Group Title: Office of Educational Research bulletin.
Title: Office of Educational Research bulletin. December 2007.
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Title: Office of Educational Research bulletin. December 2007.
Uniform Title: Office of Educational Research bulletin.
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Office of Educational Research, University of Florida
Publisher: Office of Educational Research, University of Florida
Publication Date: December 2007
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Bibliographic ID: UF00088878
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
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IJ College of Education
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Office of Educational Research
December 2006


Office of Educational Research Bulletin (ORB)

News & Notes


Two articles in the November 15 issue of
Education Week may have caught your eye.
The first, "Schools' Role in Achievement
Gaps Scrutinized," included discussion of a
paper by Eric Hanushek and Stephen
Rivkin ("School Quality and the Black-
White Achievement Gap," available from
http://www.nber.org/papers/wl2651),
which seemed particularly timely for COE
faculty who attended the Centennial
Conference-whose theme, you may recall,
was "Closing the Achievement Gap
Through Partnerships."

Although Centennial Conference presenters
tended to focus on their work in classrooms
and schools, Hanushek and Rivkin
identified between school factors that
contribute more generally to achievement
differences. As a sobering reminder of the
scale of the problem, this paper is deserving
of a careful read.

In their analysis of Texas Schools Project
and Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey
achievement data, Hanushek and Rivkin
focused specifically on achievement
differences between African-American and
White students. They describe the reality
that those of you working in high poverty
schools face daily: that African-American
children enter school lagging academically
and that the achievement gap between them
and their White classmates widens with
years in school. Hanushek and Rivkin
found three between school variables -rate
of student turnover, proportion of teachers


with little or no experience, and student
racial composition--that accounted for
much of the achievement differences
between the two groups. Thus, higher
mobility among African American students,
higher proportions of inexperienced
teachers at the schools they attend, and
racial segregation at the schools they attend
were found to contribute significantly to
achievement differences between African
Americans and Whites. It's hard to see
much of anything heartening in these
findings, except that they support the
assertion that "differences in school quality
play a fundamental role in the growth of
achievement differences with age"
(Hanushek & Rivkin, 2006, p. 28).. .and that
at least some of these variables seem
amenable to policy solutions.

That African American students are
disadvantaged academically by virtue of
attending segregated schools has long been
recognized as a failing of U. S. public
education. Recognition of the impact of
segregation dates to 1966 and the Coleman
Report, and before that to Brown v Board of
Education. Yet societal efforts to address
achievement differences by de-segregating
schools have been gutted by the courts and
largely abandoned as failures. On the other
hand, Hanushek and Rivkin's findings
regarding teacher experience offer
substantially more promise to
contemporary policy makers. After all, who
among us has not witnessed the reality that







students who need good teachers most are
least likely to have them?

In the same EW issue, a second article,
"Teacher-Incentive Plans Geared to Bonuses
for Individuals," offers hope for high needs
schools struggling to attract capable and
experienced teachers. In this article, a
relatively new federal program -the
"Teacher Incentive Fund" -is described,
along with the strategies that TIF grant
recipients are using to recruit competent
and experienced professionals to their
schools. Prominent among these strategies
are bonuses.

The longstanding concern about bonuses
for teaching in high needs schools is that
schools can't offer enough. Indeed, it was
Erik Hanushek and his colleagues
(Hanushek, Kain, & Rivkin, 2004,
http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?
pubid=2004325) who estimated that, for
relatively inexperienced White teachers,
salary premiums of 43% (females) and 9%
(males) would be required to equalize
turnover at high poverty and suburban
schools. Those are stunning numbers. To
date, the size of the bonuses we've heard
and read about have fallen far short of that
standard. However, according to EW,
Guilford County Schools (NC) has come
close. With funds from a TIF grant, that
district is offering some teachers $10,000
bonuses for moving to high needs schools
and has put an additional $4,000 on the
table for achievement premiums. You go,
GCS!


October Awards and Submissions

Congratulations are in order to Linda
Hagedorn for her award: Dual Pathways:
Support and Training of Achieving the Dream
from the Lumina Foundation for Education,
Inc. and to Fran Vandiver for her award:
Title 1 Part A -Education of Disadvantaged
Children and Youth from the FL Department
of Ed. Best wishes go to Mary Brownell and
Anne Bishop for their submission to the US
Department of Ed; to Allison Dempsey and
Nancy Waldron for their proposal to the US
Department of Justice; to Linda Hagedorn
for her proposal to the US Department of
Ed; to Holly Lane for her submission to the
University of Virginia; to James McLeskey
for his submission to the FL Department of
Ed; to Stephen Pape for his submission to
the University of North Carolina; to Rose
Pringle and Tom Dana for their proposal to
the National Institute of Health; to Fran
Vandiver for her submission to the FL
Department of Ed; and to Craig Wood for
his submission to the American Education
Finance Association. For more details about
these awards and submissions, see the
tables on the next page.

Ana & Paul


90aR onH( reotingS


ORB December 2006








College of Education Funded Projects November 2006
Principal Investigator: L.S. Hagedorn
Funding Agency: Lumina Foundation for Education, Inc.
Proposal Title: Dual Pathways: Support and Training of Achieving the Dream
Project Period: 10/1/06 9/30/09
Total Award Amount: $1,602,000

Principal Investigator: F.M. Vandiver
Funding Agency: Florida Department of Education
Proposal Title: Title 1 Part A Education of Disadvantaged Children and Youth, 2006-07
Project Period: 7/1/06 8/31/07
Total Award Amount: $102,364

College of Education Submitted Proposals November 2006
Principal Investigator: M.T. Brownell Co-PI: A.M. Bishop
Funding Agency: US Department of Education/IES
Proposal Title: The Influence of Collaborative Professional Development Groups and
Coaching on the Literacy Instruction of Upper Elementary Special Education Teachers
Requested Amount: $2,049,920

Principal Investigator: A.G. Dempsey Co-PI: N.L. Waldron
Funding Agency: US Department of Justice
Proposal Title: Bullying Prevention: Increasing the Integrity of Program Implementation
by Teachers
Requested Amount: $19,993

Principal Investigator: L.S. Hagedorn
Funding Agency: US Department of Education/IES
Proposal Title: Assessing Outcomes of Florida GEAR UP
Requested Amount: $533,137

Principal Investigator: H.B. Lane
Funding Agency: University of Virginia
Proposal Title: Project MVP: Measuring Vocabulary Progress
Requested Amount: $401,895

Principal Investigator: J.L. McLeskey
Funding Agency: Florida Department of Education
Proposal Title: State Personnel Development Grant (SPDG)
Requested Amount: $175,000

Principal Investigator: S.J. Pape
Funding Agency: University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Proposal Title: Examining the Impact of Self-Regulated Learning and Mathematics
Instruction on Middle School Students' Self Efficacy, Self-Regulation and Mathematics
Achievement
Requested Amount: $1,002,478


ORB December 2006









College ofEducation Submitted Proposals November 2006 cont....
Principal Investigator: R.M. Pringle Co-PI: T.M. Dana
Funding Agency: National Institute of Health
Proposal Title: Biomedical Explorations: Bench to Bedside
Requested Amount: $64,185

Principal Investigator: F.M. Vandiver
Funding Agency: Florida Department of Education
Proposal Title: Innovation Fair Matchmaker
Requested Amount: $40,000

Principal Investigator: R.C. Wood
Funding Agency: American Education Finance Association
Proposal Title: Executive Director, American Education Finance Association
Requested Amount: $27,500


ORB December 2006




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