• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Note
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Half Title
 Plays for January
 Plays for February
 Plays for March
 Plays for April
 Plays for May
 Plays for June
 Plays for July
 Plays for August
 Plays for September
 Plays for October
 Plays for November
 Plays for December
 Back Matter
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Stick-and-pea plays
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00088830/00001
 Material Information
Title: Stick-and-pea plays pastimes for the children's year
Physical Description: 112 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Pratt, Charles Stuart, 1854-1921
Lothrop, Lee, and Shepard Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Lothrop, Lee and Shepard Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: [between 1904 and 1908] c1899
 Subjects
Subject: Toy making -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Toys -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Games -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1904
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Charles Stuart Pratt ; seventy working designs by the author, together with other illustrations, drawn by H.P. Barnes.
General Note: Later printing than 1899: Lee & Shepard bought Lothrop Publishing Company in Aug. 1904 and renamed it Lothrop, Lee & Shepard; and Baldwin Library copy inscribed date is 1908.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00088830
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002236211
notis - ALH6680
oclc - 265143045

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Dedication
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Note
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Table of Contents
        Page 9
        Page 10
    List of Illustrations
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Half Title
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Plays for January
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Plays for February
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Plays for March
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Plays for April
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Plays for May
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Plays for June
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Plays for July
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Plays for August
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Plays for September
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
    Plays for October
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Plays for November
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
    Plays for December
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
    Back Matter
        Page 113
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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The Baldwm Library

u a B lry


THIS BOOK IS THE PROPERTY OF
tll Nanm aWe fritrulating library
NEW BERN, N. C.

PRESENTED BY




DATE UAL~--1903L

Class 7 Boo NoP


~-l__r~IICIII-P-IL-II~~~L~LIL~







STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS




PASTIMES FOR THE CHILDREN'S YEAR




BY
CHARLES STUART PRATT
AUTHOR OF
BUZ-BUZ;" LITTLE PETERKIN VANDIKE,"
"BYE-O-BABY BALLADS," BABY'S LULLABY BOOK,"
ETC.


Seventy working designs by the Author,
together with other illustrations,
drawn by H. P. Barnes








BOSTON
LOTHROP, LEE AND SHEPARD COMPANY



Craven-Pamlico-Carteret

Regional Library





























Copyright, 1899,
BY
LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY.
























To
the readers of Buz-Buz,"
and to
all my friends among the children,
I dedicate
this book of lays.
C. S. P.




























. the wise educator devotes the first years of educa-
tion to training in construction and to object teaching.
PROFESSOR WILLIAM JAMES.













NOTE.

(To Parents and Teachers.)

WHAT sort of play is the best sort of house-
play for the child?
If I could ask the mothers and fathers and
teachers who think about such things, I should
expect a reply somewhat like this: The best sort
of house-play for the child is a play the child takes
to naturally; a play the child can play largely by
itself ; a play that calls out the child's activities,
trains the hand, educates the eye, exercises the
judgment, stirs the imagination and gives pleas-
ure all the while; a play that yields something to
take, to hold, to keep, to use; a play that leads
readily to talks, and stories, and songs, with a
beautiful lesson at the heart of them.
Perhaps the first play-instinct of the child, when
the little brain begins to think and the little hands
to do, is in the making of mimic objects and the
make-believe use of them. But the child is not
merely imitative. The child is a Robinson Crusoe
and a Swiss Family Robinson all in one. The
child adapts the thing at hand to the need of the
moment, to any end desired. The child is inventive
v








NOTE.


and creative. The child's quick imagination makes
the play-object more real to itself than the real
object is to the adult.
Some time ago, I had occasion to devise a series
of easy amusements for children -plays, house-plays,
which should be educational pastimes as well as enter-
taining occupations. With the above considerations
in view, Froebel's Nineteenth Gift" (the ninth of
the Occupations ") that of sticks and peas -
was chosen as a promising point of departure.
In developing the stick-and-pea motive, I worked
along picturesque lines, largely with familiar objects
which appeal tb both the practical and the play
instincts of the child. It seemed evident that in
making these varied and picturesque play-objects-
objects which mean something, which have part in
the activities of life, as children know life -there
would be the same good results as come from con-
structing triangles and squares or prisms and cubes,
along with others as good. It seemed evident that
there would be the same manual training; a like
education of eye and exercise of judgment, in exact
measuring and cutting, in proper fitting together; a
building of things as lasting, more usable, and so
more interesting; a larger development of the imag-
ination, especially along ways of inquiry, invention,
and practical application; and that, withal, making
the work attractive and the education unconscious,
there would be the pleasure-giving of real play.







NOTE.


The reception of these plays during their magazine
publication goes to support this position.
By experiments and observations on the part of
the child, described in the opening paragraphs of
Parts II. to VII., and illustrated in the initial pic-
tures, I have endeavored to make vivid the succes-
sive stages in the life-history of the pea and so,
really, in the life-history of all "green things grow-
ing." Along with the working directions, too, and
the intentionally informing passages, I have, in a
spirit of playful comradery with the child, thrown
in many hints to open up fresh possibilities of
pleasure in the objects made.
This little book, which has resulted from the
magazine series of stick-and-pea plays, is designed
primarily for the home, as a handy help to mothers
and fathers in amusing their nursery folk and a
still handier help to children in amusing themselves.
Should it also find a place in kindergartens and
schools for little children, I shall be the more
gratified.
For convenience of grouping, I have arranged the
plays to follow in a measure the cycle of the child's
year with special reference to holidays though
obviously the plays thus grouped for a particular
month may be played in any month, or in all months.
The illustrations showing objects as made of
sticks and peas are referred to in the working
directions as "pictures." Others, showing minor








NOTE.


objects or parts of the more complex objects rather
as diagrams, by single lines and black spots, are
referred to as "plans."
When the children have mastered the making of
the simpler objects here pictured and described,
they should be encouraged to work independently
-to make other simple objects all by themselves."
A good way is first to make a pencil drawing of the
object, in dots and lines, and then build it of sticks
and peas. The drawing obliges the child to see all
parts of the object, and to observe and judge of the
lengths and directions of the parts. The building
is then comparatively easy.
Parents and teachers may make the plays the
occasion for little talks and little lessons. The
stick-and-pea objects will suggest the topics. They
will find many hints to this end also in books on
Froebel's Gifts and Occupations notably in
that admirable exposition of the kindergarten sys-
tem, The Republic of Childhood," by Kate Doug-
lass Wiggin and Nora Archibald Smith. These
authors mention, for instance, the reading of nature-
stories while the child is observing the growth of
the pea -such as George Macdonald's Story of
the Seeds in David Elginbrod," and the chapter
on "Treasure-Boxes in Jane Andrews' The Story
Mother Nature Told," and Hans Andersen's tale
of Five Peas in a Pod."
C. S. P.
















CONTENTS.


PLAYS FOR



PLAYS FOR



PLAYS FOR



PLAYS FOR



PLAYS FOR



PLAYS FOR



PLAYS FOR



PLAYS FOR


PART I.
JANUARY

PART II.
FEBRUARY

PART III.
MARCH

PART IV.
APRIL

PART V.
MAY

PART VI.
JUNE

PART VII.
JULY

PART VIII.
AUGUST .
ix


PAGE


17



23



29



** 34



S40



47



S 52



S 58










x CONTENTS.


PART IX.
PLAYS FOR SEPTEMBER

PART X.
PLAYS FOR OCTOBER

PART XI.
PLAYS FOR NOVEMBER

PART XII.
PLAYS FOR DECEMBER


PAGE


S 67



S 84



97



o6


















ILLUSTRATIONS.


PAGE
AT PLAY WITH STICKS AND PEAS Frontisfiece
VIGNETTE --" SOAKED PEAS AND LITTLE STICKS 16
INITIAL EXPRESS-WAGON 17
A DRUM-STICK 17
A PAIR OF DUMB-BELLS 18
THE BOX-BOTTOM 18
READY FOR THE TOP 19
THE BOX COMPLETE 19
THE STICK-AND-PEA CART .20
ONE SIDE OF CART MADE "SOLID" 22
INITIAL-KINDS OF PEAS. 23
THE HEART-AND-ARROW 24
THE HATCHET 25
THE, CHERRY-TREE .27
PLAN OF CHERRIES 28
INITIAL ROOT-SPROUTS 29
THE SNOW-SHOVEL 30
THE HOCKEY-STICK 31
THE SLED .32
TOP OF SLED MADE SOLID" 33
INITIAL- TOP-SPROUTS .34
THE STRAIGHT-LINE LETTER A 35
xi









ILLUSTRATIONS.


PAGE
THE CURVED-LINE LETTER 0 36
THE NAME MARY, IN STICK-AND-PEA LETTERS 37
THE NAME JOHN, IN STICK-AND-PEA LETTERS 37
PLAN OF STICK-AND-PEA ALPHABET 38
INITIAL- PEA-BLOSSOM 40
THE HOE 42
THE RAKE 44
THE WHEELBARROW 45
INITIAL PEA-PODS 47
THE STRAIGHT-LINE FIGURE 4 48
THE CURVED-LINE FIGURE 6 49
PLAN OF STICK AND-PEA NUMERALS 50
THE YEAR COLUMBUS DISCOVERED AMERICA 50
THE YEAR OF INDEPENDENCE 51
INITIAL RIPE PEAS 52
THE TENT 53
THE BUNKER HILL SWORD 54
THE FLAG AND THE FLAG-POLE 55
PLAN OF SOLDIERS' CAMP 56
INITIAL- PEA-MARBLES 58
PLAN OF BOX PART OF HOUSE 58
THE PLAIN EASY HOUSE 59
PLAN OF HOUSE WITH DOOR AND WINDOWS 61
PLAN OF END OF HOUSE 62
PLAN OF THREE-RAIL FENCE 63
THE GATE 64
THE CROQUET SET .65
INITIAL-STOOL 67
THE PLAINEST CHAIR. 68









ILL USTRA TIONS.


THE DINING-ROOM CHAIR
PLAN 'F PARLOR CHAIR
PLAN OF ARM-CHAIR AND ROCKING-CHAIR
THE SMALL TABLE
TABLE FOR DINING-ROOM OR LIBRARY
PLAN OF HAT-TREE
THE SOFA
PLAN OF EASEL
PLAN OF BOX PART OF DRESSING-CASE


xiii

PAGE
S 69
* 70
7.
S 72
* 74
* 75
* 77
S 78
79


THE DRESSING-CASE 80
THE BED 82
INITIAL BOAT-HOOK AND ANCHOR 84
PLAN OF BOX PART OF HULL 85
PLAN OF HULL COMPLETE 85
THE YACHT 87
PLAN OF ROW-BOAT 90
PLAN OF WHEEL-RIM 91
THE BICYCLE 92
PLAN OF SADDLE 94
THE PEDALS 95
THE FORKED FRAME 96
INITIAL- PUMPKIN 97
PLAN OF STICK-AND-PEA MOTTO FOR THANKS-
GIVING 98
THE CARVING-KNIFE AND FORK 99
THE PIECE OF PUMPKIN PIE 100


THE TWO TURKEYS THAT RAN AWAY
THE WISH-BONE .
INITIAL--TIP OF CHRISTMAS-TREE


. 102
. 104
. o06









xiv ILL USTRA TIONS.

PAGE
PLAN OF EASY STAR .
THE BEAUTIFUL BETHLEHEM STAR" 107
PLAN OF BOX PART OF CRADLE 8
PLAN OF ROCKER IO8
THE CHRIST-CRADLE .. IO9
THE CHRISTMAS-TREE III
















STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS









STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


PART I.

PLAYS FOR JANUARY.

VERY child likes to make
things. An easy way is
to make them of peas

"', -, of peas and a handful of
sticks will make many
objects--and give a whole bushel of
pleasure in the nursery.
Green peas can be used in their season.
Dry peas can be used all
the year. Soak the dry ========RU
A DRUM-STICK.
peas in water over night,
and dry them for an hour before using.
They will then be so soft that the sticks
17

Craven- Pamlico- Carteret
Regional Library







STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


can be stuck into them easily, yet firm
enough to hold the sticks in place.
The sticks
should be slender,
about the size of
a stout knitting-
A PAIR OF DUMB-BELLS. needle. Round
needle. Round
sticks are best, and they should be pointed
with a penknife. If the sticks prepared
for kindergarten use cannot be had, any
slender sticks will do I have seen very
cunning things made with common
wooden toothpicks.
A stick with a pea on one end makes a
hammer, a cane,
or a drum-stick.
A short stick
with a pea on
each end makes a TIE BOX-1101TOM.
dumb-bell. A pair of dumb-bells, with
the ends joined by two other sticks, make
a square or the bottom of a box.







PLAYS FOR JANUARY.


If you wish to make a box, stick four
pointed sticks, upright, into the four peas
at the corners of the box-bottom. Make
the top like the bottom, place it on the
four upright sticks, and press down the
four peas of the top until the pointed








READY FOR THE TOP. THE BOX COMPLETE.

uprights stick into them. This com-
pletes the box, as shown in the picture.
Work at these little boxes until you
can make them easily. Make small boxes
and large boxes, square boxes and oblong
boxes, deep boxes and shallow boxes.
Be very careful in measuring, and cut
your sticks just the right length. Be very







STICK- AND-PEA PLAYS.


careful, too, in sharpening the points of
the sticks, for a smooth round point can
be thrust into a pea more easily than a
rough irregular point, and with less dan-
ger of splitting the pea.
The box is the beginning of many
objects- carts, wheelbarrows, houses.









THE STICK-AND-PEA CART.

If you want a little cart, make first an
oblong box. Let the end-sticks of the
bottom extend through the peas a quarter
inch. On these four ends slip four
button-molds, or circles of cardboard, for
wheels. Outside the wheels, on the tips
of the sticks, put small peas, to keep the







PLAYS FOR JANUARY.


wheels on. When you make the box, slip
a pea to the middle of one bottom end-
stick. This middle pea is to hold a long
stick for the handle. You can put a
small pea on the end of the handle, with
a little bar through it, as in the picture.
A cart with a long handle is the kind
of cart for a boy to draw about, with all
sorts of loads from stones to little
sisters! But if you wish to make a cart
for a horse to draw, you do not set a long
stick into a pea on the middle of the
lower end-stick. Instead, you have a
pea near each end, and set a stick into
each pea. These two sticks form the
shafts and if you have a tiny toy horse
you can harness him in with a string, and
snap a whip, and trot'away to Make-
believe Land.
You can make several kinds of carts,
simply by making several kinds of boxes
to start with. A shallow box gives an







STIC K-AND-PEA PLAYS.


express-wagon, like that in the initial
picture. A short high box gives a city
coal-cart. A very long box gives a
country hay-cart.
You can also fill in the bottom, sides,
and ends, of your cart, as shown by the
dotted sticks and peas in the picture of
one side, and so make them "solid"
instead of "open." Then your cart will
hold things a load of peas, if you like.


ONE SIDE OF CART
MADE SOLID."













PART II.


PLAYS FOR FEBRUARY.

SHE home country of' the
pea is thought to be
Greece, in the south of
Europe. It was common
in the gardens of the
East long before the first
Christmas Day in Bethlehem. To-day
the pea is grown in gardens all over the
world.
There are now many kinds of garden
peas, large and small, wrinkled and smooth,
irregular and round. The smooth round
peas make the best pea-work.
When you get a pretty lace-paper valen-
tine, with its hearts and arrows and doves
and cupids, on February I4th, you will
23






STICK-AND -PEA PLAYS.


like to make a heart-and-arrow with your
soaked peas and little pointed sticks.
This is the way. Take six short sticks,
two longer
sticks, and
eight peas,
and put them
together for
the heart, as
in the pic-
THE HEART-AND-ARROW. ture. Next,
take a long stick for the arrow. Put a
pea on one end for the head, and into
this pea thrust two very short sticks,
with small peas on the ends, for the
barbs. Then thrust the other end of
the arrow-stick through one of the side
peas of the heart, so it will slant across
the heart as in the picture. On this end
of the arrow-stick slip three small peas,
close together, and into these peas stick
six very short sticks for the feathers.







PLAYS FOR FEBRUARY.


You can make the heart-and-arrow be-
fore St. Valentine's Day, if you like, and
put it in a tiny box, and give it to some
little friend for a valentine.
On February 22d, the birthday of Wash-
ington, the Father of his Country, when
papa tells you the hatchet story, about the
little boy Washington and his father and
his father's cherry-tree, you will want to
make a hatchet, a cherry-tree, and maybe
a bunch of cherries.
The hatchet is quite easy. Take a






THE HATCHET.

long stout stick for the handle, and slip
two peas on one end, a little apart. Then,
with five short sticks and three more peas,
make the blade and head of the hatchet,







STICK-AND- PEA PLAYS.


as in the picture. Finish the hatchet with
a pea at the end of the handle.
Young cherry-trees grow tall and slim,
so for the trunk of your tiny Washington
cherry-tree take a long stick. On the
lower end press a large pea. Into the
sides of this large pea thrust three sticks,
equally distant from each other, and on
the end of each slip a pea. You can call
these three sticks the roots, and they will
hold your make-believe tree upright, as
real roots hold upright a real tree. Next,
slip three peas on the trunk of the tree;
push one down toward the bottom, the
second only a little way, and leave the
third, a small one, at the very top. Into
the lower pea on the trunk set two sticks
for the lower pair of branches, and into
the pea above set shorter sticks for the
upper pair of branches. Both pairs of
branches should slant up sharply. The
upper pair should be set at right angles to







PLAYS FOR FEBRUARY.


the lower pair. All four branches should
have peas at the tips. Last of all, into
the pea at the
end of each lower
branch set two
short branches
with small peas at
their tips, as in the
picture-and your
cherry-tree will be
complete.
A pretty bunch
of cherries is made
in this way. Slip
a stout stick, or
two slim sticks side
by side, through a
big pea, for the
twig. In the top of
the big pea insert THE CHERRY-TREE.
two or three leaves. To make a leaf, take
a slim stick, make a sharp bend in the







STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


centre, and a slight bend in the middle of
each half; then bring the two ends to-
gether and thrust them into the pea, as in
the "plan" of cherries. Wet the stick
before bending, and bend carefully, so as
not to break it apart. Unless the wood is
very tough, it is best to cut V-shaped
notches at the three bending-places.
Next, insert five sticks in the bottom of
the big pea, for the stems of the cherries;
then slip five peas on the ends of the
stems, for the cherries themselves.
Red checkerberries are better than peas
for the cherries, for they are the color of
cherries -and, besides, you can pick and
eat the checkerberry cherries.


PLAN OF CHERRIES.












PART III.


PLAYS FOR MARCH.

ITTLE people who are
making play-objects with
@ soaked peas and small
Sticks will like to see
how peas grow.
This is the way to set
about it. Cut a circle of cotton wadding,
and let it float on the surface of a glass
of water. On the wet cotton scatter a
few peas. Also plant a few in a flower-
pot. Place the glass and the flower-pot
in a sunny window. Give the earth in
the flower-pot water as well as sunshine.
The peas on the wet cotton will swell
very fast. In a few days they will begin
to sprout. The first sprout will be smooth
29







30 STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


and white. This sprout is the beginning
of the root of a new pea-plant.
Next watch for the sec-
ond sprout!
Some wintry day in March
you will like to make, for
pea-work, a snow-shovel, a
hockey-stick, and a sled.
For the shovel, take three
short sticks, and two a little
longer, the long ones for the
sides. On one end of each
side-stick slip two peas, on
the other end one pea. Slip
a pea to the middle of two
THE SNOW- of the short sticks. These
SHOVEL.
two sticks form the top and
the cross-piece just below, as in the
picture. The plain stick forms the bot-
tom. Now, for the handle, take quite a
long stick, and thrust it through the
middle pea at the top, into the middle pea







PLAYS FOR MARCH.


of the cross-piece. Put a pea on the end
of the handle; through this pea thrust a
very short stick, and slip a pea on each
end of it. And, behold, you have a
pretty play-shovel, to dig paths through
the deepest drifts of play-
snow.
The hockey-stick is very
easy--a long stick with a
pea at each end, and two
short sticks and two more
peas for the crook at the
lower end. Only, be careful
to set the short sticks at
just the right slant to make
a good curve.
In building the sled, make
first the top, with two long THE HOCKEY-
STICK.
sticks, two short sticks, and
four peas. Two more long sticks, with
peas at the ends, form the runners. Con-
nect the runners with the top by four very







STICK- AND PEA PLAYS.


short upright sticks. You now have the
top and sides of the sled. The pointed
ends, at the back and the front, are each
made of two sticks and one pea, as shown







THE SLED.

in the picture. If you like, you can let
the runner-sticks extend beyond the back
upright sticks far enough to form the
bottom-sticks of the back ends. The front
ends must slant upward, and the peas at
their points must be connected by a stick.
To this stick tie the ends of a cord to draw
the sled by.
Perhaps you would rather have a sled
with a solid top, on which you can really
draw things. If so, when you are building






PLAYS FOR MARCH.


it, slip peas all along on the end-sticks of
the .top, and then connect these peas by
sticks like the side-sticks -as shown by
the dotted peas and dotted sticks in the
picture of the sled-top.
On a sled like this you can tie a tiny
doll-boy coaster, and let him slide down
hill. With a smooth board, or even a
large geography, you can make a hill as
steep as you like.





TOP OF SLED MADE "SOLID."












PART IV.


PLAYS FOR APRIL.

HEN the smooth white
root-sprout from a pea
on the wet cotton is
Swell started, the pea
will split open. Then,
if you watch, you will
see another sprout appear. The new
sprout will be rough and green, and will
grow upward. This second sprout is the
beginning of the top, or stalk, of the pea-
plant. The little points along it will
soon grow into green leaves. When
the green leaves appear, the white root-
sprout will begin to send out white root-
lets along its sides, like branches along
the trunk of a tree.
34







PLAYS FOR APRIL.


But do not yet stop watching the
pea-plant.
When big brother and sister go off
to school, the little people in the nur-
sery will find it good fun to make the
letters of the alphabet with their sticks
and soaked peas.
If you look at the twenty-six letters of
the alphabet, one by one, you will see
there are two kinds of letters--straight-
line letters, and curved-line letters. There
are fifteen straight-line
letters, and eleven curved-
line letters.
The first letter of the
alphabet, A, is a straight-
line letter. To make an
THE STRAIGHT-LINE
A, take two sticks of TLETTER A.
equal length, and one
about half as long, and five peas. Put
a pea in the middle, and also on one
end, of each long stick. Thrust the other







STICK-AND PEA PLAYS.


end of each into the fifth pea, connect
the two middle peas by the short stick
- and you will have the first letter of
the alphabet.
Some of the curved-line letters are all
curves, like C and 0; others are partly
curves and partly straight
Lines, like P and R.
To make an O, take eight
short sticks and eight peas,
and put them together as
in the picture. An 0 is
THE CURVED-LINE
LETTER O. a little taller than it is
wide, so you will make a
better 0 if the two side-sticks are a little
longer than the others.
After making A and O, you will like
to make the letters of your name, and
place them in the right order to spell the
name--as the letters that spell MARY
and JOHN are placed in the pictures of
those names. You will also like to make







PLAYS FOR APRIL.


the letters of your middle name, if you
have one, and of your last name. If you
are a little girl, you will wish to make the






THE NAME MARY, IN STICK-AND-PEA LETTERS.

letters of your doll's name; and if you are
a little boy, and have a dog, or a pony,
you will wish to make the name of your
dog, or the name of your pony.
In the "plan" showing the stick-and-






THE NAME JOHN, IN STICK-AND-PEA LETTERS.

pea alphabet, you will find all the letters,
so you can make any name, and any word,
you wish.





STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


You will need to look sharply at some
of the letters, at G and K and Q to
see how G is finished by a little hori-
zontal stick through the pea at the lower
end of its great curve, which until then is
like C to see how the lower arm of K


ABCDEFCHI

JKLMNOPQR

STUVWXYZ
PLAN OF STICK-AND-PEA ALPHABET.
starts from a pea on the upper arm near
the upright stem to see how the tail
of Q starts from one of the two bot-
tom peas, and, after running a little way
into the great oval, which is just like O,
turns about and runs out through the
other bottom pea.







PLAYS FOR APRIL. 39

When you have learned to make the
letters easily and well, it will be a pretty
surprise to make two P's and two A's,
and place them in order by papa's plate,
so that when he comes to dinner he will
find there the word PAPA.
Then, too, you can make the words of
mottoes, such as TRY, TRY AGAIN--
and mamma will put them up on the
nursery wall.












PART V.


PLAYS FOR MAY.

,'. FTER the white root-
'7 sprouts and the green
top-sprouts have grown
from the peas on the
'4. wet cotton, you will find
that the peas planted in
earth have sent up stouter and greener
stalks.
As the roots of the pea-plant spread out
underground, and gather more and more
plant-food, the stalks will grow faster and
faster and pea-plants grow very fast in-
deed. Watch one, and measure it morn-
ing and night, and find out how much
it grows in a day, how much in a night,
how much in a week.







PLAYS FOR MA Y.


And now, if you will set up in the
flower-pot a branching stick, you will
shortly discover that the pea-plant is a
vine. Look carefully at the leaves. They
are called pinnate leaves, from .a Latin
word, pinna, meaning feather, because the
leaves are set along both sides of a leaf-
stem, as the soft parts of a feather are
set along the quill or feather-stem. At
the end of the leaf-stem, in place of a
leaf, you will find slender curling tendrils
- usually three of them, though some-
times first a pair, then three further on
at the tip. Now the pea-vine does not
climb by winding about its support, like
a morning-glory-vine. It climbs more as
a boy climbs -it uses its tendrils as a
boy uses his hands and fingers. See how
the curling tendrils reach out and take
hold of anything they can find; and
also see how, when they can reach noth-
ing, they kink up into funny curlicues,







STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


as a boy doubles up his fingers into a
fist!
Then, some day, you will find at the top
of your pea-vine a bud, perhaps a pair of
buds, and the buds will open into blos-
soms. The flowers of the garden pea are
usually white, though some kinds are red.
The garden pea's pretty cousin, the
fragraAt sweet pea, has larger flowers, and





THE HOE.
often three or four on a single stem. It
blooms white and pink and yellow and
blue and purple. The little girl who is
fond of sweet peas will like to know that
their home country is the beautiful land
of Italy.
Still go on watching the pea-vine, for
after the blossom comes what ?







PLAYS FOR MAY.


In May, when the big folks are working
in the garden, spading and hoeing, raking
and planting, the little folks will enjoy
making play-tools with their soaked peas
and slender sticks.
A hoe is easy. Take two sticks for the
top and bottom, and two half as long for
the sides. Slip a pea to the middle of
the top stick, then put the four together
with four peas. The middle pea on the
top stick is to hold the handle -and you
can put a small pea on the end of the
handle.
A spade is very like a shovel, and you
can make one in the same way as the
snow-shovel described in the March plays
is made, only the spade should not be
quite as wide as the snow-shovel.
If you want a rake, put five peas on a
stick, the same distance apart--one at
each end, one in the middle, the other
two half way between. Take a long stick






STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


for the handle, and slip a pea a little way
on at one end. Stick this end into the






THE RAKE.
middle pea of the five. Connect the pea
on the handle with the peas on either side
of the middle pea by two sticks. Then
cut five very short sticks for the teeth of
the rake, and stick one into the under side
of each of the five peas. This rake will
rake the soil in your little garden, or
rake up hay in your little hay-field when
haying-time comes, just as you like.
Of course you will want a wheelbarrow.
Make first an oblong box, a little narrower
at one end than the other. Omit the top
end-stick at the wide end. Have the bot-
tom side-sticks long enough to project at







PLAYS FOR MAY. 45

the wide end for the handles, and also
at the narrow end to hold the cross-stick
for the wheel. The wheel may be a
wooden button-mold, or a circle of card-
board. Cut the cross-stick exactly the
right length, slip the wheel to the middle,
and then slip a pea up against the wheel
on each side to hold it in place. Put
peas on the ends of the projecting bottom










THE WHEELBARROW.

side-sticks, and into these peas set the ends
of the wheel-stick. The side end-sticks
of the ,wide end may be long enough to
also make the two legs of the wheelbar-







46 STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.

row, or two short sticks may be used for
the legs. Put small peas on the ends of
the legs, also on the ends of the handles -
and your wheelbarrow will be complete,
as in the picture.
The bottom, sides and narrow end of
the wheelbarrow may be made solid," in
the same way as the cart-body and sled-
top described in the January and March
plays--and then you can wheel loads of
things in your stick-and-pea wheelbarrow.












PART VI.


PLAYS FOR JUNE.

,--G'. T N the middle of the pea-
'T- blossom, as it withers
/' away, you will see the
-'~, beginning of the pea-
Spod. Soon the little
pod will become a large
pod, two, three, perhaps four, inches long,
and half an inch or more wide. At first
the pod will be thin and flat, then the
tiny peas inside will round out, until,
when full-grown, the plump pod will be
as thick as it was wide.
You can now, if you like, crack a pair
of pods, and take out the green peas, and
boil them for your doll's dinner. Dress
the boiled peas with cream and a dash of
47






STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


salt and pepper -and you will enjoy din-
ing with the doll yourself!
It will pay to watch the pea-vine a while
longer -and see what the pea-pods do.
When you shell the green
S peas for your doll's dinner,
and you count them, one,
two, three, four, five, or ten
or more, you will want to
make the figures that stand
THE STRAIGHT- for these numbers. You
LINE FIGURE 4.
can make them with your
sticks and soaked peas.
The ten figures, or numerals, like the
letters, are made up of straight lines and
curved lines. There are three straight-
line figures, and seven curved-line figures.
The straight-line figures are i, 4, and 7.
The i and 7 are very easy. The 4 is a
little harder.
To make a figure 4, take first a stick
for the upright line, and slip a pea one-







PLA YS FOR JUNE.


third up from the bottom, and put one on
each end. Next, take two shorter sticks,
and one pea, for the slanting line and the
horizontal line which form the triangle at
the left of the upright line. Last of all,
take a very short stick, with a pea on one
end, for the short horizontal line at the
right of the upright line. Put the four
sticks and five peas together, as in the
picture. If you are careful not to split
the pea, you can make the
two horizontal lines of one
stick, thrusting it through
the pea on the perpendic-
ular stick.
Like the letters, some of
the curved-line figures are NHE FRED6.
all curves, such as 6 and o.;
others are partly curves and partly straight
lines, such as 2 and 5.
The figure 6 is made of ten short sticks
and ten peas, as shown in the picture.





STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


The side-stick should be a little longer
than the others, as in the letter O. The

123 4 5

G7880
PLAN OF STICK-AND-PEA NUMERALS.
figure 9 is like a figure 6 standing on its
head.
When you have made all the figures -
the "plan of the stick-and-pea numerals
will show you how-you will enjoy put-
ting them together so as to form interest-



S482
THE YEAR COLUMBUS DISCOVERED AMERICA.
ing numbers and dates. You can make
the number that tells how old you are.








PLAYS FOR JUNE.


If you are over nine, it will take two fig-
ures. You can make a 7 for the days in a
week, 30 for the days in a month, 365 for
the days in a year.
A i, a 4, a 9, and a 2, make the name
of the year Columbus discovered America
- 1492.
A I, two 7's, and a 6, make the name
of the year of Independence the year of
the first Fourth of July-- 1776.


F INDEPENDENT


THE YEAR 0













PART VII.


PLAYS FOR JULY.

HEN the last pea-blos-
som has faded, when
& -' the last little pea-pod
Shas grown to a large
-' pea-pod, and plumped
out with full-grown
peas, the pea-vine will stop growing.
Then the green stalk, and the green
leaves with curlicue tips, and the green
pods, will all turn yellow, and brown--
and finally the dry pods will crack open,
and the ripe peas will roll out!
You have now watched the whole life
of a pea; and if you take one of the hard
ripe peas and plant it, it will live that life
over again, as peas have been doing for
52






PLAYS FOR JULY.


ages -first the root-sprout, then the top-
sprout, then the pea-plant, with its blos-
soms, pods, and peas.
So, from seed to seed, grow all plants.
When the bells ring in the Fourth, and
torpedoes pop and crackers go bang, the
little pea-players will want to set up a tall
flag-pole, with a flag flying at the top-
and also make a sword and build a tent.










THE TENT.

This is the way to build the tent. Put
together four sticks and' four peas as you
did for the oblong box-bottom. Before
joining the sides and ends, slip a pea to







54 STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


the middle of one of the end-sticks. Next,
take four sticks, a little longer than the
end-sticks of the bottom, and set one into
the top of each pea. Slant the pair of
sticks at each end so their upper points
will come together, and on each of these
double points press a pea. Then connect



THE BUNKER HILL SWORD.

these two peas by a stick as long as the
side-sticks of the bottom this makes the
top of the tent, for a tent is like a three-
sided, or triangular, box, resting on one
side. Connect the pea which you placed
at the middle of one of the bottom end-
sticks with the pea above it, and this last
stick will mark the opening where the
tent curtain is pushed aside when soldiers
go in or out.
For the sword, take a long stick and






PLAYS FOR JULY. 55

slip two peas on one end. The first you
push on the length of the handle, the
second you leave
at the tip. Two
very short sticks,
each with a pea at
one end, will make
the guard" be-
tween the handle
and the blade, as
in the picture.
Put no pea at the
end of the blade,
as you want a
sword with a sharp
point-you can
call it your Bunker
Hill sword.
When you want
STHE FLAG AND THE FLAG-
to raise your flag, POLE.
build first a little frame to hold up the
flag-pole. Make a square of four short






STICK- AND-PEA PLAYS.


sticks and four peas for the bottom. Set
four more short sticks into the tops of
the peas. Slant these four sticks from
the corners of the bottom to a big pea
above the centre, forming a pyramid.
Now thrust your tall flag-pole down
through the big pea at the peak of the
pyramid, and then slip two peas on the
top, leaving one at the tip, and pushing
the other
down the
4I width you
wish your
flag. Into
each of
< \these peas,
PLAN OF SOLDIERS' CAMP. at one side,
set a stick,
for the top and bottom of the flag. Con-
nect the ends with a shorter stick and
two peas--and your flag will be flying,
like the one in the picture. You can







PLAYS FOR JULY. 57

now throw up your straw hat and shout,
"Hurrah for the Stars and Stripes!"
If you like, you can make a whole row
of tents, and set the flag in front, and
have a soldiers' camp, as in the "plan"
- and then you can take your sword
and play you are a little defender of
your country.












PART VIII.


PLAYS FOR AUGUST.

AVING set up a stick-
and-pea tent on the
S Fourth, you will like to
Build, some vacation day
-- Bin August, a stick-and-
pea house.
You had best build a plain easy house
at first-just the four walls, under-pinning,
roof, and chimney.
You start with an
oblong box, as in mak-
ing the little cart, only
the house-box should PLAN OF BOX PART OF
HOUSE.
be much larger. The
small plan shows the form of the box
part of the house. Next, make an extra








PLAYS FOR AUGUST.


bottom for the box, just the size of the
first, and pin the corner peas of the
second bottom to the corner peas of the
first bottom with very short sticks. You


THE PLAIN EASY HOUSE.


can, if you like, let the four corner sticks
of the house project through the bottom
peas enough to stick into the peas of the
extra bottom, instead of using short sticks
to fasten it on. The second bottom







STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


really forms the underpinning, as you can
see in the picture.
The house is now ready for the roof.
Into the four corner peas at the top set four
sticks, about as long as the end-sticks of
the top. Slant the pair of sticks at each
end of the house until their tops touch,
and on each double point press a pea.
Now cut a stick just as long as the side
of the house, put two peas, a little apart,
at the centre of the stick, and then set it
in place for the ridge-pole. This finishes
the roof. The two peas in the middle of
the ridge-pole are to hold the chimney,
which is made of three short sticks and
two peas. The chimney completes the
plain easy house, as in the picture.
If you are a very good stick-and-pea
carpenter, or if papa-will help you, you can
build a house with a door, a door-step, and
windows, as shown in the two plans."
In making the box part for a house with







PLAYS FOR AUGUST.


door and windows, you should, before put-
ting the box together, slip on the top and
bottom sticks pairs of peas to hold the
side-sticks of the door and windows, as in
the plan." Each window, with side-sticks
extended to top and bottom of box part


PLAN OF HOUSE WITH DOOR AND WINDOWS.

house, and with cross-sticks to make
panes, should be put together, then
lower ends of the side-sticks set into
peas ready for them, the roof lifted a








STICK-AND- PEA PLAYS.


little, and the upper ends of the side-sticks
put in place. The door should be made
and put in place
in the same way.
Then the door-
step should be
built out. The
"plan" of the end
of the house shows
how to put in
place a triangu-
lar gable window.
If you like, you
PLAN OF END OF HOUSE.
can let the upright
stick project above the pea at the end of
the ridge-pole just enough to hold an
extra pea for ornament.
A very clever papa may build out the
triple window, in the end of the house,
into a bay-window--and I should not be
surprised if he were to add a cunning
veranda!







PLAYS FOR AUGUST.


And when the house is completed, it
will be easy to build a three-rail fence
around it, in the way shown in the plan."
A fence with one or more corners, or turns,
will stand upright of itself. You can


PLAN OF THREE-RAIL FENCE.


make a gate that will stand by itself, by
slipping short cross-sticks through the
lower end-peas, and putting peas on the







64 STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


ends of the cross-sticks, as in the picture.
Straight fencing can be made to stand up-
right in the same way. In building the
gate, in place of the middle rail, use two
rails, running
from the up-
per to the
lower corners
and crossing
THE GATE. in the centre.
Also let the
end-sticks project a little at the top, and
on the tips put small peas for a finish.
If you have a Noah's Ark, you can
fence in pastures for the animals with
stick-and-pea fences.
After the hard work of house-building,
you can take a handful of peas and go out
on the smooth walk, or driveway, and
scratch a circle, and have a game of
marbles -ring-taw, or pyramid, or any
game you play with real marbles.







PLAYS FOR AUGUST.


And then, when you see the croquet-
set on the lawn, with its gay mallets and
balls waiting by the still gayer starting-
post, you will want to make a croquet-set
with sticks and peas. It is much easier
than a house.
For the starting-post (and the turning-
post is just like it), take a long stick and
put one pea on the end which is to be
the top. Each
wicket is made
of two upright
side-sticks,
with an arched
top of three
shorter sticks
and four peas, THE CROQUET SET.
as in the pic-
ture. Big peas can be used for the balls.
For each mallet you will need one long
stick, one short stick, and four peas.
Slip three of the peas on the short stick,






66 STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.

one in the middle, one at each end, for
the head of the mallet. Into the middle
pea thrust one end of the long stick, for
the handle, and on the other end put the
fourth pea.
If you are one of the happy children
who have sand-tables, or if you can find
a smooth sandy space out-of-doors, you
can set up your posts and wickets, and
really play a game of croquet.













PART IX.


PLAYS FOR SEPTEMBER.

f URNITURE is the next
thing to think about,
after you have built a
house. Stick-and-pea
furniture is easy to make,
and pretty to look at
after it is made and set in place.
With one pea, and three short sticks,
you can make a tiny stood as in the ini-
tial picture. That, surely, is easy enough
for the very littlest pea-player of all.
Then you can have your choice of
chairs, plain chairs for chamber and
kitchen, heavy dining-room chairs, high-
backed parlor chairs, arm-chairs, rocking-
chairs any one, or all of them. If you
67







STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


have a doll-house, you will want to make
all kinds, a set for each room.
The very plainest chair is made of two
long sticks, seven short sticks, and six
peas. The' two long
sticks form the sides of
the back, and also the
back legs. Put a pea
on the end of each the
end which is to be the
top. Slip a pea up from
the bottom end of each
as high as you wish the
seat. Connect the two
THE PLAINEST CHAIR.
peas at the top of the
back, and also the two at the seat, with
sticks as long as you wish the width of
the chair. Next, build out the seat, with
three short sticks and two peas. Last of
all, set the front legs into the under side
of the peas at the front of the seat, and
you will have a simple chair, as in the







PLA YS FOR SEPTEMBER.


picture -a chair proper to place in your
doll-house chamber, or kitchen.
The dining-room chair should be heav-
ier, of course. So, when you make the
back, put two extra peas on each side,
one near the top, one just above the
seat. Connect these extra peas by two
cross-sticks. Also slip
a pea a little way up
on each leg, and con-
nect these four peas
by four short sticks.
This will give you a
fine heavy chair for
the dining-room, as in
the picture.
The parlor chairs THE DINING-ROO
may be made in the CHAIR.
same way as the dining-room chairs, only,
to make them handsomer, you should let
the side-sticks of the back project just
enough at the top to hold an extra pea,







STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


a small round one, as shown in the
"plan of the parlor chair.
The arm-chair is made
in the same way as the
i i parlor chair, only the
back should be wider,
and the seat larger. The
back need not be quite
: as high-you can omit
the upper cross-stick.
To make the back of
S the arm-chair easy to the
PLAN OF PARLOR backs of the little gentle-
CHAIR.
man dolls who may sit
in it, you can let it slant backward. If
the side-sticks will not bend easily, and
stay bent, you can use two short sticks
for the back legs, and two other sticks
for the sides of the back, setting them
into the peas of the seat at a slight angle.
Put an extra pea on each back side-stick,
to hold the top arm-stick. In making the







PLAYS FOR SEPTEMBER.


arm-chair, let the front legs project above
the seat as high as you wish the arms;
put a pea on the top of each; and then
connect these peas with the extra peas on
the side-sticks of the back, thus form-
ing the arms, as shown in the "plan" of
the arm-chair.
The rocking-chair
may be made just like
the arm-chair, and the
rockers then added.
The single rocker
shown by the dotted
sticks and peas, on one
side of the plan of
the arm-chair, will tell PLAN OF ARM-CHAIR
AND ROCKING-CHAIR.
you how to make the
pair of rockers of real sticks and peas.
Should the little lady dolls like a higher
back, to rest their heads against when
tired, you can make a back like the high
back of the parlor chair.
I







STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


You can make the seats of all the chairs
"solid," for the little doll people to sit on,
and the backs "solid," for the little doll
people to lean against, in the way the
sled-top was made solid, and as shown by
the dotted sticks and peas in the plan "
of the parlor chair and in the plan of
the arm-chair.
Even a doll-house should have several
kinds, and several
sizes, of tables.
You had best be-
gin with a small
simple table for a
chamber. Take
four sticks for the
legs, put a pea on
THE SMALL TABLE. the top, and one a
THE SMALL TABLE.
little up from the
bottom, of each. Connect the four top
peas by four sticks, and the four lower
peas by four other sticks. Last, make







PLAYS FOR SEPTEMBER.


the top "solid," as shown by the dotted
sticks and peas in the picture of the
small table.
For the sitting-room table, made in the
same way, you can slip the lower peas a
little higher, and make a "solid" shelf,
like the "solid" top. This will be very
convenient, for holding daily papers and
magazines, such as "The Doll-World
News," and "The Make-Believe Maga-
zine," and "The Rockaby Review."
By using quite short sticks to connect
the legs, you can make a very small table,
or stand."
When you build the dining-room and
library tables, put two peas, instead of
one, at the top of each leg, and connect
the pairs of peas by pairs of sticks. In-
stead, also, of connecting the four lower
peas by four sticks around the outside,
join them in pairs by two longer sticks,
crossing each other, and passing through







STICK-AND -PEA PLAYS.


a pea, at the centre underneath, as in the
picture. This gives room for the feet
when sitting at the table. The top should
be made "solid," as shown by the dotted












TABLE FOR DINING-ROOM OR LIBRARY.

sticks and peas at one side in the picture.
A hall table, to stand against the wall,
may be made like the dining-room or
library table, only instead of being square,
or nearly so, it should be quite narrow-
about half as wide as it is long.
In the hall, too, should stand a hat-tree
- and a stick-and-pea hat-tree is both







PLAYS FOR SEPTEMBER.


easy to make and pretty to see. Take
a long stick, put a large pea on the
lower end, a common-sized pea above
and close against it, another near the
top, and a fourth at the very tip-top.
Into the big pea at the bottom, set three
short sticks with peas at the ends. These
three sticks should slant
down, to form the feet (per-
haps I should say roots," it
being a tree !), or triangu-
lar base supporting the
standard as in the "plan."
Into the pea near the top,
set six still shorter sticks,
also with peas at the ends.
These six sticks should be PLAN OF HAT-
TREE.
horizontal, and equally apart,
to form the arms (perhaps I should say
"branches," it being a "tree "!), on which
to hang things. If a gentleman-doll
caller wears a high hat, it can be hung







STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


on the very tip-top of the standard it-
self.
I shall let the little pea-players invent
and build the umbrella rack all by them-
selves and it may be square, or oblong,
or triangular, to fit in a corner, or round,
with top and bottom made like the
letter O.
In the parlor, you will of course want
a handsome sofa. Now a sofa is very like
an arm-chair, only very much wider -just
as if an arm-chair were india-rubber, and
you should take it by the sides, and stretch
it to right and left, until all the horizontal
lines running from side to side were two
times, three times, four times, as long as at
the start. But sticks are not india-rubber,
so the sticks running from side to side,
or end to end, of your sofa must be four
times as long as those of a chair to start
with.
In the sofa, as in the chair, two sticks







PLAYS FOR SEPTEMBER.


form the sides of the back, and also the
back legs. On each stick put six peas,
three near together at the top, one at
the bottom, one at the seat, one just above
the seat. The peas at the top are for
ornament. Connect the pairs just below










THE SOFA.

by a pair of long sticks; also connect the
peas at the seat, and those just above.
Next, build out the seat, and the tops of
the low arms. Last, put in place the
front legs, which should extend above the
seat to form the fronts of the arms, and
which should have peas at the lower end







STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


like the back legs. The dotted sticks
and peas, in the picture, show how to
make the back "solid," and how to build
up an ornamental centre.
The seat may be made
S--... .. "solid" by sticks running
I I from end to end.
SA row of six baby
Sdolls sitting on a stick-
--- and-pea sofa is a cunning

baby-show.
If you have a cute
LAN OF EASEL. little picture which you
PLAN OF EASEL.
would like to stand on
an easel in your doll-house parlor, you can
make the easel of sticks and peas. Take
two long sticks for the sides, and put five
peas on each, one at the top, one at the
bottom, one toward the top, two toward
the bottom, as in the "plan." The top
and bottom peas are for finish." Connect
the others by short cross-sticks, the lower







PLAYS FOR SEPTEMBER.


longer than the upper, as the easel should
be wider at the bottom than at the top.
The upper cross-stick should have a pea
at its centre. Into this pea set a long
stick for the brace, or back part of the
easel, with a pea at its end. From the
upper of the two lower cross-pieces, build
out a little shelf, with two very short sticks,
two peas, and a third stick as long as the
cross-piece. On this shelf stand the cute
little picture.
The young-lady dolls will want a fine
dressing-case, with a
large mirror. Now the
part of a dressing-case
which holds the draw-
ers is really a high
wide box-like that
shown in the small PLAN OF BOX PART
OF DRESSING-CASE.
plan." Build first this
box part of the dressing-case. The front
upright sticks should have three extra







STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


peas, between the top and bottom peas,
and these extra peas should be con-
nected by sticks, to mark off the drawers,
as in the picture. The back upright sticks
should extend
high above
the drawers,
to hold the
mirror, and
each should
have a pea
near its top.
Make the
mirror of four
S sticks and
four peas, with
THE DRESSING-CASE.
an extra pea
at the middle of each side-stick. Hold
the mirror in place, and slip a very short
stick in from each side, through the pea
on the upright stick and into the middle
pea on the side of the mirror. The mirror






PLAYS FOR SEPTEMBER.


will now hang upright, or tip forward or
backward -so the young-lady doll can
see if the skirt of her gown hangs right,
or if her back hair is coiled and pinned as
it should be.
At the end of the day, and the end of
the furniture, comes the bed.
Build first the head of the bed. Take
two sticks for the sides, or posts, and put
six peas on each, at the points shown by
the picture. Cut five sticks as long as
you wish the width of the bed, and with
them connect the peas on the two posts,
beginning with the bottom peas- the top
pea on each post is left for ornament.
Next, build the foot of the bed. Take
two short sticks for the sides, or posts,
and put three peas on each, as in the
picture. Connect the peas on the two
posts with sticks just as long as the con-
necting sticks in the head of the bed.
Now cut four sticks as long as you wish







STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


the length of the bed, and join the head
and the foot by two of these sticks on


THE BED.


each side, connecting the two lower peas
on the posts. Each upper side-stick should
have a pea near the head end, and a short
stick should run from this pea to the pea
next higher on the head of the bed. These
two short sticks serve as braces, and as a
pleasing finish." The frame of the bed
is now complete.







PLAYS FOR SEPTEMBER. 83

The lower side-sticks may be joined'by
" slats," as shown by the dotted sticks and
peas at the head end. The head and the
foot of the bed may be made "solid," by
filling in with sticks and peas, as shown
by the dotted sticks and peas at one side
of each.
And then you can make up the bed,
and put your tired doll's nightgown on,
and tuck her in, and say, Good-night! "












PART X.


PLAYS FOR OCTOBER.

OATS and bicycles be-
long to boys or used
to, I should say--for,
S nowadays, the little sis-
S^ ters ride as bravely as
the little brothers.
The little sisters do not yet scrawl pic-
tures of war-ships on every scrap of paper
-tremendous war-ships, with tremendous
smoke billowing up from tremendous can-
non!-but I should not be surprised if
they soon should take to sailing toy
boats, toy canoes, toy yachts, and even
toy war-ships.
Anyway, the little pea-players, sisters
and brothers both, will like to make a
84







PLAYS FOR OCTOBER.


play-yacht, and a play-bicycle, with their
sticks and peas.
In building the yacht, begin with the
hull. Make first
a long shallow
box, omitting
the upper end-
PLAN OF BOX PART OF HULL.
stick at the stern
end, and putting a pea on the middle of the
upper end-stick of the bow end, also one
on the middle of the lower, as in the first
"plan." The middle peas are to hold the
mast. Next, build out the sharp bow, with





PLAN OF HULL COMPLETE (DOTTED PARTS BEING THOSE
WHICH COULD NOT BE SEEN IF HULL WERE SOLID).

four horizontal sticks, one perpendicular
stick, and two peas; and then build out
the blunt stern, with four shorter horizon-







STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


tal sticks, one perpendicular stick, and two
peas. This completes the hull of the
yacht, as in the second "plan."
Now cut a long stick for the mast, and
put one pea a short distance up from the
bottom, and two peas, a little apart, near
the top. Set the mast upright, by thrust-
ing the lower end down through the two
peas placed for it, and bend the tip at a
right angle for a flag, as in the picture.
Also set a short stick into the upper pea
at the prow, to serve for bowsprit and jib-
boom.
The yacht is now ready for its sails.
Into the lower pea on the mast, set a long
stick with a pea at its end, running out
horizontally over the deck and a little be-
yond the stern. This is the boom, which
holds in place the bottom of the mainsail.
Into the lower of the two peas at the top
of the mast, set a shorter stick, slanting
upward, with a pea at its end and another







PLAYS FOR OCTOBER.


near the end. This is the gaff, which
holds in place the top of the mainsail.
Connect the pea at the end of the gaff


THE YACHT.


with the pea at the end of the boom by a
long stick. This finishes the mainsail.
You can connect the pea nearest the
top of the mast with the pea near the end







STICK-AND PEA PLAYS.


of the gaff by a cord, as shown by the
dotted line, to represent the rope holding
the gaff in position. You can also run a
cord from the end of the boom to the
stern of the yacht, as shown by the dotted
line, to represent the rope which controls
the swing of the boom. Very queerly, the
sailors call this rope a sheet," the main-
sheet though you would think "sheet"
a better name for a sail than a rope.
We will now "go forward," as the sail-
ors say-in front of the mast, toward the
bow of the boat. And here, we will first
connect the pea at the end of the bow-
sprit, or jib-boom (the jib-boom is really a
spar at the end of the bowsprit, making it
longer), with the pea near the top of the
mast from which the gaff starts. This
stick must have a pea a little up from its
lower end, and this pea you connect by a
horizontal stick with the lower pea on the
mast from which the boom starts. The







PLAYS FOR OCTOBER.


triangle thus made is the jib, or triangular
sail in front of the mast.
Now your yacht is completed, and, if
you will make another, you can play at
the great yacht races between England
and the United States-and if you can
find a tiny acorn-cup, you can play it is
the silver cup the yacht America won
from England years ago, which is called
" the America's cup," and which is still the
prize for which the fastest yachts of the
two nations are raced.
If a boat with sails is too hard for you
to build, and you would like to make a
simple row-boat instead, or if you can
build the yacht and would like a row-boat
too, you can make it like the hull of the
yacht, and stop there. Only, in making
the row-boat, you omit, not only the upper
end-stick at the stern end of the "long
shallow box," but also the other upper end-
stick. You also omit the middle pea on







90 STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


the lower end-stick, as there is to be no
mast.
You can build a seat, half as high as the
sides of the boat, as shown by the dotted
seat in the plan of the row-boat. You
can also have a pea, with two short sticks
set into it like a V, on each of the upper
side-sticks, near the seat, for the row-





PLAN OF ROW-BOAT.

locks, to hold the oars, as shown in the
"plan." And any little boy with a jack-
knife can whittle a pair of tiny oars.
You can also make a boat-hook, and an
anchor, of sticks and peas, in the way
shown in the initial picture.
The older pea-players will be able to
build the bicycle alone, but the younger
ones may need the help of papa, or a big







PLAYS FOR OCTOBER.


brother who has a real one of his own -
and that will make it the more fun.
In building the bicy-
cle, make first the two
wheels that is what
the word bicycle means,
"bi" means two, and
" cycle means circle or
PLAN OF WHEEL-RIM.
wheel. The rim of each
wheel is like the letter O, as in the plan,"
only the eight sticks that join the eight
peas are of equal length. The eight spokes
that run from the hub to the rim are also
of equal length. Take a large pea for the
hub, set into it the eight spoke-sticks, the
same distance apart, put a pea on the end
of each, and join these peas by the eight
rim-sticks.
In making the front wheel, let one
spoke project its own length beyond the
rim. Put two peas at the end of this stick,
and one a little outside the rim. In mak-







STICK-AND-PEA PLAYS.


ing the back wheel, let one spoke project
about three-fourths its own length beyond
the rim. Put one pea at the end of this
stick.
Now place the two wheels in position,
and connect the pea on the end of the










0 0"
THE BICYCLE.

projecting spoke of the back wheel, by a
long stick, with the lower of the two peas
on the end of the projecting spoke of the
front wheel. This forms the top of the
frame. Next, set into the hub of the back
wheel a long stick, running toward the






PLAYS FOR OCTOBER.


front wheel, and slanting slightly down.
This stick should project about half the
length of a spoke beyond the rim, and
should have a very large pea at its end.
This very large pea is the lowest point of
the frame, where the pedals are. Con-
nect this pedal pea by a long stick with
the pea at the back end of the top of the
frame, and by another long stick with
the pea next the rim on the projecting
spoke of the front wheel. This completes
the frame -and, if you will look at the
frame sharply, you will see that the main
part, including the projecting spokes, is
diamond-shaped, with the forward point
clipped off; and that the great diamond is
divided into two triangles, with the tip of
the front and larger one clipped off.
You can run a cord from the hub of
the back wheel to the pedal pea, around
it, and back again, for the chain, as shown
by the dotted line in the picture or you







STICXK- AiD-PEA PLAYS.


can omit the cord and play it is a chain-
less bicycle.
The seat, as shown in the "plan," is made
of three sticks and three peas forming a
triangle, with a fourth stick
running in beyond the centre
From the forward point, and a
fourth pea on this fourth stick
PLAN OF at about the centre of the
SADDLE.
triangle. Hold this seat in
place, and run a short stick down through
the pea at its centre, into the pea at the
back end of the top of the frame.
The handle-bar is made of two sticks,
with peas at their ends, set into the pea
above the front end of the frame. These
sticks should slant a little back, to make
the curve of the handle-bar. This com-
pletes the bicycle, as shown in the picture.
Now a bicycle will not stand upright
of itself, except when running-and I
doubt if your very smartest doll, even






PLAYS FOR OCTOBER.


your boy doll, will be able to ride this
bicycle. So you best run a stick through
one of the lower peas of each wheel.
These sticks, with peas at their ends, as
shown by the dotted sticks and peas in
the picture, will hold the bicycle upright.
This stick-and-pea bicycle looks very
well, you will think, but, after all, it is a
little like a paper doll!-
a paper doll may look as
thick and as round as a
china doll, from one point
of view, but from another
you see it has only the
thickness of cardboard.
In like manner, the side-
view of this bicycle is
better than the front or
THE PEDALS.
back end-view.
If you are very skilful, though you
and papa--you can set even this right.
You can build out a pedal each side of







96 STICK- AND PEA PLAYS.

the pedal pea at the bottom of the frame,
as shown by the picture of the pedals.
And you can make a double or forked
frame, back and front, within
which the wheels will really turn,
as shown by the picture of the
double or forked frame, with
hub and two spokes of wheel
in place. But, even with these
improvements, I doubt if any
doll will ever ride a stick-and-
pea bicycle as fast as you ride
THE
FORKED your own real bicycle.
In the fall, if you live in the
country, you can gather the red berries
of the black alder, or winterberry, and
use them in place of peas and your
stick-and-berry objects will be very gay
indeed.












PART XI.


PLAYS FOR NOVEMBER.

HE little pea-players who
have played the April
plays, and made the
Letters of the stick-and-
pea alphabet, will re-
member that the letter T
is one of the easiest of the twenty-six.
You slip three peas on a stick, one in
the middle, one at each end. You take a
second stick, a little longer than the first,
if you like, and slip a pea on one end,
then thrust the other end into the middle
pea on the first stick. That is all. The
letter T is the first letter of a happy
day Thanksgiving.
Thanksgiving Day is Thankful Day.




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