68 76 60 83
November..... 1!4 128 135 68 76 60 83
December.... 144 128 135 68 76 60 83
1949 January....... 144 128 135 68 76 60 83
February...... 144 128 135 68 76 60 83
March....... 144 107 145 68 76 60 83
April......... 144 107 145 68 76 60 83
May.......... 144 107 145 68 76 60 83






FLORIDA CROPS


COMBINED INDEX NUMBERS OF PRICES OF FERTILIZER
MATERIALS, FARM PRODUCTS AND ALL COMMODITIES


Prices paid
by farmers Wholesale
for com- prices
Farm modities of all cor- Fertilizer Chemical Organic Superphos-
prices* bought* moditiest materialS ammoniates ammoniates phate
1924 ....... 143 152 143 103 97 125 94
1925........ 156 156 151 112 100 131 109
1926........ 146 155 146 119 94 135 112
1927........ 142 153 139 116 89 150 100
1928........ 151 155 141 121 87 177 108
1929........ 149 154 139 114 79 146 114
1930........ 128 146 126 105 72 131 101
1931........ 90 126 107 83 62 83 90
1932........ 68 108 95 71 46 48 85
1933........ 72 108 96 70 45 71 81
1934........ 90 122 109 72 47 90 91
1935........ 109 125 117 70 45 97 92
1936........ 114 124 118 73 47 107 89
1937........ 122 131 126 81 50 129 95
1938........ 97 123 115 78 52 101 92
1939........ 95 121 112 79 51 119 89
1940 ........ 100 122 115 80 52 114 96
1941........ 124 131 127 86 56 130 102
1942........ 159 152 144 93 57 161 112
1943........ 192 167 151 94 57 160 117
1944........ 195 176 152 96 57 174 120
1945........ 202 180 154 97 57 175 121
1946........ 233 202 177 107 62 240 125
1947........ 278 246 222 130 74 362 139
1948
June ..... 295 266 241 128 85 309 142
July ..... 301 266 247 231 88 317 144
August .... 293 266 247 129 91 285 144
September. 290 265 247 131 94 287 144
October... 277 263 243 130 94 277 142
November. 271 262 239 134 94 311 144
December. 268 262 237 137 94 336 144
1949
January... 268 260 233 136 97 313 144
February.. 258 257 231 136 99 309 144
March ... 261 258 231 134 99 290 144
April....... 260 258 229 134 99 291 144
May...... 256 257 228 134 99 293 144


Potash**
79
80
86
94
97
97
99
99
99
95
72
63
69
75
77
77
77
77
77
77
76
76
75
72

65
68
68
68
72
72
72

72
72
72
72
72


U. S. D. A. figures. Beginning January 1946 farm prices and index numbers of specific
farm products revised from a calendar year to a crop-year basis. Truck crops index adjusted
to the 1924 level of the all-commodity index.
t Department of Labor index converted to 1910-14 base.
$ The Index numbers of prices of fertilizer materials are based on original study made by
the Department of Agricultural Economics and Farm Management, Cornell University, Ithaca,
New York. These indexes are complete since 1897. The series was revised and reweighted
as of March 1940 and November 1942.
1 All potash salts now quoted F.O.B. mines only; manure salts since June 1941, other
carriers since June 1947.
** The weighted average of prices actually paid for potash is lower than the annual average
because since 1926 over 90% of the potash used in agriculture has been contracted for during
the discount period. Since 1937, the maximum discount has been 12%. Applied to muriate of
potash, a price slightly above $.471 per unit K20 thus more nearly approximates the annual
average than do prices based on arithmetical averages of monthly quotations.







DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


THE FOLLOWING IS FROM THE BULLETIN, "FOR SALE, WANT AND EXCHANGE"
ISSUED BY THE FLORIDA STATE MARKETING BUREAU
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
FLORIDA HOME MARKET VEGETABLE QUOTATIONS
Many Florida growers, particularly those who sell their vegetables in I.c.l. express or truck lots or
the larger Florida home markets, have requested information showing average prices prevailing throughout
the shipping season on vegetables for a number of years. The following tabulation of simple, unweighted
jobbing price averages by months, beginning with January, 1926, and running to July 1, 1947, covering the
principal Florida vegetables, top quotations, in containers as shown, sold on the Jacksonville market, will
it is hoped, meet the requirements of those interested in the data presented. This compilation of quotations
should be filed for future study and reference. NEILL RHODES, Marketing Commissioner.
GREEN BEANS (Bushel Hampers)
YEAR JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC.
1926 $5.15 $ 0 $7.30 $3.40 $2.97 $1.81 $2.14 $3.73 $3.54 $2.65 $2.23 $2.36
1927 5.36 6.22 3.60 2.16 1.63 2.41 2.56 2.36 2.58 2.40 1.63 1.78
1928 4.40 5.07 3.59 2.61 1.57 1.60 2.17 3.61 4.23 3.50 3.32 2.52
1929 3.54 2.62 2.51 2.20 1.10 1.27 2.33 3.02 2.80 2.55 2.74 2,28
1930 2.93 3.02 4.10 3.56 1.85 1.24 2.87 2.37 2.71 1.58 1.55 2.85
1931 4.82 4.05 3.90 2.55 1.52 1.33 2.95 1.85 1.93 1.93 1.51 1.50*
1932 1.66 2.29 3.05 3.49 1.50 .70 1.27 2.04 2.01 1.36 1.88 2.99
1933 2.05 1.54 1.70 1.29 1.74 2.11 2.89 1.05 1 41 2.24 1.18 .99
1934 1.51 1.91 2.01 1.85 .98r .86r 2.07r 2.44r 1.78r 1.36r 2.12 2.31
1935 5.33 2.36 1.60 1.68 .78 1.08 1.54 1.59 1.93 2.35 1.65 3.12
1936 2.28 1.61 1.01 1.92 1.25 1.19 1.59 1.28 1.24 1.00 1.27 1.25
1937 1.24 2.32 2.62 z.16 1.46 1.18 1.34 1.56 1 67 1.76 1.84 1.95
1938 1.80 1.83 1.37 .84 .61 1.10 .85 1.65 2.01 1.55 .81 .98
1939 1.31 1.67 2.60 1.43 .67 .96r 1.64r 1.41r 1.19r 1.55r 1.79 1.95
1940 1.98 3.94 5.22 1.88 1.15 1.18 1.21r 2.19r 2.03r 1.29 1.01 1.32
1941 2.04 2.64 3.31 2.63 1.36r 1.67r 1.92r 2.37r 2.15r 2.35 2.36 1.55
1942 1.99 2.98 3.15 3.08 1.43 .93r 1.91r 2.22r 2.26r 2.99r 2.46 2.71
1943 2.80 3.24 5.60 4.29 1.55 1.94r 3.18r 3.18r 3.53r 3.50r 3.23 2.82
1944 4.70 3.06 2.57 2.89 3.57 2.63r 2.92r 2.73r 3.11r 2.84 3.44 4.34
1945 4.21 3.61 3.70 3.32 1.94r 2.92r 3.44r 3.25r 3.66r 3.96r 3.34 4.08
1946 4.58 3.64 3.29 3.46 1.76 2.76r 3.37r 3.42r 3.60r 2.88 3.48 3.50
1947 2.97 4.65 6.57 4.18 2.38 3.27r
Part month, r Southern offerings.
CELERY (Crates)
1926 $4.58* $5.03 $5.04 $3.66 $5.07* $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0
1927 3.25* 2.55 2.73 2.54 2.86* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1928 2.63* 2.25 2.61 2.74 4.20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1929 0 1.90* 1.85 2.24 2.85 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1930 3.04 2.65 2.43 3.14 4.04 3.69* 0 0 0 0 0 0
1931 2.88 2.98 2.62 2.30 2.76 3.85* 0 0 0 0 0 0
1932 2.48 2.59 2.92 3.38 2.20 2.17 0 0 0 0 0 0
1933 2.17 1.37 1.44 1.20 2.24 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1934 1.92 1.37 1.42 1.74 2.09 3.68* 0 0 0 0 0 0
1935 2.82* 2.67 2.28 2.34 2.90 3.35* 0 0 0 0 0 0
1936 2.81 2.22 1.91 2.58 2 91 3.03* 0 0 0 0 0 0
1937 2.12 1.94 2.74 2.00 1.90 2.66 0 0 0 0 0 0
1938 2.13 1.51 1.47 1.59 1.89 2.67* 0 0 0 0 0 2.53*
1939 2.11 1.45 1.77 2.68 1.83 2.21* 0 0 0 0 0 2.42*
1940 2.02 2.61 2.14 1.52 2.92 4.05* 0 0 0 0 0 2.30
1941 2.28 2.72 3.02 2.15 2.60 3.16 0 0 0 0 0 0
1942 3.56 3.21 2.16 1.62 2.31 4.02* 0 0 0 0 0 5.67
1943 3.84 3.77 4.60 4.93 6.51 7.75 0 0 0 0 0 4.70
1944 4.55 3.20 2.72 2.81 7.17 9.27 0 0 0 0 0 5.80
1945 4.00 4.00 3.35 5.47 5.58 6.70 0 0 0 0 0 5.29*
1946 3.07 2.65 2.88 2.90 3.56 5.22 0 0 0 0 0 3.13
1947 3.62 5.39 6.18 5.81 5.73 7.21 0 0 0 0 0 0
Part month.
OKRA (Bushel Hampers)
1926 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $3.96 $1.86 $1.95 $1.80 $2.02 $3.05 $4.68
1927 0 0 0 7.19* 4.70 2.06 1.33 1.13 1.12 1.35 1.94 2.01
1928 0 0 0 5.10 4.66 2.76 1.29 1.77 1.49 2.28 2.72 4.02
1929 0 0 0 4.34 2.79 1.45 1.35 1.08 1.31 2.26 2.80 3.05
1930 0 0 4.05 4.70 5.20 2.95 1.29 1.26 1.17 1.14 2.25 3.34
1931 3.76* 3.42 3.93 4.14 4.38 3.01 1.42 1.18 1.37 1.53 2.42 2.46
1932 2.97 3.28 4.04 3.95 3.31 1.50 .91 .94 .99 1.40 1.73 3.45
1933 3.10 3.58 3.54 3.37 2.68 1.91 .83 .74 .90 1.22 2.11 2.80
1934 2.75 2.95 3.19 3.16 3.10 1.53 1.10 .91 .96 .91 2.11 2.77
1935 0 0 0 0 2.20 1.04 .86 .81 1.16 1.75 1.82 2.35
1936 3.30 3.13 3.54 3.01 3.21 1.74 1.00 1.02 1.03 1.18 1.69 2.94
1937 2.53 2.90 0 3.52 3.47 1.94 1.03 1.01 1.39 1.84 2.74 0
1938 0 0 0 3.33* 2.40 1.45 .84 .97 1.19 1.49 1.42 1.76
1939 0 0 3.33 3.47 1.82 1.04 .87 .93r .90r 1.14 2.18 2.50
1940 2.68 3.39 4.63 3.04 3.57 2.40 .95 .80 .97 1.47 1.52 3.42
1941 3.63 4.55* 4.31 3.34 3.09 2.06 1.08r .84r 1.30r 1.75r 2.42 2.21
1942 3.56* 4.39 4.09 0 4.17* 2.94 1.40r 1.61r 2.01r 2.54 3.14 0
1943 0 0 0 0 6.62 3.95 2.24r 3.05r 4.13r 4.47r 5.75* 7.22*
1944 6.75* 6.75* 0 0 8.98 3.58 2.20r 1.95r 2.76r 3.33 6.06 0
1945 0 0 0 0 8.62 5.81r 3.82r 3.17r 3.41r 3.72 5.09 0
1946 0 0 0 0 6.41 3.09r 2.48r 3.33r 3.73r 4.21 5.03 5.19*
1947 0 0 0 0 7.72 3.80r
Part month. r Southern offerings. Generally Florida produce where not otherwise specified.






FLORIDA CROPS 21



LIMA BEANS (Bushel Hampers)
EAR JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC.
26 $ 0 $ 0 S 0 $ 0 $ 0 $2.73 $2.10 $2.24 $2.37* S 0 8 0 $ 0
27 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.15* 192 2.09 0 0 0
28 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.09* 1.87* 0 0 0 0
29 0 0 0 0 2.25* 1.69 1.75 2.78* 0 0 0 0
30 6.19* 5.17* 3.59* 5.11* 4.33* 2.92 1.83 2.61 2.18 1.87 2.25 4.87
31 5.55* 6.58 6.12 4.96 4 16 2.22 2.18 1.80 1.84 2.01 3.12 3.19
32 3.70 3.69 4.19 4.94 3.32 1.33 1.19 2.10 2.02 0 3.10* 4.57*
33 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.06 .99 1.51 1.93 2.12* 0
)34 2.90 2.98 2.45 2.44 2,73 1.37 1.77 1.85 1.61 1.34 2.22* 4.98*
35 4.16* 0 0 3.53 2.78 1 16 1.04 1.15 1.65 1.68 2.44 4.83
t936 4.21 3.92 3.02 2.97 2.61 1.43 1.54 1.60 2.03 0 3.39 3.48
1937 3.16 3.37 3.92 3.31 3.21 2.06 1.29 0 0 0 0 3.36
1938 3.53 3.54 2.30 2.16 1.60 1.45 1.07 2.42* 3 01 3.72* 3.29* 3.50
939 2.56 2.06 2.52 2.32 1 39 1.08 2.03r 2 31r 2.99r 0 4.90* 3.86
1940 3.23 4.53 5.19 3.92 2.75 1.44 1.51r 1.81r 3.01r 2.29r 2.36r 3.02
941 3.10 4.21 3.59 3.57 3.04 1.97 1.38 2.42r 2.92r 3.02rt* 4.17* 3.43
942 3.04 4.05 3 99 3.58 4.47 1.69r 2.14r 2.96r 3.43r 1.77r 0 4.59
1943 4.26 4.52 7.40 7.33 4.12 3.01* 3.02r 3.33r 4.18r 3.33r 3.11*r 6.73*
944 5.92 5.45 4.63 4.52 4.61 3 60 3.23r 1.99r 2 75r 2.57r 7.25* 7.22*
945 6.05 4.83 4.34 5.80 5.02 3.66* 4.41r 4.32r 4 50*r 0 0 8.22*
946 5.48 5.05 4.66 4.66 3.96 2.45r 3.84r 3.56r 4.51r 4.94r 7.35* 6.04
947 5.17 5.41 8.08* 6.63 3.91 2.61r
Part month.
r Southern offerings.

GREEN CORN (Crates or Dozen Ears)
1926c $ 0 8 0 $ 0 $ 0 3 0 2 37* $1.62* $ 0 3 0 $ 0 3 0 $ 0
1927c 0 0 0 0 2.55 2.23 1.38 1.25 0 0 0 0
1928 0 0 0 0 2.94*c 1.39c .18d .25d 0 0 0 0
1929d 0 0 0 .33 .23 .21 .19 .18 0 0 0 0
1930 0 0 0 5.24c 2.58c .29d .19d .23d 0 0 0 0
1931d 0 0 0 .39 .23 .17 .21 .24 0 0 0 0
1932d 0 0 0 0 .36 .16 10 13 0 0 0 0
1933d 0 0 0 .32 .25 .18 .14 0 0 0 0 0
1934d 0 0 0 .33 .27 .18 0 0 0 0 0 0
1935d 0 0 0 .32* .20W .10 .12 .17 0 0 0 0
1936d 0 0 0 .27* .25 .15 .16 .20 0 0 0 0
1937d 0 0 0 0 .21 .21 .14 .18 0 0 0 0
1938d 0 0 0 .28 .21 .11 .13 .16 .18 0 0 0
1939d .28 .25 .29 .34 .22 .11 .16r .19r .20r* 0 0 0
'940d .25 0 0 0 .27* .14 .101 r .16r .24r .25*r .26 .26
41d 0 0 0 0 .32 .18 .14r 18r .21*r 0 .26 .21
942d 0 0 0 0 .37* .23 .19r 0 0 0 .34 .35
943d .34 .38 0 0 .51 .25 .30 .37r .39*r 0 .45 .42
1944d 0 0 0 0 .52 .39 .31r .34r .40r 0 0 .25*
1945d 0 0 .56 .65 .27 .35r .42r .40r .40r .31*r .50 .54
1946d 0 0 0 .70* .44 .32 .36r .38r .42r 0 .49 0
1947d 0 0 0 .48 .54 .30
c Crates, 4 dozen, white.
d Dozen, White, since 1943 a considerable volume of yellow sweet corn.
Part month.
r Southern offerings.

CUCUMBERS (Bushel Baskets and Bushel Crates)
1926 $5.22 $ 0 $ 0 $5.76 $2.86 $1.21 $1.69 $ 0 $ 0 $2.51 $3.48 $3.67
1927 4.20 0 5.67* 3.06 1.43 1.67 1.36 1.91 2 56 2.06 2.50 2.54
1928 0 0 4.06* 4.44 2.82 1.28 1.15 0 0 3.14 2.75 3.42
1929 0 0 3.50 2.15 1.42 1.73 2.73 3.10 2.70 2.51 2.89 2.76
1930 3.79 2.90 5.98 5.08 2.69 1.01 2.19 2.79 3.38 2.39 2.24 2.84
1931 3.62 4.14 4.54 4.71 2.03 1.03 2.00 1.87 2 27 0 0 0
1932 4.80 5.23 3.59 4.58* 1.93* .70 0 0 0 1.60 2.29r 3.46
1933 0 0 3.78 2.34 1.69 0 1.50r 1.62r 1.92r 1.62r 1.39 1.77
1934 1.99* 3.19* 4.68 3.76 1.97 .82r 1.54r 2 21r 2.58r 2.05r 2.26 2.56
1935 0 0 3.85 2.93 .89 .74 1.32 1 87 2.41 2.66 2.07 2.12
1936 2.10 2.19* 4.25 3.31 1.57 1.08 1.41 1.60 1.56 1.20 1.48 2.58
937 3.04 4.29 3.87 2.45 2.38 .97 1.06 1.55 2.08 2.15 2.27 2.60
1938 3.33 4.66 4.30 1.62 1.24 1.00 1.43 1.51 2.80 1.78 1.48 2.09
1939 3.11 3.77 3.73 2.26 1.06 1.09r 1.57r 1.79r 2.24r 1.57r 1.90 2.59
1940 3.31 3.97 3.85 3.62 2.13 1.22 1.11 1.75 2.10r 2.05 1.50 2.54
1941 4.08 4.54 4.55 3.97 1.77 1.09 1.37r 2.16r 2 12r 2.60r 3.82 3.34
1942 5.13 5.85 6.08 5.45 2.39 1.62 1.93*r 0 2.91* 3.76* 3.06 5.54
1943 0 0 0 6.23 4.79 3.63r 3.17r 3.73r 3.77r 4.16r 4.32 5.53
1944 6.97 0 0 4.50 4.52 2.89r 2.78r 2.34r 0 2.60* 6.79 6.07*
945 7.23* 7.75* 5.80 4.57 2.57 2.47r 2.78r 3.17r 4.05r 4.34r 3.65 6.18
946 7.37* 9.16* 10.18 4.95 2.21 2.28r 3.77r 3.93r 3.48r 3.39 4.93 4.29
1947 6.82 9.02 12.30* 9.14 3.64 2.41r
Part month.
r Southern offerings.


















-TIT. -e-
PB. -'` 1 s.l Y _~~


-BEANS






FLORIDA CROPS 23


EGGPLANT (1' Bushel Crates and Bushel Hampers)
EAR JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC.
926e $3.85 S 0 $5.50 $5.52 $ 0 $4.39 $1.91 81 98 $2.28 $2.41 $2.90 $3.31
927c 3.88 4.77 4.18 3.46 2.68 2.28 0 1.72 1.71 1.66 2.04 1.70
928c 2.69 2.67 2.78 2.41 2.06 2.25 1.52 2.08 1.81 3.16 3.21 3.03
929c 4.38 4.34 2.61 2.35 2.15 1.88 1.74 1.87 2.15 1.73 2.03 2.72
930c 2.84 2.66 2.60 2.65 2.56 2.12 1.94 1.65 1.63 1.69 1.77 2.17
931z 2.22c 2.07c 2.71c 2.72c 1.94c 1.83 1.03z .84z 1.03z 1.30z 1.29z 1.16z
932z 0 1.27 1.34 1.20 1.13 .88 0 0 .85 .71 .95 1.28
933z 1.33 1.66 1.45 .98 .76 .74 .63 .59 .88* 1.28 1 31 1.61
934z 1.21 1.22* 1.25 1.09 .97 .78 .77 .90r 1.17r .86r 1.03 1.42
935z 2.25 2.71 1.65 1.40 1.03 1.11 .65 .65 1.23 1.64 1.84 1.66
1936z 1.36 1.34 1.71 1.34 1.06 .92 .80 .57 .77 .80 .85 1.01
937z .92 1.04 1.10 1.26 1.20 .95 .63 .71 1.54 1.70 1.86 1.75
938z 1.65 1.74 1.53 1.33 1.06 .84 .49 .52 .91 1.11 .97 .97
1939z .99 .99 1.14 .97 .81 .78 .72 .90 .96r 1.01 1.37 1.16
1940z 1.35z 2.32z 4.29*c 3.55*c 2.35*c 2.30c 98rz .70rz 1.20z 1.00z 1.11z 2.21c
941 2.25c 2.51c 2.53c 2.68c 2.49c 1.32c .86rz 1.09rz 1.16rz .97rz 94z 1.06z
1942z 1.35 2.88 3.14 2.85 2.79 2.44 1 66 1.65r 1.73r 2.20r 2.50 2.35
943z 2.24 2.48 3.64 3.63 2.35 2.08 1.84 2.09r 2.98r 2.55r 2.96 2.85
1944z 2.84 2.68 2.79 1.89 2.36 1.35 1.20r 1.58r 1.74r 1.79 2.10 2.73
1945z 2.85 2.79 2,65 2.27 2.21 2.31 2.16r 2.30r 2.13r 2.89r 3.00 2.25
1946z 2.13 3.07 3.12 2.78 2.40 1.63 1.28r 2.21r 2.46r 2.52 2.29 2.32
1947z 2.30 3.08 3.55 3.77 2 72 2.76
c Crates.
r Southern offerings.
z Bu. Hampers.
Part month.

RED BLISS POTATOES (Bushel Hampers or Crates)
1926 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $3.34 $2.50 8 0 $ (I S 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0
1927 0 0 4.07* 2.62 1.60 2.35 0 0 0 0 0 0
1928 0 2.50 3.08 3 04 2 20 1.38 0 0 0 0 0 0
1929 0 0 2.92* 1.89 1 23 1.51 1.75* 0 0 0 2.49* 2.33
1930 2.33 2.94 2 78 2.b3 2.15 1.88 1.59 1.47 1.46 0 0 0
1931 2.02 2.04 2.28 2.48 1.27 .97 .87 0 0 0 0 0
1932 1.71 1.92 1.87 1.98 1.98 1.18 1.22 1.36 1 38 1.47r 1.29 1.35
1933 1.67 1.66 1.49 1.52 1.05 .99 1.69r 2.33r 2.48r 1.92r 1.85 1.78
1934 1.70 1. 1.7 1.47 1.50 1.21 .87r .83r .86r .90r .90r 1.63 1.48
1935 1.51 1.61 1.43 2.02 1.14 .98 .99 1.04 1.34 1.39 1.75 2.14
1936 2.17 1.81 1.53 1 66 1.27 1 83 1.76 0 0 0 2.14 1.71
1937 1.77 1.65 1.72 1.77 1.47 .94 1.06 1.13 1.15 1.35 2.12 1.81
1938 1.75 1.48 1.12 1.17 .84 .92 .98 1.17 1.10 1.00* 1.59 1.62
39 1.38 1.31 1.61 1.82 1.01 .91 1.42r 1.87r 2.09r 2.17r 1.83 2.04
940 1.68 1.63 1.98 1.85 .97 .94 .92r 1.06r 1.09r 1.07r 1.32 1.35
941 1.31 1.28 1.24 1.38 1 14 .94r 1.01r 1.08r 1.25r* 1.29r 2.02* 1.76
1942 1.59 1.58 1.72 2.24 1.50 1.33 1.15r 1.67*r 1.79r 1.86r 2.15* 2.37
1943 2 25 2.31 2.53 2.58* 2.13 3.80a 3.11ar 3.51ar 3.20ar 3.22ar 3.14ar 2.27*
944b 2.33 2.47 2.96 2.56 1.53 1.62 3.82ar 4.43ar 3 86ar 3.62ar 3.45ar 3.32r
1945b 2.59 2.60 2.58 2.50 2 27 2.75 4.40r 4.45r* 0 0 0 3.41*
1946b 3.35 3.13 2.54 2.34 1.24 1.60r 1.29r 2.15r 2.38r* 0 0 3.10
1947b 3 17 3.25 2.47 2.80 2.36 2.51*
a 100 lb. sacks.
b Bu. hampers, bu. crates, 50 lb. paper or cloth sacks.
Part month.
r Southern offerings.

PEPPERS (1 Bushel Crates and Bushel Hampers)
1926c $4.48 $5.28 $6.33 $4.83 $4.64 $3.87 $1.83 $1.65 $1.76 $2.58 $2.42 $3.19
1927c 4.36 4.97 3.59 2.28 2.65 1.96 2.18 2.04 1.63 1.65 1.66 1.49
1928c 2.29 3.53 3.20 2.71 2.52 2.21 1.90* 2.51 2.75 2.55 4.22 7.21
1929z 6.17 2.89 2.06 2.10 2.27 1.58 1.61 1.96 2.17 2.78 3.24 4.61
1930z 4.75 4.63 4.10 3.34 2.73 2.27 1.75 1.82 1.95 1.84 1.70 2.07
1931 2.16c 2.40c 3.01e 2.97c 2.75e 2.60c 1.17z .79z .89z 1.35c 2.10e 2.21e
1932 1.88c 2.08c 2.37c 3.36c 0 0 0 0 0 1.04 1.08 1.64
1933z 1.28 1.07 .83 .81 .76 .67 .35 .52 1.07 1.60 1.47 1.82**
1934z 1.42 2.00 2.14 1.75 1.51 .83 1.11 1.09r 1.10r 1.05r 1.24 1.55**
1935z 2.28 3.37 1.72 2.37 1.61 .91 .61 .79 1.32 1.64 1.72 2.26**
1936z 2.38 1.78 2.16 1.20 1.01 .81 .87 .83 1.04 1.01 1.11 1.52
1937z 1.31 1.14 1.64 1.62 2.19 1.70 .74 .83 1.09 1.10 1.55 2.03
1938z 1.93 1.98 1.56 1.14 1.02 .80 .45 .88 .97 .91 1.02 1.19
1939z 1.47 1.26 2.06 1.82 .87 1.38 1.35 .99r 1.10r 1.22r 1.95 1.85
1940z 1.61 4.11 8.44 6.44 5.34 1.67 .64 .77r 1.09r 1.10r 1.22 1.50
1941z 1.89 2.56 1.90 2.47 2.44 1.14 .65 1.02r 1.36r 1.73r 1.93 1.63
1942z 1.86 3.75 3.58 4.32 4.11 2.37 1.28 1.59 1.53 1.95 2.35 2.34
1943z 2.50 3.65 5.35 5.20 3.78 2.83 1.90r 2.08r 2.67r 2.83r 3.74 3.06
1944z 3.36 3.55 2.50 2.68 2.96 1.71 1.48r 1.92r 1.74r 1.86r 3.44r 3.77
1945z 4.39 3.68 3.18 3.14 2.82 2.74r 2.46r 2.68r 2.36r 2.87r 3.97 3.13
1946z 4.56 5.22 3.85 3.50 2.34 2.63 2.32r 2.63r 2.10r 2.69r 2.90 2.92
1947z 3.25 5.75 6.46 7.71 7.08 3.43
z Bu. hampers or baskets.
a Crates.
** Bu. hampers for years 1929-1930.






24 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


SOUASH (Yellow, Crates and Bushel Hampers)
YEAR JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC.
1926 $5.31c 3 0 $7.36c $5.55c $4.05c $1.17z $1.77z $1.89z $1.98z $2.06z $2.00z $1.71z
1927 2.13z 6.87c 5.77c 3.45c 1.22*c 0 0 2.25c* 2.02c 1.29c 1.73c 1.41c
1928 5.05c 5.50c 4.46c 1.39z 1.30z 1.43z 1.63z 0 0 3.15z 2.21z 2.30s
1929 2.88 2.93 2.99 1.36 1.21 1.35 2.42 2.61 1.54 1.99 2.62 2.59**
1930 2.64 3.71 3.62 3.48 1.72 .84 2.45 1.76 1.23 1.30 1.42 2.71*-
1931 4.14 4.32 4.14 2.75 1.40 1.36 2.46 1.61 1.48 2.24 2.60 2.64
1932z 3.07 3.11 3.28 1.85 .95 .73 1.90 1.78 2.04 .99 1.49 2.37
1933z 2.40 1.73 1.86 1.30 1.69 1.28 .89 1.20 1.88 1.98 1.25 1.30
1934z 1.88 2.30 2.70 1.96 .78 .94 2.36 2.16 1.19 1.11 2.54 2.63
1935z 6.48 4.33 1.45 1.21 .68 .76 1.13 2.08 2.53 2.92 2.33 3.35
1936z 3.27 2.78 3.26 3.31 1.65 1.35 1.61 1.35 1.20 1.52 2.10 2.70
1937z 1.99 3.27 3.42 2.20 1.36 .82 1.36 2.28 2.30 1.59 1.60 2.66
1938z 2.80 2.35 1.45 .79 .57 .71 .99 1.56 1.88 1.06 1.43 2.98
1939z 2.08 2.96 3.17 1.45 .72 1.12 1.40r 1.79r 1.04r .81 1.95 1.47
1940z 2.36 5.40 5.13 1.48 .74 .70 .82r 1.86r 1.69r .85r 1.35 2.29
1941z 4.11 4.21 4.41 3.27 1.61 1.22 1.90 2.32r 2.13r 1.85r 2.62 3.05
1942z 4.34 4.69 4.10 2.71 1.16 1.02 2.15r 2.74r 2.03r 1.75r 2.35 3.13
1943z 4.30 5.09 8.13 4.66 1.12 1.70r 2.85r 3.02r 2.73r 1.72r 3.57 2.97
1944z 5.47 3.78 3.07 3.77 4.35 3.00r 2.22r 2.05r 2.68r 2.34 3.03 4.24
1945z 4.78 3.46 4.24 2.83 1.22 2.18r 3.86r 5.40r 4.69r 2.48r 1.84 5.44
1946z 5.35 4.78 3.55 2.30 1.64 1.95r 3.22r 3.52r 3.04r 3.03 4.34 5.01
1947z 5.05 8.51* 8.96 3.63 2.79 2.45r
a Bushel hampers or baskets.
r Southern offerings.
Part month.
** Bu. hampers for years 1929-1930.
o Crates.

GREEN PEAS (Bushel Hampers or Bushel Baskets)
1926 $4.36 $4.72 $3.94 $3.10 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $2.33
1927 3.36* 0 2.82 2.08 1.21 .92 .90 .90 .98 1.03 0 1.87
1928 3.49 3.91 2.84 2.80 0 2.37 0 0 0 0 3.43* 2.83
1929 3.03 1.65 2.23 2.02 2.23 0 1.03" .97 0 0 O 2.88
1930 2.75 2.54 3.23 2.95 2.21* 0 0 0 0 0 2.72* 2.72
1931 3.69 2.06 2.77 1.74 1.54 0 0 0 0 0 3.09 2.42
1932 2.53 2.36 2.30 2.07 1.61 0 0 0 0 0 2.54r 2.42
1933 1.68 2.10 2.18 1.63 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.34 1.39
1934 1.38 1.60 1.41 1.51 1.33 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.26
1935 2.99 1.90 1.70 2.21 1.55 0 0 0 0 0 2.67 2.83
1936 1.90 1.40 1.81 1.82 1.39 0 0 0 0 0 1.77 1.38
1937 1.26 2.43 3.30 1.89 1.41 1.63* 0 0 0 0 3.18* 2.34
1938 1.80 1.60 1.75 1.67 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.86r 3.11r
1939 2.00 1.85 2.19 1.96 .81* 0 0 0 0 0 2.53 1.82
1940 1.45 3.25 2.49 1.88 1.19 0 0 0 0 0 1.85 2.23
1941 2.76 2.69 2.10 1.76 1.12r 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.32
1942 2.09 1.92 2.22 1.78 1.23* 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.29
1943 3.14 3.05* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.73* 4.37
1944 4.41 3.34 2.41 2.00r 2.57*r 0 0 0 0 0 0 4.28*
1945 4.19 3.28 2.79* 2.35* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4.00
1946 3.66 3.37 3.43 2.00 2.16* 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.79*
1947 3.04 0 3.85 3.36 3.28* 0
Part month.
r Southern offerings.

STRAWBERRIES (Pints or Quarts)
1926q .73 $.58 .41 $.35 $.22 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 3 0 $ 0 $ 0
1927q .65 .51 .23 .27 .13 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1928q 0 0 .35 .18 .12 .09 0 0 0 0 0 0
1929q .45* .29 .18 .18 .07 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1930q .34 .32 .21 .18 .08 .09 0 0 0 0 0 0
193q .35* .33 .31 .19 .09 .07* 0 0 0 0 0 0
1932q 18 .18 .24 .21 .08 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1933q .16j .11 .15 .11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1934q .23 .23 .21 .120 .08* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1935p .18 .11 .13 .08 .05 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1936p 0 .14 .12 .08 .05 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1937p .09* .09 .124* .09 .056/ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1938p 0 .10 .10 .08 .05 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1939p .12 .09* .12 .07 .05* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1940p .18 0 .14* .08 .06 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1941p .10-,Y .10 .12V .10 .05Y2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1942p 0 .14 .13 .10 .08 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1943p .15* 0 0 .20 .16 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1944p 0 0 .26* .27* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1945p 0 .33* .29 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1946p .30% .30 .29 .25% .18* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1947p .26 0 0 .20 .16* 0
q Quarts,-Prior to 1935 mostly in 24 qt. crates.
p Pints,-Beginning in 1935 mostly in 36 pt. crates.
Part month.



















DD'rT1TTr I IQ oI OTTrm~ T "T flTTlT A


000


:i6






FLORIDA CROPS 25


CABBAGE (Containers, see footnote)
YEAR JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC.
926 $3.02x $2.85x $2.62x S1.84x $2.58c $3.25e $4.09c $ 0 $ 0 3 0 $ 0 $ 0
927 1.54x 1.14x 1.21x 2.22c 2.45c 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
928 1.26x 1.15x 1.19x 1.58x 1.55x 1.40x 0 0 0 0 0 0
929 1.15x 1.00x .85x .75x 2.15c 2.00c 0 0 0 0 0 0
930 1.10x 1.06x 1.39x 1.64x 1.12x 1.27x 0 0 0 0 1.01x 1.05x
1931 1.04x .92x .85x .80x .71x 1.16x 0 0 0 0 1.57x .99x
1932 .70d .66d .75d .82d .66d .63d .52d .43d .33d 1.53a .62d .45d
1933 .27d .28d .66d .72d 0 0 3.22a 2.18a 1.91a 0 .90d .83d
1934 .48d .44d .39d .47d .59d .47d 1.20ar 1.80ar 1.45ar 1.40ar 1.75a 1.56a
1935 1.43a 2.87a 3.39a 3.20a 1.61a 1.24a 1.35ar 1.12ar 1.22ar 1.29ar 1.56a 1.76,
1936 1.70a 1.40a .98a 1.13a 1.00a 2.11a 4.55a 3.88a 2.56a 1.78a 1.53a 1.55a
1937 .77a .70a .97a .75a 1.65a 1.63a 1.24a 1.42a 1.26a 1.53a 2.15a 2.28a
1938 1.76a 1.92a .97a .78a .78a 1.07a 1.01a 1.17a 1.68a 1.36a 1.21a 1.24a
1939 .96a .59a 1.62a 2.30a .99a 1.32r 1.72r 1 83r 1.43r 1.57r 1.98a 1.39a
1940a 1.33a 1.44a .86a 1.07a 1.15a 1.33a* 1.06ar 1.10ar 1.18ar 1.12ar 1.15ar 73a
1941 28.89t 45.391 50.85t 27.22t 18.12t 32.80tr 49.32tr 59.69tr 55.24tr 52.11tr 49.00t 50.80t
1942 45.11t 24.47t 15.55t 14.75t 21.96t 32.96t 3.33ra 2.41ra 2.13ra 2.62ra 2.89ra 3.19a
1943a 2.73a 3.39a 5.77a* 5.88a* 5.35a 5.93ra 4.60ra 3.79ra 3.74ra 3.40ra 3.29ra 3.68a
1944a 3.24a 1.92a 1.69a 2.02a 2.54ra 3.14ra 3.92ra 3.73ra 3.74ra 3.43ra 3.69ra 4.82a
1945 3.77a 2.24a 1.51a 2.03a 1.87ra 3.87ra 3.90ra 3.51ra 3.01ra 2.87ra 2.65a 2.61a
1946g 1.30 1.39 1.84 1.76 1.22 1.07r 1.17r 1.91ra 1.91r 1.78r 1.22r 1.08
1947g 1.22 1.17 1.04 .91 1.67 2.00r
a 100 lbs.
g 50 lb. sacks.
r Southern offerings.
t Ton.
c Crates.
x 1% bu. hampers.
Part month.
BEETS (Per Dozen Bunches)
1932 3 0 $ 0 $ .66* S .66 3 .47 $ .44 $ 0 $ 0 $ .62 5 .67 $.73* $.66*
1933 .51 .46 .41 .35 .36* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1934 .73 .64 .60 .56 .45 .38 .59 .83 77* .68* .80 .75
1935 .75 .66 .65 .49 .42 .44* 0 0 0 0 0 .64*
1936 .(3 .58 .53 .41 .42 .42* 0 0 0 0 0 0
1937 62 .45 .45 .48 .46 .53 0 0 0 0 0 0
1938 0 .53 .53 .45 .40 .40* 0 0 0 0 0 .76*
1939 0 .66 .50 .49 .45 .46 0 0 0 0 0 .62*
1940 .65 .76 .64 .51 .45 .40*r 0 0 0 0 0 .71
1941 .72 .71 .63 .60 .55r .55*r 0 0 0 0 0 .87*
1942 .81 .77 .78 .71 .75 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1943 .78* .82 1.07 1.01 .99* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1944 1.47 1.15 1.05 1.04 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1945 1.46 1.26 1.15 1.21* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1946 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1947 0 1.59 1.25 1.25* 0 0
Part month.
r Southern offerings.
CARROTS (Per Dozen Bunches)
1932 $ 0 $ 0 $ .75* $ .71 $ .56 $.50 $ .75* $ .69 $ .64 $ .67 $ .62* $ .59
1933 .43 .38 .37 .33 .32 .38* .56 .66 .68 .63 .62 .68
1934 .70 .60 .50 .49 .42 .37 .46 .56 .57 .54 .59 .69
1935 .64 .60 .53 .45 .36 .42 .49 .55 .58 .56 .57 .66
1936 .61 .51 .47 .39 38 .44* .46 .61 .60 .58 .51 .47
1937 .47 .45 .44 .43 .44 .57 .75 .55 .50 .51 .53 .55
1938 .63 .43 .42 .39 .39 .39 .47 51 .52 .58 .61 .58
1939 .52 .44 .43 .40 .40 .40 0 0 0 0 0 0
1940 0 .50*r .37r .41r .40 .38* 0 0 0 0 0 &
1941 0 .42* .47 .40 .44r .55*r 0 0 0 0 0 0
1942 0 0 .58 .51 .58* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1943 0 0 .93* .82 .62 .73* 0 0 0 0 0 0
1944 1.25 1.08* .74* .73* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1945 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1946 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1947 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Part month.
r Southern offerings.
I






26 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


TOMATOES (Crates)
(Loose pack or bushel baskets loose pack 50-55 lbs.)
YEAR JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC.
1926 $5.31 $5.51 $5.25 $4.31 $4.69 $2.83 $2.24 $ 0 $ 0 $2.81 $2.75* $6.50*
1927 5.65 3.70 3.13 2.24 2.06 1.68 2.09 2.26 1.92 1.90 0 3.85* i
1928 3.03 2.83 4.45 3.28 2.28 1.82 1.88 2.81 2.68 0 3.25* 2.92*
1929 2.07 1.73 2.52 2.88 2.45 1.48 2.36 2.46 2.47 2.16 3.43* 3.74
1930 4.26 3.65 2.89 2.62 3.13 2.35 1.91 2.00 2.59 2.20 2.19 2.98
1931 2.36 2.34 2.87 3.16 2.84 1.30 1.50 0 0 0 3.09 3.48/
1932 2.59 1.96 1.87 1.59 2.12 2.03 .04/ .047/ .041/ .042/ .04%/ .05
1933 .05/ .04%/ .04/ 1.96 1.71 1.79r 1.51r 1.64r 2.01r 2.40r 2.19r 2.37
1934 2.35 2.02 1.82 2.58 2.24 1.45r 1.72r 2.00r 1.89r 2.12r 2.75 2.69
1935 3.33 4.25 3.83 2.63 1.87 1.32 1.41 1.41 1.83 2.53 2.38 3.13
1936 2.21 2.75 3.38 3.69 2.54 1.34 1.62 1.87 1.87 1.83 1.91 1.96
1937 1.92 1.98 2.40 2.88 2.45 2.06 1.23 1.40 2.04 2.31 3.60 3.40
1938 2.44 2.25 1.49 1.69 1.31 1.01 .96 1.21 1.73 1.66 2.69 3.25
1939 3.68 2.88 3.26 3.51 2.95 1.78 1.60r 1.42r 1.60r 2.13r 3.36 3.13
1940k 3.04 4.06 4.00* 5.38 3.74 .90 1.12r 1.28r 1.52r 1.62 2.97 2.58
1941k 2.92 3.43 3.94 4.31 3.05 2.10 1.63 2.16r 2.36r 2.48r 3.61 3.31
1942k 3.66 4.79 3.02 4.41 3.01 2.11 2.22r 2.76r 3.15r 4.52r 5.64r 4.71r
1943k 5.85 5.91 6.52 7.39 3.95 3.44r 3.66r 3.62r 3.58r 3.76r 5.38 5.89
1944k 6.01 5.75 5.86 4.75 4.89 4.58r 4.27r 4.03r 4.42r 4.90r 6.34 7.65
1945m 5.94 4.66 4.40 5.21 4.63 4.64r 4.96r 5.04r 3.92r 4.76r 7.53r 7.50r
1946m 5.91 7.16 6.96 7.74 3.77 3.22r 3.36r 3.41r 3.43r 3.52r 4.52 4.37
1947m 5.51 6.78 7.01 9.06 6.10 4.37r
/ Lugs.
k Crates or Bushel Baskets 50-55 lbs.
m 40-50 lb. crates, mostly 40 Ibs. during past three years.
Part month.
r Southern offerings.


SWEET POTATOES (100 Ib. Sacks)

1926 $3.00 $3.60 $3.63 $4.68 $4.91 $ 0 $ 0 $4.47* $3.44 $2.94 $2.20 $1.93
1927 2.68 2.41 2.20 1.90 1.90 0 2.98* 2.49 1.93 2.02 1.56 1.55
1928 1.84 1.88 2.36 2.32 2.63 3.00 3.32 4.14 3.07 2.45 2.00 2.01
1929 2.59 2.75 2.73 2.75 2.75 0 3.48 2.35 2.00 2.13 1.92 1.75
1930 1.77 2.00 2.00 2.26 2.35 2.47 3.31 3.84 2.74 1.56 1.90 1.89
1931 2.15 2.37 2.58 3.27 3.69 4.15 3.83 2.75 1.87 1.62 1.56 1.59
1932 1.73 1.75 1.88 2.03 2.07 1.95 2.07 1.22 .97 .87 .77 .70
1933 .73 .74 .80 .76 .87 .96 1.94 2.20 1.34 1.07 .94 .94
1934 1.13 1.36 1.41 1.62 2.24 3.29 3.32 2.11 1.35 1.09 .98 1.03
1935 1.10 1.25 1.55 1.53 1.62 1.89 1.83 1.40 1.04 .98 .86 1.09
1936 1.17 1.50 1.50 2.00 1.61 2.33 3.92 3.25 2.05 1.41 1.31 1.28
1937 1.37 1.49 2.05 2.48 3.04 3.00 1.93 2.08 1.49 1.20 1.13 1.40
1938 1.57 1.65 1.72 1.94 1.86 1.94 2.31 1.38 .97 .99 .99 .96
1939 1.11 1.08 1.06 1.55 1.68 1.72 1.81 1.60 1.22 1.09 1.04 1.17
1940s 1.26r 1.50r 1.55r 1.61r 1.80*r 1.73r 1.66*r 1.74 1.77 1.49 1.39 1.51
1941s 1.73r 1.94r 1.94r 2.10r 1.54r 1.62r 1.75 1.20 1.35 1.39 1.19 1.28
1942 1.50s 1.55s 1.51s 1.50s 1.28z 1.62z 3.28rs 4.45rs 3.35rs 2.50rs 2.01rs 2.39rs
1943 2.86rs 2.75rs 2.16rz 2.98rz 4.04rz 4.05*rz 4.96rs 5.83rs 4.95rs 3.55rs 3.13rs 3.67rs
1944 4.33s 4.64s 3.97s 2.88z 3.03z 4.13z 3.25z 5.06s 3.82s 3.66s 2.69s 3.08s
1945 2.95rz 2.74rz 2.75rz 2.76rz 2.67rz 3.09rz 5.70z 4.94s 3.81s 3.43s 3.02s 2.82z
1946 2.88s 2.82s 3.66rz 3.70rz 3.94rz 4.16rz 4.71rz 2.89rz 2.04rz 2.10rz 2.35rz 2.15rz
1947 2.48rz 2 52rz 2.90rz 3.09rz 3.19rz 3.42rz
Part month.
r Southern offerings.
s 100 lb. sacks.
z Bushel hampers or baskets.






FLORIDA CROPS 27


SPINACH (Bushel Hampers)
EAR JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC.
933 $ .73 $ 56 S .63 8 .65 p.66 8 .60* 8 57 S 0 81 01* 81.45 $1.32 $1.09
934 .75 .87 .85 .7S 61 56 0 0 0 .99 .91 1.14
935 1.19 1.07 .89 .82 .55 50 79 1 28 1 53* 1.48 1.22 1.27
936 1.16 .82 .63 .78 .96 .91 1 06 1.41* 1 37* 1.19* 1.03 1.22
937 .82 .68 1.13 1.03 .73 .64 .65 1.01 1 10 1.27 1.17 1.26
1938 .95 1.04 83 .60 .74 .70 95 1.18 1 11 1.08 1.12 1.08
1939 .94 .80 .85 .78 72 82r 1 (0r 90r 1.02 1.12r 1 16r 1.04
1940 1.03 1.46 1.04 .78 .77 75 0 0 0 () 75* .97
1941 1 12 1.15 1.02 .92 .90r .97*r 0 0 0 0 1.27 1.14
1942 1 02 1.00 1.00 1 11 0 0 0 0 0 1.41* 1.38
1943 1.34 1.31 1.61 1 78 1.66r 1 62*r 0 0 0 0 0 2.13*
1944 2.08 1.72 1.59 1.56 1.73 1.76 1.63 0 0 0 2 04* 2.04
1945 1 83 1 39 1.37 1.44* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.75*
1946 1.64 1.51 1 52 1.67 1.43 1.11* 0 0 I) 0 1 50* 1.64
1947 1.69 0 2 26* 2 00 0 0
Part month.
r Southern offerings.

TURNIPS (Per Dozen Bunches)
1932 0 0 $ 66* $ .57 8 .43 8 .44 $ 0 8 0 $ 61 8 .52 $ 39 3 .39
1933 .32 .36 .40 .34 .33* 0 0 0 0 67* .56 .42
1934 .34 .57 .59 .46 .29 .34* 0 0 .55* .46 .42 .58
1935 .59 .55 .44 .40 .41 .46 .55 .55 .56 .75 .51 .53
1936 .55 .56 .47 .41 .44 .42 .53 .60 .50 .60 52 .51
1937 .26 .40 48 56 .58 59 0 70* .85 .S3 69 .64
1938 .59 .60 .48 .37 .34 .56* .53* .65 .82 .76 .55 .61
1939 .69 .63 .75 .71 .61 .45 0 .81r* .64r .60r .51 .42
1940 .53 .78 .72 .47 .40r .43r .44*r 60r .85r .59 .59 .62
1941 .70 .77 .56 37 .55r .67*r 0 .S9*r .99r .99r .67 .54
1942 .66 .68 .67 .69 0 0 0 0 0 .77 .64 .69
1943 .74 .82 1.23 1 34 91 .85* 0 0 0 0 1.53r 1.16 1.10
1944 1 32 1.01 .94 1.14 1.35* 0 0 I 0 0 1.21 1.19
1945 1.16 .99 1.07 1.52 0 0 0 I 0 1.10* 1.03 1.18
1946 1.21 1.62 1.42 1 22 1.13* 0 0 0 142* 1.64 1.08 1.17
1947 1.08 1.48* 1.76 1.71 1.74 0
Part month.
r Southern offerings.


CAULIFLOWER (Crates or 1 Dozen)
1933 $1.49* $1.60* $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 S 0 S 0 S 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0
1934 2.00 2.19 2.43* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 01*
1935 1.92 2.01 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1936 1.25* 2.05* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1937 1 81 2.15* 1.69* 1.58* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.35*
1938 1.10 1.22 1.10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.29*
1939 1.52 1.48 1.61* 0 0 0 0 01 0 0 0 1.50*
1940 1.55 1.81* 1.66* 1.33* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.34
1941 1.61 1.51 1.74 1.89* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.98*
1942 1.63 1.85 2.00 2.08* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.31*
1943 2.32 2.07* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.77
1944 2.65 2.44 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4.14*
1945 3.73 2.76* 2.33* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1946 2.85 3.02 3.57 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1947 2.32* 2.78 2.98* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Part month.
r Southern offerings.
Various size crates, including 1 bushel hampers, from 1933 to 1940. Mostly in crates holding 12-18
heads, or per dozen loose for large heads since 1940.





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Units of Measure a

The following Standard Units of Measurement are used in ascertainin
the value of each product as listed below:

Acre-All crops listed as Feed.

Bushel-Alyce Clover Seed, Corn, Chayotes, Chufas, Dasheens, Irish Po-
tatoes, Oats, Peanuts, Peaches, Pop Corn, Rice, Rutabaga, Sweet Po-
tatoes, Soy Beans, Velvet Beans, Wheat.

Gallon-Milk, Sugar Cane Syrup, Sorghum Syrup.

Quart-Strawberries, Blueberries.

Pound-Cheese, Chestnuts, Black Walnuts, Beeswax, Butter, Deer Tung,
Frogs, Grapes, Honey, Papayas, Pecans, Tung Oil, Wool.

Barrel-Pears.

Crate-Avocado Pears, Assorted Berries, Beets, Beans (string), Bread-
fruit, Broccoli, Cabbage, Celery, Cucumbers, Carrots, Collards, Cher-
ries, Cantaloupes, English Peas, Eggplant, Ferns, Grapefruit, Guavas,
Japanese Persimmons, Kumquats, Lettuce, Lima Beans, Lemons,
Limes, Loquats, Mangoes, Mustard, Pepper, Parsley, Plums, Pine-
apples, Pomegranates, Radishes, Rhubarb, Rape, Romaine, Okra,
Oranges, Sapodillas, Sugar Apples, Spinach, Squashes, Tomatoes, Tur-
nips, Tangerines, Young Berries, Onions.

Per Head or Each-All Livestock and Poultry, Pet Animals and Birds,
Pumpkins and Cocoanuts.
Per Ton-Hay and Forage, Kaffir Corn, Cassava, Sugar (short ton),
Broom Corn, Silage.

Per Bunch-Bananas.

Per Bale-Cotton.

Per Carload-Watermelons.

Per Dozen-Eggs, Cut Flowers, Flowering Bulbs.

Per Lot-Farm Machinery.

Per Stand-Bees.

Per Tree-All Fruit- and Nut-Bearing Trees (Nursery Stock and Non-
Bearing Trees have not been valued).





FLORIDA CROPS 29



Summary of Production by rears


Below is given a summary by years of the agricultural production as
received through its enumerators by this Department. By comparison
hey serve to show the general trend of the farming, trucking, horticul-
tural, and livestock interests of the State.


YEAR 1913-14
Field Crop, acres.................... ............................ $ 1,181,434
Vegetable and Garden Products, acres ................... ........ 93,413
Total ..................................... ......... $ 1,274,847


TOTAL VALUE OF ALL FARM PRODUCTS
Field Crops.................................................. $ 18,861,389
Vegetable and Garden Products. ................................ 13,185,904
Fruit Products.................. ............................. 13,447,435
Live Stock on Hand ........................................... 29,541,931
Poultry and Products ......................................... 4,665,001
Dairy Products .................. ............................ 4,130,925
Apiary Products................................................ 104,550
Total..................................... ........ $ 83.937,135


YEAR 1915-16
TOTAL ACREAGE OF CROPS
Field Crops, acres................... .......................... 1,478,428
Vegetable and Garden Products, acres ........................... 68,955
Total.................. ................. $ 1,547,383


TOTAL VALUE OF ALL FARM PRODUCTS
Field Crops ............................................... $ 21,613,300
Vegetable and Garden Products. .............................. . 10,724,519
Fruit Products .................. .............................. 13,511,950
Live Stock on Hand. .................. ....................... 29,869,842
Poultry and Products.......................................... 4,559,876
Dairy Products .............................................. 3,881,452
M miscellaneous Products ................... ..................... 174,225
Total Values ........................................ $ 84,335,164


YEAR 1917-18
TOTAL ACREAGE OF CROPS
Field Crops, acres............................................ $ 1,531,338
Vegetable and Garden Products ................................. 105,645
Total ............... .......... .................. $ 1,636,893






30 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


TOTAL VALUE OF ALL FARM PRODUCTS
Field Crops................................................... $ 31,145,904
Vegetable and Garden Products. ........................ ......... 18,838,149
Fruit Products .............................................. 16,381,818

LIVESTOCK ON HAND JULY 1, 1918
Horses .. ................................................... $ 5,764,451
Mules ....................................................... 7,782,483
Milch Cows ................................................... 2,542,446
*All Other Cattle............................................ 23,670,239
Other Cattle Shipped ........................................... 2,075,552
*Hogs on Hand............................................... 8,767,353
Other Hogs ...................................... ......... 11,478,002
Sheep and Goats .............................................. 494,847

Total................. ....................... $ 62,573,373

Poultry and Products........................................... $ 5,993,243
Dairy and Products .......................................... 6,017,296
M miscellaneous Products ........................................ 312,993

Grand Total ........................................... $141,262,776
*Total number of hogs for the twelve (12) months would have been 2,164,722, if we
could have included the 477,500 butchered and the 591,651 that were shipped out of the
counties and the State for market by packers and others. The value of hogs butchered
and shipped was, for the butchered, $6,069,841, and for those shipped, $5,408,161, or a
total of $20,245,355 for hogs alone, including those on hand July 1, 1918.

YEAR 1919-20
Field Crops................... ............................. $ 27,671,320
F ruits ....................... .................................. 26,788 ,500
Stock Cattle on Hand, July, 1920 ............................... 21,444,525
Truck Products ............................................... 15,818,297
Horses and Mules on Hand, July, 1920 .......................... 12,282,604
Poultry and Eggs............................................. 7,768,195
Milk and Butter .................. ........................... 6,427,304
Hogs an Hand, July, 1920 ..................................... 5,076,851
Milch Cows on Hand, July, 1920. ................................ 2,204,186
Thoroughbred Cattle on Hand, July, 1920........................ 1,454,154
Sheep, W ool and Goats ........................................ 505,298
H oney and Beeswax ........................................... 98,515

Total .................. ............................ $124,559,749
Nineteen per cent of the State is not represented in the above because ten counties
did not report.
The aggregate value of all soil products actually marketed in the State during 1920
was approximately $80,000,000.

YEAR 1921-22
The counties reporting for 1922 showed approximately the following values:
Fruit Crops.................. ................................ $ 27,804,478
Field Crops .................................................. 20,231,412
Truck Crops................... ............................... 17,378,323
M ilk................... .................. .... .... ... ...... 6,490,493
Eggs................... ............... ........... .... ..... 4,379,753
Poultry ...................................... ..... .......... 3,045,000
Live Stock on Hand, All Kinds ............................... 56,000,000

Total ............................................... $135,329,459
It is impossible to state just how much of the live stock is turned into cash and that
represents a year's growth. When production is stated in terms of dollars a comparison
should be made of the general level of prices for a series of years. Prices of farm
products went down during the general deflation from war prices.






FLORIDA CROPS 31


YEAR 1923-24

Fruit Crops................................ ..... ............
Field Crops..........................................................
Truck Crops................................................
Root Crops ......................................... .....
Miscellaneous Crops................ ........................
Live Stock Marketed. Alive or Slaughtered .................. ....
Poultry and Eggs................ ............................
M ilk and Butter. .... ................................. ...

Total ........... ..... .. .................... ... ....


$ 21,637,762
14,765,738
11,019,626
3,999,921
2,661,168
3,212,375
7,650.729
7,089,819

$ 72,037,138


YEAR 1926-27


Field Crops...............................................
Truck Crops... ............... .........................
Fruits and Nuts.... ..................................
Live Stock Sold .............................. .... ..........
Poultry Sold ................................... ..........
Eggs.................. .................................
Milk, Butter, and Cheese ................. ... ... .........
Miscellaneous Crops ................. .... ..... ........ ....

Total....................... ..................


$ 25,355,235
12,549,459
31,325,033
5,350,540
4,208,014
6,446,611
11,472,109
5,842,745

$102,547,746


YEAR 1931-32


Field Crops ...................................... .............
Truck Crops ..................................................
Fruit and Nuts ................................................
Live Stock Sold, Alive or Slaughtered ............................
Poultry......................................................
Eggs....................... ...................................
Milk, Cheese, and Butter ...................................
Miscellaneous................... ............................

Total ................ .............................


$ 10,189,843
15,534,189
33,156,031
2,662,234
2,480,840
4,079,519
8,552,785
3,158,462

$ 79,813,903


YEAR 1936-37
FISCAL FACTS

Number of Acres in Farms ..................................... 6,220,787
Number of Acres in Merchantable Timber. ...................... 571,755
Number of Acres in Pasture .................................... 3,780,596
Number of Acres Cultivated to Field and Truck Crops............. 1,571,371
Number of Acres in Groves ..................................... 428,424
N umber of Farms Listed ..................................... 92,681
*Number of Non-Farms Listed .................. .... .... ....... 36,067

Non-Farmers are persons listed that grow Livestock, Bees, and Poultry but do not
farm.


AGRICULTURAL INVESTMENTS

Citrus Fruit Trees ............................................ $158,077.368
Other Fruit Trees ............................................ 2,270,918
Nut Bearing Trees............................................ 3,413,434

Total Fixed Investments ....... ....................... $163,691,720






32 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Movable Investments Exclusive of Household Furniture,
Automobiles, and Trucks
Farm Machinery ........................................... $ 11,792,430
W ork Stock.................................... .............. 6,395,259
Stock Cattle. ........ ................... ........... ........ 18,663,024
D airy Cattle.................................. .............. 5,105,073
Hogs. ................................... ..................... 3,774,239
Sheep ............ ....................... .................... 110 ,248
G oats............................. .................... 62,203
Bees ................................ ....................... 211,535
Poultry .. ............................... ................... 3 ,356 ,178

Total Movable Investments ................... .... .. $ 49,470,189
Total Fixed Investments ............................... 163,691,720

*Total Investments............................. . $213,161,909


AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION
Field Crops. ............................ ................. $ 30,543,412
Truck Crops ................... .............. ............ 25,255,507
Citrus Fruit Crops .................. .... ................. 42,877,622
Other Fruit Crops. ............................................ 1,078,937
Nut Crops.............. ................... .................. 580,173
Beef Products................................. ............. 2,184.632
Pork Products................... ............... ........ 4,524,531
M utton and W ool....... ..................................... 15,498
Dairy Products ............................................... 10,539,511
P oultry .. .............................. .................... 1,419 ,670
E ggs................... .................................... 5 ,782 ,255
Honey. .............................. ........................ 151,343
Beeswax.............. ................ ........................ 5,198
Floriculture ................... ........ ...................... 1,396,151
Deer Tung ............. ................................ 17,130

Total Production..................... .......... $126,372,164
These figures do not include investments in FLORICULTURE and VITRICULTURE.


YEAR 1941
FISCAL FACTS
Number of Acres in Farms ..................................... 7,444,423
Number of Farms Listed ....................................... 68,800
*Number of Non-Farms Listed ........ .......... ....... 24,344
Non-Farmers are persons listed that grow Livestock, Bees, and Poultry but do not
farm.

AGRICULTURAL INVESTMENTS
Fixed Investment Exclusive of Land
Citrus Fruit Trees.......................... .........$ 172,204,560
Other Fruit Trees............................................ 2,687,952
Nut-Bearing Trees ............................................ 3,652,800
*Farm Improvements ................ ......................... 84,340,728

Total Fixed Investments ............................. $261,886,040
Includes Buildings, Fencing, Wells, etc.

Movable Investments Exclusive of Household Furniture
Automobiles, and Trucks
Farm Machinery.................................. .. ........... $ 10,176,446
W ork Stock .................... ................... .. .... 6,595,680
Stock Cattle ........ ................................. 21,590,510
Dairy Cattle ................ ................... .............. 8,114,460





FLORIDA CROPS 33


Hogs........... .. .... ......................
Sheep............................ ........................
G oats.. .................................... ..........
Bees ....................................................
Poultry............... ............... ...............

Total Fixed Investments........ ..................
Total Movable Investments ...........................

Total Investments.... ..........................


3,120,672
101,720
22,435
322,680
3,163,255

$262,886,040
53,207,848

$316,093,888


Number
Land in
Percent
Average


AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION VALUE
Citrus Fruits ............................ ... . ... ........
Vegetables... ...........................................
Live Stock and Dairy Products .............. ...............
Field Crops ........................ ............
Poultry Products... ........................ ......
M miscellaneous .... .................. .........
Other Fruits and Nuts .................. ............... .
Bee Products ..........................................

Total............................................

The Following Was Compiled and Published by
The Florida State Chamber of Commerce
1940
of farms...................................... .. 62,248
farms, acres .................................... 8,337,708
of total area of state. .. . ................... . . 24
size of farms, acres. ................... .... ... 133.9


Land in farms according to use, acres:
Used for crops ............................... ...
Cropland fallow......... ......................
1/ Cropland used for pasture...........................
1/ Total cropland. ................... .... ........
Total land pastured.. ..........................
W oodlands and all other ...........................
1/ 1940 not comparable with 1945.


1,751,275
462,248
643,065
2,856,588
not available
5,481,120


Livestock Census, January 1, 1947
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, Preliminary
Number
C attle........... ................................... ....... 1,265,000
Hogs ... ................. ................... ........ 630,000
S heep .................................................. 14 ,000
H orses..... ..................................... .... . 27,000
M ules ............................ ... .... ... ..... ..... 33,000
Chickens .................. ................... ..... 2,864,000
Turkeys..................... .......... ... ... .... ..... 30,000

Total .................. ....... ............. ......

1944-45 SEASON
Cases (Basis 24 No. 2 cans)


(anned
Grapefruit
Sections

411,145


(Canned
Grapefruit
Juice

12,205.099


(annied
Orange
Juice

13,935,381


Canned
Blended
Juice

7,744,505


$ 35,062,399
31,611,558
25,294,266
23,925,691
11,990,131
5,884,715
1,571,068
166,479

$135,506,307



1945
61,159
13,083,501
37.7
213.9

1,840,264
474,367
562,563
2,877,194
9,095,740
1,110,567


Farm Value
$68,310,000
10,206,000
98,000
3,024,000
5,280,000
4,640,000
207,000

$91,765,000




Total
Cases

34,116,130


194546 SEASON
2,350,000 15,000,000 18,700,000 12,270,000 48,845,000*
* Last season, tangerine juice was on the market for the first time. 525,000* cases were packed.






34 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


RECORD OF INTERSTATE CITRUS SHIPMENTS BY CARS
SEASON 1948-1949


WEEK
ENDING

September................. 3
10
17
25
October.............. ...... 2
9
16
23
30
November.. .......... 6
13
20
27
December................. 4
11
18
25
January .................. 1
8
15
22
29
February.................. 5
12
19
26
M arch .................... 5
12
19
26
A pril..................... 2
9
16
23
30
May...................... 7
14
21
28
June...................... 4
11
18
25
July...................... 2
9
16
23
30
August.................... 6
13

TOTALS ....................

SEASONS
1947-48.......................
1946-47.......................
1945-46........................
1944-45 .......................
1943-44........................


ORGS


35
14
72
307
845
1,105
943
1,181
1,286
1,275
1,196
1,773
2,279
3,069
1,617
56
2,467
2,212
1,761
1,414
1,552
2,118
1,758
1,955
2,152
2,044
1,793
1,710
1,680
1,737
1,914
1,727
1,637
1,627
1,700
1,544
1,321
1,064
892
715
374
111
60
39
27
14
1


58,174


51,715
62,118
57,656
53,429
67,095


GRFT

72
380
268
276
394
634
745
730
547
380
444
498
478
567
439
626
503
24
498
674
749
606
642
769
854
1,098
1,085
970
1,074
1,118
936
872
958
893
702
614
610
476
326
179
174
170
92
29
11
3
5
5



25,450


TANGS.






5
11
121
301
267
520
417
460
668
884
574
17
500
430
244
155
83
48
30
52
91
94
121
79
80
47
63
26
22
16
9
10
5
4
5
1








6,546


17,744
19,505
17,642
12,822
19,129


5,449
5,346
6,988
7,693
7,066


NOTE: Interstate shipments compiled from records of Florida Citrus Exchange. Cars
indicate the approximate cars if shipped as fresh.






FLORIDA CROPS 35

RECORD OF CITRUS CANNED BY BOXES AND CARS
SEASON 1948-1949
ORANGES GRAPEFRUIT TANGERINES
WEEK
ENDING Boxes Cars Boxes Cars Boxes Cars

September..... 3 .......... ..
10 ...... .. ..... 3,260 7 ... ..
17 ......... ..... 44,656 89 ..
25 502 1 37,886 76 .....
October....... 2 1,894 4 41,121 82 ..
9 16,917 33 71,271 143 ..
16 21,016 159 89,447 179 .....
23 253,636 497 254,945 510 ....... .....
30 282,212 553 373,085 746 18,463 40
November..... 6 439,899 863 422,614 845 65,148 142
13 559,164 1,096 480,727 961 73,846 161
20 568,731 1,115 604,830 1,210 77,483 168
27 463,947 910 503,633 1,007 53,880 117
December..... 4 608,749 1,194 555,254 1,111 65,747 143
11 679,175 1,332 605,780 1,212 73,187 159
18 882,945 1,731 571,054 1,142 108,479 236
25 756,979 1,484 409,914 820 89,723 195
January....... 1 736,767 1,445 511,086 1,022 10,952 24
8 1,034,252 2,028 746,200 1,496 82,822 180
15 1,029,200 2,018 695,926 1,392 91,733 199
22 1,127,870 2,212 772,645 1,545 85,071 185
29 1,197,003 2,347 839,613 1,679 45,598 99
February...... 5 1,055,243 2,069 811,053 1,622 28,840 63
12 1,174,815 2,304 738,646 1,477 5,389 12
19 1,311,029 2,571 686,715 1,373 8,652 19
26 1,166,283 2,287 706,255 1,412 2,807 6
March........ 5 1,028,271 2,016 606,236 1,212 1,357 3
12 1,050,943 2,061 595,591 1,191 1,918 4
19 977,535 1,917 653,182 1,306 2,408 5
26 854,059 1,675 537,769 1,076 1,799 4
April.......... 2 849,055 1,665 453,684 907 228
9 711,878 1,396 367,345 735 778 2
16 657,894 1,290 331,512 663 569 1
23 625,338 1,226 210,700 421 1,910 4
30 728,647 1,429 179,431 359 378 1
May.......... 7 734,584 1,440 127,650 255 ..
14 693,724 1,360 114,242 228 50
21 616,605 1,209 96,875 194 27
28 543,520 1,066 86,455 173 112
June.......... 4 467,919 917 74,650 149 ..
11 389,697 764 73,960 148 ..
18 284,027 557 61.621 123 ..
25 121,550 238 51,125 102 ..
July. ......... 2 27,881 55 48,706 97 ..
9 6,745 13 14,922 30 ..
16 8,901 17 21,103 42 ..
23 4,473 9 15,116 30 ..
30 880 1 4,501 9 ..
August........ 6 43 ...... 1,486 3 ..
13 99 ...... 340 1 ..

TOTALS........... 26,812,496 52,575 16,305,820 32,612 999,354 2,172

SEASONS
1947-48........... 30,376,340 63,284 19,448,586 39,691 598,505 1,273
1946-47........... 19,825,485 41,303 15,864,346 32,376 930,751 1,980
1945-46 ........... 19,183,860 39,965 22,124,436 44,177 515,606 1,072
1944-45........... 14,223,889 27,730 15,133,817 29,684 2,728 5
1943-44........... 10,912,352 22,270 20,429,173 41,692 ........
NOTE: Canning data from Florida Citrus Commission records.





36 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

THE FOLLOWING STATISTICS ARE FROM 1947-48 REPORTS:
AGRICULTURE
Fruits ................................................. $126,000,000
Live Stock ...................................... ........ 53,000,000
Vegetables ............................................... 95,000,000

MANUFACTURING
Forest Products. .................................... ..... $140,000,000
Food Products ........................................... 150,000,000
NAVAL STORES
270,000 (Barrels)

FISH
Fish caught for food, (pounds)............................. 91,600,000
Non-food fish, (pounds) ................................... 137,000,000
MINERALS
Minerals of all kinds................ ... ................. $ 25,000,000
AIRPLANE
Airplane freight to the value of ............................ $ 60,000,000
EXPORTS by waterports and IMPORTS
10 Waterports handle, (tons).............................. 20,000,000


FLUE-CURED TOBACCO

SEASON AV. PRICE % DISTRIBUTION
& EXPORT VALUE OF DISAPPEARANCE
% OF 1934-38 % ::: -

Price DOMESTIC USE




; ". o ..
200 T H E
0 R T SE:X*OR ::::;:i:,::::i







pI er Ib. EXPORTS TO U. K.
0 E o va e EXPORTS TO U. K.
1935 1940 1945 1950 1935 1940 1945 1950
YEAR BEGINNING JULY


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEG. 46264-XE RU REsU OF AGRICULTU RAL ECONOMICS


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG. 48264-XX BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS





FLORIDA CROPS 37


SOME FLORIDA DAIRY FACTS
Number of dairymen ..................................... 1,100
Number of cows milked .................. .... . . 150,000
Gallons of milk produced in 1948.. ....... ............... 75,000,000
Number of milk plants. ................... ... 223
Number of wholesale frozen desserts plants. .............. 82
Number of retail ice cream plants .. ............ 250
Gallons of frozen desserts made in 1938..................... 10,620,353
Gallons of milk imported-Oct. 1, 1948 to Mar. 31, 1949. ..... 245,273
Gallons of 40% cream imported -Oct. 1, 1948 to Mar. 31, 1949 869,795
Pounds of cottage cheese imported-Oct. 1, 1948 to Mar. 31, 1949 1,347,729
(On basis of national average, there are over 20,000 people in Florida employed in the production, process-
ing and distribution of dairy products.)
Compiled by Milk Inspection Division, Fla. State Dept. of Agriculture, John M. Scott, Chief Dairy
Supervisor, May 23, 1949.


FARMERS' SHARE OF CONSUMERS' DOLLAR
F. W. RISHER, Director
Poultry and Egg Division

The U. S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics reports the farmers of
the U. S. received 49% of the consumers' dollar in April, 1949, the lowest
in six years. The farmers' share of the consumers' dollar reached a peak
of 55 cents several times between November, 1945 and January, 1948.
The farmers received an average of 40c of the consumers' dollar for the
five-year period, 1935 to 1939.
The price spreads between the farmers and the consumers for special
selected food products, compared with the 1935-1939 average in April,
1948 and March and April, 1949:

Period April March April
Product 1935-49 1948 1949 1949
Eggs...................... 77 74 73 74
Chickens.................. 56 58 62 67
Beef...................... 56 71 67 68
Pork...................... 52 63 67 62
Oranges. ................... 37 32 33 41
Fluid Milk. ............... 55 62 59 58
Irish Potatoes. ............. 29 37 28 45
Sweet Potatoes .......... ... 41 51 49 46
Snap Beans................ 40 43 47 41
Lettuce. Head............. 41 47 54 36


From this report egg producers received the largest share of the con-
sumers' dollar. The reason for this may be because the egg is one of
nature's products that can be served in the original container. Then the
beef cattlemen and poultry meat producers seem tied for the second place
for the greater share of the consumers' dollar followed by the dairymen
when they sell whole milk. Since the above are all important agricul-
tural products produced in Florida and gaining ground as a source of
revenue for the state, this is very encouraging.
The great orange crop does not show up so well, for the growers received
only a little more than one-third of the consumers' dollar.





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Competitive Markets
By NEILL RHODES
Of the State Marketing Bureau
BEAN COMPETITION
Competition.-The competition given by other States to Florida bean
shipments is the greatest in the early fall and late spring period of the
Florida shipping season. Domestic competition is the least in the period
December, January, February and March, and latter November and early
April might be included since normally bean shipments from other States
are comparatively light in these part months. Bean shipments are made
from Louisiana and Texas in more months of the Florida season than from
other states, but Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia
ship beans in October ahead of initial shipments from Florida, and ship-
ments from Arkansas, Georgia, Maryland, New Jersey and Tennessee
continue after the Florida season closes in June. Consequently, early
Florida fall shipments if made before killing frost largely eliminates ship-
ments from other States, and the late Florida spring shipments if con-
tinued after a number of other States are shipping heavily, must bring
proportionately lower prices.
Import competition of beans, principally Limas, to Florida offerings
comes mainly from Cuba in the period of the Florida shipping season,
December through March, the total volume annually amounting normally
to 4-5% of the Florida rail and boat shipments. Mexico with less on the
average than a dozen cars annually, gives negligible competition in the
eastern territory. The few cars from Puerto Rico are less in volume than
the Mexican imports. The Lima bean import competition in the months
of December, January, February and March is considerably greater to
Florida shipments than the domestic volume supplied by other States,
and being placed largely on a few eastern port markets is still more com-
petitive than if distributed to a number of inland markets.
Competition.-The Florida Lima bean shipping season extends from
November with I.c.l. lots, and December through June in carlot volume.
Georgia and the Carolinas offer competition to Florida shipments except
in the winter and early spring months, but Cuban competition offered
from latter October through April is more severe, especially since the
shipments are made chiefly to New York and eastern port markets. Mex-
ico and Puerto Rico also offer import competition, but the volume is negli-
gible compared to that from Cuba. The trade agreement with Cuba, re-
ducing the duty from December through May, tends to encourage competi-
tion from that source in the Florida shipping season. Information show-
ing the Florida rail and boat shipments, the U. S. shipments and imports
in each of the months of the Florida shipping season, is unavailable.
Cuban shipments very light during war and up to date.
TOMATO COMPETITION
Competition.-While only a few cars of tomatoes are shipped from
Florida as the season begins in October, they must meet competition with
offerings from California, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, and other
States. In November and December the fresh domestic competition comes





FLORIDA CROPS


mainly from California and Texas carlot shipments. By January the
domestic competition has practically faded out, Texas and California
shipping out a few cars in this month some seasons. In February and
March Florida continues to supply most of the domestic tomato ship-
ments. In April, Texas is shipping fresh tomatoes in fair carlot volume.
In May, Texas shipments increase tremendously and reach their peak.
Mississippi, Georgia, Louisiana and South Carolina begin carlot shipments
in May, reaching peak volume in June. In June, Arkansas, California,
Maryland, North Carolina, Tennessee and other States are also shipping
out tomatoes, the total U. S. shipments reaching the heaviest volume of
all months in June, and second heaviest in May.
Import competition is very pronounced on tomatoes. Cuba and Mexico
are the chief sources of import competition-Bahamas, Puerto Rico, Virgin
Islands and other countries shipping in only a few cars each season. The
import season runs with that of Florida beginning in November, continu-
ing in each following month until the import season ends in May. The
Cuban imports are heaviest in December, January and February, those
from Mexico usually after the Cuban peak has passed, in March and April.
Cuban shipments very light during the war but picking up in 1946-47
season.
POTATO COMPETITION
Competition.-A good many years ago the Florida potato shipping sea-
son began in the latter part of March and extended well into June. With
the opening up of and increase in the production of Bliss potatoes in South
Florida, the Florida shipping season now begins in November and continues
through June. Florida potato shipments have heavy competition with old
stock from late, and with new crop potatoes from early producing States.
The two largest potato shipping States, Maine and Idaho, place potatoes on
the market in carlot volume every month in the year, and so do the States
of California, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Wisconsin and other States.
While the old crop competition extends throughout the Florida shipping
season, the new crop competition comes mostly in May and June. New crop
potatoes are shipped from Texas in about the same months of the Florida
season,-November through June, peak in April. Louisiana ships new
stock from March to July, reaching peak shipments in May. Alabama and
Mississippi ship from April to July, and South Carolina mostly in May and
June. Georgia and North Carolina ship out new stock in May, June and
July. Alabama, Louisiana and South Carolina shipments reach peak in
May, and North Carolina in June.
In the eight years, 1933-40, April was the peak month of Florida ship-
ments with two exceptions,-May ranked first in 1935 and again in 1940.
California, since 1942, has been giving increasing competition in May and
June.
STRAWBERRY COMPETITION
Competition.-The Florida strawberry carlot shipping season begins in
December, and in the period from the latter part of November through
the following February, Florida strawberry shipments have little competi-
tion. In March and sometimes in February, Louisiana begins its carlot
shipping season, and this State gives Florida strawberries the strongest
competition. Louisiana ranks first among all the States in carlot ship-
ments of strawberries. The shipping season usually reaches peak in April,





40 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE



SCHEDULE OF WHEN VEGETABLE!


w w u




FLORIDA CITY

FORT PIERCE

FORT MYERS

PAH OK EE

PALATKA

PALMETTO

-PLANT CITY
aI
.POMPANO
u (FSMN- k__0W/0 l

wSANFORD
5MN-JAN 1o.JUNSEi)

STARKE

WAUCHLA
PLMER MARKETS
ACTIVE EA(H ONTH 3 8 9 8 90 1\ 9
OF SLASOT "

FSMN-Federal-State Market News Stations for Periods shown.
MONTHS OF OPERATION-BY MARKET




FLORIDA CROPS


:LEVEN STATE FARMERS MARKETS


w wx u
Ic 0 I, 1 7
PALMETTO ? ? I- ?
wu < A o i5 m u oI r u C U
t U Q( L 0 U U b 6. o 0 a. I- A.

FLORIDACITY

FORT PIERCE

FORT MYERS

PAHOKEE (X)

PALATKA

PALMETTO

PLANT CITY

POMPANO (x) W 1

SANFORD W

STARKE

WAUCHULA
NUMBER MARKETS
ANDUW A .c 6 3 2 5 4 I 2 5 2 5 I
COHMO IITV -II 3 --


(X) Variety of Other commodities also.
COMMODITIES SOLD-BY MARKETS f


, Primary Crop.











































CHAYOTES




FLORIDA CROPS 43

and Louisiana ships as much volume in April as Florida ships the entire
season. Shipments from Louisiana continue heavy into May. Texas ships
out a relatively few cars also in March and April. The Alabama shipping
season begins in the latter part of March and continues through April and
into May. Mississippi and North Carolina begin their season in April, and
ship also in May. In some seasons Tennessee also ships out a few cars in
April, and moves out a heavy volume in May. In addition to the States
above named, Arkansas, California, Delaware, Illinois, Kentucky, Mary-
land, Missouri and Virginia are all shipping strawberries in carlot volume
in May.
PEPPER COMPETITION
Competitive Shipments.-August and September are the two months
of the twelve in which the lightest total United States shipments are made.
The importing sections ordinarily place no carlots of peppers on the U. S.
markets until November. The Florida carlot shipping season begins with
considerable carlot competition in October, California, New Jersey and
Texas shipping; in November, California, Georgia, New Jersey and Texas
are shipping; and in December supplies are more limited, mainly from
Texas. Imports begin from Cuba, Mexico and Puerto Rico in December.
Texas has few cars out in January, but with that exception Florida sup-
plies the total carlot domestic pepper shipments from January through
February, March and April, to May in which month shipments begin from
Louisiana which give Florida peppers the only domestic competition in
this month. In June the season is under way in several States-Georgia,
Louisiana (peak shipments), Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina
-which States ship in July and the New Jersey season starts in July.
The imports increase in January, February, and reach peak in March,
then start declining in April, in May, about fade out in June, seldom any
imports in July. Thus in the first four months of the year Florida supplies
its own domestic competition, and has only the imports to offer competi-
tion, which are timed to meet the least competition in the eastern markets.
In the five years 1932-36 Florida shipments averaged the heaviest in May,
in 1934, 1935, 1936 increasing March over February, April over March
and May over April. No State, nor any section from which peppers are
brought into the United States, has a shipping season common entirely
to that of Florida. Mexico and Cuba are our principal foreign competitors.

GREEN PEA COMPETITION
Competitive Shipments.-Shipments of green peas from California far
exceed the shipments from any other State, about 58% of the total United
States shipments moving from California. This competition continues
with Florida during every month of its shipping season, and with other
States every month of the year. Mentioned in the order of the quantity
of green peas they ship, the States of the South and East competitive
to Florida are North Carolina, Mississippi, South Carolina and Texas.
Florida has import competition, Mexico principally, shipping December
through March, January and February the peak months. Puerto Rico
averages about 2 cars per month in January, February and March, be-
ginning shipments in November. Mississippi ships in April and May,
North Carolina April and principally May, South Carolina April and May,
Texas from December through March, Alabama and Georgia occasionally
















































EGGPLANT


ill 1 ~I '~ir:' ""
.)i
)
oi-. i
rwu~--- -











r~l ~
*:.
--~cl
I
: i. '' -




* ~i;J





FLORIDA CROPS


have carlots out in April. Virginia carlot shipments do not begin until
May. In the season proper Florida competition comes therefore mostly
from California, Texas and Mexico, at least until April. Florida produc-
tion is less and less, of little importance in 1946-47 season.

LETTUCE COMPETITION
Competitive Shipments.-Florida is outranked in lettuce shipments by
several states, and has very strong competition. California, shipping
more than 70% of the total U. S. lettuce, is the strongest competitor, and
moves more lettuce in every month of the year than Florida ships in the
entire season. Arizona has about the same shipping season as Florida, but
much heavier volume. The Iceberg type of lettuce shipped by California
and Arizona is well established, and preferred by most of the trade.
Georgia occasionally ships a few cars in March or April and May. North
Carolina and South Carolina ship in March, April and May in good carlot
volume, and Texas has a few cars in January or February. Most of the
southern states ship the Big Boston type, Romaine and some Iceberg type.

EGGPLANT COMPETITION
Competitive Shipments.-Since Florida has in the five years 1932-1936
shipped more than nine-tenths of the total U. S. rail and boat supplies, it
appears that Florida eggplant, especially during its shipping season, con-
trols the market. Domestic carlot competition is negligible until Virginia
shipments begin in June and July, as the few cars from Texas, Louisiana
or South Carolina are not serious. However, imports account for about
45% (in the yearly average 1932-1936) of the total rail and boat supply,
the total U. S. shipments amounting to only 55% of the total. Cuba is
the chief competitor, Mexico next and occasionally Puerto Rico places
eggplant on the U. S. markets. Cuban shipments usually begin in Decem-
ber, or latter November, increase in January, and in February, to reach
the peak in March. The Cuban receipts drop off sharply in April, and
end in May. Mexico ships mostly in the period January to May inclusive,
but in much less volume than Cuba. Cuban shipments have been light
since 1942 on account of war and the lack of boat transportation.

CELERY COMPETITION
Competition.-Florida celery shipments in the first months of the sea-
son must compete with new crop, and also storage shipments, though in
far more limited proportions. Celery shipments from California are placed
on the markets from either the northern, southern or central districts of
that State in not only every month of the Florida shipping season, but
in every month of the calendar year. Florida celery is shipped in carlot
volume from December through June with no carlot shipments out in
the five months July through November. California shipments are the
heaviest in December, and second largest in November, so that Florida
shipments are placed on markets well supplied with California November
shipments, and must meet the heaviest month's shipments of the entire
California season in December. California celery shipments reach peak
in the month in which the Florida celery shipping season begins. Cali-
fornia ships out its lowest monthly volume in April, and the United States
total celery shipments are the lowest in order, in July and August. Louisi-


45










































CABBAGE





FLORIDA CROPS


ana ships comparatively few cars of celery in May and June, and Virginia
less than 75 cars in June in recent seasons.
Competition from old crop or late celery comes chiefly from New York,
and secondly from Michigan in December and January. The imports
are of little consequence. Bermuda occasionally ships out a few cars to
the United States.
CABBAGE COMPETITION
Competitive Shipments.-Many of the Florida vegetables have only the
ew crop competition, but cabbage has not only the new crop, but the
shipments from the late States and storage stock with which it must
compete. Cabbage from Louisiana, South Carolina and Texas is shipped
n almost every month of the Florida season, and storage stock from New
ork and Wisconsin competes with Florida offerings practically every
month from December through April. Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi,
nd North Carolina place new cabbage on the market in April and May,
nd Tennessee and Virginia in May. There are shipments from other
states that at some time during the Florida shipping season give compe-
tition, for instance, Arizona, California, Minnesota, etc. Import competi-
tion is not serious. Cuba occasionally exports one or two cars to the
United States, usually in February. Less than 30 cars per season have
ome in from the Netherlands, usually in the period January to April.
Arizona and California are increasingly important although the large
volume in Texas generally makes the market.
WATERMELON COMPETITION
Competitive Shipments.-There are no domestic carlot shipments of
watermelons in the United States in the months of November, December,
January, February, and March. Very few cars are reported in October,
occasionally cars from Colorado or California, Illinois, or others, but only
scattering cars. In April, Florida is the only State shipping watermelons,
does not itself ship in April every season, and has no competition from
domestic sources, and only few cars from imports from Cuba. In May,
California starts shipping in volume, and Texas, a more serious competi-
tor, begins the melon season. Cuba and Mexico account for few scattering
cars in May though the volume is limited. June is the peak month of
Florida shipments, and shipments begin in June, continue through July,
and into August from Alabama, Georgia, the largest producing States, Lou-
Pisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and California and Texas continue. In
addition to these designated States in July, Arkansas, Missouri, North
Carolina, and others are shipping melons in good carlot volume. In August
practically every watermelon producing state north of Florida is in season.
CUCUMBER COMPETITION
Competitive Shipments.-If the Florida cucumber season starts in Oc-
tober, growers have fall domestic competition with Louisiana, Georgia,
New York and northern home-grown local supplies. In November sup-
plies fade out from these sources and Florida ships in December practically
all of the domestic volume. Import competition from Cuba and Puerto
Rico begins in a limited way in November and by the end of December
reaches good volume, December imports ranging in the last four years





































WATERMET T


~;rJ~$(v


is


~
..
L~8'


fBi





FLORIDA CROPS


1933-36, from 24 to 62 carlot equivalents. Florida has competition in
January, February and March with hothouse supplies mainly from Illinois,
Indiana and Ohio, and the Cuban and Puerto Rican imports, which are
heaviest of the season in January and second in February declining in
March with an average of about 23 cars, ending in April, but largely dom-
inating the market in the first three months of the year. April marks
the beginning of the early domestic shipments from Texas, the peak move-
ent from which State is reached in May. During May, Alabama, South
'arolina and Georgia cucumbers roll in carlot volume, and the Florida
cucumber season ending in June must meet competitive shipments from
rkansas, Maryland, Mississippi, Texas, Virginia, and heavy shipments
rom Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina, and a few
scattering cars from other States.

ORANGE COMPETITION
The principal varieties of oranges in Florida are divided into Early,
id-season and Late. The early varieties are Hamlin, season October,
November and later; Parson Brown, season October and November.
he outstanding mid-season varieties are Seedlings, the Pineapple and
lomosassa, season December to February. The principal late variety is
he Valencia, season March to June.
Florida oranges have been shipped in several different types of con-
ainers. For instance, the two-bushel Bruce box, the 4/-bushel box, the
ne-bushel box, the 1/ box bag, the 8-pound bag, the 5-pound bag. The
standard container is the 13/5 bushel box 12x12x24. It is estimated that
-he 1936-37 Florida citrus crop was shipped in the following containers,
in about the percentage shown:
Standard 13/5 bushel ... ... .-.. .. .- 67.00%
Two-bushel Bruce box-------- 22.50%
4/5 bushel box .. ..----------------- 9.00%
Bushel box
12 strap
1/2 box bag --.------ 1.50%
8-pound bag
5-pound bag

100.00%

The cost of producing a season's orange crop in Florida on the tree up
to picking, such as cultivation, fertilizing, spraying and pruning, not
including proportionate cost of property taxes, rental, depreciation or
interest, ranges from 42c-44c per box (1936-37 season). Delivered f.o.b.
shipping point from $1.18-1.22 per box: picking 7c-8c, hauling 6c-7c, pack-
ing house cost 63c, (box 19c, paper, etc., 9c; labor in packing, grading,
etc., 15c; miscellaneous 20c). Selling charges 15c box (shipping agencies
10c, auction charges 5c)-included, $1.33-1.37 box. These charges do not
include commission assessments of advertising, pre-cooling, color-added
royalties, etc., which would, roughly speaking, amount to 6c-10c per box.

































































AVOCADO






FLORIDA CROPS 51


CONSUMPTION OF IMPORTANT FOODS IN THE UNITED STATES
(Per Capita Civilian Consumption)
FRANK H. SCRUGGS, Market News Specialist,
Florida State Marketing Bureau, August 13, 1947

The consumption of food statistics may appear very dull reading except
or those who really desire to study and have need for them. These data
re assembled from various sources but mostly from the U. S. Department
f Agricultural Statistical Year Books.
It may be noted that the per capital consumption of red meat has
hanged very little since 1910.
The increase in chicken meat has been about 25%, while turkey meat
consumed shows a marked increase, and may increase even more. Con-
umption of eggs has increased about 30%.
Margarine has not shown any marked increase and probably would
ave decreased except that butter supplies were short in 1945.
Lard shows little change, but other edible fats showed about 1/ increase
n 1940 prior to the war in 1941.

Beef Pork Lamb Lard
and except and Total Chickens Turkeys Eggs for
ears Veal Lard Mutton Meats Dressed Dressed Number Margarine Butter Food
Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lhs. Lhs. Lbs. Lbs.
1910 77.6 62.3 6.5 146 4 20.6 (a) 3011; a) (a) (a)
1920 67.1 63.6 5 4 136.1 18.3 a) 299 2.9 14.S 12.0
1925 68 0 66.8 5 2 140.0 19.8 1 7 31S 1 7 18.0 12.2
1930 55.1 66.6 i 6 128.3 21.5 1 8 329 2 2 17.2 12 6
1935 61.0 69 6 6.8 115 9 18 1 2.1 27S 2.4 17.1 95
1940 62.0 72.4 6.6 141 0 1S.0 3.6 316 1.9 16.9 14.7
1945 70.3 60.2 7.2 137 7 25 3 4.3 392 3.3 10.9 12.0

Condensed and evaporated milk, cheese and ice cream show about a
50% increase.
The per capital consumption of grains and cereals shows a marked
decrease.
Sugar consumption showed a considerable increase from 1910 to 1940.

All Canned Total Cane
Edible Fluid and Milk for and
Fats Milk Evaporated Human Wheat Corn Beet
and and Milk ani Ice Consump- and and Other (1) Sugar
Years Oils Cream Cream Cheese Cream tion Products Products Cereals Refined
Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs.
1910 38 5 320 (a) 3 85 (a) (a) 214 9 71.8 16.5 75.4
1920 39 1 (h) 12 3 3.50 (a) (a) 186.5 48.6 19.0 85.6
1925 46 4 353 5 11.7 4 6 9.4 801.6 176.9 45.0 17.1 104.2
1930 47.7 350 9 13.5 4 6 9.1 814 8 172 4 46.7 19.6 109.1
1935 46.4 335.4 16.1 5.2 7.3 799 0 153.8 36.7 13.8 96.4
1940 50.0 343.1 19 2 6 0 11.3 820 0 150.2 38.2 12 6 95.2
1945 42 2 438.0 18.3 5.9 13.8 799.0 164.2 39.2 10.9 73.2

Per capital consumption shows a decided decrease for potatoes and
a down-trend for sweet potatoes, while dried beans show a moderate
increase.
Apples are losing in popularity, but the figures for 1910 and 1935 are
not comparable, as commercial production only was considered after 1933.
Citrus fruits per capital show a remarkable increase, being more than
31/2 times what it was in 1910.





52 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Total Total (5)
Sweet Dried (2) Citrus Fresh All Tomatoes Leafy Fresh
Years Potatoes Potatoes Beans Apples Fresh Fruits Melons Fresh Vegetables Vegetables
Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lhs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs.
1910 197.0 29.0 6.6 59.4 17.8 137.9 (a) (a) (a) 194.0
1920 146.0 34.4 5.7 63.0 26.0 145.3 34.5 27.4 82.9 220.0
1925 153.0 18.4 7.3 46.3 28.9 136.2 32.6 25.9 71.0 202.0
1930 136.0 20.7 9.5 41 9 31.0 134.2 35.2 23.9 76.9 213.0
1935 144.0 28.6 8.4 32.4 44.3 135.9 33.8 27.8 86.6 230.0
1940 131.0 19.3 8.3 29.3 56.3 142.6 37.5 28.3 89.1 239.0
1945 129.0 20.0 8.0 23.0 65.7 144.7 37.8 32.3 105.0 268.0


Fresh vegetables show a moderate increase.
matoes canned, popular for decades show no
canned vegetables show a remarkable increase
50% increase since 1930.


Tomatoes fresh and to
material change. Othel
since 1910, and about


The consumption of corn meal, which is included with the corn an
corn products consumption figures, shows a marked decrease. Rice i
just about as popular as in 1920. The same holds for dried fruits.


Green All All Fruit Fruits
Corn Peas Beans Tomatoes Canned Fruits Juices (3) (4) Dried Rice Corn (6)
Years Canned Canned Canned Canned Vegetables Canned Canned Frozen Fruits Milled Meal
Lbs. Lhs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs.
1910. ... 3.2 1.4 (c) 4.8 14.6 3.5 (e) (c) 3.3 (a) 62.8
1920. ... 4.2 3.4 (c) 5 1 19.2 9.4 (c) (e) 6.5 5.2 35.0
1925 4.8 4.1 (c) 7.9 28.8 11.0 (c) .2 6.2 5.2 29.4
1930..... 4.1 4.7 1.9 6.4 29.0 12.0 .3 .5 5.3 5.7 28.0
1935..... 4.8 4.8 1.6 6.4 30.2 13.1 2.0 .5 4 7 5.2 24.5
1940..... 4.1 5.7 2.2 6.3 35.0 17.5 7.1 1.2 6.3 6.0 23.7
1945..... 6.3 7.4 3.4 3.2 44.5 16.6 10.0 2.4 5.9 4.7 19.0



Any person over 50 years of age who was raised in the country or in
a small city can recollect the changes in eating habits since 1910. We
had plenty of red meat and chicken in 1910. Butter and lard were plenti-
ful. Lots of home made bread, biscuits, and corn meal were available at
a low price. Oatmeal was the principal cereal in 1910. Sugar was a
little high priced for some. The cheap American cheese made up most
of the cheese consumption. A slice of cheese and some crackers made a
meal for the more thrifty farmers and workers in town for the day.1
Potatoes were required in large quantities in the North; sweet potatoes,
rice and grits in the South. A lot of hard work with long hours was done
in those days and the worker needed plenty of solid, nourishing foods.

In late years no one works much over 40 hours a week, but people still
eat a lot of meat but less potatoes and bread. The doctors have recom-
mended cereals, citrus, fruit juices, etc. Many women are working in
offices and eating out of cans at night, having fruit or vegetable salads
for lunch. Many manual workers now eat a lighter breakfast and lighter
lunch.

The per capital consumption of red meats, wheat, corn, potatoes, sweet
potatoes, dried beans and lard was approximately 696.7 pounds in 1910
as compared to 509.0 pounds in 1945, while for a group of foods includ-





FLORIDA CROPS 53


ing milk, butter, eggs, fresh and canned fruits and juices, and vegetables
the per capital consumption was approximately 716.0 pounds in 1910 and
970.8 pounds in 1945. The total of these two groups was 1412.7 pounds
in 1910 and 1480.7 pounds in 1945. This shows that we eat more volume,
get less calories, but get more minerals, etc.

The physical condition of the inhabitants is considered much better
n 1945 than in 1910, but this is not entirely due to a better balanced
iet. Much of this improvement is due to better health and medical care,
nd perhaps to the lighter physical work of many.
(a) Not available to writer at present, probably not available at all.
(b) Not immediately available.
(c) Not immediately available, probably little or no production or consumption.
(1) Includes rye, oats, barley, and milled rice products.
(2) Excludes non-commercial apples after 1933.
(3) Single strength or converted to single strength. Includes all citrus, apples, grapes, prunes,
pineapples, and fruit nectar juices.
(4) Principally cherries, strawberries, and other berries.
(5) Except potatoes, sweet potatoes, and dried beans.
(6) Included in corn and corn products.











PACKS OF CERTAIN FLORIDA CITRUS PRODUCTS-1935-36 to 1947-48

Canned Canned Canned Canned Canned
Grapefruit Citrus Grapefruit Orange Blended
Sections Salad Juice Juice Juice


2,252
4,058
3,419
4,106
4,134
3,140
4,611
888
943
411
2,407
5,098
3,158


65
88
85
131
85
330
274
None
None
None
None
300
1,158


1.000 cases (Basis 24 No. 2 Cans)-
1,758 162
3,918 498
3,370 806
6,190 926
4,682 2,851
10,647 3,078
6,180 3,466
15,193 2,429
16,778 7,076
12,025 13,935
15,089 18,421
S,5:3 17,294
7,987 25,593


Canned
Tangerine
Juice


85
272
547
699
1.403
2,537
2,305
3,676
6,176
7,745
12,267
10,034
11 894


*Preliminary.


FLORIDA PRODUCTION OF CERTAIN CITRUS PRODUCTS AND BY-PRODUCTS-1940-41 to 1947-48


4,322
8,834
8,227
12,052
13,155
19,732
16,836
22,186
30,973
34,116
48,709
42,569
50,535


Conenlraled
Orange
Season Juice

(gallons)
1940-41..... .. 65,900-a
1941-42.... ....... 94,300-a
1942-43 .... . 1,882,245-b
1943-44. ............. 1 .282,742-
1944-45.. .... .... 2.0, OO-a
1945-46 ........ ... 469,669-d
1946-47 ...... .. 2,006,150-f
1947-48-g.. ....... 3,690,074-e


"Bottlers
Base"

(gallons)
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
60,000
2,487
N.A.


Citrus
Feed

(tons)
32,731
29.697
47,376
67,130
68,725
108,470
96,225
154,182


Citrus Oils
Molasses Orange Grapefruit Tangerine Lime

(tons) (ponds) (pounds) (pounds) (pounds)
N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A.
N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N A.
N.A. 170.150 51,650 5,000
14,496 198,50) 53,460 2,986 1,li00
19,261 244,553 29,101; 2,730 475
44,169 281,9,l1 73.75so 10,415 1011
58,t34 N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A
6)5,h7 N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A.


Note: "N.A." Data not available.
a. Estimated on basis of recovery of .588 gallons of concentrate per field box of orange;.
b. Government purchases, 1,882,245 gallons; civilian sales, 50,000 gallons (estimated).
c. Government purchases, 1,232,743 gallons; civilian sales, 50,000 gallons (estimated .
d. 65 Brix-244,005 gallons; 42o Brix-225,684 gallons.
e. 650 Brix-1,779,665 gallons; Frozen 1,910,409 gallons.
f. 650 Brix-1,446,841 gallons; Frozen-4-fold-518,478 gallons; 3-fold-Frozen-40,831 gallons.
g. Preliminary.
U. S. Department of Agricultural Economics, J. C. Townsend, Jr., Statistician, Orlando, Florida.


Year


1935-36 .....
1936-37 . .
1937-38 ...
1938-39 .
1939-40 ...
1940-41 .....
1941-42 ...
1942-43....
1943-44 .
1944-45 ...
1945-46 ...
1946-47..
*1947-48.


Limonene

(pounds)
N.A.
N.A.

18,977
13,249
5,t31
N.A.
N.A.


S.... .......





FLORIDA CROPS


FRUITS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA


Avacado
Ambarella
Akee
Banana
Custard Apple
Canistel
Coco Plum
Citrus
Ceriman
Cereus (Pitayz)
Carob Plum
Cashew
Carissa
Carambol
Cacao
Fig
Granadilla
Grapes
Guava
llama
Jaboticaba
Jackfruit
Jujube
Ketembilla
Litchi
Loquat


Mamey
Mamoncill
Mango
Papaya
Para Guava
Peach
Persimmon (Japanese)
Pineapple
Pitaya
Pomegranate
Prickly Pear
Rhubarb
Rose Apple
Roselle
Sapodilla
Sapote
Seagrape
Sour Sop
Star Apple
Sugar Apple
Surinam Cherry
Tamarind
Umkokolo
Watermelon
White Sapote


VEGETABLES GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA


Beans (Limas)
Beans (String)
Beets (Roots)
Beets (Greens)
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Cabbage
Cabbage (Chinese)
Carrots
Cassava
Cauliflower
Chayote
Collards
Corn (Sweet)
Cucumber
Dasheen
Eggplant
Endive
Escarole
Greens (Turnips)
Kale
Kohl-Rabi


Lettuce
Mustard (Greens)
Mustard (Chinese)
Parsley
Peas (English) (Field) (Pigeon)
Pepper (Sweet)
Pepper (Red)
Potato (White or Red) (Sweet)
(Yam)
Okra
Onion
Rape
Radish
Rutabaga
Sorrel
Spinach
Squash (Chinese)
Squash
Swiss Chard
Turnips (Roots)
Tomatoes
Watercress





56 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

IMPORTANT CONSTITUENTS AND PROPERTIES OF PLANTS I
PRIMARY LIST


No. of
Plant*


Constituents


1. Oil, sein, bitters ----Diuretic, emmenagogue
2. Methyl Salicylate and derivatives Flavor, antiseptic, analgesic
3. Oil, Resin -----Internal-stimulant; external-vesi
cant
4. Oil ---------------- Internal-stimulant, condiment, dia
phoretic; external-rebufacient
5. Oil ..--------------- Anthelmintic, vermifuge
6. Camphor ------Internal-antiseptic
7. Oil ------------------ Carminative, stimulant
8. Oil -------Flavor
9. Oil ---------Flavor
10. Oil and atropine .------------- Narcotic, anodyne, mydriatic
11. Hairs; oil ------------------ Absorbent, protective; demulcent
12. Balsam ------Stimulant, expectorant, diuretic, an
tiseptic
13. Oil .....-------------- Carminative, flavor
14. Oil ------Carminative, flavor
15. Thymol------------- Antiseptic, anthelmintic
16. Rosin B---------ase in plasters, etc.
Turpentine _----------- Antiseptic, anthelmintic; terpin hy-
drate, expectorant, antiseptic, tere-
bene, inhalant
17. Resin __ ---------------- Cathartic, cholagogue
18. Amygdalin, emulsin, bitters,
prussic acid ----Pectoral, tonic
19. Pelletereine tannates Anthelmintic
20. Tannin ___----------------------- Astringent, diuretic
21. Castor oil ------Purgative
22. Oils, resins, sugars ----------- Sedative, diuretic
23. Bitters, oil, resins ----------- Anthelmintic
24. Oil, resin, glucoside --Expectorant, emetic, laxative
25. Vanillin -------- ------- Perfumery, flavor

*No. of Plant on this list corresponds to the one on the following
Primary List.





FLORIDA CROPS 57


PRIMARY LIST OF MEDICINAL PLANTS GROWING IN FLORIDA

Symbols A, B, C, D, E, F, G after the name of the plant refer to the
region of the State in which this plant occurs, as indicated on the accom-
anying map (Page 58).


Name of Plant
Aristolochia Serpentaria
Betula lenta
Capsicum frutescens
Brassica nigra
Chenopodium ambrosioides
var. anthelminticum
Cinnamomum camphora
Cinnamomum cassia
Citrus medical, var.
Limonum
Citrus aurantium
Datura Stramonium
Gossypium herbaceum
Liquidambar styraciflua
Mentha spicata
Mentha piperita
Monarda punctata
Pinus palustris and other
species
Podophyllum peltatum
Prunus serotina
Punica granatum
Rhus galbra
Ricinus communis
Serenoa serrulata
Spigelia marilandica
Stillingia sylvatica
Vanilla planifolia
Vera aloe


Common Name
Snake Root
Sweet birch
Cayenne pepper
Black mustard

American wormseed
Camphor
Cassia cinnamon

Lemon
Sweet orange
Jimson weed
Cotton
Sweet gum
Spearmint
Peppermint
Horsemint
Long leaved pine,
loblolly pine, etc.
Mandrake
Wild cherry
Pomegranate
Sumac berries
Castor bean
Saw palmetto, Sabal
Pink root
Queen's root
Vanilla bean


Locality
D
A
F, G
E


Official
U.S.P.*
U.S.P.
U.S.P.
U.S.P.

U.S.P.
U.S.P.
U.S.P.


E, F, G U.S.P.
D, E, F, G U.S.P.
E, G U.S.P.
A, B, C, D U.S.P.
A,B,C,D,E U.S.P.
E U.S.P.
E U.S.P.
B, C, D, E ...
A,B,C,D,E U.S.P.


D, E
A, B
E, F, G
B
A, B, D, E
A, B, C, D, E

A, B, D, E
D, E


U.S.P.
U.S.P.
U.S.P.
U.S.P.
U.S.P.
N.F.t

N.F.
N.F.


*U.S.P.-United States Pharmacopoeia.
tN.F.-National Formulary.





58 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


(Fig. 19) aMp of Florida






FLORIDA CROPS


ANNONA RETICULATA (Bullock's Heart)


SECONDARY LIST OF MEDICINAL PLANTS GROWING IN FLORIDA

Symbols A, B, C, D, E, F, G, after the name of the plant means that this plant is
'ound in the region of the State in which the plant occurs, as indicated on the accom-
)anying map (See Fig. 19).


Name of Plant
1. Amanita muscaria
2. Aletris farinosa
3. Apocynum Cannabinum
4. Aralia spinosa
5. Asclepias tuberosa
6. Baptisia tinctoria
7. Carica papaya
8. Chionanthus virginica
9. Cocos nucifera
10. Conocarpus erecta
|1. Cornus Florida
12. Cymbopogon citratus
13. Delphininum consolida
14. Dioscorea villosa
15. Drosera rotundifolia
16. Eupatorium perfoliatum
17. Eryngium aquaticum

18. Gelsemium sempervirens
19. Gentiana elliottii
20. Guaiacum officinalis

21. Hamamelis Virginiana


Common Name Offical Locality


Fly Agari
Star Grass
Canadian Hemp
Spignet
Pleurisy root
Wild Indigo
Papaya
Fringe tree
Coco palm
Button-wood
Dogwood
Lemon grass
Larkspur
Wild Yam
Sundew
Boneset
Water ernygo,
Button snakeroot
Jasmine
Gentian
Guaiac


N.F.
N.F.
N.F.
N'.F.
N.F.






N.F.


N.F.
N.F.
N.F.
N.F.





U.S.P.


B
E
A,B,C,D,E
B,C,D,E


E,F,G
A,B,D
E


A,B,C,D
B,E
B
A,B
E
B

E
A,B,C.D,E
D
E


Witch Hazel N.F. A,B,D


Properties
Antispasmodic
Uterine tonic
Diuretic, diaphoretic
Stimulant, diaphoretic
Diaphoretic, expectorant
Stimulant
Digestant
Alterative, germicide
Demulcent
Charcoal absorbent
Astringent, tonic
Perfume
Parasiticide
Diaphoretic
Expectorant
Stimulant, tonic

Diaphoretic
Nervine
Tonic
Alterative, antiseptic,
astringent
Astringent






DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


BELL PEPPER


22. Hedeoma pulegoides
23. Hydrangea arborescens
24. Ipomoea pandurata
25. Iris versicolor
26. Lobelia cardinalis
27. Marrubium vulgare
28. Myrica cerifera
29. Papaver somniferum
30. Panax quinquefolium
31. Phytolacca decandra
32. Polygala polygama
33. Rumex crispus
34. Salix nigra
35. Sambucus canadensis

36. Sanguinaria canadensis
37. Sassafras variifolium
38. Scutellaria lateriafolia
39. Senecio aureus
40. Solanum carolinense
41. Tamarindus indica
42. Trilisa odoratissima
43. Ulmus fulva
44. Verbascum Thapsus
45. Xanthoxylum Clava-
Hercules


Pennyroyal
Seven barks
Ipomoea
Blue flag
Cardinal flower
Horehound
Wax Myrtle
Opium Poppy
Ginseng
Pokeroot
Bitter Polygala
Dock
Pussy willow
Elder flowers

Blood root
Sassafras
Skullcap
Life root plant
Horse nettle berry
Tamarind
Deer tongue
Slippery Elm Bark
Mullein


N.F.


N.F



N.F.
U.S.P.


N.F.


N.F.
U.S.P.
N.F.

N.F.
N.F.
N.F.
N.F.
N.F.
N.F.


U.S.P.
N.F.


E
A
B.D
A,B,C,D,E
B,D,E


A,B,C,D,E
A,B,C,D,E


B
E
E


A,B,D,E,F

A,B
A,B,C,D,E
E
E
B,E
E,F
B,D
A
B


Stimulant, emmenagogu(
Diuretic
Diuretic, cathartic
Cholagogue
Anthelmintic
Stimulant
Alterative, cholagogue
Analgesic, somniferent
Stimulant, stomachic
Alterative
Tonic, laxative
Astringent
Charcoal
Carminative, diaphor-
etic
Stimulating expectorant
Alterative
Tonic Nervine
Stimulant, diuretic
Tonic antitetanic
Refrigerant
Perfume, flavor
Demulcent
Pectoral, demulcent


N.F. B,C,D,E Alterative, sialogogue


..a


Prickly ash





FLORIDA CROPS


Florida crops can be classified as fruits, vegetables, field crops, berries
and nuts. They can also be classified geographically as the crops of
Forth, Central and South Florida. The temperatures and seasons vary
Lo much that the seasons for gathering and marketing crops are as im-
ortant as the kind of crops to be grown.
The following are crops that can be grown in all parts of Florida: Corn,
,ugarcane, peanuts, potatoes, hay and pasture crops.
From the Division of Forage Crops and Diseases of the State Experi-
ent Station comes the following list:
Alyseclover (Alysicarpus vaginalis)
Narrowleaf lupine (Lupinus angustifolius)
Crotalaria-(C. spectabilis)
(C. striata)
(C. intermedia)
Austrian winter field pea (Pisum arvense)
Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum)
Bahia grass (Paspalum notatum)
Centipede grass (Eremochloa ophiuroides)
Para grass (Panicum barbinode)
Dallis grass (Paspalum dilatatum)
From the Division of Cereal Crops and Diseases comes the suggestion
at most cereals are not active in Florida but that Victory and Bond oats,
brought in respectively from South America and Australia, have "some
Possibility for use in themselves in Florida and are being used successfully
in breeding better oats for Florida conditions. These two varieties are
highly resistant to crown rust and smut, the first of which is a serious
limiting factor in growing the crop in the State."

ORIGIN OF LEADING WORLD CROPS
EDIBLE INDIGENES OF ASIA
Spices Soy Bean
Coffee Yam
Tea Lychee
Cinnamon Citrus
Apricot Rice
Rhubarb Cotton
Buck Wheat Eggplant
Radish Black Pepper
Pistachio Dasheen
Licorice Mangosteen
Peach Endive
Cucumber Barley
Almond Shallot
Olive Fig
Aerixhoke Date
Garlic English Walnut
Mango Wheat
Pomegranate Rye
Grape























































SWEET POTATO~~


___ __ ___ ____ I__ _~___





FLORIDA CROPS 63


EDIBLE INDIGENES OF AFRICA


Coffee
Spinach
Cantaloupe


Carissa
Watermelon


EDIBLE INDIGENES OF EUROPE


Apple
Fennel (Parsley Family)
Current
Gooseberry
Mustard
Cabbage
Turnips
Cauliflower
Rutabaga
Kohl-rabi
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts


Quince
Pear
Plum
Asparagus
Parsnips
Celery
Lee
Chestnut
Filbert
Carrot
Lettuce


EDIBLE INDIGENES OF OCEANICA


Cocoanut
Breadfruit
Nutmeg


Grapefruit
Cinnamon
Banana


EDIBLE INDIGENES OF NORTH AMERICA
Corn Sweet Potato
Bean Chayote
Pumpkin Blueberry
Cranberry Blackberry
Pecan Dewberry
Hickory Chestnut
Guava Hazelnut
Avocado Papaya (West Indies)
Allspice Monistera Deliciosa
Vanilla (West Indies)
Sapodilla

EDIBLE INDIGENES OF SOUTH AMERICA


Corn
Irish Potatoes
Tomatoes
Peanut
Cocoa
Cassava
Pineapple


Lima Beans
Mate
Herbaceous Pepper
Natal Plum
Cashew
Surinam Cherry







64 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


VINES FOR SOUTH


COMMON NAME


American Bittersweet

Japanese Evergreen
Bittersweet
Clematis

Purplebell Cobaea

Dutchmans Pipe
Grape (various)

Hall Honeysuckle
Japanese Hop

English Ivy

Japanese or Boston Ivy

Kudzu-vine

Moonflower

Morning-glory

Silverfleece-vine

Trumpetcreeper

Virginia Creeper

Wisteria

Bloodred Begonia

Bougainvillea

Bowervine (Pandorea)
Catsclaw



Climbing Fig

Cup-of-Gold

Distictis

Hardenbergia

Primrose Jasmine

Spanish Jasmine

Star Jasmine

Orange Glory
(Thumbergia)
Paradise-flower
Rosa-de-Montana


HEIGHT FLOWER


10' inconspicuous

15-20' inconspicuous

8-20' white, purple, pink,
red
tall rosy purple

tall chocolate, not showy
tall inconspicuous

tall white turns yellow
tall inconspicuous

tall inconspicuous

tall inconspicuous

tall inconspicuous

tall white

tall blue, purple, and
white
10-20' white

tall orange-scarlet

tall inconspicuous

tall purple, lavender,
white
tall blood-red

tall purple, crimson, rose

10-15' white, purple blotch
tall bright yellow



tall inconspicuous

tall yellow

20' purple to white

10-15' pea-like, violet

8' soft yellow

10-15' white, very fragrant

10-15' fragrant, white

7-10' orange

15' pale blue
15' soft rose


METHOD OF
CLIMBING

twining on wire or
trellis
rootlets cling to
masonry
twining on trellis

tendrils cling to wire
or trellis
twining on wire
tendrils on trellis

twining
twining on wire

clings by rootlets to
masonry or wood
clings to masonry
or wood
twining

twining on trellis
or wire
twining

twining

ties on stems help it
cling to masonry
tendrils cling to
masonry and wood
twining on trellis

tendrils

must be tied to
supports
twining
twining



clings to masonry

must be tied to
support
tendrils

twining on wire

tie to support

tie to support

twining

twining

twining
tendrils


E






USES


grown for showy oran
fruits
popular hardy evergreen

many kinds grown for e
quisite flowers
grown from seeds sown
pots in March
covers large area quickly
excellent foliage; Crims
Gloryvine is best
covers unsightliness
very rapid; useful to cov
unsightly places
Baltic Ivy is hardiest for

shining foliage, turns r
and purple in fall
one cf the most rapid
all vines
treated as annual, sow
each year in pots in Marc
popular annuals sown eac
spring
earlier and showier tha
Japanese Clematis
gay, large flowers

gorgeous red and yellow
in fall
buy grafted plants to ge
bloom on young plants
good on roofs and high
walls
plant newer varieties ra-
ther than old magenta sort
full sun and fertile soil
give full sun; wants to
bloom high up so keep
pruning to make it bloom
low
evergreen, close clinging
foliage
large flowers; will cover a
large area
likes some shade; best in
summer
tiny flowers in great pro|
fusion I
prune to keep them front
becoming straggly shrubs
prune to keep them from
becoming straggly shrubs
excellent lustrous foliage;
give a little shade
likes sun; best in spring
and summer
full sun; prune vigorously
flowers look like begonias;
dies to soil each year





FLORIDA CROPS 65

LATIN AMERICAN PRODUCTS
MEXICO-Mining industries: Petroleum and its products, silver, gold,
timony, mercury, copper, lead and zinc; also, coffee, rubber, chicle,
ic-peas, guayule henequen, ixtle, mahogany, ebony, hides and skins,
w cotton, corn and bananas.
The following articles are produced in Latin America; many of which
e also produced, and all of which are consumed in both North and
uth America:
(All the countries have various kinds of fruits and vegetables.)
GUATAMALA-Coffee, bananas, chicle, gold, lumber, honey, sugar
d hides.
EL SALVADOR-Coffee, bullion, sugar, henequen, balsam, rice and
digo.
HONDURAS-Bananas, gold and silver, coffee, cocoanuts, livestock,
bacco and hides.
NICARAGUA-Coffee, bananas, gold, cotton, lumber, hides and skins,
gar, cacao and dyewood.
COSTA RICA-Coffee, bananas, cacao, gold, mineral earths, lumber,
money, tuna fish, hides and skins.
PANAMA-Bananas, cacao, gold, cocoanuts, meats, cattle hides, mother-
-pearl shell, coffee and rubber.
CUBA-Sugar and molasses, tobacco and cigars, bananas, copper, man-
anese, cattle hides, rum and sponges.
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC-Sugar, cacao, coffee, molasses, tobacco, corn
and gold.
HAITI-Coffee, cotton, sugar, sisal, bananas, cacao, molasses, goat-
skins, cottonseed cake and logwood.
ARGENTINA-Almost entirely products of the agricultural and meat-
producing industries; of the first, wheat, corn, linseed, oats, barley, flour,
bran and pollard; of the second, frozen and chilled meats, hides, skins,
wool, residuary animal-products of all kinds, meat extract, butter; in
addition, quebracho wood and extract.
BOLIVIA-Tin, silver bismuth, copper, lead, zinc, gold, wolfram, an-
timony, rubber, hides and skins, cocoa leaves and cassava.
k BRAZIL-Coffee, hides, rubber, mate, cacao, tobacco, skins, citrus,
eanuts, sugar, cotton, gold, nuts, carnauba wax, monazite sand, oilseeds,
vanilla, cassava, corn and kernels, rotenone, and chilled and frozen beef.
CHILE-Minerals, mainly; copper, sodium, sodium nitrate in the nat-
ural form, iodine and borax, bar silver, and iron and copper ore. Hides,
wool, wax, fruits, grains, and fresh and frozen meats.
COLOMBIA-Coffee, petroleum, bananas, hides and skins, tobacco, tagua
nuts (vegetable ivory), cacao, rubber, dividivi, platinum, gold and emeralds.
SECUADOR-Cacao, ivory, nuts, straw hats, rubber, coffee, petroleum,
gold, hides, raw cotton and bananas.
PARAGUAY-Hides, quebracho extract, cotton, cattle, mate, hard-
woods, tobacco, oranges and tangerines, oil of petit grain, canned meats.
PERU-Products of the mining industries, mainly copper and petro-
leum and its products; gold, lead, rubber, sugar, coffee, cotton, quinine





















Ii"~'Cl


Tl n A XTTTrT


nTT'-


^


IP~
iati~Lc;-rir


*D ., -
. : *


' "- ~~;
-


\bP~~





FLORIDA CROPS


lade from the bark of the cinchona tree), wool, hides, and skins, guano
d cottonseed oil.
URUGUAY-Wool, hides, skins, meat extract, preserved meats, frozen
d chilled meats, tallow and beef fat, residuary animal products, wheat,
)ur, linseed, sand and stone.
VENEZUELA-Petroleum, coffee, gold, cacao, rubber, balata, goat-
ins, asphalt, cattle hides, live cattle, heron plumes, dividivi, fruits and
arls.
FOODS THE AMERICAS BUY AND SELL
AGRICULTURE IN THE AMERICAS
Published monthly by the Office of Foreign Agricultural Relations of the
United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
By F. H. RAWLS
Latin America is both an important market for the food products of the
united States and one of this country's chief suppliers of foodstuffs.
e Latin American Republics sell one kind of food products to the United
ates, buy another.
In the past 15 years from 20 to 25 percent of all the foods the United
ates has sold for export have gone to Latin America. During the war
riod it has become even more important as a market for us. There is
ery prospect-if both North and South Americans approach the prob-
m with understanding-that its value to United States producers will
ntinue to increase.
In 1940 our total exports to Latin America amounted to about 719
million dollars, with iron- and steel-mill manufacturers as the largest
ingle item. In the same year our food exports to Latin America were
valued at 64 million dollars, or well over one-fourth of our total shipments
)f food to all countries of the world. We did business in food with every
me of the other 20 American Republics, selling them some 75 separate
products .
Of course, it should be recognized that Latin America is not a major
market for the chief export crops of the United States, since, in general,
reductionn of wheat, meat products, corn, cotton, and tobacco in Latin
America fills local requirements. Greatest returns to United States farmers
will come indirectly through the stimulation of United States industry that
Fill result from increased trade with Latin America. The American worker,
steadily employed, has always been the American farmer's best customer.
At the same time, our foodstuffs trade with Latin America is not to be
regarded lightly. While in large part it consists of specialty products
bhat range from cornstarch and rolled oats to chewing gum and walnuts,
such staple products as wheat and wheat flour, lard, and rice accounted
Eor two-fifths of our Latin American food trade in 1940. Some of the
most notable increases in exports to Latin America in recent years have
been in soybean oil, malt liquors, milled rice, malted milk and infants'
Cood, dried whole milk, yeast, and hops.
In foodstuffs trade, Latin America is even more important as a source
than as a market for the United States. It furnishes roughly 50 percent
of all the foods we use that we do not produce on our own farms, and
foodstuffs account for nearly half of all the products we import from Latin
America.





68 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


But when you come to analyzing this flow of foodstuffs into the Unit
States from the forests and fields of its southern neighbors, you quick
discover two major faults: First, we buy from too few countries; an
second, we purchase too few commodities. In 1939, the last pre-war yea
5 of the 20 Republics and 5 products represented five-sixths of our fo
imports from Latin America.

This lack of diversity is no one's fault especially. Other products simp
haven't been available, nor have other Latin American countries been
the market for our trade. The war and the great concern of all of us f
more Western Hemisphere solidarity have changed all that. Produce
that once went to the European market are accumulating in Latin Americ
Former sources of United States supply in the Far East have been cut o
by the shipping shortage caused by the war. Diversification of our tra(
with Latin America may in a sense have been forced upon us, but no
that it is here, we are finding that it is to the mutual advantage of a
countries concerned.

Look at it like this. We buy five-sixths of our Latin American foc
products from Cuba, Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, and Guatemala, in ths
order. Yet among the countries that are our best foodstuffs customer
are several which enjoy relatively little of our business and are according
hard pressed to find the foreign exchange they need to continue trading
with us.

Five-sixths of our food budget in Latin America is being spent for coffe<
sugar, bananas, cocoa beans, and canned beef.


MINERAL PRODUCTS-STATES THEY COME FROM
(Data from the U. S. Bureau of Mines)


MINERAL
Aluminum..............
Antimony ore...........
Arsenious oxide.........
Asbestos. ...............
Asphalt .................
Barytex (crude)........
Bauxite ...............
Borates .............. ..
Bromine................
Cadmium ................
Calcium magnes chloride.
Cement..................
Chromite................
Clay products...........
Clay, raw ...............
Coal:
Bituminous. ...........
Anthracite ..........
Coke....................
Copper. .................
Diatomaceous Earth.....
Emery. ...............
Feldspar (crude)........
Ferroalloys ............
Fluospar. ...............
Fuller's earth..........
Garnet, abrasive.........
G old....................
Graphite. ...............
Grindstones and
pulpstones.............
Gypsum .................
Iron Ore...............
Iron, pig...............
Lead ...................
Lime....................


CHIEF STATES
N.Y., N.C., Tenn.
Idaho
Nev., Utah, Mont., S.D.
Md., Cal., Ga., Ariz.
Cal., Tex., Ill., Ky., Utah,
Okla.
Ga., Mo., Tenn., Va.
Ark., Ga., Tenn., Ala.
Cal., Nev.
Mich., W.Va., Ohio
Not separable by States
Mich., W.Va., Ohio
Pa., Cal., Ind., Mich.
Md., Cal., Ore.
Ohio, Pa., N.J., Ill.
N.J., Pa., Mo., Ga.
Pa., W.Va., Ill., Ky.
Pa.
Pa., Ind., Ohio, Ill., Ala.
Ariz., Mont., Utah, Mich.
Cal., Okla., Ill., Mo.
Va., N.Y.
N.C., Me., N.H., N.Y.
Pa., N.Y., Md., Ohio
Ill., Ky., Col., N.M.
Fla., Ga., Tex., Ill.
N.Y., N.H., N.C.
Cal., Col., S.D., Alaska
Ala., Tex., R.I., Mich.
Ohio, W.Va., Mich., Wash.
N.Y., Iowa, Ohio, Mich.
Minn., Mich., Ala., N.Y.
Pa., Ohio, Ill., Ind., Ala.
Mo., Idaho, Utah, Okla.
Ohio, Pa., Mass., Mo.


MINERAL
Magnesite (crude).......
Magnesium............
Magnesium chloride.....
Magnesium sulphate.....
Manganese ore..........
Manganiferous ore.......
Manganiferous zinc ....
Mica. ..................
Millstones .............
Mineral paints..........
Mineral waters. .........
Natural gas............
Natural gas gasoline....
Oilstones, etc. ..........
Peat...................
Petroleum ..............
Phosphate rock.........
Platinum & allied metals.
Potash (K20)..........
Pumice .................
Pyrites ..................
Quicksilver ............
Salt....................
Sand and gravel........
Sand lime brick.........
Silicia (quartz)..........
Silver..................
Slate...................
Stone. ..................
Sulphur................
Talc and soapstone.....
Tin.....................
Titanium ore: Rutile....
Tungsten............
Uranium, vanadium ores..
Zinc....................


CHIEF STATES
Cal., Wash.
N.Y., Mich.
Mich., Cal.
Mich., Wash., Cal.
Mont., Ark., Va., Col.
Minn., Wis., Mich., Col.
N.J.
N.C., N.H., N.M., Va.
N.Y., Va., N.C., N.H.
Pa., Ill., Col., Ohio
Wis., N.Y., Cal., Me.
W.Va., Pa., Okla., Cal., Tex
Okla., Cal., Tex., W.Va.
Ark., Ind., Ohio, N.H.
Ill., N.J., Cal., Ind.
Okla., Cal., Tex., Ark., Kan
Fla., Tenn., Idaho, Ky.
Cal., Ore., Alaska, Utah
Cal., Md., Pa., Ind.
Kan., Neb., Cal., Utah
Cal., Va., N.Y., Wis.
Cal., Tex., Nev., Ore.
Mich., N.Y., Ohio, Kan.
Ill., N.Y., Ind., Mich.
Mich., Mass., Wis., N. J.
Wis., Md., Cal., Nev.
Utah, Mont., Nev., Idaho
Pa., Vt., N.Y., Me.
Pa., Ind., Ohio, N.Y.
Tex., La., Nov., Utah
N.Y., Va., Vt., Cal.
Alaska
Fla., Va.
Nev., Cal., Col., S.D.
Utah, Col.
Okla., Kan., N.J., Mont.






FLORIDA CROPS 69




AREA AND POPULATION OF FLORIDA BY COUNTIES
SHOWING TOTAL AND RURAL POPULATION
PER SQUARE MILE


(Note-In this table all incorporated towns are classed as urban.)



Total Rural
Area Total Population Rural Population
COUNTIES Square Mile Population per Sq. Mile Population per Sq. Mile
1945 1945 1945 1945 1945


Total for State ...............

chua .......................
ker.........................
y...........................
adford. ...................
evard .......................
toward ......................
Ihoun .......................
arlotte ......................
tru s ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
a ........................
uier .. ....................
umbia ......................
Soto......................
ie ..........................
uva. ..............
cam bia ......................
agler .................. ... ..
anklin ............ .........
adsden............. .......
,ilchrist .... .... ..... .. .. .. ....
lades ........................
tlf .........................
lam ilton ....... ........... .
ardee ........ .............. .
lendry ..................... .
Iernando .....................
Highlands .....................
illshorough...................
. olm es .... ....................
ndian River.... ...... ........
ackson ............... .......
efferson .. ...................
lafayette ......................
,ake . ....... ........... .
Lee ................... ..... .
Leon........ ..... .............
Levy .......... ................
iberty.................. .....
adison........ ..............
anatee ......................
ario n ... .. ..... .. .. .. .... .. ..
artin ............... ........
lonroe .. .....................
S assau .... ....................
)kaloosa ... ...................
keechobee...................
range.................... .
sceola.....................
alm Beach ....................
asco .... .. .. .. .. .. .... .. ....
Pinellas .......................
olk .. .. ... .. .... .. .. .. .. ..
utnam .......................
St. Johns ......................
;t. L ucie ......................
anta R osa ....................
rasota .......................
em inole ......................
u m ter........... ............
uwannee ....... ............
U aylor ......... .............
U nion.........................
V olusia........................
W akulla ........ ............
W alton ........................
W ashington....................


54,861

906
593
781
291
1,025
1,212
531
697
620
615
2,042
792
2,019
640
710
782
657
491
541
540
351
764
558
528
632
1,171
497
1,021
1,036
473
497
939
530
553
1,047
818
715
1,148
823
774
823
1,647
598
1.100
630
956
747
929
1,356
1,940
767
293
1,907
752
608
580
1,025
514
321
583
692
1,045
248
1,123
602
1,095
620


2,250,061

38.245
6,326
43,188
10,730
19,339
50,442
8,225
4,220
5,427
10,038
4,957
17,139
315,138
6,854
4,926
273,843
105,262
2,652
8,026
992
3,466
2,281
7,010
8,731
8,585
5,066
5,672
16,220
207,844
14,627
9,079
34,509
11,066
3,995
27,946
23,593
35,451
9,902
3,193
15,537
26,803
35,132
6,094
19,018
10,859
16,155
2,919
86,782
10,562
112,311
13,729
130,268
112.429
17,837
21,596
12,958
16,986
19,202
24,560
10,417
17,602
10,738
6,051
58,492
5,059
13,871
11,889


41.01

42.2
10.6
55.2
36.8
18.8
41.6
15.4
6.0
8.7
16.3
2.4
21.6
156.0
10.7
7.0
362.9
160.2
5.4
14.8
57.3
9.8
2.9
13.2
16.5
13.5
4.3
11.4
15.8
200.6
30.9
18.2
36.7
20.8
7.2
26.6
28.8
49.5
8.8
3.8
20.0
32.5
21.3
10.3
17.2
17.2
16.7
3.9
93.4
7.8
57.8
17.8
444.6
58.9
23.7
35.5
22.3
16.7
37.3
67.0
17.8
25.4
10.2
24.3
52.0
8.4
12.6
19.1


813,035 14.7

16,990 18.7
5,044 8.5
16,973 21.7
7,649 26.2
5,172 5.0
6,984 5.7
6,203 11.6
2,136 3.0
3,247 5.2
5,917 9.6
3,352 1.6
10.532 13.2
56,963 28.2
2,398 3.7
3,107 4.3
5s,290 74.4
61,958 94.3
1,452 2.9
1,856 3.4
16,464 30.4
2,571 7.3
1,682 2.2
3,404 6.1
5,886 11.1
4,695 7.4
2,301 1.9
3,917 7.8
5,602 5.4
73,725 71.1
12,165 25.6
3,812 7.6
24,720 26 3
8,788 16.5
3,118 5.6
9,826 9.3
7,404 9.1
17,346 24.2
5,905 5.1
3,193 3.8
11,644 15.3
10,891 13.2
21,973 13.3
3,578 5.9
4,772 4.3
6,421 10.2
7,910 8.2
1,484 1.9
26,219 28.2
5,350 3.9
38,576 19.8
8,146 10.6
16,434 56.0
40,081 21.0
9,008 11.9
8,020 13.1
3,476 5.9
13,828 12.5
4,501 8.7
9.S54 30.6
5,331 9.1
12.865 18.5
7,139 6.8
5,046 20.3
13,359 11.8
5,059 8.4
11,247 10.2
8,676 13.9






70 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE



URBAN POPULATION FOR EACH CENSUS YEAR 1915 TO 1945



COUNTIES URBAN URBAN URBAN URBAN URBAN URBA
1945 1935 1930 1925 1920 1915


Total for State 1,440,103 989,743 900,932 724,702 466.388 406,45
Alachua ....... 21,255 18,666 16,534 15,105 12,354 12,74
Baker.......... 1,282 616 519 355 350 3
Bay........... 26,215 10,041 6,330 6,278 2,596 6,87
Bradford... 3,081 2,059 2,204 1,759 2,849 3,45
Brevard........ 14,167 9,821 8,352 6,686 4,206 3,19
Broward ..... 43,458 20,285 16,635 8,848 3,463 3,64
Calhoun...... 2,022 1,887 1,270 1,815 863 1,22
Charlotte...... 2,084 1,673 1,928 1,635 *
Citrus......... 2,180 1,841 2,084 1,949 2.076 90
Cla ........... 4,121 2,969 3,312 2,062 2,426 2,62
Collier.......... 1,605 1,986 812 422 *
Columbia...... 6,607 5,036 4,688 4,279 3,701 3,42
Dade........... 258,175 161,031 130,620 90,155 31,877 16,68
DeSoto....... 4,456 4,077 4,082 4,185 9,505 8,95
Dixie.......... 1,819 1,097 1,071 710 *
Duval .......... 215,553 148,202 136,980 103,039 95,559 70,44
Escambia 43,304 30,826 31,579 25,305 31,035 23,21
Flagler ........ 1,200 1,286 869 505 682
Franklin........ 6,170 4,765 4,070 4.587 4,121 4,35
Gadsden ..... 14,528 8,037 10,931 5,648 4,039 4,36.
Gilchrist. ....... 895 677 706 *
Glades.......... 599 800 612 788 .....
Gulf........... 3,606 1,553 1,435 ....... ....
Hamilton....... 2,845 2,941 2,927 3,221 2,926 3,21.
Hardee ......... 3,890 4,237 3,871 3,788 ... .....
Hendry ........ 2,765 1,620 397 459 ........
Hernando....... 1,755 1,547 1,405 1,745 1,011 1,38
Highlands...... 10,618 8,024 6,849 3,519 ...........
Hillsborough.... 134,114 108,547 109,203 102,436 56.367 60,297
Holmes ......... 2,462 1,505 1,292 2,250 2,548 2,510
Indian River.... 5,267 3,923 3,310 *. .
Jackson......... 9,870 8,244 6,999 6,672 5,049 5,521
Jefferson........ 2,278 2,042 1,901 2,829 1.704 2,040
Lafayette....... 877 708 555 397 531 1,769
Lake......... .. 18,120 16,602 13,942 9,569 5,248 4,060
Lee ............ 16,189 10,588 9,397 8,050 4.055 3,484
Leon........... 18,105 11,725 10,700 6,415 5,637 5,193
Lev. .......... 3,997 4,298 3,278 3,206 1,518 1,600
Liberty......... All. Rural All Rural
Mladison...... 3,893 3,590 3,278 3,214 2,819 2,597
Manatee .... 15,912 13,453 12,325 15,958 9,807 8,596
Marion......... 13,159 10,538 9,847 10,282 7,949 7,734
M artin......... 2,516 2,166 2,343 ...........
Monroe......... 14,246 12,317 12,831 13,701 18.749 18,495
Nassau......... 4,438 3,309 3,660 3,685 3,658 4,026
Okaloosa........ 8,245 1,827 1,232 1,168 1,313 *
Okeechobee..... 1,435 1,914 1,795 1,920 ...
Orange......... 60,563 41,601 35,895 31,272 12,874 9,214
Osceola... 5,212 5,399 5,026 5,758 4,732 6,301
Palm Beach... 77,331 48,014 43,240 27,536 12,729 6,253
Pasco.......... 5,583 5,402 4.028 3,953 2,216 3,400
Pinellas......... 113,834 58,014 56,439 39,502 20,145 17,805
Polk........... 72.348 51,494 48,15-1 39,817 18,986 17,161
Putnam....... 8,829 8,853 8,812 9,691 6,859 8,100
St. Johns ...... 13,576 10,630 12,111 11,230 6,853 7,973
St. Lucie ...... 9,42 6,376 4,803 4,761 2,241 3,822
Santa Rosa... 3,158 1,537 1,466 2,190 1,594 1,415
Sarasota........ 14,706 10,136 S.707 6,680 ....
Seminole........ 14,706 12,858 11,741 7.922 5.694 4,998
Sumter......... 5,086 3,696 4,026 3,288 2,455 1,919
Suwannee....... 4,737 3,486 3,232 3,639 4,104 4,046
Taylor......... 3,599 2,400 2,744 2,700 1,956 1,941
Union.......... 1,005 1,400 1,346 768 *
Volusia......... 45,133 37,663 31,935 28,867 15,784 14,358
W akulla .. .. All R ural All R ural ... ....... .... ........... ..........
Walton......... 2,624 2.646 2,636 2,359 2,341 3,19
Washington..... 3,213 3,242 3,231 2,170 2,246 1,571

"Counties nc' created at this time.






FLORIDA CROPS


Census
U. S. FARM CENSUS 1945 of
1945
(Jan. 1)


FARMS, ACREAGE AND LAND AREA

arm s.............. ............... .... .......... num ber 61,159

approximate land area .............. ............................ acres.. 34,727,680
Proportion in farms ........................................percent.. 37.7

and in farms ................................................... acres. 13,083,501
Owned by operator ................................... ... .acres. 10,141,552
Rented by operator. ............... .......................... acres. 2,941,949

average size of farm .......................................... acres.. 213.9

and in farms according to use:
Cropland harvested............. ..................... farms reporting. 52,855
acres.. 1,809,430

Farms reporting by acres harvested:
1 to 9 acres ...................................... number.. 18,370
10 to 19 acres ................. ..................number.. 9,805
20 to 29 acres .................................. number.. 6,853
30 to 49 acres..................................... number.. 8,599
50 to 99 acres.............. ................... number.. 6,255
100 to 199 acres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . number. 2.023
200 acres and over ................................ number.. 950
200 to 499 acres ................. .......... number. 757
500 to 999 acres ............................ number.. 119
1.000 acres and over .......................number.. 74
Crop failure ................... .......... . . .farms reporting. 1,803
acres. 30,834
Cropland idle or fallow. ...........................farms reporting. 12,908
acres. 474,367
Cropland used only for pasture ................... .. farms reporting. 8,045
acres. 562,563
Woodland pastured ...............................farms reporting. 13,731
acres.. 4,527,462
Other land pastured ............................. farms reporting. 8,093
acres. 4,005,715
Woodland not pastured ............... ........... farms reporting. 19,026
acres. 1,274,398
All other land .................................. farms reporting.. 45,084
acres. 398,732
Cropland, total........................... ......... farms reporting.. 56,479
acres.. 2,877,194
Land used for crops (harvested and failure)................... farms reporting.. 53,161
acres.. 1,840,264
Land pastured, total .................. ..............farms reporting.. 25,410
acres.. 9,095,740
Woodland, total.......... .. ....................... .farms reporting.. 29,831
acres.. 5,801,860





72 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


U. S. FARM CENSUS 1945-CONTINUED


VALUE OF FARM PROPERTY

Value of farms (land and buildings) ....................... .... dollars..
Average per farm:
All farm s ... .............. .................. ... dollars. .
Farms of 30 acres and over .............................. dollars..
Average per acre, all farms ....... ............ .......... dollars..

Value of implements and machinery ........................ farms reporting..
dollars. .
Farms reporting by value of implements and machinery:
$1 to $99 ................. .............................. number. .
$1 to $49 ..........................................number. .
$50 to $99 .........................................number.
$100 to $249................ ...........................number.
$250 to $499........................................... .number..
$500 to $749. ................. .......................... number..
$750 to $999 ................. ..........................number..
$1,000 to $2,499. ........................................ number.
$1,000 to $1,499 .................................... number..
$1,500 to $2,499 ................. .................. number..
$2,500 and over. .................... .................. .number..
$2,500 to $4,999 ................... ............... number..
$5,000 to $9,999 ................ ............... .number..
$10,000 and over. .................................. number..

Value of livestock on farms................. .......... dollars. .


FARM DWELLINGS AND POPULATION

Dwellings on farms ............................. . farms reporting..
number. .
Occupied. .................................... .. farms reporting..
number. .
Unoccupied........................ ............farms reporting..
number. .
Occupied dwellings on farms with 2 or more occupied
dwellings. ..................................... farms reporting..
number. .

Farm population (persons living in occupied dwellings on farms).... persons..
Average per occupied dwelling ..................... .... ..persons..
Under 14 years old ................. .................... persons..
Boys................................... ...... persons. .
Girls..................... .................... ..... persons..
14 years old and over .................................. persons..
Men and boys ........ ............................... persons. .
W omen and girls ...................................... persons.
For farms with 2 or more occupied dwellings................. persons.
Average per occupied dwelling .......................... persons..
Under 14 years old ..................................... persons. .
Boys...................... .................. ..... persons..
Girls..... .............................. persons. .
14 years old and over .................................. persons..
Men and boys ........ .............................. persons..
Women and girls ............. .............. ........ persons..


Census
of
1945
(Jan. 1)



498,399,612

8,149
11,469
38.09

44,082
36,675,961


15,670
9,355
6,315
9,589
4,605
3,818
1,491
5,772
2,764
3,008
3,137
1,930
748
459

67,956,078



55,480
76,558
54,239
67,415
6,236
9,143

6,563
19,739

244,336
3.62
81,245
41,507
39,738
163,091
79,660
83,431
61,602
3.12
20,094
10,226
9,868
41,508
20,534
20.974


20,974


.v._






FLORIDA CROPS 73



Census
U. S. FARM CENSUS 1945-CONTINUED of
1945
(Jan. 1)


FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

ree fruits, nuts, and grapes (nurseries excluded):
Grapes .................................. .farms reporting.. 6,963
Vines of all ages. .. ........................... .number.. 104,294
Quantity harvested ............................... pounds. 486,774
Value............ .......................... ..dollars.. 53,545
Pecans (improved and seedling) ...................... farms reporting. 16,622
Trees of all ages ................... .................. number.. 324,540
Quantity harvested ............................ . pounds. 4,441,284
Value............ ................................ dollars 998,904
Tung nuts .... ............................ .farms reporting.. 575
Trees of all ages........... ...................... number.. 2,291,232
Quantity harvested ............................ . pounds. 11,796,572
Value....................................... dollars.. 566,236
Oranges. ............. ....................... farms reporting. 18,721
Trees of all ages... ...................... number.. 15,502,216
Quantity harvested-field boxes, 1945, 1940 and 1935;
boxes, other years................................ . ....... 40,216,013
Value ................................................. dollars. 85,540,389
Tangerines and mandarins ........................ farms reporting. .6,295
Trees of all ages.. ............................ .number.. 1,114,872
Quantity harvested-field boxes. 1945 and 1940; boxes, other years. 2,965,407
Value ............... ............................... ... dollars. 6,834,905
Grapefruit. ............. ................. . . .farms reporting. 12,066
Trees of all ages ................... ................ number. 5,199,927
Quantity harvested-field boxes, 1945, 1940 and 1935;
boxes, other years.. ....................................... 21,699,269
Value......... ............................. .dollars. 35,018,569
Limes. ................ .. ................. farms reporting.. 1,073
Trees of all ages... ............................. number.. 321,102
Quantity harvested-pounds, 1945 and 1940; boxes, other years ..... 8,578,189
Value.. ...................... dollars. 557,798
Land in fruit orchards, vineyards and planted nut trees.....farms reporting.. 19,663
acres.. 403,475
Value of specified fruits and nuts harvested ................... .... dollars. 131,204,251
Value of all fruits and nuts sold .. ........................ .. dollars. 114,865,917
Value of vegetables grown for farm householdss) use.......farms reporting.. 40,460
dollars.. 4,413,412

Vegetables harvested for sale:
Fresh beans (snap. string, or wax) ............. . .. farms reporting. .4,331
acres.. 91,206
Cabbage...................... ............... farms reporting.. 2,349
acres. 17,919
Celery .......... ......... ................ farms reporting.. 320
acres. 10,474
Tomatoes ......... .......................... .farms reporting. 4,976
acres. 27,707
Green peas (English) ........................... farms reporting.. 1,238
acres. 4,625
All other vegetables and melons. ..................... farms reporting.. 12,633
acres. 79,312
Value of vegetables sold ............................... farms reporting. 15,316
dollars. 42420,557
Value of all horticultural specialties sold ................... .... .. dollars. 9,603,590






74 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Table of Florida Citrus Shipments in Boxes

Estimate
of Citrus
SEASON BOXES Canned
188(-87 1,260 000 ..................
1893-94 5,055,307 ..........
1894-95 2,808,187 Freeze Dec. 1894 and Feb. 1895..........
1895-96 147,000 Between 1895-96 and 1915-16
1902-03 1,147,491 The U. S. Thermometer registered
h115-16 8,330,045 Lower than 27 deg. six times in Kissimmee
1916 17 7,648,995 Freeze Feb. 3rd .................. .....
1917 18 5,581,610 Jan. 5, 1918. ..........................
1918-19 8,770,610 None-Hurricane......................
1925-26 13,781 660 None-Hurricane......................
1926-27 16,605,168 Freeze Jan. 12. ........................
1927-28 14,435,360 No record Hurricane Sept................ 600,000
1928-29 24,422,280 Medfly............................... 1,527,320
1929-30 14,314,600 None ................................. 1,710,000
1930-31 29,869,945 None................... ............. 2,954,056
1931-32 21,439,685 None.............. ................ 966,533
1932-33 23,186,930 None................................. 2,800,000
1933-34 24,135,890 None. ................................. 2,667,000
1934-35 24,488,921 Freeze Dec. 11th, Hurricane Oct.......... 5,781.933
1935-36 23,002,052 None................... ............. 3,900,000
1936-37 30,774,852 Freeze Dec. 7th ........................ 7,305,512
1937-38 31,584,937 Freeze Jan. 27th ...................... 6,848,496
1938-39 42,133,127 Freeze Jan. 20th ....................... 9,582,037
1939-40 28,074,986 Freeze Jan. 28th .................. .... 12,970,408
1940-41 34,507,849 Freeze Nov. 14th....................... 17,812,227
1941-42 31,477,148 None. ................. .............. 14,399,844
1942-43 41,582,596 Freeze Feb. 15th and 16th and light
freeze Feb. 28th and March 4th .......... 24,022,299
1943-44 43,208,560 ...................................... 31,456,480
1944-45 35,524,200 None-Hurricane Oct .................. 29,493,000
1945-46 42,680,517 None-Hurricane Sept ................. 41,871,161
1946-47 42,020,625 Freeze Feb. 6th, 10th and 11th
Hurricane Oct .............. ........ 36,620,582
1947-48 36,338,040 Freeze Jan. 15th ....................... 50,413,431
1948-49 43,807,124 None, Hurricane Aug ................... 44,117,850
1949-50 94,000,000 None............................... 60,000,000

Chas. A. Garrett
Feb. 13, 1950


FLORIDA CANNED CITRUS PACK, 1949-1950 SEASON
Number of Cases (24/2)
Grapefruit sections ------------------- --------------- 3,379,357
Grapefruit juice ---------------------------------.... __ 7,894,334
Orange sections .----------------- --- ------------- 10,074
Orange juice ......... ...... ..... ------. ... 17,419,271
Tangerine juice ------------------------------ 1.4. 1,489,471
Blended juices ..------------ 9.. 7,066,956
Citrus salad -------------------------------.-... ... 422,694
Total -- .. ............. .... -------- ... .... 37,682,130
Field boxes of fruit consumed in above pack: grapefruit 11,510,458; oranges 14,812,208
and tangerines 1,485,366.
Note: Data for citrus concentrates not included in above.





FLOEIDA CROPS 75


greenhouse and flower business $-------15,000,000


1940 1950
airy Products --------$16,000,000 $ 33,000,000
ogs ----------- 4,500,000 20,000,000
ultry ---------- 3,000,000 11,000,000
ggs -- 8,000,000 10,000,000


1940 1950
itrus $-----_._-- -----__- -- 50,000,000 $175,000,000
vegetables ----------- 80,000,000 115,000,000
tobacco -.----------- 10,000,000 22,000,000


ports by airplane (Miami) ---------- ----$17,000,000
(second largest in world)


1950
manufacturing -------------- $500,000,000


1940 1950
Minerals _____--------- $16,000,000 $ 50,000,000


1940 1950
FORESTRY PRODUCTS $----- 99,397,000 $175,000,000


Florida Agricultural Growth

Total Income $2,571,000,000


1940

All Crops ........................ $134,000,000
Citrus................................ 50,000,000
Dairy Products. ...................... 20,000,000
Meat Animals......................... 10,000,000
Poultry and Eggs..................... 8,000,000
Tobacco............................ 10,000,000
Tung N uts ........................... 50,000
Syrup ................................ 800,000
Syrup and Sugar .................. ... ........
Peanuts .............................. 5,000,000
Cotton ............................... 1,500,000
Strawberries ................. ......... 900,000
Greenhouse and flower products......... 10,000,000
Pecans............................... 530,000
Truck Crops.......................... 80,000,000
Tourist......... .............. 500,000,000
Acres in Cultivation ................... 1,851,000


1950
........... .$345,000,000
............ 175,000,000
............ 39,000,000
...... . 35,000,000
.... ...... .. 13,000,000
............ 22,000,000
............ 953,000
............ .5,000,000
............ 5,000,000
............ 6,500,000
............ 2,700,000
............ 12,500,000
. . . . . 15,000,000
............ 600,000
............ 115,000,000
............ 750,000,000
..... ....... 3,500,000





76 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Florida Statistics

ACRES IN STATE ------------------- ------------ 35,000,0
ACRES IN CROPS 3,000,0(
CULTIVATED ACRES IN PASTURE 4,000,0
ACRES IN TIMBER AND OPEN RANGE ---- 22,000,0
ACRES IN WATER AND WASTE LAND ---- 5,000,0


Leading Tax-Income Items of the State of Florida:
1950
Gasoline ---------------- ------------- -- $50,836,3
Beverage ------------ ------ 23,830,1!
Sales Tax -.--------------- -- 23,569,08
Cigarettes .. -------------- ------- 15,180,22
Racing .--._. ---------- -----13,191,74
License Tags .. -.......- ............-- ------- 19,763,07


There is no state bonded debt
No state tax on land
No state income tax
No poll tax
No tax on homesteads up to value of $5,000
Partial sales tax


Total income all sources
Tourists ------
Basic Resources ____


1950
$2,570,000,0O
750,000,00C
1,820,000,000


1950
91,825,097, LB,
50,588,237, LB.
$35,000,000


Fish


Total catch of food fish
Non-food fish --- .
Value __-- --






FLORIDA CROPS


ESTIMATED
PLANTED


BEARING AND NON-BEARING ORANGE TREES
IN FLORIDA FOR COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION,
BY COUNTIES, (1948) 1*


ORANGES
Early and Midseason


COUNTY

chua..........
vard..........
Iward ........ .
arlotte..........
trus.............
ide .............
Soto...........
rdee............
ndry ...........
rnando ....... .
Whlands ....... .
Isborough.......
lian River.......
ke ..............
e .... ...... .. ...
anatee..........
arion............
martin ............
range ........ .
sceola............
am Beach........
Isco ........... .
mellas ......... .
Alk..............
utnam ...........
trasota...........
!minole ........ .
. Lucie ..........
rmter...........
olusia.......... .
Either Counties.....

STATE TOTAL....


ORANGES
Late


TOTAL
ORANGES


Bearing Non-Bearing Bearing Non-Bearing

46,000 1,000 3,000 1,000 51,000
496,000 37,000 249,000 18,000 800,000
57,000 30,000 215,000 47,000 349,000
33,000 4,000 14,000 3,000 54,000
38,000 4,000 5,000 2** 47,000
29,000 11,000 67,000 6,000 113,000
305,000 17,000 123,000 16.000 461.000
436,000 37,000 189,000 19,000 681,000
23,000 2** 30,000 5,000 58,000
58,000 7,000 32,000 2,000 99,000
231,000 81,000 426,000 65,000 803,000
564,000 94,000 399,000 60,000 1,117,000
221,000 27,000 234,000 18,000 500,000
1,329,000 178,000 712,000 98,000 2,317,000
84,000 8,000 102,000 5,000 199,000
133,000 12,000 128,000 8,000 281,000
590,000 18,000 56,000 9,000 673,000
48,000 4,000 9,000 1,000 62,000
1,708,000 273,000 991,000 191,000 3,163,000
160,000 15,000 70,000 7,000 252,000
32,000 13,000 55,000 6,000 106,000
310,000 37,000 305,000 86,000 738,000
216,000 23,000 238,000 17,000 494,000
1,838,000 347,000 2,174,000 251,000 4,610,000
232,000 8,000 43,000 2,000 285,000
61,000 4,000 91,000 2,000 158,000
353,000 22,000 100,000 9,000 484,000
275,000 163,000 369,000 63,000 870,000
59,000 2** 9,000 2** 68,000
543,000 20,000 230,000 10,000 803,000
29,000 8,000 28,000 9,000 74,000

10,537,000 1,503,000 7,696,000 1,034,000 20,770,000


* Plantings for 1946-47 and 1947-48 preliminary
** Less than 500
Compiled from State Plant Board records of movement of trees out of nurseries 1928-29 through 1947-48,
adjusted for replacements by Bureau of Agricultural Economics, University of Florida; with allowances
lade for trees planted prior to 1928-29, based on Florida Citrus Tree Survey, U.S.D.A. 1934.






78 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE



ESTIMATED BEARING AND NON-BEARING GRAPEFRUIT TREE
PLANTED IN FLORIDA FOR COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION,
BY COUNTIES, (1948) 1*


GRAPEFRUIT GRAPEFRUIT TOTAL
Seeded Seedless GRAPEFRUI
COUNTY Bearing Non-Bearing Bearing Non-Bearing

Alachua........... 2,000 2** 1,000 2** 3,0
Brevard........... 116,000 6,000 99,000 7,000 228,000
Broward.......... 7,000 5,000 13,000 9,000 34,0
Charlotte.......... 12,000 2** 3,000 1,000 16,000
Citrus............. 3,000 2** 2,000 2** 5,000
Dade............. 96,000 1,000 7,000 4,000 108,000
DeSoto........... 79,000 6,000 8,000 1,000 94,000
Hardee............ 45,000 1,000 9,000 1,000 56,0
Hendry........... 11,000 2** 2,000 2** 13,000
Hernando......... 18,000 2** 5,000 1,000 24,000
Highlands ........ 200,000 5,000 124,000 19,000 348,000
Hillsborough....... 112,000 13,000 84,000 15,000 224,000
Indian River....... 179,000 5,000 385,000 56,000 625,000
Lake.............. 290,000 22,000 280,000 38,000 630,000
Lee............... 101,000 2** 39,000 1,000 141,000
Manatee .......... 224,000 3,000 65,000 3,000 295,000
Marion............ 40,000 2,000 16,000 1,000 59,000
Martin............. 17,000 2** 4,000 2** 21,000
Orange............ 162,000 36,000 116,000 40,000 354,000
Osceola ........... 31,000 2,000 11,000 2,000 46,000
Palm Beach....... 8,000 1,000 21,000 4,000 34,000
Pasco............. 71,000 14,000 59,000 8,000 152,000
Pinellas ........... 277,000 6,000 192,000 14,000 489,000
Polk.............. 1,130,000 78,000 635,000 56,000 1,899,000
Putnam........... 21,000 2** 4,000 2** 25,000
Sarasota........... 27,000 1,000 37,000 1,000 66,000
Seminole .......... 34,000 2** 13,000 2,000 49,000
St. Lucie.......... 109,000 37,000 269,000 68,000 483,000
Sumter............ 2,000 2** 2,000 2** 4,0001
Volusia............ 67,000 1,000 25,000 2,000 95,000
Other Counties..... 13,000 15,000 11,000 21,000 60,000

STATE TOTAL.... 3,504,000 260,000 2,541,000 375,000 6,680,000

1* Plantings for 1946-47 and 1947-48 preliminary
2** Less than 500
Compiled from State Plant Board records of movement of trees out of nurseries 1928-29 through 1947-41
adjusted for replacements by Bureau of Agricultural Economics, University of Florida; with allowance
made for trees planted prior to 1928-29, based on Florida Citrus Tree Survey, U.S.D.A. 1934.






FLORIDA CROPS 79


ESTIMATED BEARING AND NON-BEARING TANGERINE TREES
PLANTED IN FLORIDA FOR COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION,
BY COUNTIES, (1948) 1*


COUNTY

Jachua...........
Irevard......... .
Iroward. .........
:harlotte ..........
'itrus ... .........
)ade. ...........
)e Soto ..........
lardee............
lendry ..........
lernando. .........
lighlands.........
lillsborough .......
ndian River.......
sake..............
.ee...............
Janatee..........
darion ............
dartin............
)range............
)sceola. ..........
'aim Beach.......
'asco. ............
'inellas. ..........
'olk..............
'utnam. ..........
;arasota...........
;eminole .........
it. Lucie ........
ium ter............
Volusia............
theirr Counties

STATE TOTAL....


TANGERINES
Bearing Non-Bearing


5,000
32,000
5,000
2**
4,000
11,000
38,000
46,000
1,000
60,000
51,000
77,000
27,000
154,000
6,000
7,000
45,000
2,000
200,000
28,000
8,000
32,000
38,000
350,000
40,000
2,000
54,000
54,000
3,000
154,000
13,000

1,547,000


2**
2**
1,000
2**
2**
2,000
2**
2**
2**
2**
3,000
3,000
2**
3,000
2**
2**
2**
2**
8,000
2**
2**
3,000
1,000
4,000
2**
2**
1,000
2**
2**
1,000
3,000


TOTAL COMMERCIAL
TOTAL ORANGE
TANGERINES GRAPEFRUIT AND
TANGERINE TREES


5,000
32,000
6,000
2**
4,000
13,000
38,000
46,000
1,000
60,000
54,000
80,000
27,000
157,000
6,000
7,000
45,000
2,000
208,000
28,000
8,000
35,000
39,000
354,000
40,000
2,000
55,000
54,000
3,000
155,000
16,000


33,000 1,580,000


59,000
1,060,000
389,000
70,000
56,000
234,000
593,000
783,000
72,000
183,000
1,205,000
1,421,000
1,152,000
3,104,000
346,000
583,000
777,000
85,000
3,725,000
326,000
148,000
925,000
1,022,000
6,863,000
350,000
226,000
588,000
1,407,000
75,000
1,053,000
150,000

29,030,000


1* Plantings for 1946-47 and 1947-48 preliminary
2 Less than 500
Compiled from State Plant Board records of movement of trees out of nurseries 1928-29 through 1947-48,
adjusted for replacements by Bureau of Agricultural Economics, University of Florida; with allowances
made for trees planted prior to 1928-29, based on Florida Citrus Tree Survey, U.S.D.A. 1934.




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