• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 In the temple
 On the road
 The waterfall
 Found
 The tiger hunt
 With Marnica
 On the mountain
 New plans
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: What came of a tiger hunt
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088867/00001
 Material Information
Title: What came of a tiger hunt
Physical Description: 80, 16 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Oxley, E. L
Knight ( Printer )
Religious Tract Society (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
Publisher: Religious Tract Society
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Knight
Publication Date: [1896]
 Subjects
Subject: Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction -- India   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conversion to Christianity -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Tigers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Worship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Religious life and customs -- Juvenile fiction -- India   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1896   ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre: Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by E.L. Oxley.
General Note: Undated. Date from BLC.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00088867
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002235255
notis - ALH5698
oclc - 63096192

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
    In the temple
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    On the road
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    The waterfall
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Found
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    The tiger hunt
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    With Marnica
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    On the mountain
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    New plans
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    Advertising
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text









WHAT CAME OF

A TIGER HUNT


BY
E. L. OXLEY.


THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY:
56 PATERNOSTER ROW, AND 65 ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD.




















CO TENTS.




CHAP. PAGE
I. .I-N-rie TEMPLE 5

II. ON THE ROAD 14

III. THE WATERFALL 28

Iv. FOUND 37

v. THE TIGER HUNT 49

VI. WITH MARNICA 56

VII. ON THE MOUNTAIN 6

viii. NEW PLANS 71














WHAT CAME OF A TIGER HUNT,



CHAPTER I.
In the Temple.
i -,1.Q'jnoo for the temple elephants!"
The cry was loud and clear,
and the crowd swayed hither
^ and thither in great haste to
) give the room desired. Not
.' much time to get out of the
way either. The elephants
rI' lled through the entrance gates
.iiiL their return from drawing the
( sacred water required to wash the
gods in the temple beyond.
What great powerful animals they were, as they
came along at a steady, ponderous trot, each carrying
a huge bucket of water; while the mahout sat on his
neck to guide him, if need be.
Amongst the crowd was one little trembling girl,







6 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
who, clinging tightly to her father's hand, was pulled
by him up the steps at the left side of the hall, into
a little shop on a small raised platform, where an old
man was seated, selling carved brass work to the
passers by.
As soon as the elephants had passed, and all fear
of being trampled on was over, father and child came
down from the little shop, and joined the crowd of
worshippers who were thronging the corridors and
immense halls of the temple, all with one purpose;
to offer sacrifice and gifts to the rows and rows of
gods who sat on either hand in vast numbers.
Chittery, for that was the man's name, clasped his
little daughter Soondrum's hand firmly in his own,
and passed quickly through the number of halls, each
with its crowd of worshippers, until he came to the
shrine he particularly wished to visit. It was almost
deserted. A lamp burnt dimly before a small image,
black and unsightly; a very terrible god it was, and
poor little Soondrum was horribly frightened.
Worship, Soondrum," said her father hurriedly,
"prostrate, and worship;" but the poor child was too
frightened to obey, she stood trembling and sobbing
before the dreadful image.
"Soondrum," repeated her father, "kneel down.
Not that way, child, lower, and lay your forehead on
the ground; yes, that is right, stay in that position
till I call you."
So, poor little child, she stayed with her head































































GOING TO THE TEMPLE.







8 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
resting on the stone floor, while Chittery opened a
bundle he had brought with him, and taking out a
bottle of oil, proceeded to pour its contents on the
head of the god. This done, he walked seven times
round the shrine, prostrated himself by the side of his
little daughter, and then slowly rising, took the child's
hand once more in his, and helping her to rise too,
took her with him away from the shrine into the
more frequented part of the temple.
Chittery was almost a stranger to this great temple.
His home, till quite lately, had been in the country,
far from the great city where he now lived. In his
old home amongst the rice fields, he had had few
companions save his wife, his two children, and his
goats. How happy he had been in his solitary life,
with few cares and anxieties !
Then all had, been changed. Rain had failed;
season after season his crops had been bad, till at
last he had been obliged to sell his land, and leaving
his old home, come to the city in search of work.
Work was hard to find, and many leisure hours
Chittery spent in the temple, watching the various
interesting sights of that wonderful place.
For this temple was one of the largest temples of
South India, very famous and renowned, and, in the
opinion of the poor deluded Hindoos, most sacred,
most holy. There was the golden lily tank, in which
it was possible for Brahmins to wash away all their
sins! Not, alas! for all comers. That precious























































DELHI.


r -- -- ------- -==- ---~I







10 What Came of a figer Hunt.
water might not be used by any but Brahmins;
others would defile it, all others must stand aside
while the Brahmins pressed into the holy place, and
bathed in the sacred waters i
How thankful we should be, that we know of a
Fountain opened for all who come to it, that "Jesus
has given the water of life freely," and how very
thankful we should. be that thousands of these
Hindoos have come to that Fountain too; and we
know that not one who has come to it has been told
to stand aside, but has been welcomed, and washed,
and purified, and "made meet for the inheritance of
the saints in light."
To-day, for the first time, Chittery ha taken his
little girl with him. He wishes her too to worship
his god, for he wants a special answer to a special
request he has to make. And his request is that the
god whom he worships will look .favourably on the
plans he has in his mind for the support of himself
and family, will not be angry with him; for he, in
common with all Hindoos, looked upon the gods as
enemies to be appeased-terrible cruel tyrants, not at
all like the Lord Jehovah, who is loving unto every
man, and whose mercy is over all His works."
So Chittery, to please the god, had brought the
oil to pour on its head, while his child lay humbly
on the floor; and, having duly performed the cere-
mony, strolled with Soondrum to watch the many
interesting sights of the temple, which was not only







In the Temple. 11

a place of worship, but also a place of merchandise.
Shops of all kinds lined the corridors on either hand;
Money-changers sat at their low tables with small


HINDOO GOALS.

piles of copper and silver coins neatly arranged in
rows before them; fruit-sellers cried their goods in







12 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
loud tones, finding a ready sale for the temptingly
cool looking oranges and plantains, which they had
placed in baskets on their heads.
Soondrum was heartily glad to have got away from
the shrine where she had worshipped, and enjoyed
sitting by her father's side, quietly looking at the
many strange sights, for her father soon found a
vacant place where he and his little girl could sit
down, and rest without being in any one's way.
Soondrum turned her back resolutely on the gods;
she hated to see them, and indeed they were not a
sight for a little girl to see, they were so hideous, so
relentlessly cruel. Near the golden lily tank, which
was not far from where the two were seated, were to
be seen strange birds of various kinds,-parrots,
cockatoos, and minars, and Soondrum soon forgot her.,
fright in watching them, and listening to their s thrill
cries.
She had plenty of time to watch them to her
heart's content, for Chittery was far too busy with
his own thoughts to take much notice of his little girl.
His thoughts were sad ones. Nearly all the money
he had got in exchange for his land was spent, and
soon he would have no means of feeding his family.
Work was very difficult to find in the city, and he
had heard that away up on the distant hills, which
he could just see from the temple roof, work was to
be had on the coffee plantations. Should he take his
family, and leaving the city, try to find his way to a







In the Temple. 18

new home amongst new people? The idea was a
very unpleasant one, but starvation was still worse,
and if the gods were favourable, he might hope
safely to arrive in due time at the plantations and
obtain work for both his wife and himself.
After thinking deeply for a long time he roused
himself, and getting up once more, took Soondrum's
hand in his, and started for home. No fear now of
the elephants, they were chained securely in their
own court in the temple, as Soondrum saw when
she peeped in on her way home.
Chittery had decided to go home and tell his wife
of what he had been thinking, and see if she were
willing to risk leaving the city, and going to look for
a new home once more.







14 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.


CHAPTER II.
On tht URoad.
UNI, the wife of Chittery, was meantime doing
her best to make his little home comfortable
for him on his return. It was a tiny little
home made almost entirely of mud. Mud walls,
mud floor, a raised mud bench at one side. The
walls were only on three sides of the house, or rather
hut, on the fourth side a screen of twisted palm-
leaves was the only protection from wind and sun.
There was no furniture in the place, only a few
mats which served the family for beds and seats, and
a few red earthen pots for cooking the curry and
rice, the daily food of Hindoos of all classes.
It was with a heavy heart that Puni was now
preparing for her husband's return. She knew only
too well how very little money was left to them, and
some tears fell silently into the water as she washed
the rice for the mid-day meal. As she heard
Chittery enter the little house, she raised herself
from her work and tried her best to meet him
cheerfully. Soondrum ran to her mother, and began







On the Road.


at once to help her in her work, for though only
seven years old, she was a helpful child, and very
useful to her mother.
"Well, Puni," said Chittery, "I think it is no
use staying here any longer; work is scarce, and
our money will soon be finished. What do you say
to taking the children and going at once to the hills ?
I hear that we can get work there, as coolies are
always wanted for the coffee. We have a little
money left; with care it will last us if we start at
once. What do you say to the plan ? "
"It is a good one," replied Puni; "let us spend
the rest of the money in buying ragi for the journey,
and go without delay."
So before many days had passed the family had
made their preparations for leaving the city. They
were not troubled with much luggage, for the dress
of poor Hindoos is of the very simplest, consisting
of only one long piece of cloth wound gracefully
round the body. Chittery wore a turban on his head,
while Puni's head was bare.
They had no change of clothes to carry with them,
for they followed the custom of the country in wash-
ing the cloth they wore daily, when they bathed,
leaving the wet dripping cloth to dry as it could,
without taking it off for the purpose.
The morning on which they were to start for the
hills arrived. The mats were rolled up and placed
on Chittery's back, together with two cooking pots.







16 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
Puni carried the little boy, Chinna, and the bag
containing ragi (a small seed used instead of rice
by the very poor in India), while Soondrum ran by
the side of either her father or mother, as she felt
inclined.
And so the little family set out in search of a new
home, where they would be able to live in tolerable
comfort without the fear of starvation, which for
many months past they had had continually before
their eyes. On they walked, hour after hour, till
poor little Soondrum felt very tired and weary,. and
dragged heavily at her mother's cloth; but still they
pressed on, for soon the sun would be shining im-
mediately over their heads, and then they must rest
and try to find shelter for a few hours till the air
became cooler.
What was Soondrum's joy after thus walking for
what seemed to her an immense while, to see rising
before them close to the roadside some lovely green
palm trees, for her father had told her that they
would rest under the first palm trees they came to.
"See there, father," she exclaimed, running to
him, "see the lovely trees, there will be shelter for
us all."
"So there will, and we shall soon be there, and
then my little girl will rest. It is a long way for
you, Soondrum; but I cannot carry you, for I have
the pots and the mats."
"Yes, father, I know," replied the child cheer-














































A WAYSIDE RESTIG-PLACE.
..... ..... .... ....... M .l...







18 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
fully, "but we shall soon be at the tope" (clump of
trees).
And so they were; very soon they came to the
place, where, a little distance from the hot, dusty
road, rose the beautiful trunks of the date-palms,
the most picturesque of all palms. Here, by the
side of a little pool of water, the weary travellers
rested, lying down at full length in the welcome
shade, and soon they were all fast asleep; for
Hindoos find it very easy to go to sleep at short
notice, and the little family were very very tired.
It was not long, however, before Puni roused
herself, for she wished to prepare the mid-day meal
for her family-so, collecting a few sticks from
under the trees, she lighted a little fire, drew water
from a pool near at hand, and boiled a small portion
of the ragi, which they had brought with them.
By the time it was sufficiently cooked the rest of
the family were awake, so they gathered round
Puni, who divided the food amongst them.
When the meal was ended they all proceeded to
bathe in the little pool, walking into the water, as I
before mentioned the custom is, in their clothes.
Greatly refreshed by the rest, food, and cold bath,
they again started on their journey as soon as the
sun's rays had declined a little, for they had far to
go, and wished to reach a chuttram (or travellers'
rest-house) before dark.
Few people willingly walk upon the roads after








On the Road.


dark in India, even in large towns, for fear of
snakes; while in country places, the dread of tigers
or cheetahs prevents people from going outside their
dwellings.
There was very little to interest the travellers along
that dusty road; the country was flat and barren, but
once they saw what caused them great pleasure.
"Look, Soondrum," said her father, "do you see
that building?"
"I see it, father; and look at all the beautiful
stone horses, what a great many there are! All
round the building, rows and rows of horses.'-
"Yes, Soondrum, there are a great many, but not
too many, for the goddess who is worshipped at that
temple is very fond of riding, and she must have
all the horses she wants."
"What goddess is she ?" asked Puni, with great
interest.
"The goddess of small-pox. A terrible disease,
and one the people hereabout suffer from greatly.
Then when they are ill, their friends bring the
goddess a stone or wooden horse, and put it in the
temple-yard for her to ride, and sometimes the sick
man gets well, but not always. She is a terrible
goddess, and it is a terrible disease."
Soondrum clung closer to her father's side, and
shuddered as she passed the building. Was it not a
dreadful religion to teach a gentle little timid child ?
Poor little Soondrum!








20 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
Before it was quite dark the travellers reached a
chuttram, and entered the building. Chuttrams are
often built by religious Hindoos as a work of charity,
and they are a great comfort to travellers, who there
obtain shelter for the night, and the means of cooking
their food. They are generally buildings containing
only one large room, with a spacious verandah on
all sides.
Our travellers were not the first who that evening
had sought the shelter of the chutttram. They found
on their arrival that the room was pretty well filled
without them; however, they took possession of one
corner of the place, and, spreading one of their mats
upon the floor, seated themselves upon it. The other
occupants of the chuttram were poor like themselves,
being mostly religious beggars and others who ob-
tained their living by wandering from village to
village. Among these, a man with a tame bear
specially attracted Soondrum's notice.
After another meal of ragi had been disposed of
the children were laid down to sleep, while Chittery
and Puni occupied themselves in watching their
fellow-travellers. Seated before them, on the oppo-
site side of the chuttram, was a strange figure. A
tall, bony-looking man, dressed from head to foot in
clothes of a deep, dirty orange colour. His hair was
long and matted, and hung in coarse locks upon his
shoulders.
His face was worn, and his cheeks were sunken,


























1


BY THE WAYSIDE.


41~1 ~
c
__~-T~-~S
="-







22 What Came of a Tiger Huznt.
and, as he sat in the dim light, he busily counted the
beads of his rosary. Not that he was a Roman
Catholic, as the rosary would seem to indicate, but a
Muhammadan; for they, too, use the rosary. His
yellow dress showed that he was a fakeer, or pilgrim,
one who had travelled to many holy cities : Mecca,
the most holy place of the Muhammadans, included.
He was evidently poor, and had probably per-
formed a great part of the long journey on foot. He
was weak, too, and Puni looked upon him with pity,
but there was nothing she could do for him. Near
him was a family of very poor Hindoos, from a
distant part of the country, whose dress and appear-
ance were strange to Puni.
No one in the chuttram took any notice of our
travellers, and soon, overcome with fatigue, they
stretched themselves on the mat beside the children,
and fell asleep.
The next day, and for several days, they journeyed
on, resting always for some hours during the heat of
the day, by the roadside, and travelling on again
during the cool afternoon, until at length, far away
in the distance, they saw the hills to which they
were travelling.
This was indeed a welcome sight, and they hastened
their steps to reach, if possible, the foot of the hills
the same day. As they drew nearer to the moun-
tains the scenery changed. No longer flat and
monotonous, small hills rose on all sides, their slopes







On the Road.


clothed with small bushes and loose stones, while
down some of them little streams were trickling,
looking like threads of silver in the sunlight.
Before very long, and just as the last rays of the
sun gilded the mountain tops, Chittery, with his
family, reached the entrance to the ghat, or moun-
tain path, by which alone it was possible to climb the
lofty hills.
"Shall we go on further to-night, father?" asked
little Soondrum, anxiously.
"No, child; would you have us all eaten up by
the tigers ?" responded Chittery. "We will rest
here to-night, and go on to-morrow. But we must
make a big fire to keep. off wild animals."
"Will they come near, do you think ?" asked the
child.
I hope not; but who can tell? Be quick, and
help to gather wood."
So Soondrum and her parents, tired as they were,
busied themselves in picking up firewood, of which
there was an ample supply scattered near the place, and
before long they had collected a large heap. Making
a good fire, they seated themselves close to it, while
Puni cooked the supper.
Are there many wild beasts about here, father?"
asked Soondrum, as she seated herself close to him,
and looked fearfully round, as if she expected to see
a tiger close behind her.
"I have heard tell," said Chittery, "that many







24 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
tigers come here; man-eaters they are called, because
they are so old that they cannot catch other wild
beasts, and so come to the roadsides to wait for men
and women; and then, if people have no fire, why,
they are easily caught. But we have got a fire,
Soondrum, so you see there is no fear."
"Tell me more about them, father," said the
child.
"No, not to-night," said her mother, quickly;
"ask him to tell you when we get away from here.
I don't like to talk of tigers in such a place as this.
Besides, you must go to sleep. You have the hill to
climb to-morrow, and that will be hard work; so go
to sleep, child, and talk no more."
Early morning found them ready to begin the steep
ascent which lay before them.
How lovely the path was up which they toiled !
It was no easy task for those accustomed to the
plains to climb that steep mountain path. Chittery,
with the pots and mats tied on to his back, plodded
wearily on, sometimes giving his hand to pull the
little girl along, sometimes taking the baby in his
arms to relieve the weary mother. Often they would
pause to rest and admire the beautiful scenery
through which they were passing.
The path wound ever upwards, crossing, some-
times, a mountain stream, in whose bed the lovely
tree ferns grew, then winding along a steep ledge of
rock, over whose side the travellers peeped in awe



















A,>. 1'





~~----------































L 71





TRAVELLING IN THE MOUNTAINOUS PARTS OF INDIA.







26 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
and fear; far down beneath them, many many feet
below, roared the waters of some angry torrent, as it
pursued its way over the large boulders which com-
posed its bed.
Often the steep precipices, along whose sides the
path lay, struck fear into the minds of the wayfarers,
for the road was narrow, and to fall meant death;
but, carefully climbing, they passed on, and arrived
safely at length at their journey's end.
No comfortable home awaited them, no friends
expected them; the poor travellers had nowhere to
go, so they spread a mat once more under a tree, and
lighting a fire, prepared their simple meal.
"Now, Puni," said Chittery, you must stay here
with the children, and I will go and look for work.
I see a village not far off, perhaps there I may hear
of some one wanting a coolie."
"Rest a little first," replied his wife; "you are
tired; there will be plenty of time."
I will go now, I think; I must find a place, if
possible, for you to go to ; the nights are cold here,
so we must find shelter."
So Puni and her children were left alone, sitting
by the roadside. Many people passed them, but no
one took any notice of them.
Chittery was not long absent. In a very short
time he returned, and told them the welcome news
that he had already found work.
"When I left you, I went at once to the village,"







On the Road.


he said to his wife, and I stood looking about me.
A man came up and asked me if I wanted work ? I
said, 'Yes, I want work, master, for myself and wife,
but we are strangers here.'
"' So I see,' said the man; 'well, if you like to
come with me, I will give you plenty to do. I am
the overseer of this coffee plantation, and I am
looking for more coolies, as we are busy. You must
live on the plantation, though, if you come.'
"'I will live anywhere you please,' I replied.
'That is right. Then come as soon as you can,'
answered the overseer, and I will show you the hut
where you must live.'
'I will fetch my wife and children, and come at
once,' I answered. So I have come to take you to
the plantation."
"How fortunate that you went to the village,
Chittery; but how very cold it is," said his wife, "I
see all the people here have cumlies (country blankets),
and we have none."
"I have thought of that," answered Chittery,
"and I think if we tell the overseer, he will perhaps
give us an advance of our pay, and we can buy cum-
lies. However, we shall see, so come along."







28 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.


CHAPTER III.
The Waterfall,
B HITTERY and his family soon reached the hut
pointed out to them by the overseer as the
one in which they were to live. How glad
they were to find themselves once more in a little
house of their own, with no more necessity to wander
in search of employment. The overseer also gave
them a little money to buy cumlies, saying, that they
must work hard to repay him with the first wages
they earned. This they gladly promised to do, and
were grateful to him for his kindness.
And now see them settled in their new home.
A poor little round hut, the walls made of split
bamboo and daubed lightly with clay, and the roof
thatched with grass. The eaves extended nearly
two feet and a half from the inner wall, which was
enclosed by a similar walling, and the space between
the two walls was divided into two or three apart-
ments for the use of the calves and poultry when the
family should be rich enough to keep them.
At the level of the inner wall there was a loft







The Waterfall. 29

which was to be used for a store-room. There were
no windows in the hut, and only one small door
which had neither bolt nor look, but was secured by
a piece of string.
Chittery spread the mat they had brought with
them upon the floor, placed the earthen vessels in
one corner, and the furniture of the hut was
considered complete.
Here for many months, the little family lived in
peace and happiness. Every morning at early dawn,
Chittery and Puni, wrapped up in their warm cumlies,
went to work in the coffee plantation, leaving little
Soondrum to take charge of her brother. Although
she was such a little girl, she was very useful, and
cooked the mid-day meal for her father and mother
with great care. As soon as it was ready, she tied it
up ih a cloth and set out with the little boy, who
could walk by this time, to take it to her parents.
They always started early, not that they had far
to go, but because little Chinna, the baby, could only
walk a few steps at a time, and Soondrum could not
carry him without resting very often. So as soon as
the food was cooked, the two children set out to join
their parents, sitting down every few minutes to rest,
and to pick the lovely flowers which grew in great
abundance on the roadside.
How happy the two little ones were as they played
in the beautiful sunshine, trying to catch the lovely
butterflies which flew past them, meanwhile, clapping







30 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
their hands with delight at the sight of their gorgeous
blue and crimson wings; or paddling with their little
brown feet in the stream which they had to cross to
reach their parents in the plantation. What a pretty
little stream it was, and how cool its waters looked
as it bubbled and gurgled round the little stones at
its margin !
"I'll tell you what we will do, Chinna," said
Soondrum one day, when, as usual, they reached the
stream on their way with their parents' dinner, we
will come back here as soon as we can, and then we
will climb down the bank of the stream, down, down
ever so far, and see where the water goes to."
So as soon as they had given the dinner to Puni
they hurried back to the stream, and began to
scramble down its steep, rough course.
What fun it was! Only, perhaps, little Chinna
did not find it quite so amusing as his sister did.
The great grey boulders looked very big and dan-
gerous to the little boy, and sometimes, when he
clung to them, they would shake in a very uncom-
fortable way, and he would call vigorously to his sister
to help him, fearing to fall into the stream which
dashed and rippled round the pieces of fallen rock.
But on the whole he managed very well, clinging
to the rocks and picking his way carefully, sometimes
sitting down and slipping along the steep surface of
the rocks, and again wading through some shallow
place with his little bare feet.







The Waterfcal. 31

So on they went, scrambling lower and lower down
the stream, never noticing, in their eagerness to find
out where the water went to, that the brook, which
at first had been a little stream rippling over small
stones, had become much wider; that instead of little
stones immense pieces of rock reared themselves out
of the water, which now rushed past with furious
speed. Only at the side of the river were smaller
stones over which the children scrambled, calling out
joyously to each other on their way.
Soondrum did not know that they had followed
the water to the place where it joined a large stream
which rushed on and on till it reached the plains far
below, and that yet more streams would join it in its
downward course, until, a large and mighty river, it
would discharge its waters into a distant ocean.
Soondrum, I am tired," said little Chinna wearily.
"Oh well, we'll go back, I think," answered
Soondrum cheerfully.
"I'm too tired to go back."
"But you must. Come now, be quick !"
"Oh, Soondrum, I am so tired," and the poor
little boy, who was almost worn out, began to cry.
"Hush, now," said Soondrum kindly; "let us go
home, and then you can go to sleep and be all
right."
So little Chinna turned wearily back, and began
to mount the steep incline, down which he had
come. But climbing down the bed of a torrent and








32 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
climbing back again are very different things. And
so the children found them to be.
They had only scrambled a very little way, when
poor Chinna once more sat down, and declared he
could go no further.
"You must," repeated Soondrum, who herself
was nearly tired out, "just think of the tigers and
the cheetahs and the monkeys, why they will eat us
if we stay here all night; come, do try, Chinna."
But Chinna was really very tired, and for a long
time refused to move, for at three years old he did
not know much about tigers, while he did know that
his little limbs ached, and that his feet were cut and
bleeding.
Come now, you have rested a long time, and it is
not so steep as it was; see, we will follow the water
this side, it is not nearly so steep. Chinna, follow
me, I am going."
So the poor little fellow got once more on to his
weary aching feet, and scrambled on after his sister.
She, poor child, was beginning to feel puzzled.
The road was no longer steep and difficult, but only
slightly inclined, and that downwards! In front she
heard a strange noise. It grew louder with each
footstep. Like the brave little girl she was, she
told Chinna to wait for her while she crept onwards
a few yards further. A great rock was in front, she
wanted to peep round it alone. So very carefully
she climbed on to the rock and peeped over it.







The, Waterfall. 33

What did she see? Down, down below her leapt
the water in one grand leap, and far down below she
saw the stream once more, a little silver thread
amongst the trees in the distant jungle. In terror
she turned from the dreadful sight, and returned
to her brother.
She sat down beside him in despair; slowly the
truth occurred to her that she had taken a wrong
turn, and was lost. No path on either hand was to
be seen, only banks high and rocky covered with
dense jungle, and between the banks the rushing
noisy river hurrying on towards the fearful precipice.
Come, it is getting dark, we must go home," said
her little brother.
Home! how she longed to go there, how bitterly
she repented ever having come away from it! and
now the darkness was coming on, it would soon be
quite dark. There is little twilight in India.
Thoughts crowded into the little girl's mind of all
she had heard of wild beasts and dreadful fairies who
live in mountain streams; but she remembered too,
how her father had told her that often there are
good fairies who take care of people who are lost,
and help them to shelter themselves in trees or caves,
where no harm can come to them.
There were plenty of trees growing on the banks
close at hand, but Soondrum was sure that little
three year old Chinna could never get up into one
of them, however much she might push or lift him.








34 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
"We must look for a nice dry hole in the rocks,
and stay there till morning," said Soondrum, trying
to speak cheerfully in order that she might not
frighten her little brother, though the tears came
into her eyes and her voice trembled pitifully.
"But I want my supper, Soondrum."
"Oh! never mind supper to-night, we will get a
good breakfast to-morrow, and you will go to sleep
in a nice dry hole, and sleep all night; you are
very tired, are you not?"
"Where is the hole?"
"Where, indeed ? echoed poor little Soondrum.
Suddenly, Soondrum remembered that she had
seen a hole only a very short time before; where
could it have been?
She soon remembered, with a shudder. It was by
the side of the very rock which overhung the
precipice. Should they go there, she wondered?
"Yes, we will," she said to herself bravely. "I
will put Chinna far into the hole, and sit beside
him. I will try to keep awake all night, and then
no harm will come to him."
"Come, Chinna," she said, "give me your hand,
we will go just a little further down the stream into
a nice little hole I know of."
So the two little children scrambled over the
slippery rocks, and soon reached the hole.
What a noise ; is it tigers ? asked Chinna.
"No, only the water." But she did not tell him.







The Waterfall. 35

of the fearful precipice, nor of the dreadful leap the
water took, just the other side of the rock under
which they sat.
By this time it was almost dark, and the weary,
hungry little children huddled together in the un-
comfortable hole.
Soon Chinna, overcome with weariness, lay down
at the end of the cave and fell asleep, but Soondrum
sat by his side trying her very best to keep awake
and guard her little brother. She was terribly
frightened; thoughts of what would happen should
any hungry wild animal come that way, filled her
heart with terror.
What fearful sounds she seemed to hear above the
rushing of the water; surely that was the angry
growl of a tiger! She peered in agony into the
darkness, expecting every instant to see the lithe,
graceful form of that most terrible of wild beasts;
but the time went on, and no tiger appeared.
Hour after hour passed wearily to the little
watcher, till, worn out with fatigue and exhaustion,
she fell asleep.
No prayers for help and protection to the great
Helper ascended from the heart of Soondrum; she
had never heard of the true God, the God of love
and pity. If she had been told the truth, so dear to
Christian children, that God can see us always and
hear us when we call to Him, it would have filled
her with terror.







36 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
Why, she never dared think of God when she was
alone. Did he not sit in that dreadful temple which
she still remembered with horror, so hideous, so cold,
so cruel? Her god was a god of vengeance, to be
appeased with presents, and then to be forgotten.
Poor little heathen Soondrum!
But the God whom she knew not, knew her, knew
her need, her helplessness, her ignorance, and took
care of her, keeping her from all harm during the
hours of darkness, and at length sent her the blessing
of sleep and forgetfulness.
The water tumbled and foamed over the rocks at
her side, the wind rose and blew in great gusts,
shaking the trees, and making them bend close over
the water; monkeys swung themselves down to the
water's edge in the bright moonlight to refresh
themselves with a draught from its cool depths, but
no sounds disturbed the little sleepers, who now lay
peacefully under the shelter of the great rock.


.* -' '1 -'- '-
S L--
KS2 .- ,
"- =,- ,i C -,- = 'P














CHAPTER IV.

Found.
uNt and Chittery returned home when the day's
work was over, and were surprised to find the
hut empty, and no children to be seen.
"Soondrum, Soondrum," called her mother, stand-
ing at the open door, "where have you gone ?" but
no Soondrum replied.
Never mind her," said Chittery, "most likely
she is playing down by the stream with the other
children, and will be home before it gets dark."
It is time for her to be home," said her mother
anxiously, "and she never stays out late; besides,
where can Chinna be at this hour ? "
Come, get the supper, and leave the children
alone, they will be home soon enough; they won't
go without their supper long, you may be sure."
But as the time went on, and no children appeared,
even Chittery began to get uneasy. "I think I'll
go out and look for them," he said presently.
"Yes, do; your supper shall be ready when you
come in," replied Pani.







38 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
So Chittery wandered down to the huts where the
other coolies lived, and inquired if any one had seen
the children.
No; no one had seen them since they had given
their parents their food at the plantation.
"Where can they have gone ?" thought the poor
man anxiously. "Night is coming on fast, they
must have wandered away and lost themselves in the
jungle, and however can we find them before it gets
dark ? "
He was soon surrounded by all the inhabitants of
the huts, talking, and suggesting to him different
places in which the little ones might have strayed,
throwing out hints by no means comforting to the
father of the possibility of the children having been
carried off by the cheetahs, or other wild beasts.
"You will help me to look for them, friends, will
you not? asked Chittery, anxiously.
Ay, that we will," replied they all. Only let us
begin at once."
So search was made diligently for the little ones,
but with no result. Chittery wandered far down the
stream, further than the children had ventured, but
he went straight on, while they had turned down the
side stream which led to the waterfall.
The poor father had to return alone to his hut,
without having come upon any traces of his lost
children.
Till quite dark the kind neighbours searched the







Found.


jungle, calling aloud in hopes of making Soondrum
hear their cries ; but no answer came, and at length
they returned home with the sorrowful news to the
anxious mother that nothing could be heard of
the children; that without doubt they were lost in
the jungle.
Poor Puni! Through the long, weary night, in
unrestrained sorrow, she rolled upon the ground,
tearing her hair and uttering piercing shrieks, after
the custom of Hindoo women in great distress.
Her friends seated beside her during the long hours
of darkness strove to comfort her, but with no success.
How could she take comfort when, perhaps, at that
very moment, her little daughter or her almost baby
son might be in the clutches of some fierce beast ?
Day dawned at length, and once more the search
was resumed; far and wide the news went that two
little children had been lost, and many more people
joined the search.
Hour after hour passed by, and still no news came
of the little wanderers. Let us leave the anxious
searchers, and see what had happened to the lost
children.
Through the long hours of the night, they had
slept peacefully under the shadow of the great rock.
The sun was just beginning to shine above the tree-
tops, when Rama, the shikaree, or hunter, who had
been out all night in a distant part of the jungle,
swung himself down from the high bank on to one of







40 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
the flat stones near the top of the waterfall. What
was his surprise to see in that desolate spot, a little
girl standing gazing drearily at the scene. Coming
up to the place where she stood, he was still more
surprised to see under the great rock, a little boy
sleeping peacefully.
With a cry of joy, Soondrum clung to him. He
was a stranger to her, and perhaps, at any other time,
she might have felt shy; but not so now. Oh! if
he would only show her the way out of that dreadful
place, how very, very thankful she would be !
It was difficult to make her voice heard above the
roar of the waterfall; but, some way or other,
Soondrum made Rama understand that they were
lost, and had spent the whole night in that dreary
place.
"I will take you both home with me," said Rama
kindly; "my hut is not far from here, and when you
have had food, I will take you to your father and
mother. How frightened they must be about
you."
So, stooping down, he gently raised Chinna in his
arms, and signing to Soondrum to follow, he climbed
the rocks on the opposite side from which he had
descended. Pushing his way through the jungle, he
soon reached a little mountain path, which led to the
hut in which he lived.
A lonely little place it was, far from any other
habitation, surrounded by one or two small fields of







Found.


paddy or rice; for, when not occupied in hunting,
Rama cultivated the ground round his dwelling.
How delightful it was to little Soondrum to be taken
away from the horrible place where she had passed
the night, and to see her little brother once more in
safety!
They were met at the entrance to the hut by
Rama's wife, who seemed greatly surprised to see her
husband accompanied by the children.
"Why, wherever did you find these poor little
things?" she asked, kindly taking Chinna in her
arms, and carrying him into the hut.
"By the great waterfall: they had slept all night
close to the fall; it is a mercy that they did not
tumble over."
"A mercy indeed. But where did they come from,
and however did they get to such a place ?"
"That they will tell us when they have had
something to eat; they are half starved, I think."
Rama's wife, Marnica, was a kind-hearted woman,
and attended to the children as if they had been her
own. She washed poor little Chinna's feet, and
bound them up in cool leaves, for they were cut and
bleeding from walking on the sharp rocks. Then,
placing rice before them, she bade them eat and not
be afraid, for they should soon go home to their
father and mother.
"How came you to be at the waterfall, Rama ? "
said Marnica.







42 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
"I had been on the mountains at the other side.
The master told me to go out to watch for tigers, and
I had heard that one had been seen away up the
mountains. I climbed a tree, and watched as soon as
the moon rose, but saw nothing for a long time.
"At last I saw one coming slowly through the
jungle; it passed close to the tree where I was, and
when it had gone a little way, I got down and
followed, it. I followed it a long way, but lost all
trace of it near the other side of the waterfall. It is
a mercy it did not find the children."
Soondrum shuddered. Oh how nearly had they
been killed by a tiger after all!
I will go up and tell the master about the tiger,"
resumed Rama, and then come and take the children
home. They live on the plantation higher up, they
say, and they would never find their way alone, so
they must rest awhile till I can go with them."
So saying, Rama went out of the hut, and left the
children alone with Marnica. She was busy for some
time sweeping the hut, and making it tidy. Then she
fed the fowls and ducks which crowded round her for
their food, but presently, her morning's work being
finished, she went and sat down on the ground by
the side of little Soondrum. "Child," she said
gently, have you thanked the great God for having
taken care of you and your brother through all the
dangers of the night ?"
Which God ?" said little Soondrum.







Found.


"There is only one true God," replied Marnica
quickly; "the others are idols."


MARNICA.


"Oh no, there are many gods," said Soondrum;
"I have seen them sitting in rows and rows, all







44 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
great black figures, but I never thanked them for
anything. Why, they were not here last night,
were they?" and Soondrum looked as if she
sincerely hoped they were not.
"No, child, those were only stone, and could not
move; the God I mean is very different. He it is
who made us all, and who takes care of us both day
and night.. He loves us, Soondrum; think of that,
loves us although we are wicked, so careless, and so
unthankful; and He wants us to love Him; you will
love Him, won't you, Soondrum ? "
"Yes," said Soondrum simply, "only I don't know
anything about Him. Was it He who kept the tiger
away last night? "
"Yes, surely !"
"But did He come down to the waterfall ?"
He is everywhere, child; although we cannot see
Him, He can see us, and hear us when we speak to
Him."
"And did He send Rama to us ?"
"Yes, I am sure He did. He knew that there
were two poor little lost children away there in the
cave, and He was sorry."
"I was sorry too," said Soondrum, "I was fright-
ened. I thought that the stone would roll over the
precipice, and we should go to the bottom. Some-
times I thought I heard growls, but then no animal
came, so perhaps it was only the water."
But Marnica made no answer. She 'was think-







Found.


ing of the time when she too had been an ignorant
heathen, lost in sin and ignorance; and of the
loving Lord Jesus who had found her, and brought
her to the knowledge of Himself.
Lord Jesus, help me to teach these children
about Thee was her heartfelt prayer, as she gazed
on the little wanderers.
You must come and see me again," said Marnica,
when the children were about to start on their home-
ward way, under Rama's care. There is a nice
short path to the plantation from here; and when
once you know the way, there will be no fear of
getting lost."
I will come soon," said Soondrum, and you will
tell me more about the true God."
"That I will," responded Marnica.
"How will her parents like that, do you suppose ?"
asked Rama.
I hope, some day, they will be glad," said Marnica
hopefully. "Is anything too hard for the Lord?"
So the children followed Rama up the steep path
which led to their home. They could not go very
quickly, as the way was rough, and strewn with loose
boulders and branches of trees. Rama soon found
that he must carry Chinna; so, placing him upon his
arm, he strode lightly over the rough road. Soon-
drum hurried on as fast as she could, and before very
long, they came in sight of the village where the
children lived.







46 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
The place was almost deserted, for all who could
be spared from the plantation were away in the
jungle looking for the little ones.
Puni was in her hut lying upon the floor, spent
with weeping and fruitless searching for her children,
when the door opened, and Rama appeared, bearing
the lost Chinna in his arms.
Here is your boy; get up and take him from me,
for he is asleep, I think."
Puni sprang to her feet and clasped the child in
her arms, overwhelming the little fellow with her
embraces, while Soondrum, who by this time. had
entered the hut, clung tearfully to her mother's
clothes.
Oh, where have you been? Where did you find
them, master? "
"I found them by the great waterfall: they had
lost their way ; but they are all right now, and I must
be going."
Puni threw herself on the ground at his feet, and
invoked blessings on his head for his goodness to her
and her family.
News of the safe arrival of the children at their
home, quickly spread through the plantation, and
soon all the coolies crowded round the mother to con-
gratulate her on her good fortune in having her
children restored to her.
Chittery was soon found, and brought home to his
happy family.







Found.


"Tell me," he exclaimed, as soon as he had
embraced his children, who it was that found them,
that I may thank him."
Rama, the great shiloaree, brought them home;
he found them in the bed of the river."
"Where is he ? "
Gone home to his hut down the stream. It is
too late for you to go to him to-day, and likely enough
you would -not find him; he will most likely start at
once to some hunting-place, there to pass the night."
So Chittery was obliged to be contented without
thanking his benefactor at the time; hoping, however,
soon to have an opportunity of doing so.
The neighbours did not leave the hut till a late
hour. They listened again and again to Soondrum's
account of her weary wandering in the bed of the
mountain torrent. But their interest was most
roused by the account of the tiger which had been
last seen by the waterfall.
It must be near still! they exclaimed; "we will
keep our doors shut close to-night. Surely it will not
get to the cattle."
Rama will be watching for it, you may be sure,
and will warn us if it comes in our direction; he is a
great hunter, and a kind man."
"There will be a big hunt soon, I expect," said
one of the visitors, and we shall all be wanted out
in the jungle."
What for ? asked Chittery.







48 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
Why, to beat the bushes, and frighten the tiger
out of its den, so that the master may shoot it."
I should like to join in the hunt," said Chittery.
You will do that soon enough; there will be more
danger than pleasure, I can tell you."
"Father," said little Soondrum, may I go again
and see Marnica? She is so kind, and asked me
to go."
"Yes, child; they must be kind people, only take
care that you don't get lost again."
What is that the child asks? said an old man,
who was seated near Chittery, "to go and see
Marnica? Take care how you let your children go
to her hut; she has left the faith of her people, and
will teach them to despise the gods."
I will go with Soondrum," said her father; "she
will not try to harm her before me," for the poor
man thought that the Christians used powerful charms
to win others to their faith.
And so they did; but not as this poor ignorant
heathen man supposed.
What other charm is so powerful as the knowledge
of the love of God in Christ Jesus ?














CHAPTER V.

The Tigcr itjunt.
s they had expected, Rama went up to the
master's house t,, ti:ll of the tiger he had seen.
He had paid another visitYo the waterfall,
and had once more come upon its tracks. He had
traced its footsteps upon the wet sand of the river
bank to where it had left the stream, and gone off
into the jungle. The track was plainly to be traced
through the long bracken and coarse elephant grass
which covered the hill side; but Rama wisely re-
frained from following it far alone, and decided to
go up to the master's house, so that a proper hunt
could be arranged.
The master received his news with great satisfac-
tion. Two neighboring planters had arrived that
same morning, full of the news that a tiger had for
some time been carrying on his depredations in a
district to the north of their plantations, and had
become a terror to the whole neighbourhood. It
had, only the day before, carried off a buffalo calf,
and had actually been seen dragging its prey up the






50 What Came of a Tiger Bunt.


hill side to the caves at the foot of the Pillar Rocks,
where it was supposed to have taken refuge, and
from which caves it would have been dangerous to
attempt to turn it out.
The plan would be to intercept him on his return
from his search for food, for every night he would
doubtless go out, prowling round the country in
hopes of finding some stray calf or deer for his
much-needed meal, and to prevent him from re-
turning to the cave, where he doubtless secreted
himself during the heat of the day.
The third day after Rama had found the children
by the waterfall was the day fixed for the tiger hunt.
As the hunt was to take place in the very early
morning, the coolies from the plantations near,
amongst whom, we may be sure, was Chittery, col-
lected overnight in the courtyard of the master's
house. Their help would be required to make as
much noise as possible with tom-toms and horns, as
well as with their own voices, and so scare the tiger
at the right time.
Just as the moon sank behind the tree tops, and
long before sunrise, the master and his friends
stationed themselves on a low ridge to the left of the
jungle, which on three sides surrounded the Pillar
Rocks; on the fourth side the rocks sloped precipi-
tously down to the low country, many thousand feet
below. Hidden in the jungle were the coolies, who
were waiting till a signal from the master would















I-


TOM-TOM BEATER.


.l_~c-.__-
i,-.


i

s
:.J
i
i1!
_cz







52 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
warn them to be ready to take their part in the work
to be done.
The hunters had not long to wait. Soon the tiger
was seen strolling along peacefully, evidently quite
satisfied with his night's work. His satisfaction was
short-lived. The master, seeing that he would pro-
bably pass at a considerable distance, fired at him
when he was about one hundred yards off, wounding
him, though not mortally, for he gave a tremendous
roar, and made off for the Pillar Rocks.
The coolie beaters, who were posted in the jungle
near at hand, now set up a great noise, shouting and
beating their drums and tom-toms with all their
might. The noise frightened the tiger, who, turning
suddenly, dashed down the hill side to a small wood
near the side of the Pillar Rocks.
The hunters well knew their danger in following
the wounded animal. But they were determined not
to lose him, so, calling to the beaters to keep close
together, they followed through the long grass. It
was easy to see that the tiger was badly wounded.
On they went for some little distance, when suddenly
a loud roar was heard from the bushes in front of
them. All stood still, while the tiger charged
straight at them, and sprang into their midst.
Every man turned and fled, except the master,
who raised his gun to fire, but not before the animal
had seized Rama by the shoulder, and was dragging
him off to its den amongst the rocks.




































































T ET O



TILE TIGER SEIZED RADA BY TUE SHOULDER.







54 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.


It was difficult, owing to the uneven nature of the
ground, to get a steady shot at a vital part; a shot
not vital would only have made the furious animal
more furious still. He dragged Rama along, growl-
ing viciously, and watching the party of hunters
suspiciously as they followed at a short distance;
but before many minutes passed the opportunity
came, and a well-aimed bullet laid the fierce tiger
low. He rolled over dead, releasing Rama as he
did so.
Poor Rama was quite sensible, but the wound in
his shoulder was very painful. It was bound up
tenderly by the master and his friends, and a drink
of water, which Chittery brought him from a little
stream near at hand, revived him.
Bamboos from a neighboring thicket were hastily
cut, and a hammock formed from a cumlie suspended
from the bamboos. In this poor Rama was gently
placed, the bamboos were then carefully carried on
the shoulders of two coolies; and the tiger, having
been suspended by the legs to another bamboo, the
procession returned home.
As the party neared the village, the whole popula-
tion turned out to meet them and inspect the dead
tiger, which had been a terror to the neighbourhood.
The joy would have been great had it not been for
Rama's accident. He was a great favourite with all
who knew him. The surgeon was called in, and he
most kindly attended to the poor man's wounds,







The Tiger Hunt. 55
which, though serious, were likely to be quickly
cured, to the great joy of all.
The tiger was duly skinned, while surrounded by
crowds of interested spectators. Following an ancient
custom, the natives danced round the body, taunting
and mocking it; while at a little distance Puni with
Chinna in her arms, and Soondrum hiding herself in
her mother's cloth, looked curiously at the prostrate
foe.
Chinna screamed at the sight of the terrible eyes
and teeth, while little Soondrum thought of the long
night by the waterfall, of the possibility of that
dreadful animal having been quite near them; and
she remembered with heartfelt pleasure, that the
great God of whom Marnica had told her was more
powerful than the tiger, and had been present to
take care of her and Chinna, and keep them from
all harm.







56 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.


CHAPTER VI.

11ihll iarni ca.
o it happened that the first time that Chittery
was able to keep his promise of taking Soon-
drum to see Marnica, was not till after Rama's
accident.
Puni had been daily to the hut to help Marnica,
for since Rama had been ill, the poor woman had
been too busy nursing him to be able to attend to her
household work herself; and Puni had taken great
pleasure in helping her, after her own work on the
plantation was over.
Soondrum was delighted to visit the hut again,
where she had been so kindly received on her first
visit. Marnica too was much pleased to see the
child, and welcomed her pleasantly.
Chittery had been several times to see Rama, who
was very ill, and suffering severely from his wound,
but he never stayed long, for Rama was too ill to
talk. After a brief visit he would return home to
his children.
On the evening when Soondrum went with her







With Marnica.


father to visit the sick man, he was lying very weak
and tired on his mat in the hut. Chittery longed to
do something to help him, but could think of no way
in which he could be of use for some time.
"Marnica," said Chittery at length, you are busy,
and must have little time to give to Rama; would
you not like my little Soondrum to stay with you for
a time? She is a helpful little girl, and would be
pleased to help you, I know."
"That is indeed a kind thought," replied Marnica
gratefully, "she would be of great use to me, and I
thank you kindly." So Chittery returned home
alone, leaving Soondrum with Marnica.
And now began a busy happy life for the little
girl. She missed Chinna sadly, but had not much
time to think about him, for early and late she found
something to do for her new friends. It was very
pleasant to help Marnica, who was kind and gentle
and grateful to the child who helped her so untiringly.
When the day's work was finished, Soondrum sat
on the ground by Rama's mat, while Marnica read
to her husband portions from the Word of God.
Soondrum listened anxiously to every word, but
alas! she could understand very little that she heard.
What she liked best was to hear Marnica talk about
what she had read; and very simply she explained
great truths to the wondering listener.
Slowly but surely, Soondrum learnt very much
from her friends; above all she learnt that the one







58 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
true God loved her and had sent His Son to die for
her, that henceforth she was not her own, but must
live as God's child, His faithful servant to her life's
end. And even this she had not to do alone, for
God Himself would help her with His Holy Spirit, if
she asked Him to do so.
All this was entirely newv to little Soondrum, and
made a great impression on her mind. She would
often steal out of the little hut, and creeping down to
the waterfall would sit alone on its brink, and think
these new thoughts that had come to her; and it
was with new energy that she would return to Rama,
anxious to do something to help him, and show her
gratitude for all she had learnt from him and his
wife.
One evening after Soondrum had been with
Marnica for some weeks, Chittery came up to the
hut as Rama was lying on his mat in the cool air at
the entrance.
"It is good to see you looking so much better,
friend," he said, you have been sick many weeks."
"Many weeks," replied Rama, "I have given
trouble to you all; but I shall never forget your
kindness, you may be sure. But you look troubled;
what has gone wrong P "
"Why, you know," replied Chittery, "we are poor
people. We get plenty of work, for which we are
thankful, and we saved a little money and bought a
cow. For some days the animal has refused to eat








With Ma1mica.


properly, and seems very sick; we fear that she will
die."
"That is indeed sad," said Marnica, who had
come out of the hut, and stood listening to the
conversation; "what do you think is the matter
with her?"
"We think she is bewitched," said Chittery in
a low voice.
"Nay, Chittery," said Rama, "there you are
wrong."
"No, I will tell you about it," interrupted Chittery
hastily. "I have asked the gooroo, and he says
there is no doubt that the cow is possessed. Some
enemy has done it. I wish I could find out who it
was."
"But what has been done?"
Well, you see," said Chittery hesitatingly, when
you were hurt by the tiger, every one was excited'
and alarmed, so no one thought of cutting off and
burning the animal's whiskers. And now they have
been stolen, and by an enemy of mine, we know,
because you see my cow is sick, and there is no
charm more powerful for evil than that which can
be made with a tiger's whiskers."
"Oh Chittery!" exclaimed IMvarnica,, "how can
you believe such nonsense? The cow has most
likely eaten some poisonous plant; many such grow
near the village, and indeed on all the mountain side."
"We shall see," said Chittery coldly, not at all







60 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
pleased with Marnica's words. "The gooroo has
ordered me to do pooja (worship) on the hill top,
at the temple there, and most of the coolies have
leave from the master to go with me, and then
perhaps the evil spirit will leave the cow. I must
take my family with me, lama, so I must ask you
to spare my little girl."
"That we will gladly. It is kind of you to leave
her with us so long She is so useful and good
that we shall miss her sadly, but a day on the
mountain will do her good; I am sorry it is to do
pooja, Chittery."
Chittery made an answer; he was a devoted
follower of his false gods.















CHAPTER VII.

On the Mfountain.

OONDRUM was very happy to be going home with
her father. She had not been home for some
weeks. How very very happy she was as she
went up the familiar path Her joy was complete
when she once more saw Chinna, who ran to meet
her as soon as he heard her coming, exclaiming, "We
are all going up the mountain, Soondrum, and you will
come too! "
Early next morning, the villagers were astir at an
early hour, many of them ready to accompany
Chittery and his family; the others, who were to
remain at home, gathered round them to watch them
start.
"We hope you will have good luck, Chittery, and
appease the gods, so that they will destroy the charm.
It is a pity for so fine a cow to die," said an old man
standing near, "you have prepared all the offerings ?T"
"All. I have obeyed the gooroo, and he has
promised to meet us himself on the mountain."






62 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
So the party set off in good spirits, and in good
hopes of the cow's recovery to health.
They had a long walk before them. After leaving
the village, the road wound round amongst the hills
for a long distance before it reached the foot of the
highest mountain.
Passing a small lake, whose waters were calm and
still, with barely a ripple to disturb its smooth surface,
they came to the sacred wood, whose trees had been
undisturbed for ages. No axe is allowed within its
enclosure, and tall creepers climb at will amongst the
old forest trees, while monkeys find a peaceful home
in its dark recesses.
Passing the wood, they kept on along the hot dusty
road, with plantations of coffee on each hand, until,
at length, they came to the foot of the desired hill.
Leaving the road, they now commenced the ascent
up a narrow winding path strewn with loose boulders.
The climb was toilsome to little Soondrum, but the
coolies, accustomed all their lives to scaling hills,
pressed on with swift untiring steps through the little
sholahs or woods which grew on the mountain sides,
or over tiny mountain streamlets, which trickled down
the slope with pleasant rippling murmur, never
hesitating or pausing to rest.
After a time, the mountain became bare of trees;
no more refreshing shade was to be had by the
climbers, as they pressed up the bare face of the
barren mountain. Only a little coarse grass or rough














































iNATIVE CA.RT



NTATIVE CART.







64 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
stag-horn moss grew in that ungenial soil, and that
only near the little brooklets.
As they neared the mountain top, the path turned
suddenly to the left, and, following it for a little way,
the travellers came once more upon most welcome
shade from the fierce rays of the sun, which was
extremely hot and scorching.
They had reached a small hollow in the mountain
side, through which meandered a tiny stream of clear
refreshing water. The hollow was filled with trees
of most lovely forms. There grew in wild luxuriance
the tree fern with its lovely feathery branches,
while orchids, in endless variety, grew on the trunks,
and to the very end of the branches of most of the
trees of larger growth.
What a lovely wood to wander through on a hot
summer day But Chittery and his friends pressed
on; they had only a little further to go to where, a
few yards higher up the mountain, the stream burst
from the earth in a spring of clear foaming water.
This spring had wonderful cleansing power in the
opinion of Hindoos. A small square basin had been
scooped out of the ground, and lined evenly with
stones, and in the middle of this basin the water rose
from the earth. At one end of the basin, a passage
had been left for the water to escape, and through
this opening it foamed and rushed in its haste to flow
down the mountain side through the lovely wood
below.







On the Mountain.


Tall ferns bent over the basin, and soft green moss
clung to its sides, while the tall tree-tops above it saw
their graceful branches reflected in its waters when
they were smooth and still; but when the waters
there foamed and bubbled, after the rainy season,
nothing could be seen in them but foam and spray.
Leaving the spring below them, the travellers
passed on a little higher to where the temple stood
on a shelf of rock.
A very poor little temple it was, partly built of
rough stones, partly dug out of the rock on which it
stood, and part of it being a cave on the mountain
side.
No idol was in the temple. Formerly, one of gold
and precious stones had been there, but it had been
stolen. Now the idol was in charge of the priest,
who lived at a distant village, and who brought it
twice a year to the temple.
Still, although no idol was there, it was considered
right to worship in the temple every week, and on
special occasions like the present.
The entrance to the temple, a small door in the
rock, was locked, so, the priest not having arrived,
the weary party threw themselves upon the ground
to rest and await his coming.
"Mother, I am so tired," said little Soondrum
pitifully, do let us rest away by ourselves in the
wood."
Puni, who had carried Chinna the greater part of
F







'66 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
the way, was extremely tired too, so they went into
the wood, and, lying down, soon forgot their weariness
in sleep.
At three o'clock in the afternoon, the priest arrived,
and all the worshippers thronged eagerly to the door
of the temple.
Stand back !" called out the priest, as they pressed
close to him; "I must enter the temple alone, and
you must all go down to the spring and be purified,
then you too may enter the holy place."
So the priest's assistant, a young man of high
caste, hastened down to the water, and the people
followed him closely.
When they arrived at the water, the purification
began at once. One by one the worshippers knelt
before the young man, who poured water on their
heads from the spring. Seven times he emptied the
water from his large brass vessel upon each person's
head; Soondrum shivered when her turn came,
and the ice-cold water descended upon her shoulders.
But there was no escape from it, she had to bear the
cold bath patiently; but we may be sure she was very
glad when it was all over.
Wringing the water out of their hair and clothes
as they best could, they now passed, all dripping wet,
into the temple, where the priest awaited them.
Inside the temple, as we have said, there was no
idol, but in the middle of the place stood two roughly
made wooden horses intended for the god to ride.







On the Mountain.


They were shaped much like rocking-horses, and
were gaudily painted with red, yellow, and green paint.
In front of these horses were placed the offerings
brought by Chittery.
Ghee (clarified butter) was smeared upon the
horses; rice, cocoanuts, and plantains were placed
before them ; while a fowl was tied by a long string
to the horse's leg.
Once more Soondrum prostrated herself at her
father's bidding in the temple, but with very different
feelings from those which had disturbed her when
she visited the great temple nearly a year before.
The hideous gods, which had so terrified her, were
absent, and Marnica's teaching had sunk deep into
her heart.
She knew now that those gods were but wood and
stone, the works of men's hands, and had no power
to molest her; the time was coming when she would
refuse to bow before them, when she would obey the
command, "I am the Lord thy God, thou shalt have
none other gods but Me "
So the worship was ended, and the offering for
the restoration of the sick cow had been presented.
It was by this time- too late to return home that
night. A hut had been made close to the temple,
in which travellers could cook their food and spend
the night if desirable, so the party crowded into it,
and soon a very busy scene ensued.
Food had been brought in large quantities, and this







68 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
the women hastened to cook. The children collected
firewood, and the men sat down near the spring to
smoke their pipes, and talk over the events of the day.
Soondrum wandered up the mountain side picking
up sticks; she left the other children behind her, and
soon .came upon the great flat plain which formed
the mountain crest. A large dreary plain it was,
covered with coarse grass and large stones, but
Soondrum did not notice the dreariness. She was
thinking very sorrowfully, for very miserable was
the poor little lonely child.
And how was it that she was so lonely and
miserable, when she had so many kind friends near
her ?
Because she knew that she had grieved and
disobeyed her best Friend.
"Thou shalt not bow down to them, nor worship
them, for I, the Lord thy God, am a jealous God."
Yes, Soondrum knew the truth, and she felt that
there was no excuse for her. She had bowed before
StL,: work of men's hands once more, and had offended
tlne jealous God.
She flung down the sticks she had gathered, and,
casting herself upon the ground, wept bitterly. Was
it fear of the anger of the God whom she had
offended that thus troubled her? Oh no. It was
bitter, bitter sorrow that she had disobeyed One whom
she had learnt to look upon with love and reverence,
the loving Lord Who had come for her before she







On the Mountain.


had even heard of Him, Who had given His life for
her. She saw it all now plainly, and was filled with
sorrow as she thought of her own ingratitude.
She raised herself slowly from the ground and
looked round her, for she heard her name called
loudly, and presently saw her father coming toward
her.
"Shall I tell him now," thought the child anxiously,
"that I will never never worship in the temples
again?" But he gave her no time to do so, for,
telling her to run on in front of him, he picked up
the sticks which she had let fall, and hastened back
to the hut.
The darkness was coming on quickly, so the fires
were made to burn brightly to keep off the wild
beasts, and the travellers sat close to each other
while they ate the supper provided for them.
Watchers were appointed to keep awake and renew
the fires when necessary, while the others retired
within the hut, or lay down in the firelight as they
felt disposed.
Soon all was still on the mountain side; sleep fell
on all the travellers who were not obliged to keep
awake, for all were weary.
Nothing occurred to disturb the slumberers, and
when morning came they awoke refreshed, and ready
to descend the mountain, and return to their own
homes.
How anxious they all were to see the cow, and find







70 What Came of ca Tiger Hunt.
out if the offering made to the god had been accepted,
and if the cow was restored to health.
But alas as soon as they reached the village they
were met with the sad tidings that the cow was dead.
They hurried to their hut, and there inside the
dwelling lay the poor animal, dead beyond all doubt.
All their offerings had been of no use; nothing could
be done but bury the cow, and bear the loss as they
best could.














CHAPTER VIII.

Piew Plans.
OOR Chittery was dreadfully troubled at the
death of the cow.
He had worked so hard and lived so sparingly
for many months in order that he might buy it, and
now it was dead, and there was nothing to do but
bury it out of his sight. It had been possessed too,
so that its skin was of no use ; poor ignorant Chittery !
The neighbours were very kind, and helped him to
bury it quickly, and then nothing remained to be
done; his enemy had triumphed, and the offerings to
the god had not been accepted.
Little Soondrum was very unhappy about the cow,
and very sorry for her father, and it was with a very
heavy heart that she left the hut the next morning
on her way to Marnica, there to resume her place
with her old friend.
"The cow is dead," was her first remark as she
came up to the place where Marnica was busy
feeding the fowls.
"That is a great loss to your father, and I am






72 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
sorry for him, but perhaps we may be able to help
him. Will he be coming to see us soon, do you
think ? "
"He did not say," replied Soondrum; "he is veiy
sad, and does not speak. Shall I help you with the
fowls ?"
"Yes, do; and then you can tell me what you did
.on the mountain. Tell me all about it."
. -.' S.-:n,,nidm wns in no hurry to tell her story. She
w aji.shamM.Ii tell Marnica how she had worshipped
in the heathen temple once more; but after a little
hesitation she began to tell her of all that had taken
place.
"Oh, Marnica,'" she concluded, "how very very
wicked and sinful I have been. I am frightened
when I think of having bowed down before the false
god. I felt, oh! so frightened when I lay there on
the temple floor, for I thought of the words 'thou
shalt have none other gods but Me;' and yet I did
not get up at once; I stayed there. I am very very
wicked, I cannot bear to think of it."
"Then don't think of it any more, child, 'Thy
sins and thine iniquities Iwill remember no more,'
said the very God against whom you have sinned,
and He has forgiven the iniquity of your sin. He is
more ready to hear than we to pray, Soondrum, and
is waiting to receive you now, to make you His child,
and keep and bless you to your life's end. You
will not keep Him waiting, will you? but will







New Plans.


decide to be His faithful little follower now and
always ?"
Soondrum did not answer; she was crying quietly
to herself. But, deep in her heart she formed the
resolution to serve the true G-od only, and try to do
His will.
"The Lord will help you, Soondrum; I am quite
sure of that. I know you want to be His child, and .
it is His Holy Spirit in your heart thai makiLs youi
want to please Him. You must ask-;im"rn to: give
you courage to obey His will.
"Let us go into the hut," continued Marnica;
"Rama will wonder what keeps us so long away
from him."
"So you have come back, little one," said Rama
as they entered the dwelling; "tell me, is the cow
better?"
"No," said Soondrum, "it is dead. We found it
dead when we came home. yesterday."
"I want to see Chittery," said Rama; "how I
wish I could go to him, but perhaps, as I cannot, he
will come to me."
"That he will, I am sure," said Soondrum; "shall
I go to the plantation, and ask him to come when his
work is done?"
"That will tire you too much, I think. No, I will
wait, perhaps Chittery may come in this evening and
tell me about the cow."
And so he did. As soon as his day's work was







74 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
finished, Chittery hastened down the rough path
which led to the cottage.
"I am glad to see you," said Rama, when Chittery
entered, "I wanted very much to talk to you; but
first, tell me about your cow."
"There is nothing to tell; the cow is buried," said
Chittery gloomily.
"I am very sorry for you," said Rama kindly;
"but I think if you will agree to my plan, you will
be able to buy another before long, and more than
one maybe."
"What plan ? asked Chittery eagerly.
You see," pursued Rama, the master is a very
kind man. He is sorry about my accident, and he
has been to see me several times. He came to-day,
and he says that the doctor thinks that I shall never
be very strong again. I could have told him that; I
know it well, but it is the Lord's doing, let Him do
as seemeth Him good!" and Rama paused in his
story.
"Well, go on," said Chittery, impatiently; what
else did he say ?"
He said he had been thinking what he could do
for me, to help me, you know. He knows that I shall
never be a shikaree again, and, most likely, shall not
be able to do much in the fields, so he wants me to
have a coolie to help me, and he will pay him his
wages, good wages too. I thought at once of you,
Chittery. Your little girl told me that you once had







New Plans.


fields of your own, so you will understand the
work."
Yes, I can work in the fields; it is kind of you
to think of me, I will serve you well if you take me,"
said Chittery eagerly.
Then let us decide at once for you to come as
soon as a hut is built; it will be a good thing for us
to have friends near us, for it is lonely down here, so
far from the village."
Chittery hastened home to tellPuni the good news.
He had not been happy working on the plantation,
and had thought with regret of the happy times he
had had working in his fields. Now, too, his wages
would be much better than they had been for a long
time, and he amused himself, as he went homewards,
thinking of all he would do with the money he would
be able to save. He would be able soon to buy
another cow in place of the one he had just lost, and
perhaps before long he would have saved enough to
buy goats as well.
Puni was much surprised to see her husband return
so soon, and what could have happened to make him
look so happy ? But, very soon, Puni was as happy
as her husband. Nothing could have pleased her
more than the good news which she heard from
Chittery. How delightful it would be to leave the
plantation and live in a new hut down the mountain,
near MVarnica. Then, too, she could work in the







76 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.

fields, and help her husband; the news was almost
too good to be true!
All the same it was true. Before long the little
hut was built, and, at Rama's request, a spot was
chosen for it a little lower down the mountain than
his own, on a ledge or flat piece of ground, uncul-
tivated at present, but which Chittery had permission
- from the master to cultivate in his spare time.





3 --4 .5..














How hard he worked Early and late he toiled
on, finishing Rama's work carefully first, and then,
with the help of his wife and children, clearing his







New. Plans.


ground from low trees and jungle, till, before long, it
was ready to plant. By the time the ground was
ready, he had saved money enough to buy seed for it,
and had made a little watercourse through his land,
bringing the water from the great waterfall in split
bamboos, laid down along the ground, and fastened
to each other, and soon the green paddy might be seen
growing in the water with which his field was flooded.
How happy they were in the little hut! Once
more they were contented and prosperous. Another
cow was bought, and then another, and soon after-
wards, two goats might have been seen browsing in
front of the little hut. These were Soondrum's
special charge, and many happy hours she passed
with Chinna, as they sat on the mountain side in
charge of the goats and cows.
She never worshipped in the heathen temples now.
She had told Chittery that she believed in the one
true God, and dared not disobey Him; and Chittery,
though angry at the first, had let her have her own
way. He too, though still a heathen, was much im-
pressed with the Christian religion since he had been
so much in the company of Rama and Marnica.
"Marnica," said Puni one day, when, her day's
work being done, she sat by her friend's side, thanks
to you and Rama, we are now as rich as ever we
were. After all, it was a lucky thing that the
children got lost by the great waterfall, for if it had
not been for that we should never have seen you."







78 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.
"Don't call it luck," said Marnica gently; rather
call it the loving providence of our God. Think how
He has led you, Puni, through all your life, till at last
He has brought you here, that you might be taught
about Himself, and learn what is His will concerning
you. He would have you to turn away from all your
idols, and worship Him alone, and trust Him for the
future ; and He will receive you graciously, and par-
don you freely, for the sake of His dear Son."
Puni did not turn angrily from her friend when
she spoke of her need of pardon, for from time to
time, she had learnt from Marnica what sin is, and
she knew well that she was a sinner; she hung her
head sorrowfully, and was silent.
You feel your sins heavy to bear, Puni, I know,"
continued Marnica; "will you not tell the Lord
Jesus about them? He has forgiven many who
were once as sinful as you feel yourself to be, and if
you askHim, He will give you the Holy Spirit to
help you fight against your sins in the future."
Puni did not answer, but the words sank deep into
her heart, to bring forth fruit "in due time."
*

The years passed on, and still the little family
lived contentedly in their mountain home. A happy
family now, because a Christian one. Yes, even
Chittery had forsaken his false gods after a while.
A time came when lama's health once more







New Plans. 79

failed. Chittery and Puni, with untiring devotion,
helped Marnica to nurse him. And there, by that
sick couch, Chittery learnt a lesson he could never
forget. The only subject of interest to the sick man
was the Lord Jesus,
And pain and weakness made Him
Nearer and dearer seem,
Till life became a story,
Of which He was the theme."
Again and again Marnica related to the sick man
stories of the loving-kindness and marvellous acts of
the Lord, and spoke of Him with never-failing love
and reverence. And all the time Chittery sat listening :
listening too while they prayed to the Lord, whom
they so much loved and trusted; until into his heart
feelings of love for the same Lord crept silently, and
he too prayed that the Lord. would receive him as
His faithful servant, and forgive him all his sins for
Christ's sake.
Rama lived long enough to hear the joyful news
that Chittery, with his wife and family, had turned
from idols to serve the living and true God; then he
passed into the presence of his Lord.
"Marnica," said Soondrum one day, when, her
work being finished, she was leaving the hut, "I
often think of what you said long ago, when we had
been lost by the waterfall."
"What was that? "
You said that although we did not know God,







80 What Came of a Tiger Hunt.

He knew us; knew that we were poor little lost
children, and took care of us."
"Yes," replied Marnica, He did, and will take
care of us all to the end, because He is our Friend. I
pray that we may all be His friends too, Soondrum,
but for all that a condition is added: Jesus says 'Ye
are My friends if ye do whatsoever I command you.'
Let us see to it, that we do His commandments, and
become His friends."
And Soondrum humbly prayed the same prayer.


LONDON: KNIGHT, PRINTER, 221, BARTHOLOMEW CLOSE, E.C.












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0Iii iIv






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III q II



I;


yi-,/ i,,;, ,

,:RaaiNi i/h~


From The Secret of the Cave."
THE SECRET OF THE CAVE. By JESSIE'S OLD MAN. By MARY E.
CHARLES COURTENAY, M.A. ROIES.
THE BROTHER'S PROMISE. By A DAUGHTER TO BE PROUD OF.
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E I








I I
14




























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ON THE EDGE OF A MOOR.
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14








sHJIIh$G STORY BOOKS.

ENLARGED AND IMPROVED SERIES.
Each Illustrated and bound in cloth.


Audrey; or, Children of Light.
By Mrs. WALTON.
A Sham Princess. By EGLANTON
THORNE.
Lance Hernley's Holiday. By H.
MARY WILSON.
Two Ssprets and a Man of His
Word. By HESBA STRETTON.
Eva Chalmer's Temptation. By
JESSIE ARMSTRONG.
A Fortunate Exile. By LILY WAT-
SON.
Alison's Ambition. By MARY
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The Waif of Bounders' Rents.
By M. B. MANWELL.
The Autobiography of a Mission-
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Roy. By L. PHILLIPS.
Joyce's Little Maid. By NELLIE
CORNWALL.
Jessica's First Prayer. By HESBA
STRRTTON.
Saved at Sea. By Mrs. WALTON.
Nobody Loves Me. By Mrs. WALTON.
No Place like Home. By HESBA
STRETTON
Lost, Stolen, or Strayed. A Story
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STRONG.
Norah's Stronghold. By L. C.
SILKE.
Out of Cabbage Court. A Story of
Three Waifs. By MARY E. ROPES.
How Little Bessie kept the Wolf
from the Door. By Mrs. COATES.
The Boy who Never Lost a Chance;
or, Roger Read's History. By
ANNETTE LYSTER.
Under the Old Roof. By HBSBA
STRETTON.
Wallaby Hill. By M. BRADFORD-
WHITING.
Annie Deloraine's Aunt. By E. A.
BLAND, author of "Constable 42 Z."
The Elder Brother. By EGLANTON
THORNE.
Pansy. A Story for Little Girls.


Next-door Neighbours. By AGNES
GIBERNE.
Nobody Cares. By CRONA TEMPLE.
Sea Larks, A Tale of the Hebrides.
By CRONA TkMPLE.
The Daughters of the Flower
Market. By G. HOLDEN PIKE.
The Well in the Orchard. By Miss
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Jasper's Old Shed, and How the
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Tempted. By HARRIETTE E. BURCH.
Stories about Japan. By ANNIE R.
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Prisoners of Hope. By D. ALCOCK.
Effie's Temptation. I By Miss WHYM-
PER.
Donald and His Friends. By SARAH
GIBSON.
Christie's Old Organ. By Mrs. O.
F. WALTON.
Sunshine at Last. A Tale of London
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Tom Larkins: or, The Boy who
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My Brother's Love. By Mrs. LUCAS-
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Little Peter the Ship-boy. By
the late W. H. G. KINGSTON.
Bravely Borne. By the author of
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As Many as Touched Him. By
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Margie's Gifts, and How She Used
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Little Faith; or The Child of the
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Little Harry's Trip to India. By
W. J. WILKINS.
A Strange Christmas Angel. By
the Rev. WALTER SENIOR, M.A.
James Saunderson's Wife. By
AINSLIE STRAHEN.
By Little and Little. A Tale of the
Spanish Armada. By EMMA LESLIE.
Daybreak in Britain. By A. L. O. E.
Granny's Hero. By SALOME HOCK-
ING.





ONE PENNY EACOH MONTH.

The CHILD'S COMPANION
A Magazine for Boys and G.irls.

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