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 Introduction
 Venture capital
 Partnering
 Training
 Start-up success














Title: Commercialization Council venture news
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Title: Commercialization Council venture news
Series Title: Commercialization Council venture news
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Creator: University of Florida Commercialization Council
Publisher: University of Florida Commercialization Council
Publication Date: Winter 2005
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Volume ID: VID00009
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Table of Contents
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Venture capital
        Page 3
    Partnering
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Training
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Start-up success
        Page 8
        Page 9
Full Text
Venture Newsletter


Commercialization Council
* UNIVERSITY OF
".FLORIDA VENTURE NEWS


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Winter 2005


Members of the
Commercialization Council

Office of Technology Licensing
David Day Director
Jane Muir Associate Director


Univ. of Florida Foundation
Christopher Needles
Assistant VP/Development


Sid Martin Biotechnology
Development Incubator
Patti Breedlove Incubator Mgr.


The following editorial from Dr. Winfred Phillips, vice
president for research at the University of Florida and UF's
liason to Scripps Florida, originally appeared in the
Gainesville Sun www.gainesville.comle.co

State Will Reap Rewards from Collaboration

With Scripps Florida set to break ground at its Palm Beach
County headquarters, the news from the fledgling biomedical
research institute is promising.

Scripps has hired 159 full-time employees and 22 faculty
members. Scientists at its temporary labs at Florida Atlantic
University have applied for 17 patents. And last month
Scripps inked its first collaboration with a corporate partner,
the Seattle-based cancer therapeutics firm NeoRx, which will
provide $2.5 million for a cancer study.

Progress has been so rapid that it has overshadowed another
development: Growing collaborations between Scripps and
Florida's public universities.

Questions about the relationship between Scripps and
universities have persisted since the institute was first
announced nearly two years ago. Scripps and university
leaders continue to mull formal arrangements including a
joint biotech incubator, a shared research park and a
university campus adjacent to Scripps.

But as these public discussions continue, there's a key under-
the-radar trend: Researchers at Florida's universities are
reaching out to newly arrived colleagues at Scripps, and vice
versa, to do joint research, borrow each other's high-tech
equipment, educate graduate students and otherwise join
hands.

This is important for a couple of reasons. For one thing, it
provides early confirmation of the scientific health and
relevance of the Scripps enterprise. For another, the budding
collaborations lend support to one of the chief claims of
Scripps backers: That, once established, the research
institute will help boost the technology and biotechnology
economy not only in Palm Beach County but all over Florida.

After all, if researchers statewide have a hand in Scripps'
science, they and their communities will reap rewards in the


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The Commercialization Council
is funded by the

Office of the Vice President for
Research

Dr. Winfred M. Phillips
Vice President for Research

PO Box 115500
(352) 392-8932
http://rgp.ufl.edu


The UFCC Venture e-newsletter is
sent to you by the University of
Florida Commercialization Council.

To be removed from the UFCC
Venture mailing list, please email
jmuir@ufl.edu.


The information contained in UFCC
Venture may not be reproduced
without the permission of the
University of Florida
Commercialization Council.


cures, technologies and spin-off companies that result.

At the University of Florida, nearly three dozen researchers -
from fields spanning biochemistry to medicinal chemistry to
psychiatry to molecular genetics to ophthalmology are
teaming up with counterparts at Scripps.

It's still very early, and some of the activity is limited to
discussions, but a few researchers have taken things a step
further. For example, UF's Dennis Steindler, has put together
a multi-million dollar grant proposal aimed at finding cures
for Parkinson's that includes Scripps researchers as informal
participants. Scripps, says Steindler, has the technology and
the expertise for so-called "high throughput" screening, or
the testing of literally hundreds of thousands of potential new
drug compounds. UF, meanwhile, has what may prove the
winning candidates.

"It's a perfect marriage," says Steindler.

UF biochemist Rob McKenna is another researcher with an
interest in Scripps. He's tapping a Scripps robot to screen for
conditions that make protein samples crystallize, a necessary
step to his research on the molecular causes of malaria,
glaucoma and other diseases. A good technician, McKenna
says, can screen 24 samples in 20 minutes. The Scripps
robot, by contrast, zips through 96 samples in 15 seconds.
McKenna's Scripps colleague, meanwhile, hopes to use UF's
extensive X-ray facilities.

"Obviously, this equipment costs a lot of money, so if we can
help each other's research, that's where we're going,"
McKenna says.

Of course, there will be challenges to Scripps-university
research collaborations, including issues surrounding
ownership of patents and licenses tied to drug discoveries.
But with any luck, administrators and lawyers overseeing
these matters will be as creative and motivated as the
scientists who made the discoveries.

Indeed, Scripps' organizational structure, which is light on
administration and heavy on scientists, is designed to
facilitate outside collaborations. And it's important to
remember that linkages aren't limited to research. UF
scientists are talking with Scripps counterparts about
educational collaborations ranging from placing Scripps
researchers on UF doctoral students' committees to training
UF students at Scripps labs.

All of this isn't only to the benefit of researchers and
students. Informal discussions, cross-disciplinary intermixing,
chance meetings leading to the exchange of vital ideas all
of these are the meat and potatoes of good scientific inquiry.

From James Watson and Francis Crick, who discovered the
structure of DNA, to William Shockley, John Bardeen and
Walter Brattain, who built the first transistor, the resulting
discoveries have had monumentally positive impacts. To be
sure, economic development is one, as the story of Silicon
Valley amply demonstrations. But more importantly, these


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and other discoveries have significantly improved people's
lives.

The unique and different strengths of North Carolina State
University, UNC-Chapel Hill and Duke have been key to the
success of that state's vaunted Research Triangle Park.
There's no reason Florida's universities can't play a similar
role in ensuring Scripps' success, and vice versa.

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VENTURE CAPITAL

UF Start-Up Ixion Biotechnology Inks Deal to Get
Kidney Stone Treatment to Market

Ixion Biotechnology, Inc., a graduate of the UF Sid Martin
Biotechnology Incubator and subsidiary of Q-Med, recently
transferred ownership of its product development of
pharmaceuticals preventing kidney stones to Q-Med.

Q-Med has formed a product company, OxThera AB, to focus
efforts on the new project, which recently received a financial
injection of SEK 165 million via a new share issue directed at
the risk capital companies Health Cap and SLS Venture
(Scandinavian Life Science Venture). Q-Med AB now owns
just over 19% of OxThera AB.

"Recurring kidney stones create enormous healthcare costs
and great personal suffering for both the young and the
elderly. Ixion's technology is very promising and at present
leads international development within the area," says Bengt
Agerup, Q-Med President and CEO. "Through this deal, the
projects can be carried on and sales of children's products
can begin within a few years. OxThera's patent-protected
technology has already demonstrated promising effects in
clinical pilot studies. As the market for the treatment of
kidney stones is outside Q-Med's core business, a
commitment from external backers is highly desirable."

Ixion intends to continue with stem cell research for
application within the area of diabetes. For more information,
visit the company website at www.ixion-biotech.com. For
more information about OxThera, visit the website at
www.oxthera.com.

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PARTNERING

Record Number of Licenses in FY2005 Takes More Life-


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and other discoveries have significantly improved people's
lives.

The unique and different strengths of North Carolina State
University, UNC-Chapel Hill and Duke have been key to the
success of that state's vaunted Research Triangle Park.
There's no reason Florida's universities can't play a similar
role in ensuring Scripps' success, and vice versa.

Return to top




VENTURE CAPITAL

UF Start-Up Ixion Biotechnology Inks Deal to Get
Kidney Stone Treatment to Market

Ixion Biotechnology, Inc., a graduate of the UF Sid Martin
Biotechnology Incubator and subsidiary of Q-Med, recently
transferred ownership of its product development of
pharmaceuticals preventing kidney stones to Q-Med.

Q-Med has formed a product company, OxThera AB, to focus
efforts on the new project, which recently received a financial
injection of SEK 165 million via a new share issue directed at
the risk capital companies Health Cap and SLS Venture
(Scandinavian Life Science Venture). Q-Med AB now owns
just over 19% of OxThera AB.

"Recurring kidney stones create enormous healthcare costs
and great personal suffering for both the young and the
elderly. Ixion's technology is very promising and at present
leads international development within the area," says Bengt
Agerup, Q-Med President and CEO. "Through this deal, the
projects can be carried on and sales of children's products
can begin within a few years. OxThera's patent-protected
technology has already demonstrated promising effects in
clinical pilot studies. As the market for the treatment of
kidney stones is outside Q-Med's core business, a
commitment from external backers is highly desirable."

Ixion intends to continue with stem cell research for
application within the area of diabetes. For more information,
visit the company website at www.ixion-biotech.com. For
more information about OxThera, visit the website at
www.oxthera.com.

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PARTNERING

Record Number of Licenses in FY2005 Takes More Life-


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Changing Products to Market

The University of Florida Office of Technology Licensing (OTL)
set an annual commercialization record by completing 66
licenses and option agreements during fiscal year 2005. UF
has long been a prolific producer of intellectual property with
such well-known inventions as Gatorade, Trusopt, and the
Sentricon termite control system. Notably, 2005 was a
landmark year for moving technologies like these toward the
market.

Licensing typically involves patenting to protect the
intellectual property, marketing to locate a commercial
partner, and licensing the technology to that company.
Licensing agreements often lead to close relationships
between researchers and corporations, yielding research
sponsorship or outright gifts and grants for basic research, as
well as job offers for UF graduates. In addition, revenues
generated by the university from its active licenses are
distributed to the inventors, their departments and colleges,
and other UF programs.

According to David Day, OTL Director, "This is what tech
transfer is all about, serving faculty and community by
getting as much of UF's science as possible into play so that
people can benefit from it."

As a result of UF's licensing success, consumers are already
benefiting from a variety of new products including a safer
highway construction barrier, a unique device to keep ants
out of pet food bowls and potted plants, and a medical
training dummy that simulates real-life emergency care
scenarios.

To read about more UF technologies that are improving
people's lives and helping create jobs, go to OTL's website at
www.otl.ufl.edu and click on Success Stories.


UF Biotech Incubator Announces Advisory Committee

The Sid Martin Biotechnology Incubator (BDI) has recruited
an outstanding Biotechnology Advisory Committee (BAC) to
assist its incubation program. Among other things,
members advise the BDI on incubator management policies,
screen applicant companies, and participate in annual
company reviews.

BAC members bring expertise from a variety of perspectives:

Industry
David Gury Gury Consulting, LLP
Frank Hunt bioStrategies, Inc.
Fred Hutchison Hutchison & Mason, PLLC
Max Wallace Arbor Group, LLC

Finance
Richard Molloy Florida Gulfshore Capital
Tony Natale, M.D. MDS Capital


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Stephen Snowdy MB Venture Partners
Michael Wasserman HIG Ventures

Academics
Dr. David Bloom Assistant Professor, Molecular Genetics &
Microbiology, UF
Dr. Ronald Evens Clinical Professor, UF
Dr. Eric Triplett Chair, Dept Microbiology & Cell Science, UF
Dr. David Zacharias, Whitney Labs, Department
of Neuroscience, UF

Read more about the BDI at www.biotech.ufl.edu.

UF, Other Florida Groups Await Results of Study on
Ways to Implement State's Cluster Development
Strategy

As part of the three-university coalition Florida High Tech
Corridor Council, UF has partnered with Enterprise Florida,
Inc. (EFI) and Workforce Florida, Inc. (WFI) to launch a
comprehensive study of the state's life sciences cluster.
Called "The Life Sciences Roadmap," the study is aimed at
developing a definitive strategic plan for the growth and
development of Florida's life sciences industry. Independent
economic think tank The Milken Institute began the study in
July, with results expected in 2006.

In October, the UF Sid Martin Biotechnology Institute hosted
a regional focus group facilitated by The Milken Institute.
Area life science stakeholders were given the opportunity to
provide critical input into the issues and success factors for
growing the industry. This input is playing a significant role in
shaping the recommendations of Florida's Life Sciences
Roadmap.

"With this comprehensive study and development of the Life
Sciences Roadmap plan, Florida further strengthens its
commitment to growing its emerging life sciences cluster,"
said EFI President and CEO Darrell Kelley.

One result of the study could be more technical training
programs like those offered by Gainesville's Santa Fe
Community College to prepare workers for careers in the
state's biotechnology companies. "By thoroughly analyzing
Florida's life sciences workforce needs, our partnership will
develop strategic training initiatives to prepare today's
workers for tomorrow's jobs in this innovative field," said WFI
President Curtis Austin.

"This study and subsequent plan will position Florida as a life
sciences business hub, providing a full spectrum of innovative
business and high-wage employment opportunities for
Floridians." said Council President Randy Berridge, echoing
the message he delivered this Fall to the Gainesville Area
Innovation Network (GAIN).

UF and its partners will assemble an advisory committee that
will include representation from life science industry


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organizations such as BioFlorida, the Florida Medical
Manufacturers Consortium and Scripps Florida, as well as
members of Florida's academic community.

For more information about the Florida High Tech Corridor
Council, please visit: www.floridahightech.com.

Find out more about Workforce Florida, Inc. at
www.EmployFlorida.com. The Enterprise Florida, Inc.
(EFI) is at www.eflorida.com.

UF Gene Therapies Available for Licensing Now on Web

Individuals and corporations looking for current information
on powerful gene therapies now have a friend on the web.
The University of Florida's Office of Technology Licensing
(OTL) has developed an innovative on-line marketing tool
featuring many of the gene therapies developed at the
university.

The University of Florida is recognized as a leader in gene
therapy research. This web page is dedicated solely to UF's
gene therapies available for licensing, saving companies time
and money, and helping move new technologies into the
marketplace faster. Treatments for cystic fibrosis,
phenylketonuria, Alzheimer's disease, and many others are
described on the website.

"This is one more tool to expedite the movement of life-
altering technologies from the laboratory to the
marketplace," said Jane Muir, OTL Associate Director, who
oversees the office's marketing efforts. The gene therapies
are in addition to hundreds of other life science, engineering,
agricultural, and pharmaceutical technologies available for
licensing already posted to the university's site.

Coupled with UF Tech Alert, a free service that generates an
email when new technologies in subscribers' area of interest
are posted to the UF website, the new Gene Therapies page
should give technology followers a leg up on the competition.
The site targets companies looking to expand product lines or
improve manufacturing processes, as well as entrepreneurs
looking for technologies that could be the basis for a startup
company.

A similar site devoted to stem cell therapies is in the works
as well. Visit the website for information on these and other
exciting new discoveries available for licensing:
www.rgp.ufl.edu/otl/genetherapies.html. To subscribe
to UF TechAlert, click on the link at OTL's website at
www.otl.ufl.edu.

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TRAINING


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BioFlorida's 8th Annual Conference Postponed until
February

BioFlorida, Florida's independent statewide bioscience
organization, will host this year's conference, entitled
"Building the Vision: From Cornerstone to Capstone,"
February 21-22, 2006 in Palm Beach. It was originally slated
for October but was rescheduled due to Hurricane Rita.

The University of Florida will be well represented at the
conference. Leadership from the Office of Technology
Licensing, Sid Martin Biotechnology Development Incubator,
Center of Excellence for Regenerative Health Biotechnology,
and Florida Sea Grant will attend and man a booth to share
information about the cutting edge research coming out of
UF.

The conference targets members of the biotechnology
industry, academics, students, and members of the press and
financial communities. In addition to nationally renowned
speakers, the conference will feature panel discussions on
subjects critical to building the bioscience industry, with
tracks on Bioscience, BioBusiness, and BioDeals. For more
information, visit BioFlorida online at www.bioflorida.com.


OTL Courting New Disclosures in the Health Sciences

Patent and licensing experts from the Office of Technology
Licensing will be at the Health Science Center throughout
December and January to answer researchers' questions, and
to schedule one-on-one conferences. OTL aims to establish
relationships with new inventors to help fortify the UF
biotechnology pipeline that includes a number of licensed
technologies and Florida-based start-up companies.

Anita Rao and Elizabeth Garami, subject matter experts in
the life sciences and Assistant Directors at OTL, are eager to
make new commercialization inroads into UF's health science
research. They will help inventors understand whether or not
a discovery is appropriate or ready for patenting, and will
help pave the way for new and more developed inventions to
be disclosed to the university.

UF's OTL Collaborates with Local Groups to Sponsor
Training

UF Start-ups Fine-Tune Investor Presentations

More than 30 area companies practiced developing and
delivering their investor presentations this fall, under the
expert tutelage of Silicon Valley executive coach Kim
Marinucci-Acker. In addition to the half-day workshop, six UF
companies were selected for one-on-one meetings with
Marinucci, for more personalized instruction.

The September event was the second time OTL and the UF
Economic Development Administration (EDA) University


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Center have brought Marinucci trip to Gainesville to work
with area start-ups and small businesses. She has worked
with numerous executives to improve how they position and
develop their company's message.

From helping the CEO prep for a quarterly earnings call to
coaching the sales executive on how to land the big account,
she has helped business leaders identify key aspects of the
situation and develop a winning presentation. Kim also works
with a national venture forum, coaching all of its applicant
companies prepare for presentations to large audiences of
venture capital firms.

Greenwoods' Semi-annual SBIR/STTR Workshop
Another Success

OTL and the UF EDA University Center also collaborated with
BioFlorida, the UF Commercialization Council, Gainesville
Technology Enterprise Center, Gainesville Council for
Economic Outreach, UF Sid Martin Biotechnology
Development Incubator, and the Gainesville Area Innovation
Network to bring national experts Jim and Gail Greenwood to
lead another workshop detailing how to successfully apply for
funds through the Small Business Innovation Research
(SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer Program
(STTR).

SBIR and STTR are federal programs that provide over $2
billion in grants and contracts each year to small and startup
companies to develop new or enhanced products and services
based on advanced technologies. About 40% of SBIR Phase I
awards made each year go to firms with no prior SBIR
experience.

The Greenwoods have brought their hands-on workshop to
UF several times in the past two years, giving participants
the opportunity to work on a Phase 1 proposal and receive a
free critique of their proposal. For more information about
future training opportunities of this nature, contact Terry
Lemesh, University of Florida EDA University Center
Coordinator, at tjlemesh@ufl.edu or at (352) 392-8929.

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START-UP SUCCESS

UF Start-ups Show Extraordinary SBIR Success

UF start-up companies have had extraordinary success with
their applications for funding through the federal
government's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)
and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant
programs.

According to Patti Breedlove, Manager of the UF Sid Martin


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Venture Newsletter


Biotechnology Development Incubator (BDI) in Alachua,
"Current BDI companies win 43% of all SBIR/STTR phase I
and II grants submitted."

The national average is a 10-12% success rate. David Day,
Director of the UF Office of Technology Licensing, attributes
UF's extraordinary success rate to the "skill and dedication of
the BDI staff, and to the frequent SBIR workshops brought to
Gainesville by the UF/Economic Development Administration
University Center," which provides support to UF's start-up
companies.


UF Start-up Banyan Biomarkers Involved in Developing
Muscular Dystrophy Treatment

CepTor Corp. has contracted Banyan Biomarkers, Inc. to
develop biomarker assays for evaluating a novel therapy for
treating muscular dystrophy.

Banyan has been working closely with CepTor, a
development-stage biopharmaceutical company, to establish
novel, muscle-specific biomarker assays to evaluate the
usefulness of a new therapy, Myodur, for treating Duchenne's
muscular dystrophy (DMD) in children. According to CepTor
management, Banyan's biomarker assays are a key element
in the company's preclinical and clinical programs.

Banyan's founders are members of the world-renowned
facilities at the University's Evelyn F. and William McKnight
Brain Institute at the University of Florida. More information
on the Company can be found at
http://www.banyanbio.com. This deal supports the firm's
goal of discovery, validation and commercialization of novel
diagnostic biomarkers that will substantially improve the
management and treatment of brain injury patients.

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Check here for upcoming events:


Calendar of Events


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