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Title: Florida crops
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088900/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida crops
Series Title: New series bulletin - Florida State Department of Agriculture ; 1
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Brooks, T. J.
Publisher: Florida. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Fla.
Publication Date: August, 1941
Copyright Date: 1941
Edition: rev.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00088900
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ame4814 - LTUF
41127112 - OCLC
002439624 - AlephBibNum

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
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        Page 32a
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Full Text




FLORIDA CROPS
WHAT AND WHEN TOi IRT,' C~l
BY T. J. BROOKS~'1 -h


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Bulletin No. 1 New Series August, 1941


FLORIDA CROPS





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By T. J. BROOKS












STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA


NATHAN MAYO, Commissioner


Bulletin No. 1


New Series


August, 1941





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FLORIDA CROPS
WHAT AND WHEN TO PLANT


SEASONS OF BEARING
The harvesting seasons for the various crops vary so greatly owing to
varying seasons as to temperature and rainfall that no definite length of
harvesting dates can be given. The same crop will last much longer when
planted on different dates. Different varieties of the same crop differ as
to length of gathering days. Bunch beans do not bear as long as pole
beans, and pole butter beans bear longest of all.
It will be noted that the number of days from planting to maturity
varies much more in some crops than in others. Weather and soil conditions
are the cause in the main of these variations.

CROPS GROWN IN NORTH FLORIDA, WHEN PLANTED
AND HARVESTED:
North Florida comprises Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Calhoun, Clay,
Columbia, Dixie, Duval, Escambia, Franklin, Flagler, Gadsden, Gilchrist,
Gulf, Hamilton, Holmes, Jackson, Jefferson, Lafayette, Liberty, Madison,
Nassau, Okaloosa, Putnam, Santa Rosa, St. Johns, Suwannee, Taylor, Union,
Walton, Washington, Wakulla Counties. Area, 14,414,560 acres.
The number after crop indicates the number of days required to reach
edible maturity, or gathering maturity if non-edible.


Vegetables


When Planted


BEANS ........... Mar., Apr., May, Aug., Sept ....
BEETS ............ Feb., Mar., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov.
BRUSSELS SPROUTSJan., Feb., Sept., Oct., Nov. ...
CABBAGE .........Oct. to Feb...................
CARROTS .........Feb., Mar. ...................
CASSAVA ......... Mar., Apr.-a root crop. No def-
inite harvest date ..........
CAULIFLOWER .... Jan., Sept., Oct. ..............
COLLARDS ........ Jan., Feb., Mar., Nov..........
CUCUMBERS ......Feb., Mar., Apr...............
EGG PLANTS ...... Feb., Mar., Apr., July, Aug .....
IRISH POTATOES .Jan., Feb., Mar., Apr., Aug.,


KALE ..........
KERSHAW .....
KOHL-RABI ....
LEEK ..........
LETTUCE ......
MUSTARD ......
OKRA ..........
ONIONS ........

PARSLEY ......
PARSNIPS ......
PEAS (English) .


Sept., Oct. .................
... Mar., Sept., Oct., Nov ........
...Mar., Apr. ...................
... Mar., Apr., Aug...............
...Jan., Feb., Sept., Oct..........
... Jan., Feb., Sept., Oct., Nov., Dec.
... Sept., Oct., Feb., Mar..........
...Mar., Apr., May., Aug........
... Jan., Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct.,
Nov., Dec. .................
...Feb., Mar., Apr...............
... Feb., Mar., Apr., Oct., Nov .....
... Sept., Oct., Feb...............


When Harvested
65
60
90 to 120
65 to 80
100

180
55
85
64
84


100
40 to 80
125 to 160
45





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Vegetables When Planted
RADISHES ........Jan., Feb., Mar., Apr., Sept.,
Oct., Nov., Dec.............
RUTABAGA ....... Feb., Mar., Apr., Aug., Sept., Oct.
SPINACH ......... Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct. ........
SQUASH ........... Mar., Apr., May, Aug ..........
SWEET POTATOES Apr., May, June ..............
TURNIPS .......... Jan., Feb., Mar., Apr., Aug.,
Sept., Oct.................
TOMATOES ........ Mar., Apr., May, June, July, Aug.


Fruits


When Planted


PEACH ............ Jan., Feb.
PEAR ............. "
PLUM ............ "
PERSIMMON ....... "
FIG ............... "
SATSUMA ......... "
WATERMELON .... Mar., Apr.
GRAPES ............ "
CANTALOUPES .. "


Field Crops
CORN ............. Feb., Mar., Apr...............
COTTON .......... Mar., Apr. ...................
PEANUTS ......... Mar., Apr., May, June, July ....
SUGARCANE ......Feb., Mar ..................
HAY ..............
TOBACCO .........Mar., Apr. .................
JAPAN CLOVER .. .May, June, July ..............
CARPET GRASS .... Mar. to July .................
VELVET BEANS ... Mar., Apr., May ..............
RYE .............. Jan., Feb., Oct., Nov., Dec ...
RAPE .............Jan., Feb., Oct., Nov., Dec ...
SORGHUM ......... Mar., Apr., May, June .........
VETCH ........... Oct., Nov., Dec ..............
COWPEAS ........Mar. to July .................
BEGGARWEED .... May to July ...............
KUDZU ............ Dec., Jan., Feb..............
CROTALARIA ......May, June ................
BERMUDA GRASS Mar., Apr., May, June, July ....
SOY BEANS .......Mar., Apr., May ..............
Berries
BLUEBERRIES .... Dec. to Mar. ...............
BLACKBERRIES ... Jan., Feb., Mar...............
DEWBERRIES .... Jan., Feb., Mar...............
STRAWBERRIES .. May and June, Sept. and Oct...
YOUNG BERRIES .. Nov. to May ................
Nuts
PECANS ..........Dec. to Feb ................
TUNG NUT .......Dec. to Feb .................


When Harvested


27
50 to
50 to
60 to
100

45
73 to


. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . .
. . . . . . .
I . . . . . .


4 to 6 yrs.
4 to 6 yrs.


When Harvested
2 to 3 yrs.
3 to 4 yrs.
3 to 4 yrs.
3 to 4 yrs.
2 to 4 yrs.
3 to 5 yrs.
83 to 93 days
1 to 2 yrs.
85 days

Days
75 to 90
180
120 to 150
210

100 to 120





160

90 to 120




90 to 100


2 to 3 yrs.
1 to 2 yrs.
1 to 2 yrs.
Mar. to June
1 to 2 yrs.








































































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FLORIDA CROPS


CROPS GROWN IN CENTRAL FLORIDA, WHEN PLANTED
AND HARVESTED:
Central Florida comprises Brevard, Citrus, Hernando, Hillsborough,
Lake, Levy, Marion, Orange, Osceola, Pasco, Pinellas, Polk, Seminole,
Sumter, Volusia Counties. Area, 9,164,800 acres.
The number after each crop indicates the number of days required to
reach edible maturity, or gathering maturity if non-edible.


Vegetables When Planted
BRUSSELS SPROUTSJan., Feb., Mar., Sept., Oct., Nov.
BEANS ........... Feb., Mar., Sept. .............
BEETS ............ Jan., Feb., Mar., Sept., Oct., Nov.
CABBAGE ........ .Jan., Feb., Oct., Nov., Dec .....
CANTALOUPES .... Feb., Mar. ..................
CASSAVA .........Mar., Apr............ ........
CAULIFLOWER .... Jan. (seed) ; Mar., June (seed) ;
July, Aug., Sept., Oct........
CUCUMBER .......Sept. to Mar. .................
COLLARDS ........ Jan., Feb., Mar., Apr., May, Aug.,
Sept., Nov., Dec.............
CELERY ........... June (seed) ; July (seed) ; Sept.
to February ...............
DASHEENS ........ Mar., Apr. ...................
EGG PLANTS ...... Jan., Feb. (spring crop) ; July,
(fall crop) .................
ESCAROLE ........Oct. to Feb...................
ENGLISH PEAS .... Sept. to Mar .................
IRISH POTATOES ..Sept. (fall crop); Nov. to Mar.,
(spring crop) ..............
KOHL-RABI ....... Mar., Apr., Aug..............
KALE ............. Feb., Mar., Aug., Sept., Oct.,
Nov., Dec. .................
LEEK ............. Jan., Feb., Mar., Sept., Oct., Dec.
LETTUCE ......... Jan., Feb., Sept., Oct., Nov., Dec.
MUSTARD ........ Jan., Feb., Mar., Apr., Aug.,
Sept., Oct., Nov...........
ONIONS .......... Jan., Feb., Mar., Apr., Aug.,
Sept., Oct., Nov. ...........
OKRA ............ Feb., Mar .................
PARSLEY ......... Feb., Mar., Apr., June, July ....
PARSNIPS ......... Feb., Mar., Apr., Sept., Oct., Nov.
PUMPKINS ....... May, June, July ..............
PEPPERS .......... Jan., Feb., Mar. (spring crop) ;
July to Oct. (fall crop) ......
RADISHES ........ Jan., Feb., Mar., Apr., Sept., Oct.
RUTABAGAS ...... Feb., Mar., Sept. to Dec. .......
TOMATOES ........ Sept. to Mar., July ............
TURNIPS .......... Jan., Feb., Mar., Apr., Aug.,
Sept., Nov., Dec...........


When Harvested
90 to 120
65
60
65 to 80
85
100 to 200

55
64

85

120 to 150


84
50 to
62


100 to 120
60 to 80

90 to 120
100 to 115
75 to 83



100
40
40 to 80
125 to 160
150 to 180

100 to 140
28
50 to 80
73 to 82













































CELERY


















PRODUCTS OF NORTH FLORIDA


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FLORIDA CROPS


Fruits
ORANGES ......
TANGERINES ..
GRAPEFRUIT ...
LEMONS .......
LIMES ..........
MANGOES ......
AVOCADOS .....
WATERMELONS
PAPAYA .......
GUAVAS .......
CANTALOUPES.
GRAPES ........

Berries
STRAWBERRIES


... Dec., Jan., Feb.
,, ,, ,,

,, ,, ,,

... Sept. and Oct...
...Sept. and Oct. ..
S. Jan. to March ..
. Feb. to June ....
...Oct., Nov., Feb.
...Feb. to Mar ...
...Jan. and Feb ...


4 to
4 to
4 to
3 to
3 to
4 to
4 to


12 to 15 mos.
2 to 4 yrs.

1to 2 yrs.


October to June
October to March
October to May
Depends on Variety
Depends on Variety
June, July
July to January
83 to 93


85
June and July


..May and June, Sept. and Oct. ..December to April


Field Crops
COTTON ..........Feb., Mar., Apr............... 150 to 180
CORN ............. Jan. (early) ; Feb., Mar., Apr. . 75 to 90
OATS ............. Jan., Nov., Dec..............
SUGARCANE ...... Jan. and Feb ................ October and Nov.
HAY (Native) ...... July and August
SHUFAS .......... Mar., Apr., May ............. Oct., Nov., Dec.
COW PEAS ......... Apr. to July .................
SORGHUM ........ Apr., May, June .............. July, Aug., Sept.
PEANUTS ......... Apr., May, June .............. July, Aug., Sept.
VELVET BEANS ... Mar., Apr., May .............. Sept., Oct., Nov.
TOBACCO ......... Mar., Apr. ................... June, July
SOY BEANS .......Mar., Apr., May .............. 90 to 100
RYE ............ Jan., Feb., Oct. to Dec. ........
RAPE ............. Jan., Feb., Oct. to Dec.........
VETCH ............ Oct. to Jan. ..................
BEGGAR WEED .... Apr., May, June ..............
KUDZU ........... Nov., Dec., Jan...............
NAPIER GRASS .. Jan. to Mar .................
MEEKER GRASS ...Jan. to Mar .................
BERMUDA GRASS .Mar., Apr., May, June, July,
Aug., Sept., Oct.............


Nuts
TUNG NUT ........ Dec., Jan., Feb. .. 4 to 6 yrs.
PECANS ........... Dec. and Jan. 4 to 6 yrs.


October and Nov.
October and Nov.


When Planted Years to Production When Harvested












































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FLORIDA CROPS


CROPS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA, WHEN PLANTED
AND HARVESTED:
South Florida comprises Broward, Charlotte, Collier, Dade, DeSoto,
Glades, Hardee, Hendry, Highlands, Indian River, Lee, Manatee, Martin,
Monroe, Okeechobee, Palm Beach, Sarasota, St. Lucie. Area, 11,376,680
acres.


Vegetables


When Planted


BEANS ............ Sept. to Apr.; June, butter beans
BEETS ........... Jan., Feb., Mar., Sept., Oct., Nov.
BROCCOLI .........
BRUSSELS SPROUTSJan., Feb., Mar., Sept., Oct., Nov.
CUCUMBERS ......Sept. to Mar. ...............
CABBAGE .........Oct. to Feb...................
CORN .............Jan. to Mar. .................
CARROTS ......... Jan., Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov.
CAULIFLOWER .... Jan. (seed) ; Feb., Mar., Aug.
(seed) ; Sept. ..............
COLLARDS ....... .Jan., Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct.,
Nov., Dec. .................
CANTALOUPES .... Feb., Mar ...................
DASHEENS ........Jan. to Apr. ................
EGG PLANTS ...... Jan., Feb. (spring crop) ; July,
Aug. (fall crop) ............
ENGLISH PEAS .... Sept. to Mar ..................
IRISH POTATOES ..Nov. to Mar. (spring crop);
Sept. (fall crop) ...........
KALE .............Jan., Feb., Mar., Aug., Sept.,
Oct., Nov. .................
KOHL-RABI .......Jan., Apr., Aug...............
LETTUCE .........Sept. to Jan. .................
MUSTARD ....... Jan., Mar., Aug., Sept., Oct.,
Nov., Dec. .................
OKRA ............ Feb., Mar., Sept. .............
ONIONS .......... Jan. (seed) ; Feb., Mar., Apr.,
Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov., Dec...
PEPPERS .......... Jan., Feb. (spring crop) ; July
to Oct. (fall crop) ..........
PUMPKINS ........ Mar., Apr., May, June, July ....
RADISHES ........ Jan., Feb., Mar., Sept., Oct.,
Nov., Dec. .................
RUTABAGAS ...... Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov. ........
SQUASH ........... Feb., Mar., Apr., May, June,
July, Aug., Sept............
SPINACH ......... Jan., Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov.
SWEET POTATOES Apr., May, June, July .........
TOMATOES ........ Sept. to Feb.; July for fall crop.
TURNIPS ..........Jan. to Oct. .................


When Harvested
65
60

90 to 120
64
65 to 80
75 to 90


55

85

85

84
62

100 to 120


to 120
to 80
to 83


60

100

100 to 140
150 to 180

28
50 to 80

60 to 80
50 to 60
100
73 to 82
45





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Fruits When Planted
TANGERINES ..... Dec., Jan., Feb. ..............
ORANGES ......... .........
GRAPEFRUIT ...... ...........
LEM ONS .......... ..............
LIM ES ............ ..............
BANANAS .........Any Time ...................
PAPAYAS .........Feb. to June .................
MANGOES ......... Sept., Oct., Nov...............
AVOCADO PEARS.. ..............
SAPODILL AS ...... " ..............
GUAVAS .......... Oct., Nov., Feb...............
CHAYOTE ......... Nov. to Feb. ..................
COCOANUTS ....... Any Time ...................
CANTALOUPES-
WATERMELONS .Jan. and Feb ................

Field Crops
SORGHUM FORAGE Mar. to June ................
PARA GRASS ...... Any Time ...................
NATAL GRASS .....
NAPIER GRASS ....Any Time ...................
BERMUDA GRASS (Seed) Oct. to Feb ..........
CARPET GRASS .... (Seed) Oct. to Feb ..........
ST. AUGUSTINE
GRASS .......... (Seed) Any Time ............
COW PEAS .........Mar. to July .................
MILLET ........... Feb. to June .................
SUGARCANE ...... Nov. to Apr. .................
PINEAPPLES ...... Aug. and Sept ...............


When Harvested
4 to 6 yrs.
4 to 6 yrs.
4 to 6 yrs.
3 to 5 yrs.
3 to 5 yrs.
12 to 18 mos.
12 to 15 mos.
4 to 6 yrs.
4 to 6 yrs.
6 to 10 yrs.
2 to 4 yrs.
4 to 5 mos.
5 to 8 yrs.

3 mos.


3 to 4 mos








Nov. to April
18 to 20 mos.


S Plantinq 1 HarvesDinq
PLANTING AND HARVESTING





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PINEAPPLE






14 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

TIME TABLE OF FLORIDA FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPMENTS
In the following table is shown names of some of Florida's most im-
portant products and the months that they are available for market
July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May Junr


Avocados
Beans
Beans-Lima
Broccoli
Cabbage
Carrots
Celery
Celery-Cabbage
Cucumbers
Corn-Green
Collards
Dasheens
Mangoes
Egg Plant
Escarole
Grapes
Greens
Grapefruit
Oranges
Mixed Citrus
Lemons
Limes
Lettuce
Tangerines
Satsumas
Mixed-Deciduous
Mixed Vegetables
Okra
Peas-Green
Peppers
Potatoes
Radishes
Strawberries
Squash
Sweet Potatoes
Tomatoes
Watermelons


XXXXXx


XXX

X X X
XXXX
X
XXX

X
XXXX X

X
X X X X X


XX
X

XX


X X
X


X X X
XXX
XX
X X
X
XXXXX
X
XX
X


X X X
XXXX

X



XX X
X X
X
X


X X


XXX
X
X
XXX
XXX
X X X


X
X X X


XX
XX
X
XX
X
XX
X
XX


X X X
X


XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
X
XX


XX
XX
X
XX










/


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PAPAYA


II







16 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


THE FOLLOWING IS FROM THE BULLETIN, "FOR SALE, WANT AND EXCHANGE"
ISSUED BY THE FLORIDA STATE MARKETING BUREAU
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
FLORIDA HOME MARKET VEGETABLE QUOTATIONS

Many Florida growers, particularly those who sell their vegetables in l.c.l. express or truck lots on
the larger Florida home markets, have requested information showing average prices prevailing throughout
the shipping season on vegetables for a number of years. The following tabulation of simple, unweighted
jobbing price averages by months, beginning with January, 1926, and running to July 1, 1940, covering the
principal Florida vegetables, top quotations, in containers as shown, sold on the Jacksonville market, will
it is hoped meet the requirements of those interested in the data presented. This compilation of quotations
should be filed for future study and reference.
NEILL RHODES, Assistant Marketing Commissioner.

GREEN BEANS (Bushel Hampers)

YEAR JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC.
1926 $5.15 0 7 30 3.40 2.97 1.81 2.14 3.73 3.54 2.65 2.23 2.3f
1927 5.36 6.22 3.60 2.16 1.63 2.41 2.56 2.36 2.58 2.40 1.63 1.78
1928 4.40 5.07 3.59 2.61 1.57 1.60 2.17 3.61 4.23 3.50 3.32 2.52
1929 3.54 2.62 2.51 2.20 1.10 1.27 2.33 3.02 2.80 2.55 2.74 2.28
1930 2.93 3.02 4.10 3 56 1.85 1.24 2.87 2.37 2.71 1.58 1.55 2.85
1931 4.82 4.05 3.90 2.55 1.52 1.33 2.95 1.85 1.93 1.93 1.51 1.50*
1932 1.66 2.29 3 05 3.49 1.50 .70 1.27 2.04 2.01 1.36 1.88 2.99
1933 2.05 1.54 1.70 1.29 1.74 2.11 2.89 1.05 1.41 2.24 1.18 .99
1934 1.51 1.91 2.01 1.85 .98r .86r 2.07r 2.44r 1.78r 1.36r 2.12 2.31
1935 5.33 2 36 1.60 1.68 .78 1.08 1.54 1.59 1.93 2.35 1.65 3.12
1936 2.28 1.61 1.01 1.92 1.25 1.19 1.59 1.28 1.24 1.00 1.27 1.25
1937 1.24 2.32 2.62 2.16 1.46 1.18 1.34 1.56 1.67 1.76 1.84 1.95
1938 1.80 1.83 1.37 .84 .61 1.10 .85 1.65 2.01 1.55 .81 .98
1939 1.31 1.67 2.60 1.43 .67 .96r 1.64r 1.41r 1.19r 1.59r 1.79 1.95
1940 1.98 3.94 5.22 1.88 1.15 1.18

CELERY (Crates)

1926 $1.5S* 5.03 5.01 3.66 5.07* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1927 3.25* 2.55 2.73 2.54 2.86* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1928 2.63* 2.25 2.61 2.74 4.20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1929 0 1.90* 1.85 2.24 2.85 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1930 3.04 2.65 2.43 3.14 4.04 3.69* 0 0 0 0 0 0
1931 2.88 2.98 2.62 2.30 2.76 3.85* 0 0 0 0 0 0
1932 2.48 2.59 2.92 3.38 2.20 2.17 0 0 0 0 0 0
1933 2.17 1.37 1.44 1.20 2.24 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1934 1.92 1.37 1.42 1.74 2.09 3.68* 0 0 0 0 0 0
1935 2.82* 2.67 2.28 2.31 2.90 3.35* 0 0 0 0 0 0
1936 2.81 2.22 1.91 2.58 2.91 3.03* 0 0 0 0 0 0
1937 2.12 1.94 2.74 2.00 1.90 2.66 0 0 0 0 0 0
1938 2.13 1.51 1.47 1.59 1.89 2.67* 0 0 0 0 0 2.53*
1939 2.11 1.45 1.77 2.68 1.83 2.21* 0 0 0 0 0 2.42*
1940 2.02 2.61 2.14 1.52 2.92 4.05*

OKRA (Bushel Hampers)

1926 $ 0 0 0 0 0 3.96 1.86 1.95 1.80 2.02 3.05 4.68
1927 0 0 0 7.19* 4.70 2.06 1.33 1.13 1.12 1.35 1.94 2.01
1928 0 0 0 5 10 4.66 2.76 1.29 1.77 1.49 2.28 2.72 4.02
1929 0 0 0 4.34 2.79 1.45 1.35 1.08 1.31 2.26 2.80 3.05
1930 0 0 4.05 4.70 5.20 2.95 1.29 1.26 1.17 1.14 2.25 3.34
1931 3.76* 3.42 3.93 4.14 4.38 3.01 1.42 1.18 1.37 1.53 2.42 2.46
1932 2.97 3.28 4.04 3.95 3.31 1.50 .91 .94 .99 1.40 1.73 3.45
1933 3.10 3.58 3.54 3.37 2.68 1.91 .83 .74 .90 1.22 2.11 2.80
1934 2.75 2.95 3.19 3 16 3.10 1.58 1.10 .91 .96 .91 2.11 2.77
1935 0 0 0 0 2.20 1.04 .86 .81 1.16 1.75 1.82 2.35
1936 3.30 3.13 3.54 3.01 3.21 1.74 1.00 1.02 1.03 1.18 1.69 2.94
1937 2.53 2.90 0 3.52 3.47 1.94 1.03 1.01 1.39 1.84 2.74 0
1938 0 0 0 3.33* 2.40 1.45 .84 .97 1.19 1.49 1.42 1.76
1939 0 0 3.33 3.47 1.82 1.04 .87 .93r .90r 1.14 2.18 2.50
1940 2.68 3.39 4.63 3.04 3.57 2.40

RED BLISS POTATOES (Bushel Hampers or Crates)

1926 $ 0 0 0 0 3.34 2.50 0 0 0 0 0 0
1927 0 0 4.07* 2.62 1.60 2.35 0 0 0 0 0 0
1928 0 2.50 3.08 3.04 2.20 1.38 0 0 0 0 0 0
1929 0 0 2 92* 1.89 1.23 1.51 1.75* 0 0 0 2.49* 2.33
1930 2.33 2.94 2.78 2.63 2.15 1.88 1.59 1.47 1.46 0 0 0
1931 2.02 2.04 2.28 2.48 1.27 .97 .87 0 0 0 0 0
1932 1.71 1.92 1.87 1.98 1.98 1.18 1.22 1.36 1.38 1.47r 1.29 1.35
1933 1.67 1.66 1.49 1.52 1.05 .99 1.69r 2.33r 2.48r 1.92r 1.85 1.78
1934 1.70 1.74 1.47 1.50 1.21 .87r .83r .86r .90r .90r 1.63 1.48
1935 1.51 1.61 1.43 2.02 1.14 .98 .99 1.04 1.31 1.39 1.75 2.14
1936 2.17 1.81 1.53 1.66 1.27 1.83 1.76 0 0 0 2.14 1.71
1937 1.77 1.65 1.72 1.77 1.47 .94 1.06 1.13 1.15 1.35 2.12 1.81
1938 1.75 1.48 1.12 1.17 .84 .92 .98 1.17 1.10 1.00* 1.59 1.62
1939 1.38 1.31 1.61 1.82 1.01 .91 1.42r 1.87r 2.09r 2.17r 1.83 2.04
1940 1.68 1.63 1.98 1.85 .97 .94







FLORIDA CROPS 17


LIMA BEANS (Bushel Hampers)

YEAR JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC.
1926 $ 0 0 0 0 0 2.73 2 10 2 24 2 37* I) 0 0
1927 0 09 0 0 I 0 2 15* 1.92 2.9 0 I) (
1928 0 () 0 I) )0 I) 2 09* 1.87* 0 0 0 0
1929 0 0 0 0 2 25* 1 .9 1.75 2 7s* ) I)0 0
1930 6.19* 5.17* 3.5* 5 33* 2 2 1 3 2.1)1 2 18 1.S7 2.25 4.S7
1931 5.55* 6(.58 61.12 4 196 4 11 2 22 2.IS 1 sl 1 84 2.01 3.12 3.19
1932 3.70 3 (9 4 19 1.94 3 32 1 33 1.19 2.10 2 12 0 3.10* 1.57*
1933 0 0 0 II I 0 1.060 1 51 1.93 2.12* 0
1934 2.90 2.98 2.45 2.44 2.73 1 37 1.77 1 S5 I 11 1 34 2 22* 4.9*
1935 4.11 0 0 3 53 2.78 1 I1i 1.04 1.15 1 .65 1.8 2 44 4 83
1936 4.21 3.92 3 02 2.97 2.61 1 43 1.54 1 .(6 2.03 0 3.39 3.48
1937 3.161 3.37 3.92 3.31 3.21 2 06 1 29 0 I (I0 3.36
1938 3.53 3.54 2.30 2.16 1.6(1 1.45 1.07 2.42* 3 01 3 72* 3 29* 3 51
1939 2.5(6 2.06 2 52 2.32 1 .3 1.08 2.03r 2.31r 2.99r 0 910* 3 86
1940 3.23 4 53 5.19 3 92 2.75 1.44

BEETS (Per Dozen Bunches)

1932 $ 0 0 .iI66* .6il .47 .44 )II .62 67 73* .66*
1933 .51 .46 .41 .3 .36* ( I II ( I) I II
1934 .73 .164 .(1i .51i .15 .3 .59 .s3 .77* .6s* .s0 .75
1935 .75 .66 .(15 .49 .42 .41* 0 0 II II II .(64
1936 .63 .58 .53 .41 .42 .42* 0 0 (0 ( 0 0I
1937 .62 .45 .45 .48 .46 .53 I0 I) (I II I
1938 0 .53 .53 .45 .411 .4)* ) (I 0 0 .76*
1939 0 .66l .50 .49 .45 .46 0 I) 0 0 .612*
1940 .65 .76 .14 .51 .45 .40*

PEPPERS ('I Bushel Crates)

1926 $4.48 5.28 6.33 4.83 4.64 3.87 1 S3 1.15 1.76 2.5S 2.42 3 19
1927 4.3( 4.97 3 59 28 2.65 1.96t 2.1 2.04 1(63 1.65 1 .66 1.49
1928 2 29 3.53 3.20 2.71 2 52 2 21 1 90* 2 51 2 75 2 55 4 22 7.21
1929 6.17 2.89 2.06 2.10 2 27 1.5S 1.11 1.96 2.17 2 78 3 24 4.61
1930 4.75 4.63 4.10 3.34 2 73 2 27 1.75 1.S2 195 1.S4 1 70 2.07
1931 2.11( 2 41 3 01 2 97 2.75 2 11 1.17 79z .9z 1.35 2.10 2.21
1932 1.88 2.0S 2 37 3 36 0 0 0 0 0 1 04 1 OS 1.(64
1933 1.28 1.07 83 81 .7i (7 .35 .52 1 .07 1 60 1.47 1.82**
1934 1.42 2.00 2 14 1 75 1 51 .S3 1.11 1.09r 1 10r 1 05r 1.21 1.55**
1935 2.28 3.37 1.72 2.37 I 61 .91 l1 .79 1.32 1 114 1 72 2.26**
1936 2.38 1.78 2.16 1.2 1.1 81 S7 .83 1.04 1.01 111 1.52
1937 1.31 1 14 1.64 1 62 2 19 1 70 .74 .83 1 09 1 10 1.55 2 03
1938 1.93 1.98 1 .56 1.14 1 02 .s80 45 .SS 97 .91 1.12 1.19
1939 1.47 1 26 2.01) 1.S2 .S7 1.3S 1 35 .99r 1.1),r 1 22r 1.91 1.85
1940 1.61 4.11 8.44 6.44 5 31 1 .67

SQUASH (Yellow, Crates)

1926 $5.31 0 7.31 5.55 4 15 1.17z 1 77z 1 89z 1 9Sz 2.0z1 2.00z 1 71z
1927 2.13z 6.S7 5.77 3 45 1.22* 0 0 2.25* 2 02 1 29 1.73 1.41
1928 5.05 5.50 4.46 1 39z 1 3(0z 1.43z 1 .6i3 0 0 3.15z 2.21z 2 30z
1929 2.88 2 93 2.99 1 36 1.21 1 35 2 42 2.61 1.54 1 .9 2.62 2.59**
1930 2.64 3.71 3.62 3 48 1.72 2 15 1.76 1 23 1 30 1 42 2.71**
1931 4.14 4.32 4.14 2 75 1 40 1.31 2.4i 1 .61 1 48 2 24 2. 60 2.64
1932 3.07 3 11 3.28 1.85 95 .73 1.90 1.78 2.04 99 1.49 2.37
1933 2.40 1.73 1 St 1 .3') 1 (9 1.28 89 1.20 1 88 198 1.25 1.30
1934 1.88 2.30 2.70 1.96 .78 94 2.36 2 1( 1 19 1.11 2 54 2 63
1935 6.48 4.33 1.45 1.21 .118 .76 1.13 2.08 2 53 2.92 2 33 3.35
1936 3.27 2.78 3.26 3.31 1 .65 1.35 .61 1.35 1.20 1.52 2.10 2.70
1937 1.99 3.27 3.42 2.20 1.361 .S2 1 36 2.28 2.31 1.59 1.60 2.66
1938 2.80 2.35 1.45 79 57 .71 .99 1.51 1.88 1.06 1.43 2 98
1939 2.08 2.96 3 17 1 45 .72 1 12 1.40r 1.79r 1.04r .81 1.95 1.47
1940 2.36 5.40 5.13 1.48 .74 .70

CARROTS (Per Dozen Bunches)

1932 $ I 0I .75* .71 .56 .50 .75* 69 .614 .(17 .12* .59
1933 .43 .38 .37 .33 .32 .3s* .5i 16i .(iS .63 .62 .(i8
1934 .7(1 .(10 .50 49 .42 37 .41; .15 .57 .51 .59 .69
1935 .114 .1 .53 .45 36 .12 49 .55 .58 51i .57 .(6
1936 .il .51 .47 39 .38 41* .46 .(i .li) .55 .51 .47
1937 .47 .45 .44 43 .-1 57 .75 .55 .50 .51 .53 .55
1938 .63 .43 .42 .39 .39 .39 .47 .51 .52 .58 .61 .58
1939 .52 .44 .43 .40 .411 .41 0 0 0 0 1 0
1940 0 .50* .37 .41 .40 .38*

SPINACH (Bushel Hampers or Crates)

1933 S .73 .56 .63 .65 .66 .60* .57 0 1 .01* 1.45 1.32 1.09
1934 .75 .78 .85 .78 .111 56 0 0 0 .99 .91 1.14
1935 1.19 1.07 .89 .82 .55 .50 .79 1.2S 1.53* 1.48 1.22 1.27
1936 1.16 .82 .63 .78 .9 .91 1 .06 1.41* 1.37* 1 19* 1.113 1.22
1937 .82 .(8 1.13 1.03 .73 .64 .115 1.01 1 .11 1 27 1 17 1.26
1938 .95 1.04 .83 .60 .74 .70 .95 1 S1 1.11 1.OS 1.12 1.08
1939 .94 .8 .85 .78 .72 .S2r I (r .90r1 1 .02 1.12r 1r 1 .04
1940 1.03 1.46 1.04 .78 .77 .75


















Z-4e-a 1 L -7 7.
*- A* .
Lr^ a i,' ^.^ <^ M.^.-. -ii .A *ar^ .* .--.,- ---< L -;*.*


-* rd






FLORIDA CROPS 19


EGG PLANTS (111 Bushel Crates)

YEAR JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. IEC.
1926 $3.85 0 5.50 5 52 0 4 39 1 91 1.98 2 2S 2.11 2 90 3 31
1927 3.88 4 77 4.1S 3 46 2.68 2.28 0 1.72 1 71 1 .66 2.4 1 70
1928 2619 2 17 2 78 2 41 2.06 2.25 1.52 2 N 1 .81 3 16 3.21 3.03
1929 4.38 4 34 2.61 2.35 2 15 1 88 1 74 1.S7 2.15 1 73 2 03 2.72
1930 2.84 2.166 2.60 2.165 2 5i 2 12 1.94 1 .5 1 .3 1 60 1.77 2.17
1931 2.22 2.07 2.71 2 72 1 94 1 .3 1.03 .81 1.03 1 3 1 .29 1.16
1932 0 1.27 1.34 1 2 1.13 .88 0 (0 .85 71 .95 1.28
1933 1.33 1.66 1.45 .98 .76 .74 .63 .59 .SS* 1 .28 1 31 1.11
1934 1 21 1 22* 1 25 1.09 .97 .78 .77 .O9r 1.17r .Slr 1 03 1.42
1935 2.25 2.71 1.65 1 40 1.03 1 11 .65 .65 1 23 1 64 1.84 1.611
1936 1.36 1.34 1.71 1.34 1.06 92 .80 .57 .77 80 .85 1.01
1937 .92 1.04 1.10 1 .26 1.20 .95 .63 .71 1.51 1 70 1 .86 1.75
1938 1 15 1.74 1.53 1.33 1.06 .84 .49 .52 .91 1.11 .97 .97
1939 .99 99 1 14 .97 .81 .78 .72 .90 .96r 1.01 1.37 1 .16
1940 1.35 2.32 4.29* 3.55* 2.35* 2.30

CUCUMBERS (Bushel Baskets)

1926 $5.22 0 0 5.76 2.86 1.21 1.69 0 0 2 51 3.48 3.67
1927 4.20 0 5.67* 3.06 1.43 1.67 1.36 1.91 2.56 2.06 2 50 2.54
1928 0 0 4.006* 4 44 2.82 1.28 1.15 0 0 3.11 2.75 3.42
1929 0 0 3.50 2.15 1.42 1.73 2.73 3 10 2.70 2.51 2 89 2.76
1930 3.79 2.90 5 9S 5.0, 2 69 1.01 2.19 2.79 3.3S 2.39 2.24 2.84
1931 3 62 4.14 4.54 4 71 2 03 1.03 2.00 1 S7 2.27 0 0 0
1932 4.80 5.23 3.59 4.58* 1.93* .70 0 0 0 1 6(1 2.29r 3.46
1933 0 0 3.78 2 34 1.69 0 1.50r 1 62 r 1.92r 1 62r 1.39 1.77
1934 1.99* 3.19* 4.68 3.76 1.97 .82r I 54r 2.21r 2.58r 2 05r 2.26 2 5ti
1935 0 0 3 85 2.93 .89 74 1 32 1.87 2.41 2.66 2.07 2.12
1936 2.10 2.19* 4 25 3.31 1.57 1.08 141 1 60 1.56 1.20 1.48 2.58
1937 3.01 4.29 3.87 2 45 2.38 .97 1.06 1.55 2 08 2.15 2.27 2.60
1938 3.33 4.61 4.30 1.62 1.24 1.00 1.43 1 51 2.80 1.78 1.48 2.09
1939 3.11 3.77 3.73 2.26 1.06 1.09r 1.57r 1.79r 2.24r 1.57r 1.90 2.59
194) 3.31 3.97 3.85 3.62 2.13 1.22

GREEN PEAS (Bushel Hampers)

1926 $4.36 4.72 3 94 3.10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.33
1927 3.36* 0 2.82 2 0 1 21 .92 90 .90 9S 1.03 0 1.87
1928 3.49 3.91 2.84 2.80 0 2 37 0 0 0 0 3.43* 2.83
1929 3.03 1.65 2.23 2.02 2.23 0 1.03* .97 0 0 0 2.88
1930 2.75 2.54 3.23 2.95 2.21* 0 0 0 0 0 2.72* 2.72
1931 3.69 2.06 2.77 1.74 1.54 0 0 0 I 0 3 09 2.42
1932 2.53 2.36 2.80 2.107 1.01 0 0I 0 0 0 2.54r 2.42
1933 1 68 2.10 2.18 1.63 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.31 1 39
1934 1.38 1.60 1.41 1.51 1.33 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 26
1935 2.99 1.90 1.70 2.21 1.55 0 0 0 0 0 2.67 2.83
1936 1.90 1.40 1 81 1.82 1.39 0 0 0 0 0 1.77 1.38
1937 1.26 2.43 3 30 1.89 1.41 1.63* 0 0 0 0 3 18* 2.34
1938 1.80 1.160 1.75 1.67 0 0 0 0 0 0I 1 .6r 3.11r
1939 2.00 1.85 2.19 1.96 .81* 0 0 0 0 0 2.53 1.82
1940 1.45 3.25 2.49 1.88 1.19 0

STRAWBERRIES (Crates, Quarts or Pints)
1926 $.73 .58 .41 .35 .22 0 qts 0 0 0 0 0 0
1927 .65 .51 .23 .27 .13 0 qts 0 II 0 0 0 0
1928 0 0 .35 .18 .12 .09 (ts ) 0 0 0 0 0
1929 .45* .29 .18 .18 .07 0 qts 0 I 0 0 0 0
1930 .34 .32 .21 .18 .08 .09 (its 0 0 0 0 0 0
1931 .35* .33 .31 .19 .09 .07* qts 0 0 0 0 0 0
1932 .18 .18 .24 .21 .08 0 qts 0 0 0 0 0 0
1933 .161; .11 .15 .11 0 0 qts 0 0 0 I) 0 0
1934 .23 .23'3 .21 .121, .08* 0 qts 0 0 0 0I 0 0
1935 .18 .11 .13 .08 .05 0 pts 0 0 0 0 0 0
1936 0 .11 .12 .08 .05 0 pts 0 0 0 0 0 0
1937 .09* .09 .120'. .092 .051' 0 pts 0 0 0 0 0 0
1938 I .110 .10 .08 .05 0 pts 0 0 0 0 0 0
1939 .12 .09* .12 .07 .05* 0 pts 0 0 0 0 0 0
1940 .18 0 .14* .08 .06 0 pts

CABBAGE (Containers, see footnote)
1926 $3.02z 2.85z 2.62z 1 84z 2.58c 3.25c 4.09c 0 0 0 0 0
1927 1.5tz 1.14z 1.21z 2.22c 2.45c 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1928 1.26z 1.15z 1.19z 1.58z 1.55z 1.40z 0 0 0 0 0 0
1929 1.15z 1.00z .85z .75z 2.15c 2.00c 0 0 0 0 0 0
1930 1.10z 1.06z 1.39z 1.64z 1.12z 1.27z 0 0 0 0 1.01z 1.05z
1931 1.04z .92z .85z .80z .71z 1.16z 0 0 0 0 1.57z .99z
1932 .70d .i66d .75d .82d .66d .63d .52d .43d .33d 1.53a .62d .45d
1933 .27d .28d .61(d .72d 0 ) 3.22a 2.18a 1.91a 0 .90d .83d
1934 .4Sd .441 39!1 .47d .59d .47d 1.20a 1.80a 1.45a 1.40a 1.751L 1.56a
1935 1.43a 2.87a 3.39a 3.20a 1 .61a 1 24a 1.35a 1 .12a .22a I .291 1 .56a 1 .7iz
1936 1.70a 1 40a .98a 1.13a 1.00a 2.11a 4.55a 3.881 2.5ia 1 .78a 1 .53a 1 .55a
1937 .77a .70a .97a .75a 1 .65a 1.63a 1.24a 1.42 1.2 1.53 1 2.15a 2.28a
1938 1 .76a 1.92a .97a .78a .78a 1.07a 1.01a 1.17a 1 .L a 1 .36a 1.21; 1.24a
1939 .96a .59a 1.62a 2.30a .99a 1.32r 1.72r 1.83r 1.43r 1.57r .98a 1.39a
1940 1 .33a 1.44a .86a 1.07a 1.15a 1.33*a







20 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


TURNIPS (Per Dozen Bunches)

YEAR JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC.
1932 $ 0 0 .66* .57 .43 .44 0 0 .61 .52 .39 .39
1933 .32 .31 .40 .34 .33* 0 0 0 0 .67* .5( .42
1934 .34 .57 .59 .46 .29 .34* 0 0 .55* .46 .42 .58
1935 .59 .55 .44 .40 .41 .46 .55 .55 .56 .75 .51 .53
1936 .55 .56 .47 .41 .44 .42 .53 .610 .50 .60 .52 .51
1937 .26 .40 .48 .51 .58 .59 0 .70* .85 .83 .19 .64
1938 .59 .60 .48 .37 .34 .56* .53* .65 .82 .76 .55 .61
1939 .69 .63 .75 .71 .61 .45 0 .81r* .64r .6(r .51 .42
1940 .53 .78 .72 .47 .40 .43

CAULIFLOWER (Crates)

1933 $1.49* 1.60* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1934 2.00 2.19 2.43* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.01*
1935 1.92 2.01 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1936 1.25* 2.05* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1937 1.81 2.15* 1.69" 1 58* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.35*
1938 1.10 1.22 1.10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.29*
1939 1.52 1.48 1.61* 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.50*
1940 1.55 1.81* 1.66* 1.33* 0 0

TOMATOES (Crates)
1926 $5.31 5.51 5.25 4.31 4.69 2.83 2.24 0 0 2.81 2.75* 6.50*
1927 5.65 3.70 3.13 2.24 2.06 1.68 2.09 2.26 1.92 1.90 0 3.85*
1928 3.03 2.83 4.45 3.28 2.28 1.82 1.88 2.81 2.68 0 3.25* 2.92
1929 2.07 1.73 2.52 2.88 2.45 1.48 2.36 2.46 2.47 2.16 3.43* 3.74*
1030 4.26 3.65 2.89 2.62 3.13 2.35 1.91 2.00 2.59 2.20 2.19 2.98
1931 2.36 2.34 2.87 3.16 2.84 1.30 1.50 0 0 0 3.09 3.48
1932 2.59 1.96 1.87 1.59 2.12 2.03 .04/ .047/ .0412/ .04'2/ .04,/ .05/
1933 .05/ .041/ .04/ 1.96 1.71 1.79r 1.51r 1.64r 2.01r 2.40r 2.19r 2.37
1934 2.35 2.02 1.82 2.58 2.24 1.45r 1.72r 2.00r 1.89r 2.12r 2.75 2.69
1935 3.33 4.25 3.83 2.63 1.87 1.32 1.41 1.41 1.83 2.53 2.38 3.13
1936 2.21 2.75 3.38 3.69 2.54 1.34 1.62 1.87 1.87 1.83 1.91 1.96
1937 1.92 1.98 2.40 2.88 2.45 2.06 1.23 1.40 2.04 2.31 3.69 3.40
1938 2.44 2.25 1.49 1.69 1.31 1.01 .96 1.21 1.73 1.66 2.69 3.25
1939 3.68 2.88 3.26 3.51 2.95 1.78 1.60r 1.42r 1.60r 2.13r 3.30 3.13
1940 3.04 4.06 4.00* 5.38 3.74 .90

GREEN CORN (Crates or Dozen Ears)

1926 $ 0 0 0 0 0 2.37* 1.62* 0 0 crates
1927 0 0 0 0 2.55 2.23 1.3S 1.25 0 crates
1928 0 0 0 0 2.94* 1.39 .18 .25 0 crates dozen ears
1929 0 0 0 .33 .23 .21 .19 .18 0 dozen ears
1930 0 0 0 5.24 2.58 .29 .19 .23 0 crates dozen cars
1931 0 0 0 .39 .23 .17 .21 .24 0 dozen ears
1932 0 0 0 0 .36 .16 .10 .13 0 "
1933 0 0 0 .32 .25 .18 .14 0 0 '
1934 0 0 0 .33 .27 .18 0 0 0 "
1935 0 0 0 .32* .20Y .10 .12 .17 0 "
1936 0 0 0 .27* .25 .15 .16 .20 0 "
1937 0 0 0 0 .28 .21 .14 .18 0 "
1938 0 0 0 .28 .21 .11 .13 .16 .18 "
1939 .28 .25 .29 .34 .22 .11 .16r .19r .20r* .27*
1940 .25 0 0 0 .27* .14

SWEET POTATOES (100 lb. Sacks)

1926 $3.00 3.60 3.63 4.68 4.91 0 0 4.47* 3.44 2.94 2.20 1.93
1927 2.68 2.41 2.20 1.90 1.90 0 2.98* 2.49 1.93 2.02 1.56 1.55
1928 1.84 1.88 2.36 2.32 2.63 3.00 3.32 4.14 3.07 2.45 2.00 2.01
1929 2.59 2.75 2.73 2.75 2.75 0 3.48 2.35 2.00 2.13 1.92 1.75
1930 1.77 2.00 2.00 2.26 2.35 2.47 3.31 3.84 2.74 1.90 1.90 1.89
1931 2.15 2.37 2.58 3.27 3.69 4.15 3.83 2.75 1.87 1.62 1.56 1.59
1932 1.73 1.75 1.88 2.03 2.07 1.95 2.07 1.22 .97 .87 .77 .70
1933 .73 .74 .80 .76 .87 .96 1.94 2.20 1.34 1.07 .94 .94
1934 1.13 1.36 1.41 1.62 2.24 3.29 3.32 2.11 1.35 1.09 .98 1.03
1935 1.10 1.25 1.55 1.53 1.62 1.89 1.83 1.40 1.04 .98 .86 1.09
1936 1.17 1.50 1.50 2.00 1.61 2.33 3.92 3.25 2.05 1.41 1.31 1.28
1937 1.37 1.49 2.05 2.48 3.04 3.00 1.93 2.08 1.49 1.20 1.13 1.40
1938 1.57 1.65 1.72 1.94 1.86 1.94 2.31 1.38 .97 .99 .99 .96
1939 1.11 1.08 1.06 1.55 1.68 1.72 1.81 1.60 1.22 1.09 1.04 1.17
1940 1.26 1.50 1.55 1.01 1.80* 1.73
Part month.
** Hampers for years 1933-1934-1935 for Peppers: 1929-1930 for Squash.
r Southern offerings.
z Hampers.
c Crates.
d Per dozen heads.
a Per hundred pounds.
/ In lugs per pound basis.







































































TOMATOES





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


COMPETITIVE MARKETS
BY NEILL RHODES
Of the State Marketing Bureau
BEAN COMPETITION
Competition.-The competition given by other States to Florida bean
shipments is the greatest in the early fall and late spring period of the
Florida shipping season. Domestic competition is the least in the period
December, January, February and March, and latter November and early
April might be included since normally bean shipments from other States
are comparatively light in these part months. Bean shipments are made
from Louisiana and Texas in more months of the Florida season than
from other States, but Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and
Virginia ship beans in October ahead of initial shipments from Florida, and
shipments from Arkansas, Georgia, Maryland, New Jersey and Tennessee
continue after the Florida season closes in June. Consequently, early Flor-
ida fall shipments if made before killing frost largely eliminates shipments
from other States, and the late Florida spring shipments if continued
after a number of other States are shipping heavily, must bring propor-
tionately lower prices.
Import competition of beans, principally Limas, to Florida offerings
comes mainly from Cuba in the period of the Florida shipping season,
December through March, the total volume annually amounting to 4-5%
of the Florida rail and boat shipments. Mexico with less on the average
than a dozen cars annually, gives negligible competition in the eastern
territory. The few cars from Puerto Rico are less in volume than the
Mexican imports. The Lima bean import competition in the months of
December, January, February and March is considerably greater to Florida
shipments than the domestic volume supplied by other States, and being
placed largely on a few eastern port markets is still more competitive than
if distributed to a number of inland markets.
Competition.-The Florida Lima bean shipping season extends from
November with l.c.l. lots, and December through June in carlot volume.
Georgia and the Carolinas offer competition to Florida shipments except
in the winter and early spring months, but Cuban competition offered
from latter October through April is more severe, especially since the
shipments are made chiefly to New York and eastern port markets. Mexico
and Puerto Rico also offer import competition, but the volume is negligible
compared to that from Cuba. The trade agreement with Cuba, reducing
the duty from December through May, tends to encourage competition
from that source in the Florida shipping season. Information showing
the Florida rail and boat shipments, the U. S. shipments and imports in
each of the months of the Florida shipping season, is unavailable.
TOMATO COMPETITION
Competition.-While only a few cars of tomatoes are shipped from
Florida as the season begins in October, they must meet competition with
offerings from California, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, and other
States. In November and December the fresh domestic competition comes
mainly from California and Texas carlot shipments. By January the
domestic competition has practically faded out, Texas and California
shipping out a few cars in this month some seasons. In February and
March Florida continues to supply most of the domestic tomato shipments.





FLORIDA CROPS


In April, Texas is shipping fresh tomatoes in fair carlot volume. In May,
Texas shipments increase tremendously and reach their peak. Mississippi,
Georgia, Louisiana and South Carolina begin carlot shipments in May,
reaching peak volume in June. In June, Arkansas, California, Maryland,
North Carolina, Tennessee and other States are also shipping out tomatoes,
the total U. S. shipments reaching the heaviest volume of all months in
June, and second heaviest in May.
Import competition is very pronounced on tomatoes. Cuba and Mexico
are the chief sources of import competition-Bahamas, Puerto Rico, Virgin
Islands and other countries shipping in only a few cars each season. The
import season runs with that of Florida beginning in November, continuing
in each following month until the import season ends in May. The Cuban
imports are heaviest in December, January and February, those from
Mexico usually after the Cuban peak has passed, in March and April.

POTATO COMPETITION
Competition.-A good many years ago the Florida potato shipping
season began in the latter part of March and extended well into June.
With the opening up of and increase in the production of Bliss potatoes
in South Florida, the Florida shipping season now begins in November
and continues through June. Florida potato shipments have heavy com-
petition with old stock from late, and with new crop potatoes from early
producing States. The two largest potato shipping States, Maine and
Idaho, place potatoes on the market in carlot volume every month in the
year, and so do the States of California, Michigan, Minnesota, New York,
Wisconsin and other States. While the old crop competition extends
throughout the Florida shipping season, the new crop competition comes
mostly in May and June. New crop potatoes are shipped from Texas in
about the same months of the Florida season,-November through June,
peak in April. Louisiana ships new stock from March to July, reaching
peak shipments in May. Alabama and Mississippi ship from April to July,
and South Carolina mostly in May and June. Georgia and North Carolina
ship out new stock in May, June and July. Alabama, Louisiana and South
Carolina shipments reach peak in May, and North Carolina-in June.
In the eight years, 1933-40, April was the peak month of Florida
shipments with two exceptions,-May ranked first in 1935 and again in
1940.

STRAWBERRY COMPETITION
Competition.-The Florida strawberry carlot shipping season begins
in December, and in the period from the latter part of November through
the following February, Florida strawberry shipments have little compe-
tition. In March and sometimes in February, Louisiana begins its carlot
shipping season, and this State gives Florida strawberries the strongest
competition. Louisiana ranks first among all the States in carlot shipments
of strawberries. The shipping season usually reaches peak in April, and
Louisiana ships as much volume in April as Florida ships the entire season.
Shipments from Louisiana continue heavy into May. Texas ships out a
relatively few cars also in March and April. The Alabama shipping season
begins in the latter part of March and continues through April and into
May. Mississippi and North Carolina begin their season in April, and
ship also in May. In some seasons Tennessee also ships out a few cars
in April, and moves out a heavy volume in May. In addition to the States






































CHAYOTES


<%K ^


i .JrZ















r r.























PRODUCTS OF CENTRAL FLORIDA


















PRODUCTS OF CENTRAL FiLORIDA





FLORIDA CROPS


above named, Arkansas, California, Delaware, Illinois, Kentucky, Mary-
land, Missouri and Virginia are all shipping strawberries in carlot volume
in May.

PEPPER COMPETITION
Competitive Shipments.-August and September are the two months
of the twelve in which the lightest total United States shipments are
made. The importing sections ordinarily place no carlots of peppers on
the U. S. markets until November. The Florida carlot shipping season
begins with little carlot competition in October, California, New Jersey
and Texas shipping; in November, California, Georgia, New Jersey, and
Texas are shipping; and in December supplies are more limited, mainly
from Texas. Imports begin from Cuba, Mexico and Puerto Rico in De-
cember. Texas has few cars out in January, but with that exception
Florida supplies the total carlot domestic pepper shipments from January
through February, March and April, to May in which month shipments
begin from Louisiana which give Flcrida peppers the only domestic com-
petition in this month. In June the season is under way in several States
-Georgia, Louisiana (peak shipments), Mississippi, North Carolina, South
Carolina-which States ship in July and the New Jersey season starts in
July. The imports increase in January, February, and reach peak in March,
then start declining in April, in May, about fade out in June, seldom any
imports in July. Thus in the first four months of the year Florida supplies
its own domestic competition, and has only the imports to offer competi-
tion, which are timed to meet the least competition in the eastern markets.
In the five years 1932-36 Florida shipments averaged the heaviest in May,
in 1934, 1935, 1936 increasing March over February, April over Maich
and May over April. No State, nor any section from which peppers are
brought into the United States, has a shipping season common entirely
to that of Florida.

GREEN PEA COMPETITION
Competitive Shipments.-Shipments of green peas from California far
exceed the shipments from any other State, about 58% of the total United
States shipments moving from California. This competition continues
with Florida during every month of its shipping season, and with other
States every month of the year. Mentioned in the order of the quantity
of green peas they ship, the States of the South and East competitive
to Florida are North Carolina, Mississippi, South Carolina and Texas.
Florida has import competition, Mexico principally, shipping December
through March, January and February the peak months. Puerto Rico
averages about 2 cars per month in January, February and March, be-
ginning shipments in November. Mississippi ships in April and May,
North Carolina April and principally May, South Carolina April and May,
Texas from December through March, Alabama and Georgia occasionally
have carlots out in April. Virginia carlot shipments do not begin until May.
In the season proper Florida competition comes therefore mostly from
California, Texas and Mexico, at least until April.

LETTUCE COMPETITION
Competitive Shipments.-Florida is outranked in lettuce shipments by
several states, and has very strong competition. California, shipping more





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


than 70% of the total U. S. lettuce, is the strongest competitor, and moves
more lettuce in every month of the year than Florida ships in the entire
season. Arizona has about the same shipping season as Florida, but much
heavier volume. The Iceberg type of lettuce shipped by California and
Arizona is well established, and preferred by most of the trade. Georgia
occasionally ships a few cars in March or April. North Carolina and South
Carolina ship in March, April and May in good carlot volume, and Texas
has a few cars in January or February. Most of the southern states ship
the Big Boston type. There is no import competition.

EGG PLANT COMPETITION
Competitive Shipments.-Since Florida has in the five years 1932-1936
shipped more than nine-tenths of the total U. S. rail and boat supplies, it
appears that Florida egg plant, especially during its shipping season, con-
trols the markets. Domestic carlot competition is negligible until Virginia
shipments begin in June and July, as the few cars from Texas, Louisiana
or South Carolina are not serious. However, imports account for about
45% (in the yearly average 1932-1936) of the total rail and boat supply,
the total U. S. shipments amounting to only 55% of the total. Cuba is
the chief competitor, Mexico next and occasionally Puerto Rico places
egg plant on the U. S. markets. Cuban shipments usually begin in De-
cember, or latter November, increase in January, and in February, to
reach the peak in March. The Cuban receipts drop off sharply in April,
and end in May. Mexico ships mostly in the period January to May in-
clusive, but in much less volume than Cuba.

CELERY COMPETITION
Competition.-Florida celery shipments in the first months of the sea-
son must compete with new crop, and also storage shipments, though in
far more limited proportions. Celery shipments from California are placed
on the markets from either the northern, southern or central districts of
that State in not only every month of the Florida shipping season, but in
every month of the calendar year. Florida celery is shipped in carlot
volume from December through June with no carlot shipments out in the
five months July through November. California shipments are the heaviest
in December, and second largest in November, so that Florida shipments
are placed on markets well supplied with California November shipments,
and must meet the heaviest month's shipments of the entire California
season in December. California celery shipments reach peak in the month
in which the Florida celery shipping season begins. California ships out
its lowest monthly volume in April, and the United States total celery
shipments are the lowest in order, in July and August. Louisiana ships
comparatively few cars of celery in May and June, and Virginia less than
75 cars in June in recent seasons.
Competition from old crop or late celery comes chiefly from New York,
and secondly from Michigan in December and January. The imports are
of little consequence. Bermuda occasionally ships out a few cars to the
United States.
CABBAGE COMPETITION
Competitive Shipments.-Many of the Florida vegetables have only
the new crop competition, but cabbage has not only the new crop, but





FLORIDA CROPS


the shipments from the late States and storage stock with which it must
compete. Cabbage from Louisiana, South Carolina and Texas is shipped
in almost every month of the Florida season, and storage stock from
New York and Wisconsin competes with Florida offerings practically every
month from December through April. Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and
North Carolina place new cabbage on the market in April and May, and
Tennessee and Virginia in May. There are shipments from other States
that at some time during the Florida shipping season give competition,
for instance, Arizona, California, Minnesota, etc. Import competition is
not serious. Cuba occasionally exports one or two cars to the United
States, usually in February. Less than 30 cars per season have come in
from the Netherlands, usually in the period January to April.

WATERMELON COMPETITION
Competitive Shipments.-There are no domestic carlot shipments of
watermelons in the United States in the months of November, December,
January, February, and March. Very few cars are reported in October,
occasionally cars from Colorado or California, Illinois, or others, but only
scattering cars. In April, Florida is the only State shipping watermelons,
does not itself ship in April every season, and has no competition from
domestic sources, and only few cars from imports from Cuba. In May,
California starts shipping in volume, and Texas, a more serious competitor,
begins the melon season. Cuba and Mexico account for few scattering
cars in May though the volume is limited. June is the peak month of Flor-
ida shipments, and shipments begin in June, continue through July, and
into August from Alabama, Georgia, the largest producing State, Louisi-
ana, Mississippi, South Carolina and California and Texas continue. In
addition to these designated States in July, Arkansas, Missouri, North
Carolina, and others are shipping melons in good carlot volume. In August
practically every watermelon producing state north of Florida is in season.

CUCUMBER COMPETITION
Competitive Shipments.-If the Florida cucumber season starts in Oc-
tober, growers have fall domestic competition with Louisiana, Georgia,
New York and northern home-grown local supplies. In November supplies
fade out from these sources and Florida ships in December practically
all of the domestic volume. Import competition from Cuba and Puerto
Rico begins in a limited way in November and by the end of December
reaches good volume, December imports ranging in the last four years
1933-36, from 24 to 62 carlot equivalents. Florida has competition in
January, February and March with hothouse supplies mainly from Illinois,
Indiana and Ohio, and the Cuban and Puerto Rican imports, which are
heaviest of the season in January and second in February declining in
March with an average of about 23 cars, ending in April, but largely
dominating the market in the first three months of the year. April marks
the beginning of the early domestic shipments from Texas, the peak move-
ment from which State is reached in May. During May, Alabama, South
Carolina and Georgia cucumbers roll in carlot volume, and the Florida
cucumber season ending in June must meet competitive shipments from
Arkansas, Maryland, Mississippi, Texas, Virginia, and heavy shipments
from Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina, and a few
scattering cars from other States.








A


LITCHI CHINENSIS (Litchi)


~I~


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..
,,

4~5~
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FLORIDA CROPS


ORANGE COMPETITION
The principal varieties of oranges in Florida are divided into Early,
Mid-season and Late. The early varieties are Hamlin, season October,
November and later; Parson Brown, season October and November. The
outstanding mid-season varieties are Seedlings, the Pineapple and Homo-
sassa, season December to February. The principal late variety is the
Valencia, season March to June.
Florida oranges have been shipped in several different types of con-
tainers. For instance, the two-bushel Bruce box, the 4/5-bushel box, the
one-bushel box, the /2 box bag, the 8-pound bag, the 5-pound bag. The
standard container is the 1 3/5 bushel box, 12x12x24. It is estimated
that the 1936-37 Florida citrus crop was shipped in the following containers,
in about the percentage shown:

Standard 1-3/5 bushel ................... ... 67.00%
Two-bushel Bruce box .................... .. 22.50%
4/5 bushel box ............................ 9.00%
Bushel box
1/ strap
1/2 box bag ........................... 1.50%
8-pound bag
5-pound bag

100.00%
The cost of producing a season's orange crop in Florida on the tree
up to picking, such as cultivation, fertilizing, spraying and pruning, not
including proportionate cost of property taxes, rental, depreciation or
interest, ranges from 42c-44c per box (1936-37 season). Delivered f.o.b.
shipping point from $1.18-1.22 per box: picking 7c-8c, hauling 6c-7c,
packing house cost 63c, (box 19c, paper, etc., 9c; labor in packing, grading,
etc., 15c; miscellaneous 20c). Selling charges 15c box (shipping agencies
10c, auction charges 5c)-included, $1.33-1.37 box. These charges do not
include commission assessments of advertising, pre-cooling, color-added
royalties, etc., which would, roughly speaking, amount to 6c-10c per box.













1)


-J


*.r.1s


AVOCADO






FLORIDA CROPS 31

CONSUMPTION OF FOODS U. S. PRODUCED 1909 AND 1939
The Bureau of Agricultural Economics of the U. S. Department of
Agriculture reports that during thirty years the total per capital consump-
tion has remained fairly stable, such things as war and depressions causing
some reduction in total consumption in those periods. There have been
important shifts as between beef and pork, from butter to other fats,
decrease in fresh fruits with increased canned and dried fruits. These
shifts did not affect the total to any marked degree.
We eat fewer potatoes, less wheat, fewer apples, less beef and veal
and drink less tea per capital than in 1909. We consume more vegetables,
citrus fruits, sugar, poultry and eggs, fluid milk and other dairy products,
especially ice cream, edible fats and oils other than lard and butter, and
drink more coffee. Consumption of lamb and mutton, pork, lard and butter
has varied but the general level has not changed.
Per capital consumption of wheat and most cereal has declined. Per
capital consumption of beef and veal declined, while pork consumption has
remained practically constant.
Consumption per capital of poultry meat was close to 20 lbs. in 1909
and almost 20 lbs. in 1939. Egg consumption was almost the same in 1939
as it was in 1909-or 305 eggs-however egg consumption per capital was
342 in 1927.
Milk and cream per capital consumption was 351 lbs. in 1939 and 320 lbs.
in 1909. Butter consumption remains constant, however, the consumption
of processed cheese has increased and that of canned milk three fold since
1909. Ice cream consumption has increased six fold.
Consumption of apples declined while citrus fruit consumption tripled
since 1909. The use of canned fruits has increased five times, dried fruit
two times and fruit juices have had an extraordinary rise of fifteen times
since 1909.

PER CAPITAL CONSUMPTION -POUNDS

Other Beef & Lamb & Chickens No. of
YEAR Wheat Corn Cereals Veal Pork Mutton Dressed Turkeys Eggs Butter
1909 298 129 74.5 Sl 1 66.7 Gi 7 19.5 201 17.8
1924 249 84 40.2 117 9 74.0 5.2 19.2 1 .* 323 18.
1939 222 70 46.5 60.9 63 7 i.(6 19.4 2.9 305 17.7
*Turkeys data bRgaIi 1929.

Milk Manufac- Other
& tured Fats Citrus Canned Dried Juices
YEAR Cream Milk Lard ( **) Apples fruits fruits fruits fruits
1909 320 55 12.2 10 3 13 S 1 2 3.1 3.9 0.4
1924 3H1 93 14.3 13. 52 7 31 0 S.4 ( 2 0.1

** Edible fats and oils.

Sweet Tomatoes Canned Canned Dry Cane &
YEAR Potatoes Potatoes canned Corn Peas Beans Beet Sugar Tobacco Cotton
1909 196 35 7 (.0 2.1 1 7 8.5 79 5.8 2(.1
1924 165 23.5 (i 1 3.4 3.8 7.5 10( 6.3 2i.5
1939 140 30.9 5.6 4.2 5.0 9.7 103 6 8 27.7
Wool
YEAR Rayon Rubber Mohair
1)019 1 ) 7 4
1924 0.5 8.2 5.S
1939 3.5 10 5 6 4





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


FARMERS' SHARE OF CONSUMERS' DOLLAR GROWING SMALLER
In a recent study by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, covering
the period from 1913 to 1939, which included 58 of the most important
foods used by the ordinary working man and his family, it is shown that
the spread between producer prices and consumer prices was progressively
increasing. In 1913 the consumer paid $252 for food for his family and
the farmer received of this $134, or 53%. In 1923, because of higher per
unit prices, the consumer paid $384 for these same products and the
farmer received $173 for them, or 45% of the consumer dollar. In 1933
the consumer paid in the depression year $264, or $12 more than he did
in the normal year of 1913, but the farmer of 1933 received only $92 for
his part, or 35% of the final sale price. In 1939 the producer did a little
better and received 40% or $126 out of $311 spent by the consumer.
This is not all of the story for the by-products from farm animals
and from grain and other products are not counted, yet we boast that
even the squeal from the pig is sold to the toy man. Were these included
the farmers' per cent would have been some lower than those quoted.

WHERE FLORIDA IS AFFECTED
Of all the commodities studied, the poultry man received the largest
part of the consumers' dollar for eggs, or 56%; and next was poultry meat
for which he received 50% of the retail price. This report says in ex-
planation that the reason the poultry producers receive so large a part of
the retail price is because eggs do not have to have much processing. If
this is true, why do the citrus growers receive only 22% of the retail?
Eggs have to be gathered, sized, candled and packed in cases; in many
instances they are processed in oil and often large quantities are cleaned
before handling in the retail stores. They are certainly as fragile and as
breakable and are very perishable. In this study they show that the
retailer received 32.6c per dozen for eggs and the producer received 18.4c
a dozen for his part; the citrus producer received 6.2c a dozen for oranges
and the consumer paid 27.9c a dozen for oranges. Another big Florida
crop is cabbage and the producer received 22% of the retail price. The
tomato grower, when he sold to a cannery, received 16% of the retail price.
This report goes on to say: While some progress has been made in
increasing efficiency in marketing, these savings in operating costs have
been more than offset by the increased amount of processing and services
between farmer and consumer. Services for the most part, are demanded
by the consumer, and it is true to a growing degree. If they are demanded
more and more, and supplied, the spread between the farm and retail
prices will become wider. So far the consumer has been getting products
packaged in consumer portions: For example, chickens cut up ready for;
the pan, but he has not paid for these extra services, instead the producer!
has had to foot the bill. In other words, it looks like if we keep on preparing
fancy packs and doing more and more processing, the producer will grow'
products for nothing, for processing will take up all of his share of the
retail price.
F. W. RISHER, Marketing Specialist,
Poultry and Dairy Products,
Florida State Marketing Bureau.












































PRODUCTS OF SOUTH FLORIDA





FLORIDA CROPS


COUNTY
Alachua......
Baker............
Bay ....... .
Bradford....
Brevard.....
Broward ...
Calhoun.... ...
Charlotte....
Citrus ......
C lay. ........
Collier ......
('olumbia.........
I)ade .... .
)e Soto......
D ixie ........ ...
Duval .. ....
Escambia.....
Flagler. ..... ...
Franklin........
Gadsden .. ..
( ilchrist.........
Glades .......
G ulf ......... ...
Hamilton .....
Hardee.......
Hendry ......
Hernando....
Highlands ...
Hillsborough..
Holmes .... ...
Indian River..
Jackson ... ..
Jefferson..... ...
Lafayette. .
Lake.........
Lee.........
Leon .........
Levy.........
Liberty. .........
Madison .....
Manatee. ... .
Marion ......
M artin.......
M onroe...... ...
N assau..........
Okaloosa..... ..
Okeechobee...
Orange .......
Osceola. .....
Palm Beach..
Pasco. .......
Pinellas ........
Polk. ........
Putnam ......
St. Johns.......
St. Lucie ........
Santa Rosa......
Sarasota .....
Seminole. ... .
Sumter .......
Suwannee .... ..
Taylor.......
Union...........
Volusia ......
W akulla...... ...
Walton....... ...
Washington....
Total...


VEGETABLE PRODUCTION-1937
PEPPERS'-


Acres
144


9
63
3.958

92 1

9
424

194
10

381
1


12

6

1
1,142
51
10
13
1,361

107
5


32
529
1
4

3
598
40
117



6
193
30
2,712
2

198
10


65
110
261

1

8



12,915


Yield Value Acres
19,650 $ 20,120 30
. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
30 65 7
800 800 19
12.097 17.897 62
593,056 786.126 3.093
. . . . . . .. 9
12,361 12,721 193
34 54 11
120 195 7
64,010 S6112 3,167

25,945 37.796 20,861
820 887 18

54,650 61,790 298
100 60 1


1,263 995 3
. . . .. . . . . . . .. 1
600 475 76
S1
50 50 ..
172,784 164,679 1,488
3,945 2,851 849
800 1,000 18
3,200 4.390 366
163,548 255,326 2,057
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .
16,123 16.740 572
415 645 53
. . . . . .. . . . . .. 1

1,895 1.935 378
89,498 93,783 1,023
130 90 2
315 315 49
. .. . . . . . . . . . ..
450 525 104
86,428 72,953 3,165
960 1,210 920
9,227 8,711 213
. . . ... .. . . . .. .

. . . . .. . . . . .. . 6
337 553 59
32,165 34,930 69
5,658 9,895 2
317,425 288,567 9,002
105 95 7
. . . . . 4
22,689 31,904 467
370 495 20
1


4,043 .. 4,742 103
36,045 40,137 29
29,855 31,339 1,212
. . . . . . ... . . . . . . . .
100 150
. . . . . . . . 2
2,096 1,643 21

. . . . . . . . . . . 3
. . . . . . . . . . . . 15

1,780,192 $ 2,095,746 52,836


TOMATOES
Yield
4,400
35
609
1.690
10.161
457,156
195
15,655
615
645
384,432

2,125,655
1,480

37,250
65


277

2,822
70

191,324
46,800
1,545
18,712
212,856

72,741
2,191
75

50,913
145,574
350
1,681

3,260
125,759
35,965
14,718

195
179
1,945
4,597
128
762,345
500
180
26,758
1,035
120
86,064

10,032
2,142
129,163


100
1,724
66
50

4,994,999


Value
$ 4,6i40
47
965
2,465
12,075
486,867
290
16,693
642
580
312,910

2,509,800
1.695

39,320
102


392

2,380
85

180,736
46,590
1,765
22,320
373,061

84,653
2,820
95

75,813
141,721
540
1,741

3,077
160,986
48,403
14,235

190
156
2,490
5,573
192
823,512
550
280
35,130
1,235
95
111,154

11,801
2,769
172,316


100
2,232
75
35

$ 5,720,389




34 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

VEGETABLE PRODUCTION-1937 (Continued)
EGG PLANTS STRAWBERRIES
COUNTY
Acres Yield Value Acres Yield Value
Alachua...... 232 31,320 $ 34,650 18 13,777 $ 2,650
Baker ........ ..... ... ...... ... .. ... ... ....... 1 400 100
Bay......... 1 51 89 3 2,885 699
Bradford..... ......... ............ ............. 745 806,622 84,688
Brevard...... 15 1,310 1,840 3 10,000 1,000
Broward .... 315 55,027 68,461 10 21,135 4,374
Calhoun...... ... ....... ...... .... ...... ....... 25 16,690 4,042
Charlotte..... 12 1,300 1,075 ............ .....................
Citrus ................................ .....................................
C lay ......... ............ .................. ...... 4 440 79
(ollier....... 205 47,450 58,293 ..................................
Columbia ............ .. ............ ............. 4 10,200 1,020
Dade........ 63 12,852 16,337 159 330,678 65,958
De Soto...... 4 250 225 2 1,400 140
D ix ie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . .
Duval ........ 204 28,540 27,460 32 39,150 6,900
Escambia... ........... .............. ..................... .............. ............
Flagler ....... ..................................... .. .........................
Franklin................ ............. ...................................
Gadsden..... 20 340 450 1 350 70
Gilchrist ..... 22 4,216 5,120 1 2,500 350
Glades....... 4 375 390 ............ ......................
Gulf ................... ......... ............ ..................................
Hamilton..... ............ ........... ............ ...................... ............
Hardee....... 413 52,7C6 47,378 1,421 1,426,918 372,696
Hendry...... 22 1,900 1,450 3 3,000 600
Hernando.... 52 3,750 3,810 1 950 123
Highlands.... 3 635 940 2 6,500 1,000
Hillsborough.. 335 58,797 50,374 4,524 7,784,013 1,654,614
H olm es...... ..................... ........ ...... 1 800 80
Indian River.. 62 10,365 10,634 20 20,700 3,925
Jackson ...... 6 466 460 ..................................
Jefferson ..... ............................... ....................................
Lafayette.... ............. ......................... ............ ............ ............
Lake ................ .... ............ ............ 27 68,000 6,833
Lee.......... 411 55,946 70,135 1 200 40
Leon ......... 1 157 171 ............ .....................
Levy ................... ............ ............. .................................
Liberty ......... ............ ......... ....................... ...........
Madison...................... ............... ...................................
Manatee..... 130 17,062 12,610 140 243,223 36,871
Marion....... 1 110 115 3 5,330 529
Martin....... 23 2,515 2,241 1 1,500 285
Monroe ............. .... .. ........ ................... ............ .............
N assau....... 1 10 10 ........ ........
Okaloosa................ ........... ......................... .......... ..........
Okeechobee... 7 1,150 975 1 2,200 400
Orange....... ... ..... ........ ... ..... ... ..... 4 4,170 591
Osceola ...... 2 283 496 1 2,700 550
Palm Beach... 884 58,672 71,370 15 38,100 9,225
Pasco .................... ............ ............. 14 65,620 8,269
Pinellas ...... ............ ....... . ............. 4 8 ,850 1,475
Polk. ........ 15 842 1,058 1,758 2,383,426 451,563
Putnam...... 9 708 710 6 5,700 1,160
St. Johns..... .......... ... ............ .........................
St. Lucie ................ ............ ....................... .......................
Santa Rosa... ............ ...... ... ............. 1 1,920 200
Sarasota...... 7 318 366 91 55,612 10,251
Seminole. ... 67 23,072 20,938 25 63,806 13,138
Sumter ....... 35 4,047 5,561 118 194,000 39,850
Suwannee .... ............ ........ .. ......... . ......................
T aylor....... ............ ............ ............. 1 425 85
Union ........ ............ ....... .. .... ............. 52 50,300 3,030
Volusia ....... 17 185 250 11 3,586 651
W akulla...... ............ ............ ......... .... ..... ................ ....
Walton ................... ............ ....................... ...............
Washington .............. ......... .. .... ................. ........... ...........
Total.... 3,600 476,817 $ 516,442 9,254 13,697,776 $ 2,790,144




FLORIDA CROPS

VEGETABLE PRODUCTION-1937 (Continued)


WATERMELONS


COUNTY

Alachua......
Baker........
Bay ........
Bradford....
Brevard......
Broward. ....
Calhoun......
Charlotte ....
Citrus........
C lay .........
Collier.......
Columbia.....
Dade .......
DeSoto......
D ixie........
Duval........
Escambia.....
Flagler.......
Franklin .....
Gadsden. ...
Gilchrist. ....
Glades .....
G ulf .........
Hamilton.....
Hardee.......
Hendry. .....
Hernando. ...
Highlands....
Hillsborough..
Holmes .....
Indian River..
Jackson......
Jefferson. ... .
Lafayette.....
Lake.........
Lee..........
Leon.........
Levy.........
Liberty .....
Madison ....
Manatee. ....
M arion .......
M artin.......
Monroe .....
Nassau.......
Okaloosa. .. .
Okeechobee...
Orange .......
Osceola. .....
Palm Beach...
Pasco. .......
Pinellas. .....
Polk.........
Putnam. .....
St. Johns.....
St. Lucie.....
Santa Rosa...
Sarasota .....
Seminole. .. ..
Sumter.......
Suwannee....
Taylor ......
Union.......
Volusia.......
Wakulla ......
W alton .......
Washington...
Total....


Acres
480
32
18
256
14
40
128
2
25
2
27
200
2
22

26
14
. . . .. .

215
1,224
5
2
373
56
15
5
7
301
411
2
773
2,005
213
3.057
196
521
1,002

1,003
19
1,074
9

20
11
2
10
12
223
104

86
72
9
4
23
5
25
1,094
2,190
21
99
12
25
6
69
17,898


Yield
155 $
16
13
77
3
2
72
2
22
1
14
114 i

11

16
8

. .. . . . .s "
186
343
3
2
195
8
5
1
1
181
177
1
277
389
51
1.340
25
91
268
. . . .. .. .. .7 ..
177
8
340
4

6
5
1
6
2
20
57

25
34
6
2
4
2
5
222
645
4
22
3
14
1
16
5,702 $


Value
12.685
2,355
897
9,784
228
300
6,122
145
1,660
50
1,860
14,195
200
1,650

1,475
555

.... ......
11,160
19,345
270
225
13,380
1,225
485
75
100
29,161
27,016
70
26,021
40,591
3,373
242,718
1.560
5.124
39,825

17,673
500
51,765
525

750
374
95
530
230
2,025
4,615

3,750
3,085
575
200
430
155
615
32,257
53,933
450
2.195
358
770
120
1,830
695,690


Acres
142
6
1,
43
4
112
3
60

11
168
2
88
7

82



23
12
7
1
7
794
92

38
117
16
25
67

1
223
458
3
118

49
201
267
56


9
1
22
1
103
9

27
35
44
73

125
2
452


68
5


12
4,293


:CUMBERS
Yield
19,880
106
19
2,505
403
5,442
140
9,254

400
32,250
310
11,460
250

5,330



232
1,921
476
15
200
112,210
8,793

1,080
2,345
1,980
1,500
3,840

10
31,876
37,756
237
6,258

1,100
4,225
14,962
3,150

20
385
25
2,350
30
5,400
540

1,684
925
1,315
1,550

10,400
75
75,757


2,386
126


620
425.503


Value
$ 21,640
182
28
2,993
554
6,875
140
12,325

425
50,375
320
22,328
275

7,450



340
2,942
590
25
260
136,759
8,460

1,535
35,175
1,896
2,250
41,250

20
45,750
53,991
211
12,551

750
6,269
12,662
4,400

20
365
25
3,589
45
7,820
618

2.684
1,705
1,340
2,800

16,460
150
116,295


2,387
130


750
3 651,179




36 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

VEGETABLE PRODUCTION-1937 (Continued)
SQUASHES ONIONS
COUNTY Acres I Yield Value Acres Yield Value
Alachua.... 66 9,570 $ 9,520 27 4,665 $ 4,550
B aker........ ............ ...... ...... ............ 1 60 90
Bay ......... 1 52 135 3 161 322
Bradford..... 70 3,815 4,046
Brevard...... 1 200 215 2 65 65
Broward..... 800 52,386 67,341 5 2,365 2,950
Calhoun.............. ......... .... ... ...... 4 190 280
Charlotte..... 67 6,117 5,220 1 60 60
Citrus........ 7 595 568 1 24 37
(lay........ 4 90 137 2 60 90
(ollier ...... 72 15,705 16,357 16 2,959 4,949
Columbia..... 5 655 530 4 464 475
Dade ........ 1,094 65,475 75,605 7 620 1,245
D e Soto.... .4 185 185 ........... ............ .........
Dixie .................... ........................
Duval ........ 279 33,480 34,185 101 12,625 12,575
Escambia ........ ............. ...... .............. 2 60 90
Flagler....................... ............ .......... .....................
Franklin ..... ........... .......... .................................... ..
Gadsden..... 96 5,765 6,038 1 50 75
G ilchrist..... 1 80 90 ............ ...................
Glades ..... 2 160 120 1 40 50
Gulf....... 1 10 10 1 38 75
Hamilton..... 5 150 175 1 40 40
Hardee...... 185 24,916 19,214 2 60 70
Hendry..... 98 9,649 9,181 21 1,600 2,640
Hernando... 2 115 110 1 56 75
H ighlands... 8 785 895 ...............................
Hillsborough.. 529 32,475 45,615 4 168 325
Holmes .................... ............ .......................................
Indian River.. 66 5,088 7,191 1 100 150
Jackson...... 13 915 795 32 1,593 2,030
Jefferson ..... 1 120 135 6 450 395
Lafayette..... 1 20 30 ...............................
Lake......... 13 1,465 2,190 2 407 714
Lee.......... 161 16,480 13,112 3 350 615
Leon ......... 1 125 125 1 35 40
Levy......... 29 1,769 2,240 1 25 40
Liberty .
Liberty ................................................................
Madison..... 27 1,040 842 1 10 10
Manatee..... 259 9,583 11,229 1 25 57
Marion....... 534 21,110 31,518 2 150 211
M artin....... 101 6,525 7,405 ..................................
Monroe.................. ... ......................... ............ ........
N assau....... ........................ ............. ..... ..... ............
Okaloosa. .. 1 21 21 1 45 46
Okeechobee... 48 1,217 1,330 1 38 48
Orange...... 4 600 916 3 250 283
Osceola ..... 6 400 700 1 84 148
Palm Beach... 825 50,475 53,356 17 2,325 2,175
Pasco........ 1 150 115 ............ ............ ...........
Pinellas...... ............. .... ........ . . ... ......... .......... ...... ... .
Polk ...... 104 10,238 13,474 11 341 347
Putnam...... 54 1,427 1,858 4 155 155
St. Johns..... 7 525 525 1 100 85
St. Lucie..... ..13 795 1,460 ...................................
Santa Rosa ... 2 250 200 ...................................
Sarasota...... 8 370 325 ...............................
Seminole... 68 6,400 5,686 2 240 392
Sumter....... 55 4,193 4,303 27 1,345 1,711
Suwannee.... ............. ........ ............. .................................
Taylor ....... .. ................. ....... ............ ............ ........... .......... ..
Union........ 22 415 334 ...... ...........
Volusia....... 33 3,856 3,621 1 105 150
W akulla ...... ......... .......... .. ............. ............ ............ ..........
Walton ................... ............. ............ .... ....... ..........
Washington.
Washington... ........................5 4 ......408,002 460,528 327 34,603 40
Total.... 5,854 408,002 $ 460,528 / 327 34,603 $ 40,930




FLORIDA CROPS


VEGETABLE PRODUCTION-1937 (Continued)


COUNTY
Alachua......
Baker........
Bay ........
Bradford .....
Brevard......
Broward. ....
Calhoun.... .
Charlotte.....
Citrus........
Clay.. .. .. .
Collier. ......
Columbia .....
Dade. .......
De Soto.. . .
D ixie ........ ...
D uval........
Escambia....
Flagler.... .
Franklin ...
Gadsden. .. .
Gilchrist .. ..
Glades ......
G ulf ......... .
Hamilton .....
Hardee.......
Hendry......
Hernando. ...
Highlands. ..
Hillsborough..
Holmes.......
Indian River..
Jackson. .....
Jefferson. ....
Lafayette.....
Lake .........
L ee..........
Leon.........
Levy........
liberty .....
Madison ....
Manatee. .. .
Marion .......
Martin......
Monroe .....
Nassau.......
Okaloosa.....
Okeechobee...
Orange.......
Osceola ....
Palm Beach...
Pasco. .......
Pinellas. ....
Polk. .......
Putnam .....
St. Johns....
St. Lucie....
Santa Rosa..
Sarasota .....
Seminole ....
Sumter.....
Suwannee ..
Taylor.......
Union.... .
Volusia .. ..
Wakulla....
Walton .....
Washington.. ..
Total. ...


Acres
733
22
5
181
11
409
6

6

3(i
223
12

120
1


8

I


96
38
6
56
292
2
1
18
7

(1
26
3
12

;60
37
82
61

2
11
2
1

6,560
8

8
89

42
5
2
18
920
4

28
5
1

10,382


LIMA BEANS
Yield
60,519
712
521
8,119
746
34.493
520
520
21
150. .
2,052
18,774
455

11.160
90


720

236

65
16,420
1,160
860
3,301
17,478
260
52
746
200

322
616
170
367

1.015
994
2,341
1,939

60
434
75
13

370.050
400

4,014
4,075

1,285
100
146
1,227
10.419
145

1 .702
285
20
20


Value
74,592
585
729
12.074
885
53.794
1.040
1,260
37

200
3,600
29,927
850

12.920
90


1.065

3C9

95
14.548
2,625
915
4,930
39,702
498
84
835
230

704
1,030
205
609

1,015
1,846
3,050
3,290

100
4(8
80
15

480,428
650

7,304
5,798

1,817
100
175
1,327
12.314
175

1.851
393
35
40


582,584 | $ 783,238


Acres


ENGL;IH PEAS
Yield -
1 1,575 8
1 90
S107
1 20
130
S 4,151
20


1 40
1 160
20 875
88 10,205
2 51

97 9,215
1 65


1 ( 60

21 1,320
1 15 .

13 965
260 S.256
1 20

39 2,914

25 1,424
1 100


15 1,327
5 300



3 '0
(8 2,74(i
7 3(5
415 5,'00


14
8,624
5

112
21
5
20

12
16
68



7
1


10.086


Value
1,518
130
218
50
175
7,190
40


50
200
1,191
14,880
51

10.650
117


135

1,346
35

1,337
8,405
31

5,113

2,157
140


1,954
300



145
4,233
678
7,190


32 61
13 40
525 1,055
919,375 1,108,842
152 248

3,131 6,902
501 957
200 400
300 390

642 775
801 899
4,908 7,716


150 150
328 549
12 18


983,056 $ 1,198,664


I



































ANNONA MURICATA (Soursop)


IT- 5":~




FLORIDA CROPS


VEGETABLE PRODUCTION-1937 (Continued)


CELERY B
COUN TY -- --- -, ---- -- --
COUNTY Acres Yield Value Acres
Alachua...... 28 4,423 S 4,424 387
Baker................... ........... ..... ......... 11
Bay ................. .... ................. 8
Bradford ........... .......... . ....... 403
Brevard...... 5 1,700 1,380 13
Broward..... 3 450 900 24,269
C alhoun ...... ....... .. .. .......... 1
C h arlotte ..... ... . ............ .......... .
Citrus .. 1
Clay.... ..... 5
C ollier . . . . . . . ... ...... 106
Columbia.... .. ......... .... 76
Dade........ 12 1,550 1,655 2,245
De Soto........... ....... ........................ 1
Dixie ....... .... ............
Duval....... 126 17,275 24.775 212
Escambia..... 1 15 16 4
Flagler ....... ... ............. .........................
Franklin .. ......... ...... .....
G adsden ..... .. ... ... ........... .. ......... 291
Gilchrist ..... ..................... .
Glades ...... ....... . .. .. ............. 128
Gulf......... .. ........... .. . ......... 1
Ham ilton..... .1. I
Hardee.... ...... .. ........... ............ 238
Hendry...... .......... 744
Hernando... ...... 52
H ighlands.... ........... .. . ....... 113
Hillsborough.. 6 1,065 1,125 2,0W0
H olm es ... .. .. ....... ......................... 1
Indian River.. 1 100 150 169
Jackson ... .. .................... ......... . 22
Jefferson ... ..... .. ........... 1
L afayette ..... ........ ...... ............
Lake......... 2 88 100 3C6
Lee.......... .. ...... ............ . ... . 13
Leon......... ....... ..... ......... 7
Levy........ .. .. .. ......... 73
Liberty................ .. ..........
Madison...... .... ..... ............ 22
Manatee.... 478 144,625 113,487 287
M arion ....... .......... ............ ............ 820
M martin ....... .. ... . ..... .. .. .......... 1 ,113
M on roe .. ... .. .. .. .. .. ........ ........ ....
Nassau ..... ........... ............ ............ 3
Okaloosa ..... .. ....... ...... . ....... . 1
Okeechobee..... ........ .......... ........... 188
Orange........... ... .... ........... ............ 168
Osceloa ....... .................. .... .... 33
Palm Beach... 144 70,500 90,500 37,392
Pasco ........ .................. ... ....... 81
P inellas .. . ...... ...... ...... ......... . .....
Polk......... 2 40 75 656
Putnam...... 11 2,715 4,975 1,154
St. Johns................. .... .. ............. 5
St. Lucie .... .. ..... ....... .. ........... 428
Santa Rosa. ................... ......................
Sarasota...... 1,197 478,151 597,191 17
Seminole .... 4,936 2,346,077 2,631,488 424
Sumter..... 16 2,440 3,550 494
Suwannee .................................... .............
Taylor .... ... ................................ ....... .. .
U nion ........ ........... .... ... .. .286
Volusia....... 1 150 187 63
W akulla ...... . ..... ..... .. .. . 1
Walton .................. ........... .......................
Washington...........................................
Total.... 6,969 I 3,071,364 $ 3,475,978 75,879


EANS, STRING
Yield
27,172 $
343
829
27.372
905
1,603,992
100
60
27
115
20.565
1.036
229,868
50

21.650
405


22,26

6,541
60
87
22,460
31,261
3,570
16,717
130,257
100
10,991
1,033
50

38,545
1,117
420
5,492

1,370
16,525
45,639
81,913

132
117
6,794
23,161
1,826
2,230,000
2,784

28,913
39,347
400
25,630

1,080
53,689
40,721


17.098
5,641
13


4,848,239 $ 5,300,359


Value
39,541
350
1,154
25,784
865
1,767,402
150
80
43
115
24,730
962
257,166
65

22,450
476


24,405

4,309
90
87
23,719
33,773
3,810
24,200
211,902
100
10,208
1,120
72

58,052
1,312
517
9,051

1.585
22,750
49,301
97,434

157
120
7,520
34,841
2,096
2,285,171
2,754

45,534
39,850
440
36,503

1,195
46,310
53,257


17,698
7,763
20




40 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

VEGETABLE PRODUCTION-1937 (Continued)
CABBAGE LETTUCE
COUITNTY
Acres Yield Value Acres Yield Value
Alachua.... 343 54,160 $ 43,500 66 9,200 $ 9,300
Baker........ 25 1,082 649 1 40 60
Bay......... 15 1,162 1,320 2 115 230
Bradford .. 9 705 575 ................. ........ ............
Brevard...... 38 2,850 2,111 1 100 150
Broward..... 114 12,265 13,896 15 2,550 2,620
C alhoun ...... 2 55 55 ........................ ...........
Charlotte..... 2 200 210 ..................
Citrus........ 1 92 97 1 20 40
Clay ......... 28 2,100 2,065 2 80 100
Collier ....... 40 7,691 6,170 ..................
Colunbia..... 24 2,760 2,120 1 25 30
Dade ....... 267 44,129 37,735 4 685 665
D e Soto...... 21 1,050 940 ...................................
Dixie ............... .........................................................
Duval........ 1,120 112,260 104,320 299 33,275 34,160
E scam bia..... 1 135 101 ........................ ...........
Flagler....... 249 30,850 19,375 ...... ...... .....
Franklin .......................................................................
Gadsden .... 155 25,469 21,360 1 175 350
G ilchrist. ..... 3 160 140 ...... ............
Glades....... 324 15,070 9,880 1 120 240
G ulf ......... 1 30 60 ........................ ...........
H am ilton ..... 1 100 50 ....... .............
H ardee....... 17 1,220 1,441 ........................ ...........
H endry..... 156 5,750 4,550 ........................ ...........
Hernando.... 6 717 410 1 68 1CO
Highlands.... 48 2,425 1,820 ..................................
Hillsborough.. 203 34,105 30,525 4 475 960
H o lm e s . . .. . . .. . . . . .. . .. .. . .. . . . . .. .. . .. .. . . . . .. .. .. . . .
Indian R iver.. 5 405 258 ...................................
Jackson...... 10 1,365 982 2 400 400
Jefferson ..... 61 1,800 1,700 ...................................
Lafayette..... ............... ................... .. ...................................
Lake ....... 333 52,110 47,760 4 171 172
Lee.......... 101 19,173 17,640 ..................................
Leon......... 5 740 740 1 50 100
L evy ......... 10 1,500 1,300 ........................ ...........
Liberty...... ................ ...........................................
M adison. ... 57 2,800 2,590 ...................................
Manatee..... 603 22,759 17,472 148 29,735 26,420
Marion....... 94 12,166 13,320 118 6,557 7,169
M artin....... 19 1,790 1,440 ........................ ...........
M onroe ...... ........... ............. ............
Nassau....... 12 570 470 .. ............ ..
O kaloosa ..... 5 163 156 ........................ ...........
Okeechobee... 265 2,867 2,012 ...... ...... .....
Orange....... 401 68,260 54,976 9 518 642
Osceola .... 42 3,019 3,264 1 75 70
Palm Beich... 6,384 180,580 95,593 ...... ...... ....
Iasco ........ 3 175 140 ........... .. ........... ...........
Pinellas ...... 2 201 230 ...... ..........
Polk ......... 542 49,695 46,141 5 120 190
Putnam .. ... 461 49,019 41,475 .................
St. Johns..... 758 95,340 72,550 1 150 175
St. Lucie...... ....... ................................. ........... ............
Santa Rosa... ........... ............ ............. ....... ............ ............
Sarasota...... 52 6,225 3,615 ...................................
Seminole .. . 456 68,336 37,336 155 56,358 39,686
Sumter ... 330 41,870 30,151 ..................
S u w annee .... ............ ............ ............. ...
T ay lor....... 1 75 75 ............ ...... ... .........
U nion.... . 8 700 800 .............. .....
Volusia .. ... 161 24,137 21,219 10 602 721
W akulla...... 1 40 40 ..................
Walton....... ............................... ..................................
Washington.. 10 350 350 ....................... ...........
Total.... 14,405 1,066,822 $ 821,270 853 141,664 $ 124,750





FLORIDA CROPS


CITRUS FRUIT PRODUCTION-1937


COUNTY
Alachua ....
Baker.......
Bay........
Bradford. ...
Brevard.....
Broward.....
Calhoun.....
Charlotte....
Citrus.......
C lay ........
Collier ....


ORANGES


Yield
28,860
2,879
11,427
991
1,010,525
92,166
3,145
39,471
36,378
9.556
2,520


Columbia... 457
Dade ... .. 128,215
De Soto..... 292.645
D ixie. .. .. ......
Duval....... 31,327
Escambia... 1,795
Flagler...... 10,350
Franklin. ... 148
Gadsden..... 401
G ilchrist... . ....
Glades...... 472
Gulf....... 1,249
Hamilton... 298
Hardee...... 773,799
Hendry.... 28,477
Hernando.. 13,960
Highlands... 892,045
HillsborouI h 1,668,239
Holmes ..... 207
Indian Iliei 266,149
Jackson ... 16,0'9
Jefferson 1,814
Lafayette... 22
Lake....... 1,845,520
Lee........ 152,198
Leon....... 58
Levy......... 148
Liberty .... 12
Madison.... 25
Manatee.... 210,389
Marion..... 468,723
Martin..... 46,610
Monroe .... ... .
Nassau...... 441
Okaloosa... 202
Okeechobee. 9,874
Orange..... 1,673,159
Osceola .... 235,685
Palm Beach 51,597
Pasco...... 217,345
Pinellas... 855,961
Polk ..... 8,600,957
Putnam.... 525,982
St. Johns.... 214,300
St. Lucie... 621,462
Santa Ro a 4,237
Sarasota.... 70,730
Seminole... 470,695
Sumter...... 135,872
Suwannee.. 38
Taylor...... 54
UTnion..... 330
Volusia..... 864,455
Wakulla.................
Walton...... 420
Washington.. 98
Total... 22,260,653


TANGERINES


valuee


Yield


$ 37,649 ... .
1,433 .....
16,688 .....
979 .....
1,430,915 20,191
158,466 ........ .
4 ,817 ...........
41,836 ......
45,850 .
9.958 ...
3,130 . .
587 .. . ....
250,595 ..
266,701 ..

41,366
1,834
18,135
223
223 . . . .. ..
407 .......

505
2.012 ...
447 ........ ..
774,305 28.857
34,072 .... ....
13,210 72.646
1,362,989 45.747
2,100,241 231,543
420 .....
481,258 17,565
15,853 .. ........
1,634 ...
33 .....
2,314,535 103,865
223,641 2.505
62 ....
296 .
24 . .
25 ......
218,452 5.322
479,875 8,632
56,844 200

578 ....
284
11,537 . .
2,189,342 110,110
350,750 51,412
78,419 24,600
386,420 ...........
890,240 19,433
12,634,048 467,173
408,934 29,763
236,420 ............
905,068 64,160
4,528 .....
106,653 .. .. .
543.734 87.853
162,753 ......... .
58 ......
96 .......
460 ........
1.235.948 110.893
880 .. .........
880
170
$30,559,622 1,502,470


'Va lue




$ 12,588


. . . .


24.889

55,631
38,209
162,080

13,696



120.972 1
2,567


. . . ..
5,475
8,849
200




87.328
48,961
22,800

22,833 1
394,629 6
27,569

55,814


53,086




96,648
. . . ... . .


$ 1,254,824 15


E
I

.i


GRAPEFRUIT
Yield Value
4,539 $ 4,469
20 25
4 7

303,715 282,132
4,550 4,695
2 3
13,053 13,715
2.523 1,931
55 35
18,050 14,027
223 210
165,717 142,325
112,982 94,889

3,960 4,525


14 16
. . . . . . . . .

189 137
15 17
10 10
70,C34 58,708
5,662 4,658
42,016 32,612
940,130 564,075
377,809 362,332

934,360 I 861,903
10 10
2 6
7 8
,917,082 985.322
329,878 225,591

2 3


402.411 288,214
23,141 15,970
28,079 19,463

18 24

1,5C6 922
528,382 308,244
157,06 150,288
39,726 31,509
140,772 104,673
,471,373 909,800
,930.232 4,420,507
39,218 35,550
4,625 3,900
500,823 463,703

92,218 62,273
90.232 79,536
24,588 20,651

15 20
54,487 46,679

75 95

,775,640 $10,620,417


I . .





42 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


CO


CITRUS FRUIT PR

UNTY


Alachua........ .................
Baker .................................
Bay............................. .....
B radford .............................
Brevard. ........................ ...
B row ard .............................
Calhoun ..........................
Charlotte .................. ...........
Citrus ............. ..............
Clay........................ ....... ..
Collier .............. .................
Columbia ....... ... ................
Dade.. ................. ..............
De Soto................... ............
Dixie ................ ............
D uval........ ............ ...
Escambia .............................
F lagler ... .................. . ...
F franklin .............................
Gadsden....................... ....
G ilch rist .. ..........................
Glades.. ...... ........ ......
Gulf............. .............. .......
Hamilton .......... .............
Hardee........ ....................
Hendry ............... ............
H ernando ............................
Highlands. ........... .............
Hillsborough ............... ...........
H olm es.............................
Indian River ................ .......
Jackson. ............................
Jefferson ............ .................
Lafayette.. ........... ..........
Lake .................................
Lee................. .. ..............
Leon........ .... ..................
Levy .............. ...............
L iberty ........ ................ .......
M adison .............................
M anatee ................... .........
Marion ........ ... ................
Martin ................................
Monroe......................... ...........
Nassau........ .... ................
Okaloosa. ..........................
Okeechobee ............. ..........
Orange ................................
O sceola ..............................
Palm B each ..........................
Pasco. ............... .................
Pinellas ..........................
Polk ..................... .......
Putnam.......... ................
St. Johns.. .... ............... ...
St. Lucie......... .............. ...
Santa Rosa. ........................
Sarasota..... .. ............ .....
Seminole. ................... ......
Sum ter.. ................. ......
Suw annee ............................
Taylor....... ............... .....
U union ................................
Volusia ............. ............. ...
W akulla ... .................... .
W alton ... ................ ......
W ashington.................... ...
Total. .................. ......


.ODUCTION-1937 (Con
LEMONS
Yield Value
254 $ 615
12 36


3,819 7,436

......... 522 ... 735
522 735


6


28
1,443
33

486


7


111


136
12
163
28
23,660

280



147
519




105
24
15
2,744


344
196
148
26
3,474
141
27,179
54

600

47
100
78



42



66,983


68
3,186
53

878


14

118


301
25
216
29
45,239

340



325
1,226




186
31
22
3,926


412
273
326
38
3,950
152
37,354
159

750

58
235
99



67



$ 108,889


tinued)


LIMES


Yield
179



1,849
740

1,480
15

235
4
24,930
10

233





61


68
24

1,983
15,687

274



337
7,792




1,999
21
623
99,655


50

46
213
60
24
16,610
3,133

7,500

40
55
45



66



186,041


Value
$ 648


2,424
2,220

3,209
39

680
8
57,701
14

689





133


46
72

4,520
35,179

859



496
9,912




2,476
36
1,054
140,420


87

128
310
180
69
43,516
5,322

19,726

60
175
92



168



$ 332,668




FLORIDA CROPS 43

FIELD CROP PRODUCTION-1937
COTTON, UPLAND COTTON, SEA ISLAND
COUNTY Acres Yield | Value Acres Yield Value
Alachua ...... 1,074 341 $ 20,212 3.372 1,513 $ 132,385
Baker........ 16 3 185 171 48 3,863
B ay ......... 146 103 6 ,165 ....... ........ . ....... ....
Bradford ..... ............ ........... ......... 142 62 5,839
B re v a rd .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B ro w a rd . .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. ... .. . .. .. ..
Calhoun...... 1,161 726 43,560 .
C harlotte ..... ............ ... ...... . .. .
C itrus ........ ........... ............ ............ 47 12 890
Clay......... 19 5 382 3 1 84
C ollier ..... ... . ...... .. .. .
Columbia. ... 2,382 1 1,084 65,890 1,968 915 79,772
D a d e . . . . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D e S o to .. .. . .. .. . . .. . . .. .. .. .. . .. . .. . . . .
D ixie ........ ...... ..... ...... .... ..... 3 75
D uval ........ ............. ...... ...... .. . 107 53 4,565
Escambia..... 4,056 2,020 120,200 14 6 522
F la gler .. .. .. ..... .. .. ... .. .. . .... .. .. .. .. ... . .. ..
F franklin ...... ........... ........ ......... ............ ............. ..
Gadsden..... 684 253 15,229 3 1 92
Gilchrist. ..... 2 1 45 1324 272 24,780
G la d e s . . . . . . . . ... . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .
G u lf .. .. .. .. 9 3 18 0 .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .
Hamilton..... 4.071 1 278 75,650 440 145 14,450
H ard ee ...... . ....... . ... ......... . .. .... .. i .. . .. . . .. . . . .. .
H endry ................... ........... .......
Hernando.. .. 243 187 16,269
H ig h la n d s . . .. ... . .. . .. .. . . .. .. . . .. .. ... . . .. . ..
Hillsborough.. 2 2 140 2 1 85
H olm es 14,763 6,268 380,182 ............ .........................
Indian R iver.. .. ......... ........... ........ .. . ..... ...... ... ..........
Jackson...... 13,374 5,736 366,229 18 8 595
Jefferson ..... 3,444 1 ,055 54,512 ....................................
Lafayette..... 726 180 1,040 644 174 15,725
L a k e . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
L e e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... ... . . . . . . . . . . .
Leon ........ 5,671 2.183 122.248 240 112 9,881
Levy........ 60 18 1,262 279 102 ; 8,670
L iberty ...... ........... ........... ....... .... ........... ............ .............
Madison..... 6,577 2,268 139,954 399 152 14,453
Manatee
M a n a te e . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . ... .. .. .. ... . . . . .. .. . . .. .. . . ..5 .
Marion....... 86 26 1,675 620 137 8,905
M a rtin ... . . ............ . . . . .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. . . . ... . . .. ..
M o n ro e . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .
Nassau....... 2 1 65 34 10 820
Okaloosa..... 4,972 2,380 146,074 10 3 210
O keech obee ... .......... ........... .........................
O range ....... 3 1 65 ............ .. ... ................
O sceola . ... .. .. .. ... ... .... . .. ... ......
Palm Beach.. . . . . ............. . .... ... .... .
Pasco........ ........... .... .. .. .. .... .... 44 10 815
P in ella s .. .. ........... .... .. .. .. . . .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .
P olk ......... ........... .......... .. ... .. ........ 5 2 150
Putnam. ...... 41 15 1,125 14 6 424
St. Johns ..... ........... . ........ . ..............
S t. L u cie . .. . .. .. . .. . ... .. . . . . . .. .. . .. .. ..
Santa Rosa... 10,639 4,696 266,841
S a ra sota ..... .... .. .... ...... .. .. ... ... .. . .. . .
S em in o le .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .
Sumter....... 191 42 2,630 468 152 13,320
Suwannee.... 4,626 1,199 69,369 903 201 19,208
Taylor ...... 97 24 1,560 51 14 1,270
U nion ........ ........... ............ .. ......... 167 56 4 ,887
Volusia....... 6 2 145 10 2 155
W akulla ...... 35 12 689 .. ..... ............ ...............
Walton....... 6.367 2,756 149,170 .......... $ 383,
Washington.... 2,427 1,213 72,780 ............
Total....| 87,729 35,894 2,125,453 11745 3,159





44 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

FIELD CROP PRODUCTION-1937 (Continued)
CORN OATS
COUNTY
COUNTY Acres Yield Value Acres Yield Value
Alachua..... 45,900 434,323 $ 413,653 438 5,056 $ 6,703
Baker....... 8,253 66,037 65,084 108 885 1,078
Bay......... 1,445 22,255 23,344 4 95 85
Bradford.... 9,883 89,265 89,550 7 140 165
Brevard.... .3 115 135 ..................................
Broward ... .44 605 642..................................
Calhoun...... 13,956 151,878 151,878 404 8,880 8,880
Charlotte.... 41 505 639
Citrus........ 1,191 12,363 11,918 43 385 350
Clay..... 2,660 34,134 34,200 ...... ...........
(ollier....... 135 3,700 3,935 ...... ...........
(olumbia..... 26,049 262,612 260,522 42 420 420
Dade........ 383 10,275 8,767 ...................................
De Soto...... 556 4,733 4,769
D ixie ........ 2 ,194 21,024 17 ,191 ............ ............ .. ... .......
Duval........ 10,009 123,189 121,243 9 145 184
Escambia .... 10,901 107,264 105,394 21 735 865
Flagler.... 1,612 18,190 17,032 20 600 500
Franklin ..... 8 128 96 ..................... .............
Gadsden..... 39,9F6 613,846 613,E46 2,398 13,074 13,991
G ilchrist..... 13,286 122,717 116,320 ...................................
Glades....... 822 4,076 4,901 ...... ...........
Gulf......... 934 9,415 9,417 16 230 280
Hamilton.... 17,388 172,716 172,716 .................
Hardee....... 3,847 43,910 50,021 14 600 600
Hendry ..... 180 1,955 1,092 14 155 165
Hernando... 2,526 37,132 37,132 10 120 110
Highlands.... 67 364 372 ...... .....
Hillsborough. 9,298 155,220 169,111 14 158 252
Holmes .... 22,234 253,620 215,098 27 330 390
Indian River........
Jackson..... 57,524 493,247 4E3,247 357 5,970 5,580
Jefferson.... 33,750 328,437 328,537 492 1,960 2,006
Lafayette..... 10,073 89,2C6 85,412 ...................................
Lake......... 1,666 30,636 31,607 ...................................
Lee.......... 66 1,015 1,503 ............ ......
Leon......... 29,704 287,163 287,1C3 251 3,656 3,656
Levy......... 25,633 352,671 352,298 26 185 200
Liberty...... 2,656 30,718 31,044 6 75 75
Madison... 39,217 369,916 332,855 340 2,325 2,287
Manatee..... 1,347 19,991 15,743 15 90 90
Mqrion ...... 25,505 282,065 239,381 410 3,285 2,720
M art;n....... 6 75 85 ..................................
Monroe ........ .. .... .... ..............................................
Nassau....... 2,309 38,463 38,463 37 554 610
Okaloosa .... 10,213 121,600 110,975 49 698 710
Okeechobee... 718 8,910 9,265 ...... ...... .......
O range. ..... 157 3,208 3,116 ............ ............ ..........
Osceola...... 200 2,F30 2,74 ......... ........... .......
Palm Beach.. 3,817 121,020 100,095 ...... ...... .
Pasco........ 2,6'0 24,830 24,505 ...................... ......
Pinellas...... 114 1 ,60 1,710. .
Polk......... 7,104 119,500 122,543 16 230 240
Putnam..... 6,719 84,625 66,133 36 460 475
St. Johns.... 6,635 119,200 119,200 5 160 145
St. Lucie ..... ...................... ...... ............. ......................
Santa Rosa.. 17,477 217,927 218,108.......................
Sarasota...... 22 215 235 ...... ....
Sem inole. .. 1,565 40,533 40,433 ...................................
Sumter ...... 7,903 84,593 85,583 199 5,716 6,336
Suwannee.... 40,538 365,200 321,214 156 1,655 1,650
Taylor...... 5,376 53,410 53,410 9 90 90
Union ........ 9,197 110,835 110,835 215 4.000 4,000
Volusia....... 514 5,290 5,065 128 1,325 1,225
Wakulla...... 3,919 30,649 28,400 2 25 20
Walton....... 14,610 149,492 149,492 15 270 265
Washington... 19,566 160,327 121,197 43 1,840 1.250
Total .... I 634,301 6,927,313 $ 6,652,554 6,496 66,577 $ 68,640




FLORIDA CROPS


FIELD CROP PRODUCTION-1937 (Continued)
IRISH POTATOES SWEET POTATOES
COUNTY
COUNTY Acres Yield Value Acres Yield Value
Alachua...... 1,047 131.235 $ 180,935 1,703 157,335 $ 156,880
Baker........ 27 1,002 1,255 697 19,951 16,988
Bay ......... 10 592 876 110 11,025 9,707
Bradford..... 148 10,218 9.731 262 20,172 19,041
Brevard...... 14 546 601 17 920 1,030
Broward.... 101 12,430 12,796 2 125 130
Calhoun...... 27 2,290 2,310 1,011 97,952 98,053
Charlotte..... 9 799 977 8 890 835
Citrus........ 2 138 128 70 4,665 4,625
Clay......... 424 72,990 94,615 247 19,745 19,970
Collier....... 93 17,170 23.321 48 4,893 4,981
Columbia..... 78 1.420 1.520 843 68,283 63,340
Dade........ 7,229 850,441 1,120.994 136 14,053 16,770
De Soto...... 146 13,823 13,061 44 2,960 2,615
Dixie........ 1 15 21 17 1,523 1,508
Duval........ 875 85,375 85.500 2.802 182,130 165,130
Escambia..... 408 47.212 52,460 341 25,819 22,217
Flagler....... 1,886 173,530 189.240 18 1,150 1,140
Franklin ..... 1 40 40 14 1,350 1,350
Gadsden..... 32 2,280 3,020 1,893 179,284 178,284
Gilchrist .... 2 226 226 100 11,390 9,791
Glades....... 13 960 1,347 43 2,535 2,292
Gulf......... 1 50 55 98 5,802 3,387
Hamilton..... 1 50 55 720 30,502 25,418
Hardee...... 173 14.278 15.449 217 21.765 21,959
Hendry ..... 22 1,024 1,476 39 2.806 2,832
Hernando.... 7 204 344 120 8,971 8,770
Highlands.... 126 8.855 1,246 38 3,415 4,207
Hillsborough.. 430 33,419 38.946 387 34,649 33,920
Holmes ...... 65 8,410 8,115 533 45,808 34,798
Indian River.. 224 26,945 27,017 12 392 277
Jackson ...... 31 2,200 2,245 938 73,310 51,886
Jefferson..... 1 29 40 1,163 64,348 57,746
Lafayette ..... ......... ............ .... ..... ..... 104 10,320 10,099
Lake......... 95 7.364 8.613 210 20,447 21,644
Lee.......... 542 53,655 47.313 45 5,165 6,091
Leon......... 4 285 532 1,216 71,480 57,039
Levy ......... 6 529 612 179 20,690 20,573
Liberty. ..... 1 60 75 141 9,785 9,595
Madison..... 6 360 340 412 29,867 20,953
Manatee..... 267 26,130 30,162 71 5,283 6,160
Marion....... 7 236 417 849 34,949 30,260
Martin....... 303 47,700 39,555 16 2,175 2,010
M o n roe .. .. . .. .. ..... . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .
Nassau....... 10 730 680 138 15,285 14,285
Okaloosa ..... 13 575 481 477 50,399 25,045
Okeechobee... 18 318 532 56 2,165 2,070
Orange....... 8 428 572 10 1,050 1,305
Osceola. ..... 35 1,376 1,404 110 5,579 5,647
Palm Beach... 6,222 839,125 814,980 97 10,525 10,265
Pasco ....... 37 1,500 2,335 168 11,365 10,778
Pinellas ...... 1 40 80 1 40 30
Polk......... 317 18,205 21,325 731 35,397 35,300
Putnam...... 3,524 448,344 463,687 562 54,567 53,212
St. Johns ... 7.369 1,056,992 1,438,363 390 28,095 28,095
St. Lucie .... 128 5,350 7,475 3 200 250
Santa Rosa... 12 520 322 214 19,345 12,319
Sarasota...... 17 1,220 1,780 19 690 585
Seminole .... 168 22,255 23,183 70 7,308 5,682
Sumter....... 50 2,377 2,835 325 18,620 16,420
Suwannee. ..... ..... .................... ..... 53 3,067 2,587
Taylor ....... 4 315 375 101 12,360 10,360
Union........ 168 18,853 12,950 134 12,613 8,895
Volusia....... 220 22,200 23,783 147 13,193 10,650
Wakulla...... 2 123 130 93 7,960 7,535
Walton....... 4 420 480 358 49,607 24,996
Washington.. 20 300 350 179 15,006 9,804
Total.... 33,232 4,098.081 $ 4,835,683 22,370 1,704,515 $ 1,522,416




46 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


FIELD CROP PRODUCTION-1937 (Continued)
SUGAR CANE SYRUP SORGHI
Acres Yield Value Acres Yi


COUNTY
Alachua.....
Baker.......
Bay .......
Bradford...
Brevard......
Broward .....
Calhoun..... .
Charlotte .....
Citrus.......
Clay........
Collier........
Columbia.....
Dade........
De Soto......
D ixie.......
Duval ........
Escambia.....
Flagler.......
Franklin. ....
Gadsden.....
Gilchrist. ....
Glades.......
G ulf .........
Hamilton.....
Hardee......
Hendry ......
Hernando...
Highlands....
Hillsborough..
Holmes .... .
Indian River..
Jackson .... .
Jefferson .....
Lafayette ....
Lake.........
Lee..........
Leon .........
Levy ........
Liberty. .....
Madison .....
Manatee .....
Marion .......
Martin .......
Monroe. .....
Nassau.......
Okaloosa.....
Okeechobee...
Orange.......
Osceola. .....
Palm Beach...
Pasco. .......
Pinellas .. .. .
Polk. ........
Putnam .....
St. Johns....
St. Lucie....
Santa Rosa...
Sarasota......
Seminole. ....
Sumter ......
Suwannee....
Taylor......
Union.......
Volusia......
Wakulla....
Walton ......


Total.... 13,230


488
110
60
75
4

778

15
57
75
481
.. . .. . .
6
13
773
69
5

2,153
65

46
219
83

22
11
113
495
1
1,273
798
98
60
20
438
118
126
679
25
507
6

435
346
61

10
22
38
20
146
49
34
5
235
4
1
148
213
130
142
11
84
337
394


50,965
14,002
6,614
9,211
800

197,098
.......... .
2,020
2,941
5,550
57,780
. . . . . . .
658
2,383
113,060
23,709
300

358,232
9,789

4,055
32,232
9,223

1,561
765
10,810
88,930
250
239,549
92,576
18,295
12,191
2,810
34,324
19,516
14,540
106,896
2,765
50,869
467

80,318
41,544
2,734

775
1,320
3,492
2,497
11,289
4,111
6,070
1,400
36,284
185
173
42,030
34,437
26,345
19,136
896
12,364
65,099
63,834
2,084,069


IM SYRUP
eld I Value


$ 23,458
6,568
3,340
4,362
450

89,704

1,301
1,765
3,400
26,279
S. . . . . . .
393
1,127
67,836
11,628
135

160,892
4,382

2,019
14,328
4,193
. . . . . . . ..
700
310
5,066
43,628
125
93,886
40,001
8,883
5,848
1,365
16,175
9,870
6,958
41,216
1,346
23,831
215

37,685
18,246
1,284

350
650
1,680
1,688
5,174
2,080
2,862
650
15,768
85
80
2,055
16,017
13,612
8,909
425
5,208
27,571
27,255
$ 916,317


51
7
8
1

5
37


1

33
140
3

58
11
1


7

4
2
4

1

7
30

1
1
3


Washington.. .


4,725
1,202
770
50

200
9,560


75

3,575
2,200
100

9,020
1,136
100


845

265
425
125

83

545
7,082
600O
60
160
350
320
. . . . . . .
400
375
100
1,290

365
4,309





290
125


15

460
1,000
250


60
1,300
1,017
54,929


4
4
2
29


6
39





17
3


1

15

14
1


1
6
II
584


$ 2,420
600
269
25

100
4,070


32

1,510
1,000
50

4,085
594
40


352

120
162
50

40

271
2,313

240
30
70
140

160

160
185
40
545


119
1,765





135
50

6


200
450
110

30

550
450
$ 23,538




FLORIDA CROPS


FIELD CROP PRODUCTION-1937 (Continued)


COUNTY
Alachua......
Baker........
Bay.........
Bradford .....
Breward......
Broward ....
Calhoun......
Charlotte.....
Citrus........
Clay.........
Collier .......
Columbia .....
Dade .......
De Soto ......
D ixie........
Duval ........
Escambia.....
Flagler.......
Franklin .....
Gadsden .....
Gilchrist.....
Glades .......
G ulf.........
Hamilton.....
Hardee.......
Hendry. .....
Hernando. ...
Highlands ...
Hillsborough..
Holmes ....
Indian River..
Jackson ......
Jefferson. ... .
Lafayette.....
Lake.........
L ee..........
Leon.........
Levy.........
Liberty. .....
Madison .....
Manatee .....
Marion .......
M artin ......
Monroe. .....
Nassau ......
Okaloosa. .. .
Okeechobee...
Orange .......
Osceola. .....
Palm Beach...
Pasco. .......
Pinellas. .....
Polk ........
Putnam .....
St. Johns....
St. Lucie...
Santa Rosa...
Sarasota .....
Seminole. ....
Sumter.......
Suwannee ...
Taylor......
Union.......
Volusia. . .
Wakulla ......
W alton .......
Washington..
Total. ...


Acres
827
515
129
597
30

1,118
11
128
22
92
588

255
30
56
46

8
743
. . . . . .
86
49
218
1,803
26
251
47
3,243
293
1
435

178
103
43
203
1,135
100
205
257
1,482


FIELD PEAS
I Yield
16,549
6,696
3,417
7,759
127

16,885
220
1,135
285
2,270
9,130

1,963
455
2,520
455

160
7.182
. . . . . .
747
757
2,441
21,686
429
2,952
584
65,749
5,178
30
5,100
. . .. . . .9 .
1,936
2,023
472
1,881
16.344
1,615
993
2,093
15,959


3,696
9,348
815
1,690
3,762
37
14,198
280
13,933
29,277
1,225

1,522
460
392
6,449
1,820
3,417
5.417
1,406
1,447
640
1,715
329,123


Value Acres
16,693 1,518
6,540 734
3,287 164
7,759 1 163
1651 2
. .i ....... ....
18.855 3,790
240 ... .
1,217 212
320 126
2,690
10,037 104

2,145 i 63
374 8S0
2,750 110
532 454

200 5
6,609 1,358
....... .. 30
714 .....
825 88
2,297 1,262
21,686 1,128
427
2,952 224
625
72,039 915
5,391 9,688
40 .....
4,695 20,960
... 627
1,714 521
2,578 16
585
2,022 2.478
20,607 1,333
1.700 228
1,198 1,740
2,334 333
17,845 3,928


3,756 244
10,569 3.038
754 36
1,692 15
3,837 74
42 16
14,055 374
325 ......
15,082 320
31,269 374
1,545 5

1,775 1,028
580 41
425
6,600 89
1,621 279
3,899 538
5,312 567
1,799 17
1,480 437
885 274
1,775 349
351,764 I 63,297


321
624
55
43
149
2
857
13
781
2,051
63

128
44
37
252
129
305
552
129
112
50
92
22,142


ELVET BEANS
Yield | Value
28,870 $ 32,375
8,808 8,601
4,518 4,328
1,440 1,610
56 65

41.352 41.825

2,067 2,335
1,720 1,985

3,640 3,875

645 715
4,689 3,856
3,920 4,375
9,181 9,705

100 115
19,210 19,210
450 600

975 977
12,605 10,084
11,315 13,315

2,575 3,125

12,226 13,491
127,466 104,520

81,241 81,086
12,572 12,572
4,633 3,615
275 350

22,807 20,500
26,719 30,653
4,695 5,275
18.637 19,776
3,267 3,324
42,670 47,150


3,187 3,187
29,134 25,501
720 850
150 150
6,128 6,400
1,475 1,355
7,480 6,840

3,354 3,840
4,485 4,566
135 140

13,808 14,379
600 705

2,171 1,934
2,732 2,835
5,321 5,436
7.250 7.250
208 270
3,912 4,178
3,695 4,390
6,503 6.909
617,792 $ 605,963




DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


FIELD CROP PRODUCTION-1937 (Continued)
PEANUTS HAY AND FORAGE


COUNTY
Alachua......
Baker........
Bay.........
Bradford.....
Brevard......
Broward .....
Calhoun.....
Charlotte ....
Citrus........
Clay.........
Collier .......
Columbia.....
Dade. .......
De Soto......
D ixie.......
Duval ........
Escambia.....
Flagler.......
Franklin. ....
Gadsden. ....
(ilchrist .....
Glades ......
Gulf.........
Hamilton.....
Hardee.......
Hendry .....
Hernando....
Highlands....
Hillsborough..
Holmes .... .
Indian River..
Jackson......
Jefferson. ....
Lafayette .....
Lake.........
Lee..........
Leon .........
Levy .........
Liberty ......
Madison .....
Manatee. ....
Marion ......
M artin.......
Monroe. .....
Nassau.......
Okaloosa....
Okeechobee..
Orange .. ....
Osceola. .....
Palm Beach...
Pasco. .......
Pinellas .....
Polk .........
Putnam .....
St. Johns.....
St. Lucie .....
Santa Rosa...
Sarasota ......
Seminole. ....
Sumter.......
Suwannee.
Taylor ......
Union........
Volusia.......
Wakulla .....
Walton .......
Washington.. .
Total ...


*350 tons Peanut Hay.


Acres
29,101
5,381
328
6,220


12,686

1,226
133

21,991
2
18
2,511
494
477
. . .. .. .
6
15,360
12,102

169
9,558
500
21
975
3
503
19,635

63,633
2,052
10,375
189
2
2,629
29,564
1,440
15,627
60
19,602


634
2,760
. . . . . .. .
1
6

949

337
526
66

4,649
. . . . . .
10
4,269
24,440
3,822
9,926
15
1,529
9,488
4,895
352,895


I


Acres Yield Value


I


Yield
652,857
43,114
9,825
53,505


252,114

12,805
7,980

586,098
95
310
68,207
13,781
29,136

250
303,855
356,775

2,688
232,064
24,725
560
13,070
120
7,472
660,020

1,559,812
124,768
136,376
6,607
50
41,942
831,518
15,599
380,816
1,240
414,930


21,832
66,702

40
152
............
32,002

6,323
26,341
3,450

148,342
.......... .
645
154,372
265,670
41,265
289,059
304
28,187
124,734
83,034
8,137,538


Value
$ 600,149
39,692
8,913
50,752


242,400

10,301
7,216

453,195
110
320
52,580
16,880
28,903

190
291,792
280,565

2,188
207,224
21,660
510
13,175
160
8,211
569,718

1,163,103
97,026
105,389
7,120
50
40,042
810,878
13,073
325,853
1,240
308,830


20,875
57,265

40
145
. . . . .. .
23,780

6,334
17,827
4,100

104,091
.......... .9
450
134,372
202,575
40,200
239,059
345
26,502
114,015
63,051
$ 6,834,524


1,448
60
188
112
9
6
850
12
202
130

169
699
97
3
237
1,481
390
12
3,566
58
15
37
688
2,307
.. 57
57
2,026
8
10
2,957
1,639
69
634

1,626
133
20
4,132
140
1,178


159
115
3
18
67
40
223
100
696
1,487
1,382

190
19
256
2,174
829
90

280
30
245
74
35,939


1,566
53
169
88
7
4
870
28
175
107

146
754
58
2
397
1,210
380
12
2,828
*392
15
33
283
1,242

49
67
1,518
11
15
1,474
1,157
86
552

933
147
19
3,014
133
1,281


109
170
3
17
36
40
202
152
767
1,316
1,124

145
22
253
1,815
493
68

323
25
179
58
28,592


$ 25,242
907
2,984
1,185
120
100
16,713
476
3,200
2,120

2,880
14,055
1,083
40
4,527
22,371
7,700
240
47,375
5,366
290
667
6,062
23,838

1.040
1,090
29,886
220
185
23,676
21,602
1,520
8,925

18,144
2,483
305
55,629
1,908
21,202


2,015
3,215
60
230
900
600
4,142
2,055
13,135
21,644
19,050

2,455
396
4,477
32,285
9,174
1,342

4,928
540
3,125
1,280
$ 504,404






FLORIDA CROPS


MISCELLANEOUS FIELD CROP PRODUCTION-1937

Broom Corn


COUNTY

D ad e .. .. ... .. .... ....... ......


Acres


Alsike Clover


COUNTY


Acres


Lake ....................


Deer Tung


COUNTY

Alachua ..................................... ...............
Duval ...................... .................... .........
Lake.......................................................
Polk........................................... ............
P utnam ............ ......... ..... .. ..... ......
Seminole ...................................................
Volusia ..... ................. .............................

Total ............ .............. ................


Floriculture


Alachua ............ ..... ....... ... .... .... .. .... ...... ..........
Bay.......... ...... ................. ... ... .. ... ...............
Broward................ ................... ..
C lay ..... .............. ......... .. ......... ....... .................
C ollier .. .. .. .. ..... ..... .. .. .. .. ....... .. .... . . .. .. .. .... .. .... .. .....
Duval ...................................... .............................
Hardee..................... .. ................................
H ighlands.............. .................. .... ....... ......... .
Lake.......... ........................ ... ....................
Lee.. .............................. .. .. .. ... ..................
M anatee ...................... .... ....... .........................
Marion ...................................................... ...
Martin ........................ ..................................
Orange ................................. ......................
Polk........... .... .................... ..................... ....
P u tn a m . ... . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . .. .. . .
Seminole .................. ............ ................. .....
V olusia ................. ............ ... ..... ........... ......... ...
W ashington ........................... ........ .... .... .... . .

Total..........................................................


Yield


Value


Yield


100 $


Value


1,000


600
824
400
240
995
68,627
50,000

121,686


Value

8 243
237
218
165
334
8,333
7,600

8 17,130


$ 40,000
5,132
52,225
20,350
10,500
83,865
17,485
800
246,360
69,500
99,650
48,600
32,100
47,750
60,749
74,566
241,543
224,059
1,017

$ 1,396,151





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

FRUITS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA


Avocado
Ambarella
Akee
Banana
Custard Apple
Canistel
Coco Plum
Citrus
Ceriman
Cereus (Pitayz)
Carob Plum
Cashew
Carissa
Carambol
Cacao
Fig
Granadilla
Grapes
Guava
Ilama
Jaboticaba
Jackfruit
Jujube
Ketembilla
Litchi
Loquat


Mamey
Mamoncill
Mango
Papaya
Para Guava
Peach
Persimmon (Japanese)
Pineapple
Pitaya
Pomegranate
Prickly Pear
Rhubarb
Rose Apple
Roselle
Sapodilla
Sapote
Seagrape
Sour Sop
Star Apple
Sugar Apple
Surinam Cherry
Tamarind
Umkokolo
Watermelon
White Sapote


VEGETABLES GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA


Beans (Limas)
Beans (String)
Beets (Roots)
Beets (Greens)
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Cabbage
Cabbage (Chinese)
Carrots
Cassava
Cauliflower
Chayote
Collards
Corn (Sweet)
Cucumber
Dasheen
Egg Plants
Endive
Escarole
Greens (Turnips)
Kale


Kohl-Rabi
Lettuce
Mustard (Greens)
Mustard (Chinese)
Parsley
Peas (English) (Field) (Pigeon)
Pepper (Sweet)
Pepper (Red)
Potato (White) (Sweet) (Yam)
Okra
Onion
Rape
Radish
Rutabaga
Spinach
Squash (Chinese)
Squash
Swiss Chard
Turnips (Roots)
Tomatoes
Watercress






FLORIDA CROPS


PRIMARY LIST OF MEDICINAL PLANTS GROWING IN FLORIDA
Symbols A, B, C, D, E, F, G after the name of the plant refer to the
region of the State in which this plant occurs, as indicated on the accom-
panying map (Page 55).


Name of Plant
Aristolochia Serpentaria
Betula lenta
Capsicum frutescens
Brassica nigra
Chenopodium ambrosioidee
var. anthelminticum
Cinnamomum camphora
Cinnamomum cassia
Citrus medical, var.
Limonum
Citrus aurantium
Datura Stramonium
Gossypium herbaceum
Liquidambar styraciflua
Mentha spicata
Mentha piperita
Monarda punctata
Pinus palustris and other
species
Podophyllum peltatum
Prunus serotina
Punica granatum
Rhus galbra
Ricinus communis
Serenoa serrulata
Spigelia marilandica
Stillingia sylvatica
Vanilla planifolia
Vera aloe


Common Name
Snake Root
Sweet birch
Cayenne pepper
Black mustard

American wormseed
Camphor
Cassia cinnamon

Lemon
Sweet orange
Jimson weed
Cotton
Sweet gum
Spearmint
Peppermint
Horsemint
Long leaved pine, lob-
lolly pine, etc.
Mandrake
Wild cherry
Pomegranate
Sumac berries
Castor bean
Saw palmetto, Sabal
Pink root
Queen's root
Vanilla bean


Locality
D
A
F,G
E

F, G
D,E
E


Official
U.S.P.*
U.S.P.
U.S.P.
U.S.P.

U.S.P.
U.S.P.
U.S.P.


E, F, G U.S.P.
D, E, F, G U.S.P.
E, G U.S.P.
A, B, C, D U.S.P.
A, B, C, D, E U.S.P.
E U.S.P.
E U.S.P.
B, C, D, E ......
A, B, C, D, E U.S.P.

D, E U.S.P.
A, B U.S.P.
E, F, G U.S.P.
B U.S.P.
A, B, D, E U.S.P.
A, B, C, D, E N.F.$


A, B, D, E
D,E


N.F.
N.F.


*U.S.P.--United States Pharmacopoeia.
SN.F.-National Formulary.





52 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

IMPORTANT CONSTITUENTS AND PROPERTIES OF PLANTS IN
PRIMARY LIST
No. of
Plant' Constituents
1. Oil, sein, bitters ............... Diuretic, emmenagogue
2. Methyl Salicylate and derivatives. Flavor, antiseptic, analgesic
3. Oil, Resin .................... Internal-stimulant; external-vesi-
cant
4. Oil .......................... Internal- stimulant, condiment, dia-
phoretic; external-rebufacient
5. Oil .......................... Anthelmintic, vermifuge
6. Camphor ..................... Internal- antiseptic
7. Oil .......................... Carminative, stimulant
8. Oil .......................... Flavor
9. Oil .......................... Flavor
10. Oil and atropine .............. Narcotic, anodyne, mydriatic
11. Hairs; oil .................... Absorbent, protective; demulcent
12. Balsam ..................... Stimulant, expectorant, diuretic, anti-
septic
13. Oil .............. ......... Carminative, flavor
14. Oil .......................... Carminative, flavor
15. Thymol ...................... Antiseptic, anthelmintic
16. Rosin ..................... Base in plasters, etc.
Turpentine ................... Antiseptic, anthelmintic; terpin hy-
drate, expectorant, antiseptic, tere-
bene, inhalant
17. Resin ........................ Cathartic, cholagogue
18. Amygdalin, emulsin, bitters,
prussic acid .................. Pectoral, tonic
19. Pelletereine tannates .......... Anthelmintic
20. Tannin ................... ... Astringent, diuretic
21. Castor oil .................. Purgative
22. Oils, resins, sugars ............ Sedative, diuretic
23. Bitters, oil, resins ............. Anthelmintic
24. Oil, resin, glucoside ............ Expectorant, emetic, laxative
25. Vanillin ..................... Perfumery, flavor

*No. of Plant on this list corresponds to the one on the preceding
Primary List.






FLORIDA CROPS


ANNONA RETICULATA (Bullock's Heart)




SECONDARY LIST OF MEDICINAL PLANTS GROWING IN FLORIDA

Symbols A, B, C, D, E, F, G, after the name of the plant means that this plant is
found in the region of the State in which the plant occurs, as indicated on the accom-
panying map (See Fig 19).


Name of Plant
1. Amanita muscaria
2. Aletris farinosa
3. Apocynum Cannabinum
4. Aralia spinosa
5. Asclepias tuberosa

6. Baptisia tinctoria
7. Carica papaya
8. Chionanthus virginica
9. Cocos nucifera
10. Conocarpus erecta
11. Cornus Florida
12. Cymbopogon citratus
13. Delphinium consolida
14. Dioscorea villosa
15. Drosera rotundifolia
16. Eupatorium perfoliatum
17. Eryngium aquaticum

18. Gelsemium sempervirens
19. Gentiana elliottii
20. Guaiacum officinalis


Common Name Official Locality


Fly Agaric
Star Grass
Canadian Hemp
Spignet
Pleurisy root


N.F.
N.F.
N.F.
N.F.


Wild Indigo N.F.
Papaya ....
Fringe tree N.F.
Coco palm ....
Button-wood ....
Dogwood N.F.
Lemon grass ....
Larkspur N.F.
Wild Yam N.F.
Sundew N.F.
Boneset N.F.
Water ernygo,
Button snakeroot ....
Jasmine N.F.
Gentian ....
Guaiac U.S.P.


21. Hamamelis Virginiana Witch Hazel


B
E
A,B,C,D,E
B,C,D,E


E,F,G
A,B,D
E


A,B,C,D
B,E
B
A,B
E
B

E


Properties
Antispasmodic
Uterine tonic
Diuretic, diaphoretic
Stimulant, diaphoretic
Diaphoretic, expector-
ant
Stimulant
Digestant
Alterative, germicide
Demulcent
Charcoal absorbent
Astringent, tonic
Perfume
Parasiticide
Diaphoretic
Expectorant
Stimulant, tonic

Diaphoretic


A,B,C,D,E Nervine
D Tonic
E Alterative, antiseptic,
astringent
A,B,D Astringent


N.F.






DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


BLIGHIA SAPIDA (Akee)


22. Hedeoma pulegoides

23. Hydrangea arborescens
24. Ipomoea pandurata
25. Iris versicolor
26. Lobelia cardinalis
27. Marrubium vulgare
28. Myrica cerifera
29. Papaver somniferum
30. Panax quinquefolium
31. Phytolacca decandra
32. Polygala polygama
33. Rumex crispus
34. Salix nigra
35. Sambucus canadensis

36. Sanguinaria canadensis

37. Sassafras variifolium
38. Scutellaria lateriafolia
39. Senecio aureus
40. Solanum carolinense
41. Tamarindus indica
42. Trilisa odoratissima
43. Ulmus fulva
44. Verbascum Thapsus
45. Xanthoxylum Clava-
Hercules


Pennyroyal

Seven barks
Ipomoea
Blue flag
Cardinal flower
Horehound
Wax Myrtle
Opium Poppy
Ginseng
Pokeroot
Bitter Polygala
Dock
Pussy willow
Elder flowers

Blood root

Sassafras
Skullcap
Life root plant
Horse nettle berry
Tamarind
Deer tongue
Slippery Elm Bark
Mullein

Prickly ash


.... E Stimulant, emmena-
gogue
N.F. A Diuretic
.... B,D Diuretic, cathartic
N.F. A,B,C,D,E Cholagogue
.... B,D,E Anthelmintic
.... ...... Stimulant
N.F. A,B,C,D,E Alterative, cholagogue
U.S.P. A,B,C,D,E Analgesic, somniferent
.... ...... Stimulant, stomachic
N.F. B Alterative
... E Tonic, laxative
N.F. E Astringent
U.S.P. ...... Charcoal
N.F. A,B,D,E,F Carminative, diaphor-
etic


N.F. A,B


N.F.
N.F.
N.F.
N.F.
N.F.

U.S.P.
N.F.


A,B,C,D,E
E
E
B,E
E.F
B,D
A
B


Stimulating expector-
ant
Alterative
Tonic Nervine
Stimulant, diuretic
Tonic, antitetanic
Refrigerant
Perfume, flavor
Demulcent
Pectoral, demulcent


N.F. B,C,D,E Alterative, sialogogue


4r4





FLORIDA CROPS 55


(Fig. 19) Map of Florida





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


RARE TROPICAL TREES
The Federal Government has had stations in Dade County, Florida,
trying out all manner of warm-climate plants of every description for
many years. According to the report of the office directed by Dr. David
Fairchild about 20,000 specimens have been introduced. No one can say
as yet how many will prove to be of commercial use. Below we are giving
a list of what one man found would grow near Homestead, 20 miles South-
west of Miami.
Col. H. W. Johnston of Homestead, Florida, gives this list as growing
on his place:
Ten kinds of oranges, six varieties grapefruit, four varieties limes, two
varieties lemons, six varieties tangerines, two varieties tangelos, two
citron and one calamondin. Five varieties pineapple, 30 avocado, 20 mango,
three fig, 10 papaya, five loquat, 15 guava, five pomegranate, four zizyphus
jujube, two tropical mulberry and three cocoa.
Other tropical fruits represented are: Akee, cashew nut, imbu imbu,
ambarella, sugar apple, cocoanut, olive, sour sop, Bullock's heart, Ilama,
pond apple, soncoya, rollinia mucosa, isis gram, purple and sweet grena-
dilla, manzanilla, icaco, pitange, jaboticaba, feijoa, jambolan, rose apple,
pintamba, antedesma, litchi, mamoncillo sapodilla (two), white, golden,
green and yellow sapote, star apple, canistel, ti-es, locumo, mamee, Rheedia
madrone, jak fruit, marang, langsat, averrhoa crambola, tamarind, carissa
(Natal Plum 2), karandas, Java plum, unkokolo, tuna, pitaya, date (3),
garcinnia, erythoxlon, quitoensis S., quandong, mimusops, balanites, ac-
tinidia, mang mao, stricknosis spinosa (2), nux vomica, lustania, pithe-
colobium dulce, satin fruit, cecropia, cudrambia jovoensis, monstera deli-
ciosa, vanilla (2), Arabian coffee (3), beayillia, embloco, tamentossa,
julgans, pemula, cocolobis, pistachio, ramontchi, ratauguresse, lovilovi,
elephant apple, phylanthus, zicycum dulaefiam, physic or Mexican nut,
chaya, Malay apple, rambutan, velvet apple, forbidden fruit, moringa,
morinda, kei apple, Queensland nut, date plum, passion fruit, ocomba
spinosa, genipi, cochin gcraka, algoroba, Ceylon olive, wampee, pewa, Jaya
almond, rambia, breadfruit, malphygia, perwiski, bail fruit, domei, nam-
nam, wax jambu, anchova pear, water lemon, santol, etc.







FLORIDA CROPS


IST OF EDIBLE FRUIT, NUT AND SPICE BEARING TREES, VINES AND SHRUBS ON FARM OF
WM. R. GROVE, LAUREL, SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA, JULY 1, 1940.
THE MAJOR PART OF THESE ARE NOT OF BEARING AGE.
CITRUS


No. of
Trees
867
22
2
91
393
24
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
40
5
5
1
2
5
18
260
20
251
2
2
2
417
26
2
2
2
100
2
10
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
4
2
2
1
1
1
20
180


Botanical Name
Citrus grandis
Citrus grandis
Citrus grandis
Citrus grandis
Citrus sinensis
Citrus sinensis
Citrus sinensis
Citrus sinensis
Citrus sinensis
Citrus sinensis
Citrus sinensis
Citrus sinensis
Citrus sinensis
Citrus sinensis
Citrus sinensis
Citrus nobilis
Citrus unshiu
Citrus deliciosa
Citrus limonia
Citrus mitis
Citrus hybrid
Citrus hybrid
Citrus hybrid
Citrus aurantifolia
Citrus aurantifolia
Citrus medical
Citrus species
Citrus species
Achras sapota
Aegle Marmelos
Anacardium occidentale
Ananas sativa
Annona Cherimola
Annona Squamosa
Annona reticulata
Annona purpurea
Annona paludosa
Annona glabra
Annona senegaliensis
Annona diversifolia
Annona muricata
Annona montana
Antidesma bunius
Artocarpus cummunas
Artocarpus communas
Artocarpus integrifolia
Averrhoa carambola
Blighia sapida
Canarium commune
Calocarpum mammosum
Calocasia sp.
Carica papaya
Carissa grandiflora
Carissa karandas
Carissa acuminata
Cassia Fistula
Chrysophyllum Cainito
Cygypsium cymosum
Crataegus spp.
Clausena lansium


Common Name
Grapefruit, Marsh Seedless
Grapefruit, Pink
Shaddock
Miscellaneous
Orange, Lu Gim Gong
Orange, Washington Navels
Orange, Temple
Orange, Ruby
Orange, Mangerine
Orange, Sour
Orange, Ring
Orange, Bitter sweet
Orange, Morcutt Honey
Orange, Miscellaneous
Orange, Temple
Orange, King
Orange, Satsuma
Orange, Mandarin
Lemon, 3 varieties
Calamondin
Kumquat
Limequat
Limes, Rangpur
Limes, Key
Limes, Tahiti
Citron
Tangelos, Lake
Tangelos, Miscellaneous
Sapodilla
Bael Fruit
Cashew
Pineapple
Cherimoya, two varieties
Sugar Apple
Custard Apple-Bullock's Heart
Soncoya
Chinese Yellow Sugar Apple
Pond Apple
Annona senegaliensis
Llama
Soursop
Soursop
Bignay
Breadfruit
Breadnut
Jackfruit
Carombola
Akee
Java Almond
Mamey Sapote
Dasheen
Papaya (several varieties)
Amuntungula



Candy Tree-Golden Shower
Star Apple (2 varieties)
Cygypsium cymosum
Manzanilla
Wampi







DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


No. of
Trees Botanical Name
1 Cecropia Palmata
1 Cyphomandra betacea
1 Coccoloba uvifera
1 Coccoloba species
6 Cocos nucifera
1 Cinnamomum zeylanicum
2 Coffea excelsa
1 Concha Winterena
8 Casimiroa edulis
4 Calocarpun mammosum
2 Dillenia indica
3 Dovyalis hebecarpa
1 Dovyalis caffra
1 Diospyrus discolor
1 Diospyrus embryopteris
2 Diospyrus kaki
3 Euphoria longana
1 Eleagnus var.
3 Eleagnus philippensts
14 Eugenia uniflora
2 Eugenia Dombeyi
2 Eugenia Jambos
3 Eugenia Jambolan
1 Eugenia Klotzschiana
1 Eugenia Luschnathiana
1 Eugenia malaccensis
1 Eugenia coronata
1 Eugenia Hookeriana
1 Eugenia edulis sp.
1 Eugenia Smitti
110 Eriobotrya japonica
1 Ficus Tibic
1 Ficus papaya
2 Flacourtia ramontchi
2 Feijoa Sellowiana
2 Garcinia Livingstoneii
2 Garcinia mangostana
1 Garcinia spicata
1 Harpephyllum caffrum
1 Hylocereus undatus
1 Hicaria


Common Name
Cecropia-Hot Dog Tree
Tree Tomato
Sea Grape

Cocoanut (1 dwarf)
Cinnamon
Coffee
Spice
White Sapote
Sapote

Ceylon Gooseberry
Umkola
Umkokola
Diospyrus embryopteris
Persimmon
Longan

Lingaro
Surinam Cherry
Grumichama-Brazilian Cherry
Rose Apple
Jambolan Plum (2 varieties)
Pero de campo
Pitomba
Ohia




Unknown
Loquat
Fig

Governor Plum
Feijoa
Munkonga
Mangosteen

Kafir Plum
Pitaya
Spice





FLORIDA CROPS


Florida crops can be classified as fruits, vegetables, field crops, berries
and nuts. They can also be classified geographically as the crops of North,
Central and South Florida. The temperatures and seasons vary so much
that the seasons for gathering and marketing crops are as important as
the kind of crops to be grown.
The following are crops that can be grown in all parts of Florida: Corn,
sugarcane, peanuts, potatoes, hay and pasture crops.
From the Division of Forage Crops and Diseases of the State Experi-
ment Station comes the following list:
Alyseclover (Alysicarpus vaginalis)
Narrowleaf lupine (Lupinus angustifolius)
Crotalaria-(C. spectabilis)
(C. striata)
(C. intermedia)
Austrian winter field pea (Pisum arvense)
Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum)
Bahia grass (Paspalum notatum)
Centipede grass (Eremochloa ophiuroides)
Para grass (Panicum barbinode)
Dallis grass (Paspalum dilatatum)
From the Division of Cereal Crops and Diseases comes the suggestion
that most cereals are not active in Florida but that Victory and Bond oats,
brought in respectively from South America and Australia, have "some
possibility for use in themselves in Florida and are being used successfully
in breeding better oats for Florida conditions. These two varieties are
highly resistant to crown rust and smut, the first of which is a serious
limiting factor in growing the crop in the State."

ORIGIN OF LEADING WORLD CROPS
EDIBLE INDIGENES OF ASIA
Spices Soy Bean
Coffee Yam
Tea Lychee
Cinnamon Citrus
Apricot Rice
Rhubarb Cotton
Buck Wheat Egg Plant
Raddish Black Pepper
Pistachio Dasheen
Licorice Mangosteen
Peach Endive
Cucumber Barley
Almond Shallot
Olive Fig
Aerixhoke Date
Garlic English Walnut
Mango Wheat
Pomegranate Rye
Grape





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

EDIBLE INDIGENES OF AFRICA


Coffee
Spinach
Cantaloupe


Carissa
Watermelon


EDIBLE INDIGENES OF EUROPE


Apple
Fennel (Parsley Family)
Current
Gooseberry
Mustard
Cabbage
Turnips
Cauliflower
Rutabaga
Kohl-rabi
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts


Quince
Pear
Plum
Asparagus
Parsnips
Celery
Lee
Chestnut
Filbert
Carrot
Lettuce


EDIBLE INDIGENES OF OCEANICA


Cocoanut
Breadfruit
Nutmeg


Grapefruit
Cinnamon
Banana


EDIBLE INDIGENES OF NORTH AMERICA
Corn Sweet Potato
Bean Chayote
Pumpkin Blueberry
Cranberry Blackberry
Pecan Dewberry
Hickory Chestnut
Guava Hazelnut
Avocado Papaya (West Indies)
Allspice Monistera Deliciosa
Vanilla (West Indies)
Sapodilla

EDIBLE INDIGENES OF SOUTH AMERICA


Corn
Irish Potatoes
Tomatoes
Peanut
Cocoa
Cassava
Pineapple


Lima Beans
Mate
Herbaceous Pepper
Natal Plum
Cashew
Surinam Cherry





FLORIDA CROPS


VINES FOR SOUTH


COMMON NAME

American Bittersweet

Japanese Evergreen
Bittersweet
Clematis

Purplebell Cobaea

Dutchmans Pipe
Grape (various)

Hall Honeysuckle
Japanese Hop

English Ivy

Japanese or Boston Ivy

Kudzu-vine

Moonflower

Morning-glory

Silverfleece-vine

Trumpetcreeper

Virginia Creeper

Wisteria

Bloodred Bignonia

Bougainvillea

Bowervine (Pandorea)
Catsclaw



Climbing Fig

Cup-of-Gold

Distictis

Hardenbergia

Primrose Jasmine

Spanish Jasmine

Star Jasmine

Orange Glory
(Thunbergia)
Paradise-flower
Rosa-de-Montana


HEIGHT

10'

15-20'

8-20'

tall

tall
tall

tall
tall

tall

tall

tall

tall

tall

10-20'

tall

tall

tall

tall

tall

10-15'
tall



tall

tall

20'

10-15'

8'

10-15'

10-15'

7-10'

15'
15'


FLOWER

inconspicuous

inconspicuous

white, purple, pink,
red
rosy purple

chocolate, not showy
inconspicuous

white turns yellow
inconspicuous

inconspicuous

inconspicuous

inconspicuous

white

blue, purple, and
white
white

orange-scarlet

inconspicuous

purple, lavender,
white
blood-red

purple, crimson, rose

white, purple blotch
bright yellow



inconspicuous

yellow

purple to white

pea-like, violet

soft yellow

white, very fragrant

fragrant, white

orange

pale blue
soft rose


METHOD OF
CLIMBING


USES


twining on wire or grown for showy orange
trellis fruits
rootlets cling to popular hardy evergreen
masonry
twining on trellis many kinds grown for ex-
quisite flowers
tendrils cling to wire grown from seeds sown in
or trellis pots in March
twining on wire covers large area quickly
tendrils on trellis excellent foliage: Crimson
Gloryvine is best
twining covers unsightliness
twining on wire very rapid; useful to cover
unsightly places
clings by rootlets to Baltic Ivy is hardiest form
masonry or wood
clings to masonry or shining foliage, turns red
wood and purple in fall
twining one of the most rapid of
all vines
twining on trellis or treated as annual, sown
wire each year in pots in March
twining popular annuals sown each
spring
twining earlier and showier than
Japanese Clematis
ties on stems help it gay, large flowers
cling to masonry
tendrils cling to gorgeous red and yellow in
masonry and wood fall
twining on trellis buy grafted plants to get
bloom on young plants
tendrils good on roofs and high
walls
must be tied to sup- plant newer varieties ra-
ports their than old magenta sort
twining full sun and fertile soil
twining give full sun; wants to
bloom high up so keep
pruning to make it bloom
low
clings to masonry evergreen, close clinging
foliage
must be tied to sup- large flowers; will cover a
port large area
tendrils likes some shade; best in
summer
twining on wire tiny flowers in great pro-
fusion
tie to support prune to keep them from
becoming straggly shrubs
tie to support prune to keep them from
becoming straggly shrubs
twining excellent lustrous foliage;
give a little shade
twining likes sun; best in spring
and summer
twining full sun; prune vigorously
tendrils flowers look like begonias;
dies to soil each year





DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


LATIN AMERICAN PRODUCTS
MEXICO-Mining industries: Petroleum and its products, silver, gold,
antimony, mercury, copper, lead and zinc; also, coffee, rubber, chicle,
chic-peas, guayule henequen, ixtle, mahogany, ebony, hides and skins, raw
cotton, corn and bananas.
The following articles are produced in Latin America; many of which
are also produced, and all of which are consumed in both North and
South America:
(All the countries have various kinds of fruits and vegetables.)
GUATAMALA-Coffee, bananas, chicle, gold, lumber, honey, sugar
and hides.
EL SALVADOR-Coffee, bullion, sugar, henequen, balsam, rice and
indigo.
HONDURAS-Bananas, gold and silver, coffee, cocoanuts, livestock,
tobacco and hides.
NICARAGUA-Coffee, bananas, gold, cotton, lumber, hides and skins,
sugar, cacao and dyewood.
COSTA RICO-Coffee, bananas, cacao, gold, mineral earths, lumber,
honey, tuna fish, hides and skins.
PANAMA Bananas, cacao, gold, cocoanuts, meats, cattle hides,
mother-of-pearl shell, coffee and rubber.
CUBA-Sugar and molasses, tobacco and cigars, bananas, copper,
manganese, cattle hides, rum and sponges.
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC-Sugar, cacao, coffee, molasses, tobacco, corn
and gold.
HAITI-Coffee, cotton, sugar, sisal, bananas, cacao, molasses, goat-
skins, cottonseed cake and logwood.
ARGENTINA-Almost entirely products of the agricultural and meat-
producing industries; of the first, wheat, corn, linseed, oats, barley, flour,
bran and pollard; of the second, frozen and chilled meats, hides, skins,
wool, residuary animal-products of all kinds, meat extract, butter; in ad-
dition, quebracho wood and extract.
BOLIVIA-Tin, silver bismuth, copper, lead, zinc, gold, wolfram, an-
timony, rubber, hides and skins, cocoa leaves and cassava.
BRAZIL-Coffee, hides, rubber, mate, cacao, tobacco, skins, citrus,
peanuts, sugar, cotton, gold, nuts, carnauba wax, monazite sand, oilseeds,
vanilla, cassava, corn and kernels, rotenone, and chilled and frozen beef.
CHILE-Minerals, mainly; copper, sodium, sodium nitrate in the natural
form, iodine and borax, bar silver, and iron and copper ore. Hides, wool,
wax, fruits, grains, and fresh and frozen meats.
COLOMBIA-Coffee, petroleum, bananas, hides and skins, tobacco,
tagua nuts (vegetable ivory), cacao, rubber, dividivi, platinum, gold and
emeralds.
ECUADOR-Cacao, ivory, nuts, straw hats, rubber, coffee, petroleum,
gold, hides, raw cotton and bananas.
PARAGUAY-Hides, quebracho extract, cotton, cattle, mate, hard-
woods, tobacco, oranges and tangerines, oil of petit grain, canned meats.
PERU-Products of the mining industries, mainly copper and petroleum
and its products; gold, lead, rubber, sugar, coffee, cotton, quinine (made





FLORIDA CROPS


'rom the bark of the cinchona tree), wool, hides, and skins, guano and
:ottonseed oil.
URUGUAY-Wool, hides, skins, meat extract, preserved meats, frozen
and chilled meats, tallow and beef fat, residuary animal products, wheat,
lour, linseed, sand and stone.
VENEZUELA-Petroleum, coffee, gold, cacao, rubber, balata, goat-
skins, asphalt, cattle hides, live cattle, heron plumes, dividivi, fruits and
pearls.

FOODS THE AMERICAS BUY AND SELL
AGRICULTURE IN THE AMERICAS
Published monthly by the Office of Foreign Agricultural Relations of the
United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.
BY F. H. RAWLS
Latin America is both an important market for the food products of
'he United States and one of this country's chief suppliers of foodstuffs.
The Latin American Republics sell one kind of food products to the United
States, buy another.
In the past 15 years from 20 to 25 percent of all the foods the United
States has sold for export have gone to Latin America. During the war
period it has become even more important as a market for us. There is
avery prospect-if both North and South Americans approach the problem
with understanding-that its value to United States producers will con-
;inue to increase.
In 1940 our total exports to Latin America amounted to about 719
million dollars, with iron- and steel-mill manufacturers as the largest
single item. In the same year our food exports to Latin America were
valued at 64 million dollars, or well over one-fourth of our total shipments
)f food to all countries of the world. We did business in food with every
me of the other 20 American Republics, selling them some 75 separate
products.
Of course, it should be recognized that Latin America is not a major
market for the chief export crops of the United States, since, in general,
production of wheat, meat products, corn, cotton, and tobacco in Latin
America fills local requirements. Greatest returns to United States farmers
will come indirectly through the stimulation of United States industry that
will result from increased trade with Latin America. The American worker,
steadily employed, has always been the American farmer's best customer.
At the same time, our foodstuffs trade with Latin America is not to
be regarded lightly. While in large part it consists of specialty products
that range from cornstarch and rolled oats to chewing gum and walnuts,
such staple products as wheat and wheat flour, lard, and rice accounted
for two-fifths of our Latin American food trade in 1940. Some of the
most notable increases in exports to Latin America in recent years have
been in soybean oil, malt liquors, milled rice, malted milk and infants'
food, dried whole milk, yeast, and hops.
In foodstuffs trade, Latin America is even more important as a source
than as a market for the United States. It furnishes roughly 50 percent
)f all the foods we use that we do not produce on our own farms, and
Foodstuffs account for nearly half of all the products we import from
Latin America.
But when you come to analyzing this flow of foodstuffs into the United







64 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


States from the forests and fields of its southern neighbors, you quickly;
discover two major faults: First, we buy from too few countries; ano
second, we purchase too few commodities. In 1939, the last pre-wa
year, 5 of the 20 Republics and 5 products represented five-sixths of ou
food imports from Latin America.
This lack of diversity is no one's fault especially. Other products simple;
haven't been available, nor have other Latin American countries beei
in the market for our trade. The war and the great concern of all of u
for more Western Hemisphere solidarity have changed all that. Product
that once went to the European market are accumulating in Latin America
Former sources of United States supply in the Far East have been cut of
by the shipping shortage caused by the war. Diversification of our trad,
with Latin America may in a sense have been forced upon us, but, nov
that it is here, we are finding that it is to the mutual advantage of al
countries concerned.
Look at it like this. We buy five-sixths of our Latin American foo(
products from Cuba, Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, and Guatemala, in tha
order. Yet among the countries that are our best foodstuffs customer;
are several which enjoy relatively little of our business and are according:
hard pressed to find the foreign exchange they need to continue trading!
with us.
Five-sixths of our food budget in Latin America is being spent for coffee
sugar, bananas, cocoa beans, and canned beef.



MINERAL PRODUCTS-STATES THEY COME FROM
(Data from the U. S. Bureau of Mines)


MINERAL

Aluminum .............
Antimony ore ..........
Arsenious oxide ........
Asbestos ...............
A sphalt ................

Barytes (crude) ........
Bauxite ................
Borates ................
Bromine ...............
Cadmium ...............
Calcium magnes chloride.
Cement ................
Chromite ...............
Clay products ..........
Clay, raw ..............
Coal:
Bituminous ..........
Anthracite ...........
Coke ...................
Copper .................
Diatomaceous earth .....
Em ery .................
Feldspar (crude) ......
Ferroalloys .............
Fluospar ...............
Fuller's earth ..........
Garnet, abrasive ......
G old ...................
Graphite ...............
Grindstones and
pulpstones ...........
Gypsum ................
Iron Ore ...............
Iron, pig ...............
Lead ...................
L im e ..................


CHIEF STATES

N.Y., N.C., Tenn.
Idaho
Nev., Utah, Mont., S.D.
Md., Cal., Ga., Ariz.
Cal., Tex., Ill., Ky., Utah,
Okla.
Ga., Mo., Tenn., Va.
Ark., Ga., Tenn., Ala.
Cal., Nev.
Mich., W.Va., Ohio
Not separable by States
Mich., W.Va., Ohio
Pa., Cal., Ind., Mich.
Md., Cal., Ore.
Ohio, Pa., N.J., Ill.
N.J., Pa., Mo., Ga.

Pa., W.Va., Ill., Ky.
Pa.
Pa., Ind., Ohio, Ill., Ala.
Ariz., Mont., Utah, Mich.
Cal., Okla., Ill., Mo.
Va., N.Y.
N.C., Me., N.H., N.Y.
Pa., N.Y., Md., Ohio
Ill., Ky., Col., N.M.
Fla., Ga., Tex., III.
N.Y., N.H., N.C.
Cal., Col., S.D., Alaska
Ala., Tex., R.I., Mich.

Ohio, W.Va., Mich., Wash.
N.Y., Iowa, Ohio, Mich.
Minn., Mich., Ala., N.Y.
Pa., Ohio, Ill., Ind., Ala.
Mo., Idaho, Utah, Okla.
Ohio. Pa., Mass., Mo.


MINERAL

Magnesite (crude) .....
Magnesium ............
Magnesium chloride .....
Magnesium sulphate ....
Manganese ore .........
Manganiferous ore .....
Manganiferous zinc ....
M ica ...................
M illstones ..............
Mineral paints ..........
Mineral waters .........
Natural gas ............
Natural gas gasoline ....
Oilstones, etc. ..........
P eat ...................
Petroleum ..............
Phosphate rock .........
Platinum & allied metals.
Potash (K20) ..........
Pumice ...... ....... .
Pyrites ................
Quicksilver ...........
Salt ...................
Sand and gravel ........
Sand lime brick ........
Silicia (quartz) ........
Silver .................
Slate ..................
Stone ..................
Sulphur ................
Tale and soapstone .....
T in ....................
Titanium ore: Rutile ...
Tungsten ..............
Uranium, vanadium ores.
Zinc ...................


CHIEF STATES

Cal., Wash.
N.Y., Mich.
Mich., Cal.
Mich., Wash., Cal.
Mont., Ark., Va., Col.
Minn., Wis., Mich., Col.
N.J.
N.C., N.H., N.M., Va.
N.Y., Va., N.C., N.H.
Pa., Ill., Col., Ohio
Wis., N.Y., Cal., Me.
W.Va., Pa., Okla., Cal., Te
Okla., Cal., Tex., W.Va.
Ark., Ind., Ohio, N.H.
Ill., N.J., Cal., Ind.
Okla., Cal., Tex., Ark., Kai
Fla., Tenn., Idaho, Ky.
Cal., Ore., Alaska, Utah
Cal., Md., Pa., Ind.
Kan., Neb., Cal., Utah
Cal., Va., N.Y., Wis.
Cal., Tex., Nev., Ore.
Mich., N.Y., Ohio, Kan.
Ill., N.Y., Ind., Mich.
Mich., Mass., Wis., N.J.
Wis., Md., Cal., Nev.
Utah, Mont., Nev., Idaho
Pa., Vt., N.Y., Me.
Pa., Ind., Ohio, N.Y.
Tex., La., Nev., Utah
N.Y., Va., Vt., Cal.
Alaska
Fla., Va.
Nev., Cal., Col., S.D.
Utah, Col.
Okla., Kan., N.J., Mont.




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