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Group Title: Bulletin State of Florida, Dept. of Agriculture
Title: What and when to plant in Florida
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088899/00001
 Material Information
Title: What and when to plant in Florida
Alternate Title: New series bulletin - Florida State Department of Agriculture ; 1
Physical Description: 11 p. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Scott, John M. ( John Marcus )
Publisher: State of Florida, Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Fla.
Publication Date: 1935
Copyright Date: 1935
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Crops -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by John M. Scott.
General Note: On cover: "(Reprint)" and "Prepared and published in cooperation with the College of Agriculture, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00088899
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKD9377
oclc - 27157951
alephbibnum - 001962700

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
    Introduction
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
Full Text
, FROM THE LIBRARY
OF
DAVID FAIRCHILD


BULLETIN NO. 1


NEW SERIES


AUGUST, 1935


What and When to Plant

in Florida

(Reprint)


By
JOHN M. SCOTT


STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


JME LIBRARY

DEC 97 1971


,S. I 0T 4 N
. ,... ... ..... ----- 1


IAYO, Commissioner
'allahassee


Prepared and published in cooperation with the College of
Agriculture, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.




















INTRODUCTION


The climate and soils of Florida are such that it is
possible to grow crops of various kinds at all seasons of
the year, including both vegetable and general field crops.
The general field crops are usually planted in early spring
and summer, while the truck crops are usually planted
during the fall, winter, and early spring months.
The value in dollars and cents of the truck crops varies
from year to year, but runs into the millions of dollars.
A large number of the truck crops are produced in from
45 to 130 days from time of planting, and nearly all of
them may be classed as short season crops. This is why,
in many cases, two crops a year may be grown on the same
land, the vegetable crops during the fall and winter
months, and feed and forage crops from May to October.








What and When to Plant

in Florida
By JOHN M. SCOTT
Prepared and published in cooperation with the College of Agricul-
ture, University of Florida, Gainesville.



Because of the difference in the seasons and the kinds
of crops grown we have divided the State into three
sections.

NORTH FLORIDA
Alachua, Baker, Bay, Bradford, Calhoun, Clay, Colum-
bia, Dixie, Duval, Escambia, Franklin, Flagler, Gadsden,
Gilchrist, Gulf, Hamilton, Holmes, Jackson, Jefferson,
Lafayette, Leon, Liberty, Madison, Nassau, Okaloosa,
Putnam, Santa Rosa, St. Johns, Suwannee, Taylor, Union,
Walton, Washington, Wakulla. Area, 14,414,560 acres.

CENTRAL FLORIDA
Brevard, Citrus, Hernando, Hillsborough, Lake, Levy,
Marion, Orange, Osceola, Pasco, Pinellas, Polk, Seminole,
Sumter, Volusia. Area, 9,164,800 acres.

SOUTH FLORIDA
Broward, Charlotte, Collier, Dade, DeSoto, Glades,
Hardee, Hendry, Highlands, Indian River, Lee, Manatee,
Martin, Monroe, Okeechobee, Palm Beach, Sarasota, St.
Lucie. Area, 11,376,680 acres.

LEADING PRODUCTS OF NORTH FLORIDA
The following is a list of leading crops raised commer-
cially in North Florida:
Cotton, corn, oats, sugar cane, sorghum cane, Japanese
cane, tobacco, rice, field peas, soy beans, velvet bean hay,
cow pea hay, Natal grass, kudzu hay, native grass hay,
millet, rye, velvet beans, peanuts, sweet potatoes, Irish
potatoes, cabbage, watermelons, tomatoes, string beans,
cucumbers, onions, lettuce, lima beans, egg plants, canta-








4 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

loupes, English peas, beets, squashes, peppers, straw-
berries, pecans, peaches, figs, pears, Japanese persim-
mons, grapes, plums, oranges and grapefruit in limited
quantity.
The number after each crop indicates the number of
days required to reach edible maturity, or gathering
maturity if non-edible.

WHAT AND WHEN TO PLANT IN NORTH FLORIDA
BRUSSELS SPROUTS-January, February, September,
October, November. (90 to 120)
BEANS-March, April, May, August, September. (65)
BEETS-February, March, August, September, October,
November. (60)
CORN-February, March, April. (75 to 90)
COTTON-March, April. (180)
CABBAGE-October to February. (65 to 80)
CAULIFLOWER-January, September, October. (55)
COLLARDS-January, February, March, November.
(85)
CANTALOUPES-March, April. (85)
CUCUMBERS-February, March, April. (64)
EGG PLANT-February, March, April, July, August.
(84)
ENGLISH PEAS-February, March, April, September,
October (McNeil pea). (62)
IRISH POTATOES-January, February, March, April,
August, September. (100 to 120)
KALE-March, September, October, November. (90 to
120)
KERSHAW-March, April. (150 to 180)
KOHL-RABI-March, April, August. (60 to 80)
LEEK-January, February, March, September, October.
(100 to 115)
LETTUCE-January, February, September, October,
November, December. (75 to 83)
ONIONS-January, February, August, September, Octo-
ber, November, December. (100)
OKRA-March, April, May, August. (60)
PARSLEY-February, March, April. (40 to 80)








WHAT AND WHEN TO PLANT IN FLORIDA 5

PARSNIPS-February, March, April, October, Novem-
ber. (125 to 160)
RADISHES-January, February, March, April, Septem-
ber, October, November, December. (27)
RUTABAGAS-February, March, April, August, Sep-
tember, October. (50 to 80)
SUGAR CANE-February, March. (210)
STRAWBERRIES-January, September, November, De-
cember.
SWEET POTATOES-April, May, June. (100)
SALSIFY-February, March, September. (120 to 180)
SPINACH-February, August, September, October. (50
to 60)
SQUASH-March, April, May, August. (60 to 80)
TURNIPS-January, February, March, April, August,
September, October. (45).
TOMATO PLANTS-March, April, May, June, July,
August. (73 to 82)
TOBACCO PLANTS-March, April.
WATERMELONS-March, April. (83 to 93)

Forage Crops
BURR CLOVER-September to November.
JAPAN CLOVER-May, June, July.
BERMUDA GRASS-March, April, May, June, July,
August, September, October.
CARPET GRASS-March to July.
VELVET BEANS-March, April, May.
PEANUTS-March, April, May, June, July.
RYE and RAPE-January, February, October, November
and December.
SORGHUM-March to June.
VETCH-October, November, December.
SOY BEANS-March to June.
COW PEAS-March to July.
BEGGAR WEED-May to July.
KUDZU-December, January, February.








6 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

CROPS THAT CAN BE RAISED ON SAME LAND
SAME YEAR
Oats, Bunch Velvet Beans, Rape.
Oats, Cow Peas, Rape.
Irish Potatoes, Corn.
Irish Potatoes, Cow Peas or Velvet Beans.
Good Silage Crops
Corn, Napier Grass, Sorghum, Japanese Cane.
Fruits and Berries
The leading fruits and berries of this section are the
fig, peach, pear, Satsuma, grapes, plum, persimmon, blue-
berries, strawberry, blackberry, and dewberries.
The Satsuma is a supplement to the round orange,
making Florida an all-year orange producer, as the two
overlap in seasons of ripening.
Nuts
The counties comprising North Florida produce four-
fifths of the pecans of the State.

CENTRAL DIVISION
The Central Division comprises fifteen counties with an
area of 9,164,800 acres. This division produces the bulk
of the citrus fruit and the garden truck of the State. Its
shores are laved on the east by the Atlantic and on the
west by the Gulf of Mexico, the high land ridge occupies
the center.

WHAT AND WHEN TO PLANT IN CENTRAL
FLORIDA
BRUSSELS SPROUTS-January, February, March, Sep-
tember, October, November. (90 to 120)
BEANS-February, March, September. (65).
BEETS-January, February, March, September, Octo-
ber, November. (60)
CABBAGE-January, February, October, November,
December. (65 to 80)
CANTALOUPES-February, March. (85).
CAULIFLOWER-January (seed) ; March, June (seed);
July, August, September, October. (55)








WHAT AND WHEN TO PLANT IN FLORIDA


CUCUMBERS-September to March. (64)
COLLARDS-January, February, March, April, May,
August, September, November, December. (85)
CELERY-June (seed); July (seed); September to
February. (120 to 150)
COTTON-February, March, April. (150 to 180)
CORN-January (early) ; February, March, April. (75
to 90)
DASHEENS-March, April.
EGG PLANT-January, February, spring crop; July, fall
crop. (84)
ENGLISH PEAS-September to March. (62)
IRISH POTATOES-September, fall crop; November to
March, spring crop. (100 to 120)
KOHL-RABI-March, April, August. (60 to 80)
KALE-February, March, August, September, October,
November, December. (90 to 120)
LEEK-January, February, March, September, October,
December. (100 to 115)
LETTUCE-January, February, September, October, No-
vember, December. (75 to 83)
MUSTARD-January, February, March, April, August,
September, October, November.
ONION SETS-January, February, March, April, Au-
gust, September, October, November. (100)
OATS-January, November, December.
PARSLEY-February, March, April, June, July. (40
to 80)
PARSNIPS-February, March, April, September, Octo-
ber, November. (125 to 160)
PUMPKINS-May, June, July. (150 to 180)
PEPPERS-January, February, March, spring crop; July
to October, fall crop. (100 to 140)
RADISHES-January, February, March, April, Septem-
ber, October. (28)
RUTABAGAS-February, March, September to Decem-
ber. (50 to 80)
RAPE-January, February, October, November, Decem-
ber.
SWEET POTATOES-March, April, May, June, July.
(100)








DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


SQUASH-March, April, May, June, July, August, Sep-
tember. (60 to 80)
STRAWBERRIES-August to November.
SPINACH-February, August, September, October, No-
vember. (50 to 60)
SPANISH ONIONS-January, February, March. (90 to
120) (Sets)
TOMATOES-September to March, July. (73 to 82).
TURNIPS-January, February, March, April, August,
September, November, December. (45)
WATERMELONS-January to March. (83 to 93)

Forage Crops
BERMUDA GRASS-March, April, May, June, July,
August, September, October.
CARPET GRASS-March to July.
VELVET BEANS-March to May.
PEANUTS-March, April, May, June, July.
RYE and RAPE-January, February, October to Decem-
ber.
VETCH-October to January.
SOY BEANS-April, May, June.
COW PEAS-April to July.
BEGGAR WEED-April, May, June.
KUDZU-November, December, January.
NAPIER GRASS, MEEKER GRASS-January to March.

CROPS THAT CAN BE RAISED ON SAME LAND
SAME YEAR
The shorter the length of time required for a crop to
mature, the greater number can be grown on the same
land. The following may be mentioned:
Oats, Bunch Velvet Beans.
Oats, Cow Peas.
Irish Potatoes, Corn.
Irish Potatoes, Cow Peas or Velvet Beans.
Tomatoes, Lettuce, English Peas.
A number of vegetables may be planted in the fall for
winter shipping and then followed by field crops in
spring.
Silage Crops-Corn, Japanese Cane, Napier Grass.







WHAT AND WHEN TO PLANT IN FLORIDA 9

SOUTH FLORIDA
South Florida presents the truly semi-tropical part of
the United States. It comprises eighteen counties with
an area of 11,376,680 acres. It has one of the largest
inland fresh water lakes in the world. Miami, "The City
Wonderful," is on the east coast, Fort Myers on the west
and Key West, at the southern extremity of the United
States, in touch with the trade of the southern hemis-
phere.
Citrus fruit growing, trucking and live stock raising are
the principal industries. More than five million acres of
this division was originally under shallow water-the
Everglades. Since drainage and reclamation have proved
it to be of wonderful agricultural possibilities, it is being
turned into ranches, field crops and trucking farms.

WHEN AND WHAT TO PLANT IN SOUTH FLORIDA
BEANS-September to April; June, butter beans. (65)
BEETS-January, February, March, September, October,
November. (60)
BRUSSELS SPROUTS-January, February, March, Sep-
tember, October, November. (90 to 120)
CUCUMBERS-September to March. (64)
CABBAGE-October to February. (65 to 80)
CORN-January to March. (75 to 90)
CARROTS-January, February, August, September,
October, November.
CAULIFLOWER-January (seed); February, March,
August (seed) ; September. (55)
COLLARDS-January, February, August, September,
October, November, December. (85)
CANTALOUPES-February, March.
DASHEENS-January to April. (85)
EGG PLANTS-January, February, spring crop; July,
August, fall crop. (84)
ENGLISH PEAS-September to March. (62)
IRISH POTATOES-November to March, spring crop;
September, fall crop. (100 to 120)
KALE-January, February, March, August, September,
October, November. (90 to 120)








10 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

KOHL-RABI-January, April, August. (60 to 80)
LETTUCE-September to January. (75 to 83)
MUSTARD-January, March, August, September, Octo-
ber, November, December.
OKRA-February, March, September. (60)
ONIONS-January (seed); February, March, April,
August, September, October, November, December.
(100)
PEPPERS-January, February, spring crop; July to
October, fall crop. (100 to 140)
PUMPKINS-March, April, May, June, July. (150 to
180)
RADISHES-January, February, March, September, Oc-
tober, November, December. (28)
RAPE-January, February, October, November, Decem-
ber.
RUTABAGAS-August, September, October, November.
(50 to 80)
SQUASH-February, March, April, May, June, July,
August, September. (60 to 80)
SPINACH-January, February, August, September, Oc-
tober, November. (50 to 60)
SWEET POTATOES-April, May, June, July. (100)
SUGAR CANE-January, February. (210)
STRAWBERRIES-September, October, November, De-
cember.
TOMATOES-September to February; July for fall crop.
(73 to 82)
TURNIPS-January to October. (45)
VELVET BEANS-March, April.
WATERMELONS-January to March. (83 to 93)

Forage Crops

Para Grass, Natal Grass, Sorghum, Napier Grass, Ber-
muda Grass, Carpet Grass, Saint Augustine Grass, Cow
Peas, Soy Beans, Velvet Beans, Millet, Oats, Rye. To the
above list may be added a number of native wild grasses.








WHAT AND WHEN TO PLANT IN FLORIDA


CROPS THAT CAN BE RAISED ON SAME LAND
SAME YEAR
South Florida grows crops all the time so that the
number of things that can be grown in a year on the
same land depends on the length of time it takes to
mature the crops that are planted.
Silage crops are the same as those of other divisions of
the State.


Florida also is a State of rare products, many of which
are grown commercially, while others are being intro-
duced. Among those now grown commercially are:
Australian blackberries, avocados, blueberries, ba-
nanas, cocoanuts, chayotes, cherimoyas, maumee apples,
mangoes, mangosteens, Natal plums, ornamental plants,
palms, papayas, pineapples, sappodillas, sugar apples,
tangelos, tung oil trees.

CROPS THAT MAY FOLLOW WINTER TRUCK CROPS
Corn and Cow Peas.
Corn and Soy Beans.
Corn and Peanuts.
Corn and Velvet Beans.
Or any of the above may be planted alone.

SOME CROP ROTATIONS
Irish Potatoes followed by Corn.
Oats followed by Peanuts.
Vetch followed by Corn or Cotton.










PLANTING TABLE FOR FLORIDA TRUCK CROPS

FLORIDA GROWER FOR MAY

General Instructions for the Commercial Production of Vegetable Crops

All truck crops listed in this table are produced in commercial quantities by Florida farmers. Such crops as beets, turnips,
radishes, spinach and cantaloupes, which are grown mainly for local markets in this state, are not listed.
Because of the wide range in Florida climatic and soil conditions, the rules for growing one crop in the Southern part of the state
do not always apply to growing the same crop in the Central or Northern sections of the state. Hence, the information and sugges-
tions given in this table are of only a general nature, and must be properly interpreted, when applied to various local conditions.
REFERENCES: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Gainesville; Florida State Department of Agriculture, Tallahassee; P.
H. Rolfs' "Sub-Tropical Vegetable Gardening;" and William Gomme, County Agricultural Agent.


Principal Varieties


Giant Stringless
Refugee
Black Valentine
Wardwell's Kidney wax
New Davis White wax
Green and Yellow
Bountiful
Fordhook
Lima

Jersey Wakefield
Charleston Wakefield
Premium Flat Dutch
Succession
Copenhagen

Golden self blanching

Green Top
Easy Blanching

Improved White Spine
Davis Perfect
Stay Green


Type of Soil
Best Adapted


Muck;
Hammock;
Flat Woods.
well-drained;
Pine, good
quality.


Muck;
Hammock:
Flat Woods.
well-drained;
Pine, good
quality.

Muck;
Hammock;
Flat Woods,
well-drained.

Hammock;
Flat Woods,
well-drained.

ammock; Flat
ods, well-
ned; Pine


Amount
Seed Per
Acre




3 pks. to
1 bu.





1 lb.
sufficient
for 2 acres


6 oz.



2 to 3 Ibs.


6 oz.


When to
Plant




Sept. to April;
June (butter
varieties)


October to
February


July to Sept.
(Seedbed);
Sept. to Jan.


Sept. to March


Amount
Fertilizer




800 to 1.000
lbs. per
acre


1,500 to
2,000 lbs.
per acre


2,000 lbs.
per acre
and more if
necessary

500 to 800
Ibs. per
acre


Days to
Mature


70 days


_ I ) 45 days


ESTIMATED

Yield Per Cost Per
Acre Acre




110ham- $60 to
pers $85


90 to 100 100 to 150 $75 to
days Crates $100


130 days


600 $500 to
crates $800


Distance
Apart Rows
and in Rows




3 to 4 ft.
3 to 4 in.






3 by 1% ft.





3 ft. by 4 in.


65 to 75 200 to 300 $75 to
days cukes $100 4 by 2 ft.


________ 1___1_ _I I


Jan. and Feb.
spring crop;
July. fall crop.


2,000 Ibs.
per acre


130 days


quality I I I


400
crates


$125


5 by 3 ft.


Remarks


Ready market for
late fall and
spring crop. In
South Florida fall
beans sell well.




Spring crop
brings good
returns.


This crop must be
carefully handled
for the best
results.

Easy crop to
grow, good
market.

Good profitable
shipping crop.
Ready market.


CROP


BEANS


CABBAGE


CELERY



CUCUMBERS


-




--oods q Wd a peracre rates
well-drained.


ONIONS


Low Hammock; 3 to 4 lbs.
Flat Woods; seed
Pine. 8 bu. sets


ENGLISH
PEAS



PEPPERS



POTATOES
(Irish)



POTATOES
(Sweet)


STRAW-
BERRIES




SWEET CORN






TOMATOES





WATER-
MELONS


Crystal Wax
White Bermuda
Australian Brown
Red Bermuda


Alaska Extra Early
Thomas Laxton
Florida McNeil
Telephone


Ruby King
World Beater
Ruby Giant


Spaulding Rose 4
Bliss Triumph
Irish Cobbler

Porto Rico
Big Stem Jersey
Triumph
Norton Yam
Nancy Hall

Missionary
Klondyke


Adams' Early
Crosby's Early
Stowell's Evergreen
Country Gentleman

Livingston Globe
Marglobe
Stone
Earliana
Beauty
Bonny Best
Norton

Tom Watson
Florida Favorite
Irish Gray
Stone Mountain


Muck;
Hammock; Flat
Woods, high
quality; Pine,
good quality

Flat Woods;
Hammock; Pine,
good quality.

Flat Woods,
well-drained;
Hammock;
Muck.


Pine Land;
Sandy Flat
Woods.


Flat Woods;
Hammock.



Muck; Flat
Woods;
Hammock.



Prairie Ham-
mock; Muck;
Flat Woods,
well-drained.


Pine
Flat Woods.
well-drained.


80 lbs.




'/2 lb.




10 bu.




8 bu. for
draws

Single Row,
15,000 plants
9x12 in.
35.000 nlants



15 lbs.


120 days





65 days


400 to 500
crates


Sept. to March





Sept. to March


July to Oct.,
fall crop; Jan.
and Feb.
spring crop.

Sept., fall crop;
Nov. to March
spring crop.



March to July



Aug. to Nov.




Jan. to May





Sept. to Feb.
and July




January to
March


2,000 lbs.
per acre




500 to 800
lbs. per
acre


3,000 lbs.
per acre


1,500 lbs. to
2,000 lbs.
per acre


600 to 1,000
lbs. per
acre

1,500 lbs.
plus 100
lbs. Nitrate
per acre

500 Ibs. plus
50 lbs. Ni-
trate soda
at tassel-
ing per
acre


1,300 lbs to
1,500 lbs.
per acre



1,500 lbs.
per acre


90 days


45 bbls.


120 days 100 to
1200 bu.


70 days




70 to 85
days





135 days




70 to 90
days


$45


1,500 to $175 to
2.000 qts. $250


30 to 50
crates





250
crates


1 carload $30
2 acres


12 by 6 in.


200
hampers $85


sour.

Use well rotted
stable manure
when able. Nitrate
soda can be used
when maturing
100 lbs. to acre.


Soil must not be
sour. Inoculation
of seed advisable.


Good fall shipping
crop.

Treat seed before
planting. Be pre-
pared to dust or
spray with bor-
deaux prepara-
tions.


Allow 10,000 slips
to acre.

Use stable manure
if possible in ad-
dition to commer-
cial fertilizer.
Run seed through
creolin solution to
keep off birds.
Use Ilb. arse-
nate lead powder
to 6 lbs. hydrated
lime for bud worm


Good commercial
market for first-
4 ft. by 2 ft. class material.
Local market
good.

Treat seed and be
prepared to dust
10 by 10 ft. or spray with
nicotine and bor-
deaux solution.


4 ft. by 1 in.




3 ft. by 20 in



3 ft. 6 in. by
12 in.




4 ft. by 14 in




3 ft by 14 in




3 ft. by 9 in.


120 to 200
140 days crates


-- --
xou


14 oy 14 In. siouid- not be












Spray Calendar for Some Florida Truck Crops

Prepared by M. R. Ensign, Florida Experiment Station

For American Produce Grower


VEGETABLE HOW AFFECTED PESTS CONTROL MEASURES WHEN TO TREAT

Dust at first appearance of mildew;
Mildew. Powdery mildew (fungus). Flowers of sulphur, repeat as necessary.
Bean (Snap) Spray or dust at very first appearance
Leaf margins cut and rolled. Leaf-roller (insect). Arsenate of lead as spray using of the worm. Repeat in a week to ten
1 lbs. to 50 gallons. days if necessary.
"Spot dust"* under cover or hood first
Cabbage Stunted and unproductive. Aphid or plant louse (insect). 3 per cent nicotine dust. few plants that become infested. Dust
when warm and bright.
As soon as plants come up in seedbed;
Celery Leaf Blight. Early and late blight (fungus). 5-5-50 Bordeaux. continue at 5-7 day intervals until
celery is boarded.
First two Bordeaux applications of
Spotting and blighting of leaves. Downy mildew, anthracnose 3-6-50 Bordeaux and 4-4-50 Bor- 3-6-50 strength. Begin with appear-
Spotting of fruit and decay. (fungi), angular leaf spot deaux or 25-75 copper-lime dust. ance of third leaf, continuing at 5-7
(bacteria). day intervals till harvest is over.
Begin as soon as egg masses are found
Cucumbers Devoured leaves and wormy 1 lbs. arsenate of lead to 50 on under side of leaves. (This is not
fruit. Melon-worm (insect). gallons of spray, the pickle-worm for which a trap crop
must be used).
"Spot dust" the first colonies found
3 per cent nicotine dust or under hood. Dust or spray for gen-
Stunted and unproductive plant. Aphid or plant louse (insect). nicotine sulphate in spray at eral infestation as often as necessary
rate of 1 part to 800. for control.
Eggplant ditto ditto ditto ditto
ditto ditto ditto ditto
Potatoes Begin when plants are 4-6 inches high;
Leaf and stem blight. Late blight (fungus). 4-4-50 Bordeaux. continue for 30 to 35 days at intervals
of 5-7 days.
-- --.... ~. .I..


Curled, stunted leaves.


Aphid or plant louse (insect)


Cereospora leaf spot or leaf drop 4-4-50 Bordeaux.
(fungus).


I ame as for cucumbers.


Begin with first leaves in seedbed.
Repeat at weekly intervals.


Curled, ~ ~ ~ stne evs


Leaf spotting. -


L


Same as for cucumbers.


Peppers







Begin when plants are well started in
Spotting of leaves and fruit. Nail-head rust (fungus). 4-4-50 Bordeaux. seedbed. Repeat at 5-7 day intervals
Tomatoes until harvest.
Leaves devoured, worm-holes in Corn-ear worm or tomato worm 1 % lbs. lead arsenate, 50 gals, Begin with first sight of infestation.
fruit. (insect). spray. Egg masses on leaves is best sign.

Curled and stunted leaves. Aphid or plant louse (insect). Same as for cucumbers. Same as cucumbers.

Watermelons Begin with the first appearance of dis-
Spotting and blighting of leaves, Anthracnose (fungus). 4-4-50 Bordeaux. ease in field. Repeat at 5-7 day inter-
spotting of fruit, vals as many times as necessary for
control.

*"Spot dusting" means the dusting of those plants here and there where the infestation has just begun. By the use of a hood either of metal or cloth the
nicotine fumes are retained in concentrated form with a higher percentage of kill. All dusting with nicotine should be done with high temperature prevailing so
as to increase the volatility of the gas. In many instances a general infestation of aphids may be prevented by judicious "spot dusting."
Except for nicotine dust as a fumigant, the use of the dust for the control of insect pests and plant diseases of truck crops has not been proven as effec-
tive as liquid sprays. In some instances the use of dust has been to supplement the liquid sprays since the dust can be applied more quickly.
Arsenate of lead may be used either alone at the strengths indicated or it may be used with Bordeaux mixture. Where it is used with Bordeaux the latter
acts as an effective sticker.











DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION


List of Bulletins


1. What and When to Plant.
2. Citrus Growing.
3. Soils and Fertilizers.
4. Fig Growing.
5. Beekeeping in Florida.
6. Rabbit Raising in Florida.
7. Sorgham for Silage and Forage.
8. Dwarf Essex Rape.
9. Peanut Growing.
10. Watermelons in Florida.
11. Tung Oil in Florida.
12. Livestock in Florida.
13. Strawberry, Blackberry and Young-
berry.
14. Some Drug Plants.
15. Waterways in Florida.
16. Native Plant Life.
17. Marketing Poultry and Eggs.
18. Soil Improving Crops.
19. Commercial Bulb Production.
20. Mangoes in Florida.
21. Hogs in Florida.
23. Some Florida Truck Crops.
24. Avacadoes in Florida.
26. Dairying in Florida.
28. Beef Cattle in Florida.
29. Legume Feed Crops.
30. Non-Legume Feed Crops.
31. Root Crops.
32. The Papaya.
33. The Blueberry.
34. Poultry Raising.
35. Growing Asparagus Plumosus.
37. Goats in Florida.
38. Ducks & Geese.
40. Tobacco Growing.
*42. The Soils of Florida.
43. Farm Engineering.
45. Medicinal Plants.
46. Florida Fruits & Vegetables in the
Family Menu.
49. Mushroom Growing.
50. Fla. Fruits and Vegetables in the
Commercial Menu.
51. Drainage & Water Control.
52. Home Vegetable Garden.
53. Growing Sugarcane.
54. Corn Production.
55. Cotton Production.
56. Bullfrog Raising.
58. Outline & Directory of Florida State
Gov't.
59. Rose Culture.
60. Home Curing and Canning of Meats.


61. Possibilities of the Everglades.
62. Parks and Playgrounds.
63. Grape Culture.
65. Florida, Land of Health.
66. Florida Honey and its Hundred Uses.
67. Drainage Districts.
68. Forage and Pasture Crops.
69. The Mandarin Orange.
70. Pestiferous Insects of the House-
hold.
71. Silos.
72. Fibre-Bearing Plants.
73. Priceless Dietetic Value of Florida's
Tropical Fruits.
74. Guava Production & Preparation.
75. Pecan Growing.
76. Co-operative Marketing Laws.
77. Floridan Keys.
79. General Information on Florida.
80. Ready Reference for Florida Farm-
ers.
81. Federal Agricultural Report-1935.

GENERAL BULLETINS
Florida, March of Progress.
North and Northwest Florida.
Central Florida.
South Florida.
Biennial Report.
Twentieth Census (31-32).
Agricultural Statistics (31-32).
From Field to Market.
State Population Census-1935.
State Farmers Wholesale Market.
Know Florida.

QUARTERLY BULLETINS
Plant Pests and Plant Diseases.
Rural Culture.
Farmers Cyclopedia.
Agriculture and Related Subjects.

MAPS
Generalized Soil Map.
Latitude Map of Florida.
Large Sectional Map.
Historical Map.
Resource Map.

SUPPLEMENTARY BULLETINS
Fundamentals of Co-operation.
Pineapple Culture.
Squab Raising.


THE TRIBUNE PRESS-TAMPA-5




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