Group Title: Office of Educational Research bulletin.
Title: Office of Educational Research bulletin. October 2008.
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Title: Office of Educational Research bulletin. October 2008.
Uniform Title: Office of Educational Research bulletin.
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Creator: Office of Educational Research, University of Florida
Publisher: Office of Educational Research, University of Florida
Publication Date: October 2008
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Bibliographic ID: UF00088878
Volume ID: VID00026
Source Institution: University of Florida
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IF College of Education
SUNVERSITY of FLORIDA


Office of Educational Research
October 2008


Office of Educational Research Bulletin (ORB)


News & Notes

This month, we feature an opinion piece
written by Mary Ann Clark, Associate
Professor in Counselor Education and a
key player in bringing Peg Tyre to our
college for a special forum on the
growing gender gap in education (See
OER Happenings for details!) Here is
what she had to say about this emerging
problem:

There have been numerous articles in
the media on the growing gender gap in
educational achievement and
persistence resulting in significantly
more women than men entering and
graduating from college and earning
graduate degrees (see "Outnumbered
on Campus," Gainesville Sun, March
16).

There have also been counterarguments,
such as a recent American Association
of University Women (AAUW) study,
that claim there is no gender gap and
that boys are doing just fine in school.
Politically in today's world, it is difficult
to make a case for boys being offered
interventions, as the perception is that
any assistance given them may
shortchange girls and the numerous and
positive educational and career inroads
made by women over the past 30 years.


However, the national and international
data are there: More women than men
are earning more degrees and have
better grades at all levels of education.

Undergraduate enrollment in the United
States of women to men is currently
about 134:100 with many flagship
universities enrolling 60% or more
female students (UF's freshmen class in
2007 was 59% female). More women
than men are entering graduate schools,
accounting for the increase in graduate
enrollment. The gender gap with regard
to college enrollment and retention cuts
across racial and socioeconomic groups.

Local data in Alachua County mirror
the national and international data. Boys
at the elementary, middle and high
school levels have significantly more
discipline referrals, special education
placements, and attendance issues than
do the girls. These findings are true of
White, African American and Hispanic
students. Significantly more girls in all
groups are achieving at a higher level in
middle and high school as measured by
earning unweightedd) grade point
averages (GPAs) above 3.0, and
significantly more boys in all groups
earning GPAs below 2.0. Those that
have grades below a 1.0 are potentially
the ones who will drop out of high











school, and a large majority of that
group is male.
Although the numbers of students
identified as "gifted" in K-12 education
are relatively equal by gender, the girls
are more often the honors graduates
(check the Gainesville Sun each spring
for pictures of these students and count
the numbers of girls and boys). In our
Alachua County public schools, there
are significantly more girls enrolled in
the advanced high school programs.
Out of 2221 students in Advanced
Placement courses, 57% are females.
Likewise, the International
Baccalaureate Program consists of 59%
girls. The Cambridge Program has 63%
female enrollment as does the Santa Fe
Community College dual enrollment
program. In an era where college
admissions officers of selective
institutions are emphasizing the
importance of rigorous and challenging
high school preparation (read college
level work), many more girls than boys
are following such a path.

My graduate students and I have
engaged in research about this
important educational issue for the past
two years. In addition to analyzing
quantitative data, we have conducted
focus groups of middle and high school
students, and have interviewed
educators and parents about their
perspectives on school success skills,
achievement, and attitudes towards
learning.

Educators and parents voiced concern
as related to student gender about


themes of organization, motivation,
study skills and completing
assignments, learning styles, role
models and mentors, impulsivity and
discipline, maturity, and thinking about
the future. The majority of the
interviewees expressed that boys as a
group are less organized and appear to
spend less time on their assignments
and in studying, seem less motivated
and interested in school, and plan less
for the future than do girls as a group.
"Perceptions of masculinity" seemed to
be another major theme; adults and
students of both genders state that boys
are more likely to face criticism from
their peers for trying to do well, while
girls are expected to achieve at a high
standard and care about their
performance.

There is a concern about the lack of male
role models both at the school level and
outside of school. The number of male
educators is at a 40 year low and 85% of
single parent homes are headed by
women. Educators and parents
expressed that school culture is more
female oriented; group work and
expectations to comply and to sit still
are more closely aligned with girls than
with boys.

Several of these themes have
implications for educators, parents and
community members when considering
student gender. These points include
increasing the awareness level among
parents and educators regarding gender
issues and learning, the expansion of a
network of male role models, assisting


ORB -October 2008











male students in practical organization
and study skills, offering choices in
assignments and reading materials that
may take learning styles and energy
levels into account for both genders, and
making a concerted effort to encourage
male students to think more about
future educational and career planning.
Other strategies, such as using single
gender groups within classrooms as
appropriate may warrant trying and
evaluating.

Collaborating with business partners in
schools can assist in developing
programs that feature mentoring and
tutoring for all ages, as well as possible
job shadowing and apprenticeship
possibilities for older students. Setting
high academic expectations and
encouraging males to enroll in advanced
courses or programs in middle and high
school can set an achievement trajectory
earlier in their academic careers.
Increasing home and school
communication about future planning
may be essential to increase boys'
awareness and motivation for future
opportunities.

There are several vital programs in
Alachua County that seek to provide
mentors and role modeling for our
youth to foster pride, motivation,
appropriate behavior, and group
bonding for positive gains as students
and citizens. Perhaps building on such
programs to reach a wider network of
boys by utilizing community and school
partnerships could be a positive step in
extending such influences and


promoting cross generational bonding
that seems less prevalent than it has
been in the past.

It is in the best interest of all of us for
both genders to work to their potential
and be successful in school and in life in
general. Educational achievement and
persistence of our young people affect
all of us, our future generations and
family structures. The gender issue is
not about innate abilities. It is about
motivation, encouragement,
engagement, developing aspirations for
the future, and strengths building. Let's
meet that challenge as educators,
parents and community members for all
of our students.

Mary Ann Clark is an Associate Professor
and B.O. Smith Research Professor in the
Department of Counselor Education at the
University of Florida. She is the 2008
Graduate Faculty Teacher of the Year in the
College of Education.

OER Happenings

October 28 ~ COE Symposium:
The Trouble with Boys

Terrace Room ~ 4:30-6:00pm featuring
Peg Tyre, award-winning journalist and
author.

This special event is co-sponsored by
the UF Lastinger Center for Learning
and the OER. Read the full story at:
http://news.education.ufl.edu/author-
discuss-%E2%80%9C-trouble-
boys%E2%80%9D


ORB -October 2008











Seating is limited! RSVP to Rosie
Warner: rwarner@coe.ufl.edu by
Friday, October 17.




We are pleased to present a brown bag
panel discussion:

Subcontracting 101
Successfully funded Principal
Investigators with extensive knowledge
and experience securing and managing
subcontract grant work will share their
expertise. Brian Lane, OER Grants
Specialist will also share his knowledge
navigating subcontracting guidelines.

Panel members are Mary Brownell,
Special Education; Dave Miller,
Research Evaluation & Methodology;
Cathy Cavanaugh, School of Teaching
& Learning; and, Brian Lane, OER
Grants Specialist.

Tuesday, October 14 ~ 11:30am-1:00pm
Terrace Room

Please RSVP to Rosie Warner:
rwarner@coe.ufl.edu by Friday, October
10.

Bring your lunch, refreshments and
cookies will be provided.

We hope to see you there!

c-

October's Monday Morning Coffees will
be held from 10:00-11:30am in the


Faculty Commons (4004*) and Terrace
Room on:

October 13: Signing up for Grant Funding
Announcements

Ever wondered how to get signed up to
receive potential funding sources via
email from Community of Science,
Grants.gov; USDOE, FLDOE, or UF's
FYI? Join Ana Puig in the Faculty
Commons for this informal session. She
will walk you through the various
websites and get you signed up for
email announcements that suit your
research agenda.

Bring your laptops!

Please RSVP to Rosie Warner:
rwarner@coe.ufl.edu by Friday, October
10.

A continental breakfast will be served.

October 27: Topic TBA
Stay tuned!

September 2008 Submissions

Congratulations are in order for Troy
Sadler (STL), Richard Ferdig (STL),
Richard Snyder (Molecular Genetics
and Microbiology), and Mary Jo Koroly
(Center for Precollegiate Education and
Training) for their award from the
National Science Foundation; Theresa
Vernetson (Dean's Area) and Michael
Bowie (RRMA) for their award from the
State Community Colleges and to
Benjamin Lok (CISE) and Richard


ORB -October 2008











Ferdig (STL) for their award from the
National Science Foundation.

Best wishes to Randolph Duran
(Chemistry), Troy Sadler (STL),
Thomas Emmel (Florida Museum of
Natural History), and Michael Scott
(Chemistry) for their submission to the
National Science Foundation; Mary Jo
Koroly (Center for Precollegiate
Education and Training), Richard
Snyder (CERHB), and Rose Pringle
(STL) for their proposal to the National
Institutes of Health; Theresa Vernetson
(Dean's Area) and Michael Bowie
(RRMA) for their submission to the
State Community Colleges; Diane
Ryndak (SE) for her proposal to the US
Department of Education/OSEP; Ruth
Lowery (STL) for her submission to the
Gainesville Housing Authority; Nancy
Waldron (EP) and Diana Joyce (EP) for
their proposal to the US Department of
Education/OSEP; Mary Brownell (SE),


Paul Sindelar (SE) and Erica McCray
(SE) for their submission to the US
Department of Education/OSEP;
Danling Fu (STL), Linda Lamme (STL)
and Ruth Lowery (STL) for their
proposal to the US Department of
Education/IES; Pilar Mendoza (EAP),
Panagote (Panos) Pardalos (Industrial
and Systems Engineering) and Vladimir
Boginski for their submission to the US
Department of Education/IES; Ann
Daunic (SE), Stephen Smith (SE),
Nancy Corbett (SE), and Scott Miller
(Psychology) for their proposal to the
US Department of Education/IES and to
James McLeskey (SE) for his
submission to the Florida Department of
Education.

For more details about these awards, see
the table on the next page.

Ana & John


ORB -October 2008












College ofEducation Funded Projects September 2008

Principal Investigator: Troy Sadler (STL) Co-PI: Rick Ferdig (STL), Richard Snyder
(Molecular Genetics and Microbiology), Mary Jo Koroly (Center for Precollegiate Education
and Training
Funding Agency: National Science Foundation
Proposal Title: OUTBREAK: Opportunities to Use immersive Technologies to explore
Biotechnology Resources, career Education and Knowledge
Project Period: 09/01/2008-08/31/2011
Award Amount: $1,489,596.00

Principal Investigator: Theresa Vernetson (Dean's Area) Co-PI: Michael Bowie (RRMA)
Funding Agency: State Community Colleges
Proposal Title: College Reach-Out Program (CROP)
Project Period: 09/01/2008-08/31/2009
Award Amount: $66,566.00

Principal Investigator: Benjamin Lok (CISE) Co-PI: Richard Ferdig (STL)
Funding Agency: National Science Foundation
Proposal Title: HCC-Medium: Mixed Reality Virtual Humans for Training
Project Period: 09/01/2008-08/31/2012
Award Amount: $97,134.00


College of Education Submitted Projects September 2008

Principal Investigator: Randolph Duran (Chemistry) Co-PIs: Troy Sadler (STL),
Thomas Emmel (Florida Museum of Natural History), Michael Scott (Chemistry)
Funding Agency: National Science Foundation
Proposal Title: The LSAMP/REU Site for the Promotion of International Chemistry
Requested Amount: $509,581.00

Principal Investigator: Mary Jo Koroly (UF-CPET) Co-PIs: Richard Snyder (CERHB),
Rose Pringle (STL)
Funding Agency: National Institutes of Health
Proposal Title: Biomedical Explorations: Bench to Bedside
Award Amount: $11,521.00

Principal Investigator: Theresa Vernetson (Dean's Area)Co-PI: Michael Bowie (RRMA)
Funding Agency: State Community Colleges
Proposal Title: College Reach-Out Program (CROP)
Award Amount: $66,566.00

Principal Investigator: Diane Ryndak (SE) Co-PI: N/A
Funding Agency: US Department of Education/OSEP
Proposal Title: Project PRAIS-Preparing Researchers in Assistive Technology Application
in Inclusive General Education Contexts for Students with Significant Disabilities
Award Amount: $800,000.00


ORB -October 2008












College of Education Submitted Projects, con't. September 2008


Principal Investigator: Ruth Lowery (STL) Co-PI: N/A
Funding Agency: Gainesville Housing Authority
Proposal Title: Bright Futures Project
Award Amount: $43,549.00

Principal Investigator: Nancy Waldron (EP) Co-PI: Diana Joyce (EP)
Funding Agency: US Department of Education/OSEP
Proposal Title: Project TIER-Transforming Inquiry and Educational Practice Through
Response-to-Intervention: A Program to Prepare Leadership Personnel in School
Psychology
Award Amount: $800,000.00

Principal Investigator: Mary Brownell (SE) Co-PI: Paul Sindelar (SE),
Erica McCray (SE)
Funding Agency: US Department of Education/OSEP
Proposal Title: Research on Quality in Educating Special Education Teachers (ReQuEST)
Award Amount: 799,967.00

Principal Investigator: Danling Fu (STL) Co-PI: Linda Lamme (STL),
Ruth Lowery (STL)
Funding Agency: US Department of Education/IES
Proposal Title: The Development of a Literature-Based Literacy Intervention Program for
High-poverty Low-performing Elementary Schools (Project LBL
Award Amount: $1,327.322.00

Principal Investigator: Pilar Mendoza (EAP) Co-PIs: Panagote (Panos) Pardalos
(Industrial and Systems Engineering), Vladimir Boginski (UF Research & Engineering
Education Facility)
Funding Agency: US Department of Education/IES
Proposal Title: Mining the Nexus Between Finances & College Outcomes: A Multimethod
Approach
Requested Amount: $330,525.00

Principal Investigator: Ann Daunic (SE) Co-PIs: Stephen Smith (SE),
Nancy Corbett (SE), Scott Miller (Psychology)
Funding Agency: US Department of Education/IES
Proposal Title: Development of a Social-emotional Learning Curriculum for Children at
Risk for Emotional or Behavioral Disorders
Requested Amount: $1,494,225.00

Principal Investigator: James McLeskey (SE) Co-PIs: N/A
Funding Agency: Florida Department of Education
Proposal Title: State Personnel Development Grant (SPDG)
Requested Amount: $305,000.00


ORB -October 2008




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