• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 "Robinson Crusoe," and a voyage...
 The Hartz Mountains; and the...
 Lost in the forest; the charcoal-burners;...
 The storm; the recovery; the...
 The boys in the city: a happy...
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Every man in his place
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087578/00001
 Material Information
Title: Every man in his place the story of a city boy and a forest boy
Physical Description: 128,p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Blackie & Son ( Publisher )
Publisher: Blackie & Son
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: [1899?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Boys -- Juvenile fiction -- Germany   ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Forests and forestry -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Mountain life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
City and town life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Imagination -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Kindness -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- Harz Mountains (Germany)   ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1899   ( rbprov )
Juvenile literature -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1899
Genre: Prize books (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Date of publication from prize inscription.
General Note: Engraved title page; pictorial front cover and spine.
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087578
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002231569
notis - ALH1948
oclc - 154200233

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 1a
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Table of Contents
        Page 4
    "Robinson Crusoe," and a voyage to Heligoland
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    The Hartz Mountains; and the delusion
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Lost in the forest; the charcoal-burners; trout-fishing
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
    The storm; the recovery; the compact
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
    The boys in the city: a happy end
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
    Back Cover
        Page 129
        Page 130
    Spine
        Page 131
Full Text





















Sr. THOMAS' SUNDAY SCH8
STOURBRIDG E.



priae in Class Z ,
Fol Good I Attendance and Good Conduct.



CITrt C II fT rT' > lr


Mali


I U.J Li L1 Ef.t fl -,. )IiJ
Vicar.
ch, 899.


The Baldwin Library
University
S of
Fvorid I


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EVEiY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


PAGE 59.






C/


EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE:


THE STORY OF
A CITY BOY AND A FOREST BOY.


LONDON:
BLACKIE & SON, 49 OLD BAILEY, E.C.;
GLASGOW, EDINBURGH, AND DUBLIN.
















CONTENTS.




CHAPTER I.
Page
"ROBINSON CRUSOE," AND A VOYAGE TO HELIGOLAND, 5

CHAPTER II.
THE HARTZ MOUNTAINS; AND THE DELUSION,. . 26

CHAPTER III.
LOST IN THE FOREST; THE CHARCOAL-BURNERS; TROUT-
FISHING, .. .. . 45

CHAPTER IV.
THE STORM; THE RECOVERY; THE COMPACT, ..... .83

CHAPTER V.
THE BOYS IN THE CITY: A HAPPY END, . 109













EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.



CHAPTER I.
ROBINSON CRUSOE," AND A VOYAGE TO HELIGOLAND.

ANIEL BROCKMANN was a prosperous
-- rd wealthy merchant in the great com-
Smercial city of Hamburg. His warehouse,
in which was stored valuable goods from nearly
every quarter of the globe, was conveniently
situated in the vicinity of the harbour and docks.
The clerks, warehousemen, and porters employed
in it formed quite a small army; while the ships
engaged in carrying the produce of other coun-
tries backwards and forwards might almost be
said to represent a large fleet.
The imports and exports of Herr Brockmann
consisted of goods of every description. He did







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


not, as many merchants do, confine himself to any
special variety of goods; but dealt in anything
which was sent him by his numerous confidential
agents located in different countries. Thus his
stock comprised silks, dyes, and spices from the
East Indies; coffee, sugar, tobacco, and cotton
from those of the West; sealskins, oils, and
whalebone from the frozen North; Africa yielded
him a supply of ivory, ostrich-feathers, and herbs
used in the manufacture of medicines and dye-
stuffs; and Russia sent him stores of skins, tar,
and other produce. From tropical countries the
choicest and most delicious fruits found their way
to his warehouses, and from the Chinese Empire
loads of tea and bales of silk were constantly ar-
riving. Indeed, whatever was valuable in the
products of the earth, in manufactures, or as food,
was always to be found in plenty in the stores
of Herr Brockmann; and the quantity of goods he
received from and despatched to all parts of the
world in the course of a year was simply mar-
vellous in extent.
As a winter residence he occupied a magnifi-







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


cent mansion on the banks of an estuary of the
river Alster; and during summer he generally
resided in a handsome villa on the banks of the
Elbe, about half an hour's drive from the city.
His family consisted only of his wife and one
son, named Adelbert, who, at the time our story
commences, was between twelve and thirteen
years of age.
The merchant, we have said, was wealthy; and
in addition to an abundance of means, Providence
had blessed him with a kind heart and mind, so
he was generally beloved by all classes of the
community, but more especially by the sick and
the poor and needy, to whom he was at all times
most benevolent. Nothing gave him greater
pleasure than to aid struggling and deserving
persons in whatever position in life he found
them. His wife was of a similar disposition.
She supported her husband in the exercise of his
generosity, and was ever ready to aid and sym-
pathize with him in all his efforts to do good.
Adelbert was the only and adored son of this
happy couple. He possessed many of the good







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


qualities of his parents, and by his natural dis-
position and abilities, goodness of heart, and gen-
eral disingenuousness, bade fair to follow in the
footsteps of his worthy father. Not, however,
that he was without faults. He had many of the
failings and peculiarities of nearly every boy of
his age, not the least of which was an intense love
of adventure and romance, engendered by the
reading of a certain class of books, and strength-
ened by a vivid and lively imagination. To such
an extent did this feeling sometimes possess him,
and so completely were his senses, thoughts, and
even dreams imbued with it, that his parents
were frequently not a little puzzled to think
what the result of it all would turn out to be.
When any book interested him more than
usual, or any particular character took his fancy,
he would immediately identify himself with the
place or person, and burn to undergo the same
experience. As an instance, on his eleventh
birth-day his father presented him with a copy
of that wonderful and evergreen book Robinson
Crusoe, and it is needless to say Adelbert speedily







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


became deeply immersed in it. As might have
been expected from a boy of his ardent tempera-
ment the adventures of the immortal York mar-
iner produced a powerful effect on him; and not
satisfied with a first perusal, so entranced was he
with the stirring incidents detailed in it that he
read it over a second, third, and even a fourth
time, from the first page to the last, and each
time with ever-increasing interest. Thus far all
was well, and his father and mother were delighted
to observe the interest which their boy took in
the charming book. But an unexpected result
followed the fourth reading. This was nothing
more nor less than a desire on the part of Adelbert
to enact the part of Robinson Crusoe himself;
to encounter all the sufferings, undergo the priva-
tions, meet the difficulties, finally triumph, and
after overcoming all obstacles return home safely
and end his days peacefully among his friends,
in the same manner as the great original himself
had done!
From the moment that this idea took posses-
sion of his mind he could not rest till he was


9 7f







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


allowed to make a trial of it. His parents at first
ridiculed the notion and tried to laugh him out
of it; but still Adelbert insisted. They tried to
reason with him, to point out the folly of such
an idea, and its entire impracticability in the
present stage of time, when there was scarcely an
undiscovered island to be met with in any ocean
in the world. They explained to him that the
whole book itself was the work of the imagination
of a man who, so to speak, had never been beyond
the shores of his own country, and who wrote
the book in his own house in London; but all in
vain. Being slightly wilful in his temper, and
perhaps, as an only son, a little more humoured
than otherwise he would have been, Adelbert
pressed his point. After several conversations,
one night his father (who saw his way to perhaps
give his son a powerful lesson which would be
useful to him in after life) told him to go to bed,
and that he and his mother would have a talk
over the matter, and if Adelbert was still of the
same mind in the morning they would consider
what was best to be done. The boy retired with







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE. ii

a light heart, and was speedily in the land of
dreams, where his whole future island life was
rehearsed before him, and he awoke in the morn-
ing quite delighted. After the boy had gone to
his room Herr Brockmann said to his wife:
"After having thought over this silly idea of
Adelbert, my dear, I think it would not be a bad
thing to allow him to have a little of his own
way in the manner he desires. Depend upon it
he will soon tire of it. I propose to let him go
for a short time-indeed only till the first shower
of rain drives him home again, as it is sure to do;
and let him taste the pleasures of the life he so
much admires so long as it is only in a book.
I had the same desires when I was a boy, but
years and experience have completely dissipated
them. What do you say, dear?"
"I think your suggestion a very good one, and
likely to prove useful to him; but you must not
let him go too far. You know he is wilful and
impetuous, and may get himself into trouble or
catch a serious cold," replied Mrs. Brockmann.
There is little fear of that," replied her hus-







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


band. "In this pleasant time of the year"-it
was the height of summer-" little harm can be-
fall him even if he does' camp out,' as it is called,
for a night or two; and, as I said already, a good
heavy shower will soon wash the Crusoe fever
out of him, or I shall be very much surprised in-
deed."
So, to the great delight of Adelbert it was re-
solved to let him have a game at Robinson Crusoe;
and quite overlooking the fact that his prototype
did not seek his desolation, but encountered it
and considered it as a great misfortune, he went
gladly to work actually to prepare for himself a
miserable existence! He found that his plans
would not admit of his being shipwrecked, so he
had to content himself with beginning his experi-
ence of isolated life directly on the island. He
selected the most distant corner of his father's
garden, in which he constructed a rude hut of
branches of trees closely woven together, and he
fenced it round with some rails which he bor-
rowed from his father, forgetting that Robin-
son Crusoe had no father to borrow anything of







EVERY MAN. IN IIIS PLACE. 13
on his island. In this hut he placed a quantity
of clean straw, which with a couple of rugs which
he procured from home (his "ship," as he called
it) was to form his bed. He procured a couple
of goats, the milk of which was to form part of
his food, the other part being bread and other
articles which were to be handed to him daily
over the fence! So brightly had his imagination
coloured the whole scheme that the absurdity of
it was not apparent to him. But his brilliant
hopes were very badly realized, as his father had
rightly anticipated.
The youthful Crusoe, who had worked hard
all the first day, found himself very tired at
night, and after partaking of a supper of cold
meat and bread and butter, and a nice hot cup of
tea, he tethered his goats, or rather he tied them
to a tree outside of his fence, and retired to his
couch of straw with all the consciousness of hav-
ing done an excellent day's work, and having
fully earned the delightful repose he was about
to enjoy. True, he was very tired, and soon fell
asleep. But in the morning, somehow or other,







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


he did not feel so comfortable as he generally did
when he awoke on his nice soft downy bed at
home. There was a coldness in the air and a
dampness in the hut which he had not reckoned
upon; and his legs and arms were quite stiff and
pained. However, thought he, I will get accus-
tomed to it after a few weeks; and he went forth
to milk his goats for the first time. But the
goats had no idea of allowing him to do anything
of the kind, and stood on the defensive in such
a manner that he was afraid to approach them.
Disappointed in this, he had to make a breakfast
of bread and water, which was all he had by him
until the supply from over the fence arrived!
When night came he was not quite so tired as
he had been on the previous evening, and on
retiring to his couch of straw he had a difficulty
in falling asleep. As he lay, turning first on one
side and then on the other, the rustling of the fresh
straw grated uncomfortably on his ears, and not a
few of the prickly stems made themselves uncere-
moniously familiar. He began to think that he
had made a mistake, and in doing so had made






EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


a fool of himself. What would his father and
mother say? Sleep he could not, and his thoughts
were far from pleasant, when suddenly a large
raindrop fell upon his face! His roof was not
waterproof, thought he, and he resolved to pro-
cure some felt from the 'ship' in the morning.
By-and-by, however, a regular heavy summer
shower began to fall, and in less than ten minutes
everything in the camp, proprietor included, were
thoroughly drenched, the rugs of Crusoe junior
serving more as receptacles for the rain than as
a protection against it. What was to be done?
He got up and dressed himself in his wet clothes,
and felt particularly miserable. He looked at
the sky and the stars-the former seemed very
watery, and after looking by the aid of a candle
at the state of affairs inside the hut, he concluded
he was a fool; that to read about Robinson
Crusoe's experiences in a book was all very well,
but that to try and perform them practically was
only the act of an ass; and that the best thing
he could do was to put his pride in his pocket,
go home to bed, and in the morning come back







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


and remove all traces of the camp. Without any
further hesitation he carried out his resolution.
He entered the house dripping wet, and after his
father and mother, who were sitting talking about
him before a bright warm fire, had had a good
laugh at his miserable appearance, he got a change
of clothing, a good supper, a good lecture; and
then followed a good, sound, refreshing sleep.
And so ended Adelbert Brockmann's futile at-
tempt to live on a desolate island!
Although this adventure cooled his romantic
ardour for a considerable time, it did not exactly
cure it. Some weeks afterwards he was one day
reading a book about shipwrecks and disasters
at sea, wherein were depicted some stirring adven-
tures, which fired his blood and made him long
to experience a storm at sea. He remembered
the Crusoe episode, but he reasoned with himself
that it was an adventure upon land, whereas
what he was now reading about took place on
the sea, therefore there was no comparison be-
tween them. At length-he resolved that he would
ask his father to take him with him the next
(144)







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


time he went to Heligoland, which he frequently
did in the course of a year to visit some relations
who resided there.
His father, who suspected his motive but said
nothing about it, promised to grant his request
as soon as he conveniently could; and in the
course of a few days father and son were on board
a vessel bound for Heligoland, an island which be-
longs to Great Britain, and which lies equidistant
between the mouths of the Elbe and the Weser.
Adelbert was in ecstasies, and as the ship
passed Cuxhaven he said to his father:
"Oh! father, I hope we shall have a good
storm before we get to Heligoland."
"Perhaps we may have," dryly responded his
father; and if we do, you will find it no joke, I
can assure you. It is all very well to read about
storms at sea in books, when you are sitting at
a comfortable parlour fire, but a very different
thing to be personally in one. At least that is
my experience, and I hope you have not for-
gotten your Robinson Crusoe escapade."
"Oh, no!" replied Adelbert, blushing, "I will
(144) B







18 EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.
not forget that for a long time; but I would like
to see something better than this smooth un-
ruffled water-it is almost as motionless as a
mirror."
"For which I am very thankful. But what
sort of a sea would you like to meet with?" said
his father with a smile.
"I should like to see, to see-" said Adelbert,
at a loss for words to describe exactly what he
desired to convey. I would like to see the
waves running mountains high, and washing
everything overboard-"
"You would go with them, my boy," said Herr
Brockmann suggestively.
Not heeding the interruption, Adelbert pro-
ceeded:-" While the winds would tear the
shrouds to pieces, and whistle through the rig-
ging, and-and-make the ship shiver and
tremble like a living thing. I should like to see
the ship rise on the crest of the mountainous
waves, and next moment be buried in the trough
of the sea, from whence it would rise again like
a bird on the wing-"







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE. 19
Yes, yes," interrupted his father; very pretty,
no doubt. You have an excellent memory, my
son, as I observed all these fine sentences in a
book which you left open on the parlour table
the other day; but if I have anything to say in
the matter, I would rather not be in your com-
pany when your courage is put to the proof."
"That may be sooner than you expect, sir,"
said the captain of the steamer, who had acci-
dentally overheard the conversation between Herr
Brockmann and his son. "This young gentle-
man may perhaps have a taste of a strong north-
west wind before he gets to the island. I don't
at all like the appearance of the clouds ahead of
us, I can tell him; he may have more than enough
of it before he's done with it."
"Do you anticipate anything serious, captain?"
said Herr Brockmann anxiously, for he was what
is generally called "a bad sailor," that is to say,
the least roughness on the water made him sick.
"I don't expect anything more than a squall;
it will not last above an hour, and there will be
no danger. If the young gentleman is not







20 EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.
afraid," and here he looked at Adelbert in a
curious manner, "he can stay on deck and see
the fun, if he cares about being lashed to the
mast to prevent him being washed overboard;"
and here the captain gave a significant look to
his father, but the boy only exclaimed:
"Oh! that will be glorious! I hope we shall
have just such a storm as I was reading about
the other day."
"IMy young gentleman, as your father said,
storms that you read about and storms that
you see are very different. Let me tell you that
if you are not washed overboard in the one that
is approaching you will have something to tell
your friends about when you get home that will
open their eyes, and perhaps tell you they don't
believe you, for those who believe in book storms
will have no faith in the real article."
Adelbert's joyful excitement at this unex-
pected treat was so great that he could scarcely
contain himself, and he was just about to say
something grand about "clouds sweeping," "out-
spread wings," "flying thunderbolts," and so on,







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


when a great swelling wave came right across
the bows of the ship, throwing her roughly on
her side, and breaking in a heavy shower over
the deck, drenching everything which it touched.
The shock was so sudden that, had his father not
caught hold of him, Adelbert would have been
thrown to the other side of the vessel; as it was
he staggered so much that it was some moments
before he was able to speak, and when he did his
father observed that he looked a little pale.
"Oh!" said he, as bravely as he could, "that
took me by surprise; I was not prepared for it.
When the next wave comes I will stand as firmly
as an oak holds by its roots."
"My lad," said the captain, laughing, "if you
think the waves or the wind ask your liberty
before they come, or can be ordered about as I
have to order my sailors, you are greatly mis-
taken. They don't stand upon ceremony-at
least I've never seen them do it, and I've been at
sea now more than forty years."
Adelbert looked rather abashed at this state-
ment, and his father gave the captain a smile of







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


approval. The latter suggested that both should
now go below, as the squall was coming too near
to be pleasant, and he would have to attend to
his duty. Herr Brockmann, however, thought he
would be better on deck, as the close atmosphere
of the cabin made him worse, and concluded to
remain where he was. Both being advised
to hold tightly to some rails, they, as the cap-
tain said, now stood prepared to "take their
chance !"
"Now," said Adelbert, "father, we shall see
what a storm really is; I am sure it will be a
fine sight. Oh, I wish it would come quickly!"
"Yes, we shall see, my boy," said his father, as
he shrugged his shoulders, "we shall see;" and
the waves came rushing nearer and nearer, and
the noise of the wind increased.
If the first wave took Adelbert by surprise,
what did the storm itself do? As it neared the
ship the clouds suddenly broke, and as the light-
ning darted forth from them there followed peals
of thunder which fairly shook the very ship;
while the wild moaning of the winds, and the







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


restlessness of the waves, proved that a squall
was not a bad semblance of a storm.
Adelbert and his father were soon drenched
through, but this the boy did care about; he
lost his cap, which was blown overboard, but
that he did not mind; he even laughed to his
father as his long fair hair streamed in the wind,
and remarked that if this was only a squall
he should so like to see a real storm-a regular
hurricane, he said; but his father only shook his
head, and expressed a hope that it would soon
be all over. The boy stood firm; he joked and
laughed amid the wind and the fierce beating
rain which now began to fall; his cheeks red-
dened and fairly glowed with excitement, while
his eyes seemed to sparkle with pleasure. There
could be no doubt he was thoroughly enjoying
the squall! But Adelbert had reckoned without
his host; he forgot that there were two sides to
the most of things, even to a storm. Suddenly he
began to feel a peculiar faintness come over him,
his eyes grew dim, and his hitherto ruddy cheeks
assumed a white and livid appearance, his head







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


dropped on his shoulder, and he looked a very
picture of misery.
"What is the matter with you, Adelbert?"
said his father, as he grasped at him with one
hand.
"Oh, father!" said he, "I'm so sick! I'm
dying. Take me out of this, or I shall fall down
and be washed overboard. Oh dear! oh dear!
I wish I had stayed at home. I am dying, I am
dying!"
"My boy, it will be a bad job if it comes to
that; but there's no fear of that," said the cap-
tain, with a slight laugh, as he approached, all
wrapped up in his oil-skin waterproofs. "You
are only sea-sick, and you will be all the better
for it afterwards. Sit down and suffer patiently,
but don't let go your hold of the rails."
As Adelbert did so the captain said, "What do
you think of the raging waves and the whistling
winds now, my young friend? The lightning is
very pretty, and the thunder puts you in mind
of a field of battle, I suppose, eh? Are your
book storms anything like this little bit of a







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE,


squall?" and he proceeded to banter the boy for
a few moments, when he kindly told him not to
be frightened, as it was only a slight attack of
sea-sickness which had affected him, and which
would disappear as soon as he set foot on land,
which he hoped he would be able to do in a
couple of hours; or perhaps sooner, if the storm
would abate. But all the beauties of the storm
had vanished from the mind and gaze of the
youthful enthusiast, and he lay, as he said him-
self afterwards, like "a bundle of wet clothes,"
until he was carried on shore by two sailors, and
placed safely on the red cliffs of Heligoland. Of
course he speedily recovered, but the terrors
of that night were not soon erased from his
mind. He had had enough of the sea to last him
for some time, and when afterwards he did go
short voyages with his father he never sighed or
wished for either storms or squalls.








<_: -- :,, .-.-,.. -,. -.. ..I
-Af






CHAPTER II.

THE HARTZ MOUNTAINS; AND THE DELUSION.

FEW weeks after the eventful voyage to
Heligoland Adelbert was reading a book
about the famous Hartz Mountains of
North-western Germany, and of the many strange
things to be seen in that strange district, includ-
ing the wonderful Spectre of the Brocken, the
charcoal-burners, and the toymakers; and the
wonders of which he read had the usual effect of
raising a desire in his breast to see them. The
glowing descriptions given by the writer of the
book fairly entranced him. When he read of the
rugged rocks, the tremendous cliffs, chasms, and
valleys; the rushing mountain torrents; the mag-
nificent forests, tenanted by the stately stag and
timid roe-deer, and of other parts where dwelt







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


the wild boar and other game of coarser kind;
of the dark caves in the mountain sides, from
whence swarthy miners brought forth precious
metals, and gathered treasures which they never
enjoyed,-Adelbert was fairly "glamoured," and
a visit to this most wonderful part of his own
country became a fixed desire in his mind. He
spoke to his father several times on the subject
of a visit to the Hartz Mountains, but the old
gentleman only shook his head, and said "he
would see about it by-and-by."
Adelbert, however, at length grew tired of
waiting, and being accustomed to getting his own
way by dint of persistency-not always the best
way, be it borne in mind-he appealed to his
mother one morning after his father had left
home for his office.
Oh! mother," said he, "I wish you would
persuade father to let me go there, only for once.
I shall never ask him to take me anywhere else,
or feel any desire to leave Hamburg again, until
I am old enough to choose for myself. I am
sure I shall die of longing, if I am not allowed to







28 EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.

go; please do, mother, make father send me
there !"
"My dear, foolish boy!" replied his mother, "I
cannot make your father send you to the Hartz
Mountains. He knows better than you or I do
whether it will be for your good to go there or
not. As for your dying of longing, there is little
fear of that; little boys never die of such a disease,
and I am surprised that a man of thirteen years
of age, as you are, should say such a thing; if you
said you would die if you longed for a piece of
sweet-cake and did not get it, perhaps it would
be nearer the truth. Besides, Adelbert, you must
know that it is too late in the year for any one
to think of a journey to the cold Hartz, unless
their business compels them to do so. Why, my
dear son, at this time of the year"-it was then
October-" the mountains are covered with snow,
the valleys are damp and filled with clouds of
mist to such an extent that I am certain before
you were twenty-four hours in any part of them
you would be anxious to be at home again. No,
no, my boy, put it out of your head at present,







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


and when spring-time comes round again your
father and I will consider it, and if your father
thinks it right you should go, I am sure he will
be only too glad to send you there, and perhaps
go with you, for you know how kind and indul-
gent he is to you in nearly everything you desire.
Perhaps before spring-time comes again you will
have read some other books which will put fresh
notions into that silly head of yours, and you
will want to go in a different direction. Put the
Hartz Mountains on one side for the winter, and
then, as your father says, 'we shall see.'"
Of course, under the circumstances, Adelbert
had no alternative but to wait; but it seemed a
very, very long time till spring did come. In
due time, however, the cycle of the year wound
its way round to the month of June, and the
Hartz Mountains and its wonders retained pos-
session of the mind of Adelbert. During the
winter he had had many conversations with his
parents about them, but had invariably been put
off by the remark of his father, "we shall see,"
which rather discouraged him.







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


J .T ],.1 of his surprise, however, when one morn-
ing as the family sat at breakfast, and while
Adelbert was expatiating on the beauties and
:..i- -,in,-, of the Hartz, in his usual enthusiastic
manner, he was interrupted by his m*tther, who
-au... with a smile:
"P'.i- ic..*, my son, patience; your birthday
comes next week, and no person but your father
and niy-elt' knows what is going to be done, if
God spares us in health;" and she held up her
:.2-: ;, as much as to say, "You must not ask
any q i.. --ti.:.i," and his father appeared so deeply
engrossed in his newspaper that he could not pos-
sibly have heard a word of what was said.
A 1:1.-l r was shrewd enough to see that some
ip.: .-dit surprise was in store for him, so he pru-
ti.- tly said nothing; but when he got into his
own room he took down from the shelves all the
books he had which related to the Hartz, and
commenced to read them with a fresh sensation of
pleasure, which he felt would very soon be real-
ized. It would be tedious to relate all that he
:I.':uit, felt, or spoke on this memorable morn-







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


ing, but from what the reader already knows of
the character of Adelbert it can readily be im-
agined; it consisted of a little sense mixed up
with a large quantity of nonsense and froth, the
latter, like the poet's "fury," signifying nothing.
At length came the much-wished-for 10th of
June, "the anniversary of the natal day of the
heir of the house of Brockmann," as an elderly
gentleman said at the breakfast table, and which
a youthful cousin said to Adelbert, in an under-
tone, put him in mind of the "House that Jack
built!" In a side-room were placed the numer-
ous and beautiful articles which had been sent to
Adelbert by his relations as birth-day presents;
but what pleased him most was a complete suit
of travelling clothes, and all the articles neces-
sary for a long journey into-anywhere. While
he was admiring them, and examining each article
in succession, he was attracted by a ticket pinned
over them, and which bore the words, "An outfit
for a journey to the Hartz Mountains," and, in
the writing he recognized the penmanship of his
mother. He was overjoyed, and when his parents







32 EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.

entered the room to ask him what he thought
of his presents his heart was too full for utter-
ance.
Herr Brockmann and his wife, it seems, had
long entertained an idea of visiting the Hartz
Mountains, and as this happened to be an oppor-
tune time for the merchant to leave his business
for a few weeks, they had resolved to carry out
the project. Adelbert, not being aware of this,
concluded that the journey was about to be made
solely on his account; and his father did not con-
sider it necessary to undeceive him.
The day of departure was fixed, and early in
the morning the conveyance drove up to the door.
The merchant, his wife, and son, with the neces-
sary servants, soon took their seats inside and
outside, and before much time had elapsed they
were driving along briskly in the direction of the
Hartz, to the indefinable delight of Adelbert.
The weather was glorious, the air perfectly clear
and light, and everything betokened a holiday
underneath sunshine and blue sky. The boy, in
his impetuosity, wished to push on without stop-







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


ping. In his desire to get to the much-desired
mountains he forgot that the poor horses required
food and rest on their journey; but the more sober
counsel of his father overruled him. However,
he beguiled the time as best he could in picturing
to himself the delightful scenery which he was
about to behold; and the pictures which his im-
agination drew were such as never have been
painted on canvas or written on paper.
On the third morning, however, after their
departure from Hamburg he obtained a glimpse
of the Selkethal, one of the loveliest valleys of the
Hartz, and his delight knew no bounds. Here,
thought he, is the Hartz at last! Here are the
brooks that plash and dash, that leap and whirl
like living crystal over the pebbly courses of the
stream. On every side he saw mountains rise
before him, some covered with dense forests,
others formed of nothing but hard gray stone.
On the undulating surface of the valley were
stretched out before him hundreds of acres of
splendid meadowland, on which fed thousands
of sheep and lowing cattle; while the little plots
(144) C







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


of garden ground, sprinkled here and there, were
filled with flowers of every hue, from which
wafted the most delicious odours. A soft blue
haze hung over and descended from the surround-
ing hills, while from the cool shade of the neigh-
bouring trees the song of the birds rose like
music in a wilderness.
The sight was so entrancing to the excitable
mind of Adelbert that he obtained permission
from his father to leave the carriage and make
his way for a time on foot. By-and-by his father
and mother also alighted from the carriage, and
the driver being ordered to proceed in front, the
three walked behind and enjoyed the beautiful
scenery which surrounded them, undisturbed by
the sound of wheels or other city associations.
As Adelbert walked in advance of his parents
he suddenly stopped, and, holding his hand to his
ear, exclaimed:
"What is that?"
His father listened for a moment, and then said
it was only the sound of some cow-bells. But
the youthful imagination of the boy had already







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


decided that it was the echo of fairy music from
the forest glades on the mountain sides. His
father only smiled and said:
"Well, well, Adelbert, we shall see!"
Presently the loud and angry barking of a dog
was heard, immediately followed by the hoarse
voice of a man calling upon it to keep quiet.
The sound of the bells drew nearer, and in a few
minutes afterwards there issued from the under-
wood close by where they were a herd of sleek
drowsy cattle, each bearing a bell attached by a
leather belt about its neck, the tinkling of
which had first attracted the attention of Adel-
bert. The cows turned up their large dreamy
eyes, and the herdsman touched his forehead
respectfully to the strangers, wished them good-
day, and passed on without stopping.
Adelbert was delighted. The whole scene ap-
peared to him like a picture out of a book; and
he now felt quite convinced that his father could
have nothing to say against his long-expressed
desire to visit the beautiful Hartz Mountains.
The sound of the cow-bells gradually died







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


away, and the cattle were finally lost in the dis-
tance. On turning a corner of the road Adelbert
came suddenly upon a broad stream, on the edge
of which stood a plain but substantially built
mill, having a huge wheel dipping into the water,
and causing a clatter which raised the echoes of
the valley all around. After admiring this for a
short time the party proceeded onwards, until
they were again arrested by a shout of joy from
the exuberant Adelbert. Running on in advance
he had come upon an opening in the valley from
which the heights of some distant mountains
could be clearly seen.
"Oh, father! mother!" he cried, "look at this
beautiful sight!" and away up on the point of a
mass of bright red rock they looked and saw,
glistening in the sunshine, a large castle sur-
mounted by lofty towers, crowned by golden
vanes which gleamed like stars. The whole
scene was most magnificent. Nobly and proudly
the grim and grand old walls of the castle looked
down upon the valley beneath. In the back dis-
tance lay the picturesque old mill, and all around







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


was joyous with the flush of the flowers, enlivened
with the songs of the birds.
Herr Brockmann and his wife stood gazing in
silent admiration at the magnificent scene before
them,/while Adelbert, more proud of himself than
ever, exclaimed:
"Now, father, after this you will never call me
an idle, foolish dreamer again, because I longed
to make a journey to the Hartz Mountains.
Where could you see such scenery but here?"
Yes, my boy, you are quite right. There is no
scenery can equal that of these mountains at this
time of the year; but if you were to visit them
in the dead of winter, when the mountains are
covered with snow and not a tree in the forest
has a leaf on its branches; when the broad rush-
ing brook which turns the mill-wheel is but a
solid mass of ice, and nought but desolation reigns
around,-then perhaps your admiration of the
Hartz might undergo a little change. At that
season of the year the poor huntsmen have to
stay at home and live upon the hard-earned sav-
ings of the summer season; the charcoal-burners







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


cannot venture into the forest to follow their
occupation, both from fear of losing their way
amid the snow-covered tracks, and the shortness
of the daylight. You, who have been brought
up to a city life could no more endure the sever-
ity of a winter in the mountains than you could
become Pope of Rome. No, my boy, you must
learn to look at both sides of a question; and how-
ever much you may admire the sunny side, never
forget that there is a darker and a colder one."
Adelbert, who had listened thoughtfully to his
father, then said:
"Yes, father, but we have winter in Hamburg
the same as here. To those who are accustomed
to it in the city it must be much the same to
those who are used to it here, is it not?"
"Well, Adelbert, since you put the matter in
such a straightforward way, I must say it will
be; but in the city we have better means and
facilities for contending against the severities of
winter than the poor people who inhabit these
mountains and valleys can have," said Herr
Brockmann.







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


For all you say, father, I should like to be a
huntsman or a charcoal-burner among the moun-
tains and forests of the Hartz, if only for a short
time," said Adelbert, gathering courage from his
father's admission of the truth of his last
remark.
"0 ho, my son!" replied his father, "is that
what is in the wind? Have you not yet got over
your Robinson Crusoe venture and your voyage
to Heligoland? I thought these would have
driven some of the romance out of that silly head
of yours. If, as I say, you had been born and
brought up in the forest, that might be all very
well; but you were born and bred under very
different circumstances. You do not seem to
understand that every one should endeavour to
adapt himself to the position in which he is
placed, unless, indeed, his abilities or opportuni-
ties enable him to look higher; then, by all means,
a person ought to do so, if he can without jeo-
pardizing himself. But it is not in the nature of
man to lower himself in the social scale, which
you would undoubtedly do if you were to become







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


either a hunter or a charcoal-burner, noble though
these occupations appear in your eyes, and neces-
sary as they are in the estimation of others.
Every man in his place: every man should try to
fill the place in which God has placed him; and
your place, it seems to me, is to settle yourself
down in Hamburg, so that you may be thoroughly
educated and instructed to carry on the great
business which our forefathers founded, and which
is now in a more flourishing condition than ever.
You would make but a sorry huntsman, I am
certain; and as for a charcoal-burner, you would
burn your ten fingers off before you had a penny-
worth to sell."
Perhaps I would," said the boy; "but I would
like to try it."
"Adelbert," interposed his mother, "you are a
very stupid, self-willed boy, and what your father
says is quite right. The occupations you have
mentioned are quite as honourable as any other,
but those who are to follow them should be born
to them. Providence, however, has placed you
in a very different position, and I am surprised







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


that a boy of your years should still persist in
entertaining such foolish notions."
Adelbert was a little taken aback by this re-
proof, but, boy-like, it was soon out of his head,
and in a few minutes he was again dreaming of
a forest life, and assuring himself that it was the
finest thing in the world.
The farther the Brockmanns proceeded on
their journey the more confirmed did Adelbert
become in his opinion. Favoured by the fine
weather and the wildly romantic scenery his
whole soul was filled with admiration, and his
desire to remain among the mountains became
stronger and stronger.
After spending about a fortnight on the way,
remaining a day or two here and there, Herr
Brockmann resolved to remain for a fortnight at
the picturesque town of Ilsenburg, where he had
some transactions to arrange with the proprietor
of the extensive ironworks there. This charm-
ing little town was the centre of a fine neighbour-
hood, from whence nice drives could be taken in
nearly every direction; and he came to this con-







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


elusion all the more readily because his wife was
tired, and required rest after the fatigues of
travelling:
For a few days, then, Adelbert revelled amid
the pleasures and beauties of the little Hartz
town. The house which his father had taken for
their accommodation stood close to the banks of the
bright little river Ilse, and here Adelbert used to
stand every morning and hold an imaginary con-
versation with the murmuring stream as it mean-
dered slowly along on its way to the greater river
beyond.
The river Ilse seemed to greet Adelbert as he
approached its banks, and after having secured
his attention he fancied that it said to him, "Come,
little boy, come, and follow me on my way. The
course is beautiful, and we will be joyful and
frolicsome together. Come with me, and I will
show you where the proud oak rears its head,
and where the broad branches of the beech-trees
spread themselves. Come, and I will show you
where the bald rocks rise, and from whence spring
the purling brooks which flow so merrily down







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE. 43
their sides. Come! and I will lead you to where
the birds sing sweetest and the flowers bloom
brightest. Come! and as we go along together
we shall leap and dance like two happy children.
Come! we can be happier and better than is pos-
sible in the great, mighty, troubled city!"
So the little Ilse seemed to plead in the ears of
Adelbert, and he listened only too readily to the
voice of the charmer. Then, when he thought
the rivulet had said all it had to say, he would
respond:-
"Wait but a short time, little stream, and I
will come with you and enjoy the pleasures you
have told me of. Wait! and I will come and
wander with you by the side of the rugged rocks,
and listen to the sound of the purling brooks
which flow from them. Wait! and I will accom-
pany you to where the oak and the beech cast
their proud heads on high. Now that I have
found what I have longed for; wait! wait! and
I will come!"
Now this may sound all very pretty, but it is
utter nonsense. The rivulet never said a word,







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


It certainly murmured as it flowed along, but it
was only the boyish imagination of Adelbert that
formed these murmurs into words. But for all
that, the effect produced upon the impressionable
mind of the boy was such, that it ultimately led
him to take a step which resulted in an end
being put to his romantic notions.
One morning he rose with the sun, having
during the night formed a resolution to accept
the invitation of the delusive Ilse. He dressed
himself very quietly, in order that he might not
disturb his parents, who slept in an adjoining
chamber. He put some bread and meat into a
satchel, which he slung across his back, and,
taking a stick in his hand, he stepped lightly down
stairs, passed over the courtyard, where he met
one of the servants, who wondered what the
young city gentleman could be doing out of bed
so early. Observing her surprise Adelbert said
that he was going for a walk, and that if his
parents inquired for him, to say that they need
not be anxious about him, and that he should be
back about mid-day.














CHAPTER III.

LOST IN THE FOREST; THE CHARCOAL-BURNERS; TROUT-
FISHING.

SHEN Adelbert set out for his morning
WIN walk it was perhaps his intention to be
back by mid-day; but it is also equally
probable that he had no particular idea of what
he really said or thought. He walked down to
the side of the Ilse, and as he heard its murmur-
ings as usual, the invitation seemed to be repeated.
He turned in the direction in which it was run-
ning, and with a gladsome, but at the same time,
it must be added, a thoughtless heart, he com-
menced to follow its course. The fresh dewy
breath of the morning invigorated him, the flowers
seemed to smile at him, and even the bushes on
the banks appeared to welcome him, while the
song-birds which fluttered everywhere about him







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


seemed to chirp forth their delight at seeing him.
At least so he thought, and that was enough for
him. As he pursued the course of the stream an
elegant roe-deer sprang from the covert, and see-
ing him, was about to run, but as Adelbert stopped
on its appearance it halted also, and gazed at him
with its large full eyes, appearing to think there
was nothing to be feared from the smartly
dressed, fair-haired, red-cheeked boy. It stood
gazing at him for a few moments, when he
plucked a branch from a bush and held it to-
wards the animal, which, however, took fright at
this apparent act of antagonism, and stepped
slowly back into the underwood from which it
had emerged. Adelbert followed it, but as he
approached it gradually receded, until it turned
round, entered an opening in the underwood,
gracefully bounded over a small bush which lay
in its way, and the next moment was lost to
view.
"Poor frightened thing!" said the boy to him-
self, "it might have known that I would not
have hurt such a pretty, graceful creature."







EVERY, MAN IN HIS PLACE.


He continued to follow the course of the rivu-
let, which now began to diverge through the
forest, and as he proceeded he was more and more
pleased with everything he saw. In a short time
he began to feel that he was now fairly in the
midst of the forest, and the very thought of
being so acted upon him as a charm. Through the
openings of the trees he could perceive the steep
and precipitous rocks towering on every side of
him, while the tall oaks and burly beeches waved
their noble heads as if in welcome. The rivulet
skipped joyfully along beside him, as if overjoyed
at his company,-now springing headlong from
rock to rock, now forming a deep pool prepara-
tory to making another run. Beyond the slight
rustle of the leaves everything around him was
calm and still. He was indeed happy! What
was the world to him, or the great- city, with its
noise, bustle, and turmoil? Here he was in a
world by himself-the wondrous world of the
famous Hartz Mountains, of which he had been
for months dreaming and longing for! As such
thoughts, or at all events something akin to







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


them, passed through his mind, he went on and
on, gazing, listening, dreaming, and never think-
ing of the distance he was placing between him-
self and his father's house at Ilsenburg, or of
the anxiety which his absence would cause to
his parents.
"It is but early yet," said he to himself, "and
it is not time for me to turn and go back; and
now that I know my way I can return quicker
than I came."
By-and-by he began to feel hungry, and as he
sat down on a grassy knoll to eat something
from his satchel he said:
"Although I am hungry it cannot be breakfast
time yet. The morning air and the fresh breeze
have whetted my appetite keener than usual. I
suppose that is it."
As he sat eating his bread and meat he thought
he never enjoyed a humble repast so much in his
life, and his vivid imagination once more ran
away with him. Completing his meal with a
draught from the brook he once more set out on
his journey. Sometimes he would be attracted







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


by the song of some bird, and would stop and
listen to it for a few moments; at another time
the tapping of a woodpecker on the trunk of a
tree would cause him to pause and listen to it;
when suddenly he was startled at the sound of a
woodman's axe, apparently not far distant from
him.
"Ah!" said he joyfully, "that must be a char-
coal-burner felling trees for his kiln. I must
find out where he is, and perhaps he will tell me
all about his life in the forest. I have some
money in my pocket, and I will ask him to invite
me to breakfast with him; his cottage cannot be
far distant from where he is working. I can see
from the shadows on the mountains that the
morning cannot be very far advanced yet, and I
have plenty of time to be home by mid-day.
The sounds seem to come from the left, so I must
leave the little river for a time, but I can easily
find my way back to it again. I am not afraid
of losing myself; and even if I do, the charcoal-
burner will find me and show me the way
home."







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


So he said Good-bye" to the little Ilse, and,
turning to the left, entered the forest in the
direction he thought the sounds came from. Not
being, aware that the extreme stillness which
prevailed all around him caused the sound to
travel much farther than it really seemed, Adel-
bert pushed on; but as he did so he suddenly
discovered that the sound now came from quite
another direction. In fact, in forcing his way
through some bushes he had turned at a right
angle from the course he was pursuing with-
out knowing it. For a moment he was at a
loss how to proceed, but as his determination did
not fail him he again turned in the direction of
the sound, and proceeded in search of it, or
rather of the cause of it, little thinking of the
quandary he was getting himself into.

"Thorough bush, thorough brake,"

up hill and down hill he went, now climbing and
clambering over mounds, now into a valley, up
the other side of which he had to toil with much
difficulty, as the small stones gave way beneath







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


his feet and brought him on his knees; now con-
fronted by a steep bank, which he could only
overcome on all-fours, to the sad detriment of his
hands and his clean white trousers. Anon he
would arrive at a stretch of furze, through which
he had to force his way, and which did not im-
prove the elbows of his blouse. Now he would
slip and slide, saving himself only by clinging to
roots and shrubs, and sometimes, when no such
aid was at hand, falling back again to the bottom.
But he was naturally of a courageous disposition,
and these difficulties only made him the more
determined to gain his object. Pushing boldly
forward the sound of the axe seemed to come
nearer, and he felt certain he would confront the
charcoal-burner before many minutes had elapsed,
when, behold! in front of him there ran a rapid
mountain stream, too broad for him to leap
across.
"Here," thought he, suddenly becoming pro-
saic, "here is a nice finish to my morning walk!"
He then sat down and began to consider with
himself what was best to be done. Should he







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


go back? No. The way forward had been long
and tiresome enough, and it would never do to
return without having accomplished his purpose,
which was to reach the charcoal-burner who had
attracted him by the noise of his axe.
"The only thing I can do is to wade over," he
thought; "and even if I do get wet, I shall soon
be dry again in this warm sunny weather."
He proceeded to take off his boots and stock-
ings, and having tucked up his trousers he
began to search for the most convenient place to
cross. He soon found a place where several
large stones lay together so close as almost to
enable him to step from one to the other, which
he did, and was pleased to find that the water
over them barely reached over his ankles. At
length he stood on the last one, but there was yet
a few feet between him and the bank. Throw-
ing his boots, into which he thrust his stockings,
before him, he made a spring for the land.
Unfortunately he missed it by a short distance,
and came plump full length into the water!
Luckily it was not very deep, and as the bottom







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


was of a sandy nature he ,was on his feet in an
instant; he then waded to the bank, to which he
got safely, with the exception of his clothes
being wet through. Giving himself a good shak-
ing he grumbled to himself:-
"What a fool I must be, that cannot leap
that distance! Why, at school I have jumped
double the length; but I suppose I must have
slipped. How cold the water is, to be sure!
Well, never mind, a brisk run will soon dry my
clothes, they are not very thick; and if not, I
will hang them up at the charcoal-kiln when I
get there."
So off he set again, climbed up a bank, over
the top of which the sounds of the axe seemed to
come; but as he stood gazing about him the blows
suddenly ceased.
"Ah!" said Adelbert, "the man is taking a
rest, or perhaps he is having his breakfast. He
cannot be far away now, I am certain. I must
look for him."
Plunging boldly through some underwood which
stood in the direction from which the sound







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


came, he scrambled for nearly a quarter of an
hour, when his progress was interrupted by a
dense thicket of briers, which spread right and
left of him as far as he could see.
"Hallo!" said he, "must I go back after all?"
"No!" answered an inward voice.
"I must go straight through, or I shall lose
my way," said he; and with a "Now for it!" he
made a bold effort to do so, but it was unsuccess-
ful. The sharp-pointed briers scratched his
hands and face, and before he had gained a yard
his blouse and white trousers were torn and
soiled nearly in every part.
"Ah!" said he, as he looked at his hands and
clothes, "I have got the worst of it this time.
There is no doubt about that; but I must try
again. Let me see, what is best to be done? I
must try and go a short distance round, and
then I cannot fail to come upon the charcoal-
burner."
Turning to the right he scrambled slowly along,
examining the thicket carefully as he went. At
length he came to a part which was less dense






EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


than the rest; he succeeded in getting through
without much additional damage to his person
or clothes. Leaving what he called "this inhos-
pitable spot," he returned as near as he could
determine to the spot opposite to where he
diverged, and set out again in search of the wood-
man.
But neither man could be seen nor sound heard.
About him were noble trees, whose branches
formed a leafy canopy, through which glinted
and waved the rays of the sun; but though this
would have put him in ecstasies at the outset of
his walk, he now failed to see the beauty of it,
or at any rate he was not much impressed by it.
"This is all very fine," said he; "but I would
much rather see a begrimed charcoal-burner or
his hut. Where can the man be? He must have
hidden himself. He must be close by," and here
he stood still, and shouted as loud as he could:
"Hallo hallo! Where are you?"
"Where are you?" answered a clear ringing
voice almost instantly; but it was only the sound
of his own voice that the echo had thrown back







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


upon him. Again and again he shouted, but no
reply came save from the echo; and now, for the
first time, Adelbert began to feel his courage fail,
and he became not a little alarmed. Could he
have missed the way, and passed the cottage or
the kiln in the density of the forest? Which
way should he go now? That was a question
which puzzled him, for whichever he chose might
only lead him farther wrong. Should he retrace
his steps and regain the banks of the Ilse?
Prudence suggested that would be best, but
obstinacy urged him forward. He was now very
hungry, and if he did not soon get something to
eat he should die of starvation before he reached
Ilsenburg. At length he decided to go forward,
trusting to fortune to find some assistance, either
in the form of charcoal-burner, huntsman, or
cottager.
He proceeded onward, and when he had gone
about a hundred yards he came suddenly upon
a clearing which looked down into a beautiful
green valley, at the bottom of which ran a little
brook. In the valley under a shady clump of







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


trees Adelbert could espy the white walls of a
small cottage; and beyond it he could observe a
thick cloud of clear blue smoke curling gracefully
through the branches of the trees.
"Hurrah!" said he, joyfully, "victory at last!
I'm so glad I did not go back: I would have felt
quite foolish ever afterwards;" and he bounded
forward down the valley, where he found a
pathway which led in the direction of the cottage.
Following it he soon arrived at the door. He
knocked, but as he received no answer he lifted
the latch and entered. There was no one within,
but the occupant could not be far away, for a
bright fire was burning, and over it a large pot
was boiling.
"I will wait till some one comes," said he; "I
will go no farther without instructions this morn-
ing." So being very tired, he sat down on a wooden
stool. After waiting for some time, however, he
became impatient, and going to the door he put
his hands to his mouth and shouted "Hallo!" as
loud as he could.
The shout was returned in a few moments, but







58 EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.
this time it was not the echo of his own voice,
but that of a man possessed of a deep and power-
ful one. He proceeded in the direction of the
sound, and towards the back of the cottage he
came upon a path which clearly led to the kiln.
This he followed, and in the course of a few
minutes he came upon a large open space, in the
centre of which was a burning mound, which
Adelbert, from what he had read, knew at once
to be a charcoal-kiln. By it stood a tall powerful-
looking man, with begrimed face and thick
curly hair and beard, who wielded a heavy
iron shovel with as much ease as if it had only
been a hazel wand.
When he saw Adelbert approach he leant upon
his shovel and looked at him in surprise. He
then said in a friendly tone:
"Well, my ragged young gentleman, what
direction of the wind has blown you here? You
must be a brave youth to venture thus far alone
into the midst of the forest."
"I came out for a walk this morning, Mr.
Charcoal-burner, and I am afraid I have lost my-







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


self," answered Adelbert politely but boldly, for,
as we have already stated, he was almost a
stranger to fear. In fact he was too much
delighted to meet with the man to be anyway
frightened, so he approached him, and holding
out his hand, said:
"I bid you good day, Mr. Charcoal-burner. I
am sure I am very glad to see you, whether you
are or are not to see me, for I have been wander-
ing about in the forest ever since six o'clock this
morning, and am both tired, and wet, and hungry."
"Well, I must say you look all three; but why
were you so foolish as to venture so far into the
forest?" And before Adelbert could reply, he
added, "But you will have to wait a little-it
won't be long-till my wife calls us for dinner.
I know by the twinge in my stomach that it will
not be long before it is ready; sit down on that
block there, and dry yourself as well as you can,
while I attend to my work."
Adelbert did as desired, and after looking about
him for a few moments he ventured to ask:
"What place is this, Mr. Charcoal-burner?"







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


"This is the Wolf's Hill, in the Ranschetal,"
answered the man. "I shall ask you presently
who you are and where you come from; but in
the meantime don't trouble me. The kiln wants
tending, for if the flames break out it will be a
troublesome thing to keep them down. When
we go to dinner we can have a talk, but hold
your tongue just new."
Adelbert had sense enough to see the force of
what the man said, so he simply nodded his head
and watched the man, who walked round the
kiln, shovel in hand, carefully subduing any out-
break of flame that appeared, and keeping a
strict watch over the whole surface of the mound.
In this way nearly half an hour passed, neither
man nor boy saying a word to each other. All
at once a shrill female voice was heard calling:
"Severin, Severin! dinner is ready!"
"All right, old woman," cried Severin, "I'll be
with you in a minute;" then turning his back
to Adelbert, he shouted:
Hans, come along, I want you."
"Hallo, master 1 I'm coming," answered a voice







EVERY EMAN IN HIS PLACE.


from the wood, and in a very short time a man
appeared, quite as big and rough-looking as
Severin himself, and bearing a large axe on his
shoulder.
Hans," said his master, dinner is ready. Go
and get yours, and when you have done come
and look to the kiln. It will be an hour or two
before the 'coal' is ready, and you must see to it,
or until I come back."
"All right, master," replied Hans, as he laid
down his axe and walked off with the air of a
man who felt that he had earned his dinner, and
who certainly was quite prepared for it.
If you are very hungry, boy, you can go with
him," said the charcoal-burner kindly to Adel-
bert; "or you can stay till he returns, and then
go with me."
I would rather go with you, sir, if you please,"
said the boy.
"As you please, young gentleman; but you
must not say 'sir' to me. We humble foresters
are not accustomed to such city compliments-
do you understand? lMy name is Severin;" and







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


without waiting for any reply from Adelbert he
once more renewed his patrol round the kiln, the
boy w;.tI-:linL him with intense and increasing
interest; and somehow or other his fatigue and
.,h :1 of hunger seemed to vanish.
Hans returned in about half an hour, when
Severin, handing him the shovel, told him to
watch carefully, then turning to Adelbert he
said:
"Now, youngster, come along and let us see
what you can do when placed in front of a warm
forest dinner. It may not be so nice as those you
get in the city; but if you are very hungry I
have no doubt you will enjoy it, for hunger is a
capital sauce."
Adelbert was only too glad to accept the invi-
tation of the honest charcoal-burner, so rising
from the block on which he had been sitting he
took hold of the horny hand of Severin without
the least hesitation, and forthwith the pair
made for the cottage. As they approached it
a. woman appeared at the door. Holding up her
].,:ii i-. in surprise, she exclaimed:







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


"Why, Severin, good gracious me! who have
you got with you?"
"Can't you see, Marguerite, that it is a boy;
aye, and a city one too. He has lost himself in
the forest. He has been wandering about since
six o'clock; he is very hungry, and he wants some
dinner: there now, you know all about him, or at
least as much as I do at present. I suppose you
have sufficient for us and Bastel too?"
Oh yes," replied his wife, "plenty for all,
Severin; and if not, I can go without till more
can be got ready. But perhaps this young gentle-
man won't care about our humble fare?"
"Never fear for that, wife," said her husband.
"If he is as hungry as he looks he will be sure
to like it, only be quick and don't keep us wait-
ing. Where's Bastel?"
"He will be here in a minute. He has just
come back from the forest, and what do you
think? He has brought home such a beautiful
trout, which I can soon cook for the young
gentleman. Bastel will wonder when he sees
our guest. Here, Bastel, Bastel!"







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


"Yes, mother," said a boyish voice from the
adjoining apartment; and next moment a boy
appeared. He said, "Here I am, what do you
want?"
"I want to introduce you to a young gentle-
man from the city; now you must be sure and be
civil to him." Then turning to Adelbert she said:
"This is my son Bastel," and both the boys
looked curiously at each other.
The charcoal-burner's son was a good-looking
lad about the same age as Adelbert, but taller
and much stronger. He had fair curly hair, and
his face and hands were deeply tanned with the
rays of the sun, while his dark blue eyes gleamed
and glistened like those of a hawk, and the ex-
pression of his features was honest and straight-
forward. He wore a coarse home-spun suit, with
a cap of the same material, and was not encum-
bered with such luxuries as shoes or-stockings.
Everything, though simple, was clean, and the
white collar round his neck made the brown face
appear of a deeper hue than it really was, and
showed it, indeed, to more advantage.







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


After the two boys had taken a good look at
each other, Bastel opened the conversation by
abruptly inquiring:
"What's your name?"
My name is Adelbert Brockmann, and I come
from Hamburg," was the ready answer.
"Hamburg!" said Bastel, "why, that is a very
long way from here, is it not?"
"Yes," answered Adelbert, "it is more than
fifty miles, I think."
"And how are your hands and face all scratched
and your blouse and trousers all torn?" asked
Bastel. "What have you been doing with your-
self? There is scarcely a whole inch in all your
fine clothes."
Adelbert scarcely liked the tone in which this
question was put; however he answered:
"I fell into a brook which I was crossing, and
I got scratched and my clothes torn in trying to
get through some bramble-bushes. But I did not
come from Hamburg to-day, I only came from
Ilsenburg."
"Yes, and like all the city boys when they come
(144) E







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


there you got lost in the woods," added Bastel in
a contemptuous tone. "I never get lost, nor
could if I tried: why, I know every tree in the
forest. But don't trouble yourself about being
lost, and after you have had some dinner and a
rest I will show you the way back to Ilsenburg,
and we will have some fun on the way."
"Now, boys," said the powerful voice of Severin,
"come to dinner, and don't stand there talking
all day."
Come along," said Bastel, seizing Adelbert by
the arm, and leading him into the kitchen, where
the dinner was laid. It consisted of a large
basinful of flour dumplings and a dishful of
stewed bilberries. The woman had thoughtfully
placed a plate, and a knife and fork and spoon
for Adelbert; but the family themselves only used
the latter article and their fingers, and all ate out
of the same dish.
"Fingers were made before forks," observed
Severin, as he noticed the look of astonishment
which passed over Adelbert's face at this, to him,
strange proceeding. "Besides, it is quicker, and







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


the food tastes quite as good. Our potter lives
a long way off, so plates are scarce in the forest,"
he added, with a smile at his own joke; "but help
yourself, and never mind us!"
Adelbert was too hungry to stand upon cere-
mony, and the smell of the dishes was delicious
and tempting. He soon consumed the first plate-
ful with which he had been served, and another
speedily followed. After that came the trout
which Bastel had brought with him from the
forest, and which was cooked in a most delicious
manner.
"Oh! how nice!" said Adelbert when he first
tasted it. "Why, our cook could never make a
trout taste so delicious!"
"Ah! my boy," said the charcoal-burner plea-
santly, "it isn't the trout that tastes so well, it's
the sauce you eat it with, as I told you."
After dinner was over, Severin took his large
pipe from the mantel-piece, and after he had filled
and lighted it, and commenced to smoke, he said
to Adelbert:
"Now, my young gentleman, you must tell us







68 EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.
all about how you got here. You say you belong
to Hamburg,-what, then, are you doing at Ilsen-
burg?"
My father and mother are staying there for
a few weeks," replied Adelbert. My father has
business there, and as mother is not very well he
thought the change would do her good."
"Oh! so your parents are at Ilsenburg also?
Do they know that you went out for a walk in
the forest this morning?"
"They were asleep when I started, but I told
one of the servants to tell them," said Adelbert,
feeling a little awkward at the question.
"Why, did you not get their permission first?"
asked Severin sternly.
"No; I did not intend to stay so long, and I
never expected to lose myself," answered Adel-
bert, blushing very red.
Well, you are a nice young gentleman indeed!
I'll be bound to say that your parents are now
in a fine state of anxiety about you, and that
your mother is very nearly broken-hearted."
Then he added gravely, My young sir, you have







EVERY IMAN IN HIS PLACE.


acted very wrongly, and you ought to be pun-
ished. Are you not sorry for what you have
done?"
"Yes, I am; for my mother especially. She is
always anxious about me when I am out of her
sight," answered the boy, with a tinge of remorse.
"But what can I do? Will you not suffer me to
remain here? I should like to be a charcoal-
burner like you!"
"Ah! now I understand what is the matter
with you. You have been reading some of these
foolish boys' books, which put all sorts of stupid
notions into youthful heads. It appears to me
that you are a very silly boy," continued Severin,
growing more grave in his manner. "What
could a delicate pink-and-white faced youth like
you do as a charcoal-burner? Why, you would
not be able to make salt to your broth, and the
hard work would kill you in a month. Now if
you were a boy like my Bastel there you might
speak. He is properly made for forest life, be-
cause he was born to it. He has- all the necessary
bone and sinew for the hard work, and can fell







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE,


trees and attend to the kiln as well as any man
of twice his age; but you! half an hour's work,
and your hands and face would be as black as
your blouse."
"But they could be washed again," answered
Adelbert, who summoned a little courage when he
heard that it was only his hands and face that
might get dirty. "I should so like to be a char-
coal-burner, or a huntsman, or, indeed, anything
that would enable me to enjoy a forest life. It
must be so pleasant to be always under the shade
of the beautiful green leaves, and enjoy the
bracing fresh air-"
"And tumbling into brooks, and scratching
yourself with brambles and thorns," interposed
Bastel with a laugh.
"Hold your tongue, Bastel!" said his father,
restraining a smile. Turning to Adelbert he said,
"No doubt to you, my young sir, brought up in
the crowded, noisy, smoky city, it may appear
very pretty and delightful. But have you ever
thought of what it must be in the depth of
winter, when the snow is several inches, nay,







EVERY MAN IN IIIS PLACE.


sometimes feet, in depth; when the trees are leaf-
less, and the brooks are frozen into solid ice?
When the cold north-east wind whistles through
the forest, and cuts through clothes and skin to
the very bone, and freezes the warm blood in
your veins,-do you think you would find that as
pleasant! No, no, boy, you talk like a fool,
and the sooner you get rid of such notions the
better. You do not understand what you are
talking about. The forest is not the place for
you; you belong to the town, and your delicate
hands are fitter to wield the pen than the shovel.
Now, with my boy Bastel there, he would find it
harder work to use a pen for an hour than to
attend to the kiln for a whole day. No, no!
'every man to his place;' let those intended for
the city remain in it, and let the foresters belong
to the forest."
"I know that I would not like to live in a
town," said Bastel, who had been listening atten-
tively to the conversation. "I went once to
Wernigerode with father, but I was glad to get
away from the close, stifling, crowded streets, and







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


I would not care to see a house built within half
a mile of this cottage."
"Yes, Bastel, that is right enough," said his
father. "That is because you have been brought
up here, and you have become habituated to all
the circumstances and necessities of the case.
You belong to the forest, and no other place
would suit you; but this young gentleman here,
who has been brought up amid all the luxuries
of the city, who has rich parents, and everything
that money can procure, of what use would he
be in the forest? None whatever; he would simply
be in the way of every one he worked with."
He now observed the end of a gold chain hang-
ing out of Adelbert's pocket. "See, Bastel," said
he, "your friend has a gold chain, and I'll war-
rant there is a watch at the end of it."
Bastel looked. "Have you a watch, Adelbert?
I never saw one; please let me look at it."
Adelbert drew his watch from his pocket will-
ingly, and placed it in Bastel's hands. The
forest youth examined it very carefully both out-
side and inside, and then handed it back.







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


"It is very pretty," said he, "but I would not
know what to do with it. I should very likely
let it fall and break, or do something else to spoil
it. The sun, I think, is the best clock, and it
never goes wrong."
"The boy is quite right," said Severin; it has
served me and my forefathers all our lives, and
has never deceived us. Put your watch in your
pocket, Adelbert, and let us consider what is best
to be done. I think the sooner you go back to
your parents at Ilsenburg the better, for they
will be in a state of great alarm about you.
Bastel, you must show him the way to the bank
of the Ilse, and then he will be able to go on to
Ilsenburg by himself."
Oh, I will be very glad to do so, father," re-
sponded Bastel, readily. "But do you not think
he is too tired to travel so far to-day? It is a
good six miles by the nearest way, and he looks
as if he could not walk six yards."
"Surely it cannot be such a long way to Ilsen-
burg," said Adelbert in surprise. "I did not
think I had walked a third of that distance."







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


"Bastel is right," said Severin; "it is fully six
miles by the very nearest way, and you are cer-
tainly not able to travel so far to-day under any
circumstances. But what is best to be done?
Your poor mother will be in a dreadful state of
anxiety, and we must not leave your parents
longer in suspense. I think I will send my man
Hans to Ilsenburg to let your mother know
where you are, and tell her that you will be
sent home to-morrow. What do you think,
wife?"
"I think that will be the best plan, Severin,"
said his wife; "it would be a cruel thing to send
the little boy on such a long journey to-day.
Hans will be able to explain everything to his
mother, and so set her mind at rest."
"Now then, my young city gentleman," said
the charcoal-burner smiling, "you must be pre-
pared to obey my orders for the rest of the day.
You will first take a good rest, and after you
have had a good cup of tea, Bastel will take you
out and show you some of the wonders of this
wonderful place, as you seem to consider it. In







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


the meantime I will be off to the kiln, and de-
spatch Hans to Ilsenburg."
Adelbert having given Severin the necessary
information about the residence, the latter left
the cottage, and within a few minutes after his
arrival at the kiln Hans was on the way to Ilsen-
burg.
Oh! that will be glorious, Adelbert," said
Bastel. "You will come with me to the trout-
stream this afternoon and I will have another
hunt after that big fellow who has cheated me so
often. I saw him again this morning, and he
will weigh five pounds if he does an ounce."
Then see that you catch him, Bastel," said his
mother; "and I will cook him nicely for supper.
But do not get into mischief, and be home in good
time, for this young gentleman will require a
good sleep to fit him for his journey to-morrow."
After tea the two boys, each taking a rod, set
out for the trout-stream, and Bastel undertook to
initiate Adelbert into all the mysteries of rod-
fishing as practised in the Hartz Mountains.
"It is a fine day for it," he said, "and I am







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


sure they will bite readily. Can you fish, Adel-
bert?"
"I don't know," was the reply; "I never
learned. Indeed I never had a fishing-rod in
my hand that I can remember."
"Well, then, I must show you the way," said
Bastel; "it is not very difficult."
-The young charcoal-burner led the way to a
well-shaded little pool that was formed by the
rivulet that ran through it, and where the water
was so beautifully clear that the bottom could
be plainly seen. The roots of several large trees
which grew on the banks stretched into the water,
and formed little caves and recesses which served
as sheltering places for the fsh.
"Ah!" said Bastel, peering into the water,
"there is the big fellow I was speaking about.
He is very shy, but we must take him home with
us to-day. Now, Adelbert, be very cautious, and
make as little disturbance as possible. Throw
your line by that great bush there, while I cast
mine over here. Let me show you how to do it."
Adelbert proved an apt pupil, and when he had







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


acquitted himself to the satisfaction of Bastel the
latter said:
"Now you have nothing to do but wait and
watch. If the float only moves a little do not
pull up your line, because the fish is only play-
ing with the bait; but if the float is drawn under
the water suddenly and deeply, then keep a
strong hold on the rod and call me. It is an easy
thing to hold a fish, but a difficult thing to land
it; -so don't you try it, or Mr. Trout may pull you
into the water with him. If he is a big fish he
won't be trifled with, and this one I want to get
hold of is a regular giant."
Adelbert having promised to obey these in-
structions, seated himself under a tree, while
Bastel went to ply his rod at some little distance
to the right. The float of Adelbert's rod floated
motionless on the surface of the water so long,
and the silence was so universal, that at length
he began to feel sleepy, being of course nearly
worn out by the fatigues of the morning. His
eyes seemed to close of their own accord, but,
remembering his instructions, he kept a firm







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


hold of his rod. After dosing for a short time
he was suddenly aroused by a strong jerk, the
rod was nearly drawn out of his hand, and he
had just time to spring up and prevent its being
pulled from him altogether, and also to save him-
self from being drawn into the water. Where
was the float? It had disappeared altogether;
but as he was looking for it the tugging and
pulling at his rod and line plainly indicated
that there was a fish at the other end, and a
good strong one too; and this conviction was
strengthened by his being almost dragged into
the stream. However he held on bravely, and,
planting his foot against the root of a tree, he
was able with both hands to hold the rod against
his unseen antagonist. The sudden excitement
thoroughly awakened him, and he soon under-
stood the position of affairs. He saw that the
fish was likely to prove too much for him, but
his pride would not allow him to call for Bastel.
He thought the city boy should be as good, if
not better, than the boy of the forest; so he held
on bravely to the rod, and determined to land







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


the fish himself without assistance. By easing
and pulling his line he caught sight of a beautiful
large trout, and by manoeuvring a little, in a
style of his own, he thought he was just on the
point of throwing it on the bank, when, lo and
behold! the trout seemed to tie itself into a knot,
and, making one strong effort, it bounded off,
fairly pulling the rod out of Adelbert's hands!
He had now no alternative left, so he shouted as
lustily as he could:
"Bastel! Bastel! come here quick; I have lost
my rod!"
The forest youth was by his side in a twink-
ling, and having in a breath asked:
"How? why? where is it?"
There it is," said Adelbert; a big fish pulled
it out of my hand, and nearly drowned me into
the bargain."
"I see," said Bastel, as he hastily threw off his
clothes. "You are a fool! But I want my rod,
and the fish too, if I can get it; he must be a
good one, and we must not lose him; so here goes!"
And as he 'said so he plunged into the water







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


and swam towards the rod, which he seized
with his teeth, and brought back to the bank
in a few minutes. He was on his feet in an
instant, and although the trout pulled and pulled,
he held his own against it. But the capture was
a more difficult task than Adelbert had any idea
of, and he could not but admire the delicate and
workman-like skill that Bastel displayed in hand-
ling the rod. For a time there was a doubt in
his mind whether fish or fisher would be the
victor; but by-and-by the trout seemed to lose
strength, and Bastel, taking advantage of a
favourable opportunity, gave a strong pull and in a.
moment a magnificent trout lay struggling on the
bank about six feet from the water's edge. One
sharp blow deprived it of life; and Bastel pro-
ceeded quietly to redress himself.
"That's the very fellow I have been trying to
catch for the last fortnight," said he, "and had he
not thought you were a poor fisher he never
would have touched your bait, Adelbert. He
was too cunning to place himself under the line
of an experienced fisher, and he knows me asan







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


enemy. However, his cunning has not saved
him this time, and I am glad we have got him.
Isn't he a fine fellow, though?" he added, gazing
admiringly on the dead fish; "I have never seen
a handsomer or a heavier one; but you must have
been a fool, Adelbert, to allow him to pull the rod
out of your hand."
"If he had pulled your rod as strongly," an-
swered Adelbert, a little cross, "I am certain you
would have let go too."
"No fear, not I!" said Bastel proudly; "the
trout is not yet born that will ever drag the rod
from my hands! But we've got the fish, so there's
no use talking any more about it-let's go home."
He then tied a piece of string through the gills
of the trout and slung it over his shoulder on
the rod, and the two boys started for the cottage
of Severin. As they jogged along the fancy of
Adelbert was attracted by the singing of a fine
blackbird, which carolled forth its notes from the
branches of an oak close by where they passed.
Isn't that beautiful, Bastel," he said; I would
give anything to possess a blackbird like that!"
(144) F







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


"Would you now? If you really want it I
can get it for you; but you can get scores of them
any day if you only know the way. But they
are not worth having-they eat too much, and
you can't eat them."
"Surely you are joking, Bastel, when you say
you could catch that bird there," exclaimed
Adelbert.
"There is no joke about it," replied Bastel;
"and if you were not a city boy you would
understand why. If you will only wait until we
get this trout home I will get out my snares and
show you how to make a prisoner of this whist-
ling blackbird in no time, and I will also make a
willow cage for it, in which you can take it with
you to Ilsenburg. Come on."





a i.,t ,.







--- ,.-i






CHAPTER IV.

THE STORM; THE RECOVERY; THE COMPACT.

N arriving at the cottage the trout was soon
S disposed of, and after Bastel's mother had
congratulated the boys on their success-for
Bastel generously gave Adelbert more credit for
the capture than he was really entitled to-the
young charcoal-burner got out his snares, and the
youths proceeded out again to put, as Bastel said,
"salt on the tail" of the blackbird, which still
seemed to occupy the same branch, and sang as
beautifully as before. Bastel laid his snare and
baited it, and retiring with Adelbert behind a tree,
gave a peculiar whistle which seemed to attract
the attention of the bird in a moment. It ceased to
sing, left the branch, and espying the bait, flew
at it, and in an instant was entangled in the







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


meshes of the net; and in another Bastel was
upon it, and held it gently but securely in his
hand. Adelbert was struck with wonderment,
and could not sufficiently praise the skill of his
companion.
"Oh," said the latter, "there is not much to be
surprised at in catching a blackbird. Any boy
can do it-I mean any boy brought up in the
forest; but of course you, being only a city boy,
cannot be expected to know anything about such
things. But now that he is caught, I must make
a cage for him. Come, there are willows down
here, and I can soon do it.'"
He led the way down a slight declivity to the
edge of a brook, where there was an abundance
of willows. Here they sat down, and Adelbert,
acting under instructions, took charge of the bird,
while Bastel proceeded to cut and peel some wands,
which he soon wove into a very neat cage. In
this the blackbird was soon housed and fed by
Bastel, who thoroughly understood what to do
with all sorts of birds. After finishing the
cage Bastel said:







EVERY MXAN IN HIS PLACE.


"Now, let us go to the Conies' Hill. Mother
wants a pair of conies to make soup to-morrow."
"Conies!" said Adelbert, immediately attracted
by the sound of something new; "what are
they?"
"What are conies!" answered Bastel, puzzled
for a moment. "Why, conies are conies of course;
what else should they be? They are neither fish
nor fowls so far as I ever heard, they are only
conies. They are like small hares, and with a
snare and a ferret we can catch as many as we
like, and as fast as we like."
"Oh," said Adelbert, "I suppose you mean
rabbits? I have seen them often in the market at
Hamburg."
"Well, you may call them rabbits if you like,
but we call them conies, and they make capital
soup, I can tell you," said Bastel, a little surprised
to hear that what were known as conies in the
Hartz were called rabbits in Hamburg.
After having refreshed themselves with wild
strawberries the two boys took their way to the
Conies' Hill, which was simply a little sandy hill







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


in a valley which run up from the brook close by,
and which was perforated by numerous small holes
like a honey-comb.
"There they are, Adelbert," said Bastel, as he
pointed with his finger. "Look, hundreds of
them, running and skipping in and out of the
burrows. But wait a moment, and we shall soon
get as many as we want." He then went to the
Hollow trunk of an old oak tree, from which he
took a number of small nets, and a box, which
he placed on the ground.
This is where I keep my ferret," he said, and
I can tell you he is about the best one there is in
the mountains. Now, watch me, and you will
then know how to catch conies when you get
back to Hamburg,-that is," he added, as if it
were an afterthought, "if there are any there to
be caught."
He then proceeded to spread his nets, which
were of a bag-like shape, before some of the rab-
bit-holes, fastening them with wooden pins so
that they completely covered the openings and
left no corner for the conies to escape by. He







EVERY M AN IN HIS PLACE.


then took the long, thin, red-eyed, grayish ferret
from its box, and holding it tightly he caressed
it for a short time.
"What are you going to do with that strange-
looking animal?" said Adelbert.
"Wait a minute and you shall see," replied
Bastel. "I am going to send him on a visit to
the conies, and very likely some of them will
come back with him."
Now, Bastel," said Adelbert, "although I am
a town boy, you need not take me to be such a
fool as to believe that."
"If you were not a fool-which I don't think
you are-you would not speak like that," an-
swered Bastel laughing. But if you do not like
to believe me, keep your eyes open and watch
what I am going to do."
He then carried the ferret to the entrance of one
of the rabbit burrows, which he had covered with
a net. Withdrawing one of the wooden pegs, he
placed the animal inside the net: it sniffed about
for a moment or two, and then suddenly disap-
peared into one of the holes. "Ah!" said Adel-







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


bert, "you have lost him-what will you do
now?"
"Wait till he comes back again, that's all,"
coolly answered Bastel. "Now you just watch
these holes, and if some conies do not come out
of them presently and in double quick time, then
say my name is not Bastel."
After watching and looking anxiously at the
holes in the sand for a short time a rumbling
noise was heard, which seemed to proceed froi
the burrows. A number of conies rushed out in
a frightened state, and not a few were caught in
the meshes of the net. Bastel selected six of the
largest, killed them, and put them in a bag, and
liberated the others. He then proceeded to
gather in his nets and pegs, when Adelbert said:
"But are you going to lose the ferret, Bastel?"
"Oh no," replied the latter, "he will soon be
here: he knows when he has done his work.
Look there he is," and he pointed to a hole, from
which peered forth the long-pointed nose of the
ferret. Bastel approached it quietly, and, taking
hold of it by the neck, gently drew it out, stroked







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE. 89
it for a few seconds, and then placed it in the
box, which with the nets and other things were
duly deposited in the trunk of the old tree, till
they should be again required.
"There!" said Bastel, "the sun is now begin-
ning to set, and I think you at least, Adelbert,
have done enough for the day. Let us go home."
Turning from the sun, he looked up at the clouds,
and suddenly exclaimed, "Let us get home as fast
as we can, if we wish to do so with a dry skin.
There will be such a storm shortly as you never
saw in your life before."
Throwing' the conies in the bag over his
shoulder, and calling upon Adelbert not to forget
the blackbird, he hastened forward, his com-
panion following closely behind, at a loss to know
what it all meant. He, however, was not allowed
to remain long in suspense. A sound of distant
thunder reached his ear, and the flash of lightning
overhead soon convinced him that Bastel was
right, and that the necessity of hurrying on was
urgent. Presently large drops of rain began to
fall, the thunder approached nearer, and seemed







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


to break almost immediately over the heads of
himself and his companion.
Come away," said the latter, what are you
stopping for?" as Adelbert stood, perfectly para-
lyzed at the sound of a terrific peal of thunder
which seemed to rend the whole forest.
Come!" cried Bastel, "or you will be drowned;
hurrah! here we are at home!" On looking
round, however, he saw Adelbert still standing;
so without ceremony he seized him by the arm
and literally dragged him inside the cottage.
"Here we are, father!" cried Bastel. "We're
just in time."
"Thank Heaven! boys," said Severin, who had
just hastened home from his kiln to escape the
storm; "I'm glad to see you both safe in-doors.
The storm to-night will be a severe one, and if this
young city gentleman had happened to be out in
it, it would perhaps have damped his ardour for
a forest life. Now, wife, let's have supper; I am
longing to see that extraordinary trout that these
two noble anglers brought home to-day."
"It will be ready in a minute, Severin," said







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


his wife, "so you may talk to the boys for a
little."
"Well, Adelbert," said the charcoal-burner,
acting on the suggestion, "I am very glad indeed
that I sent Hans to Ilsenburg this afternoon. He
will have seen your parents before this time, so
they will not require to distress themselves. As
for himself, he knows the weather too well to
think of venturing home to-night. He has friends
in the town with whom he can stay till the
morning."
Bastel was about to say something about the
blackbird and cony escapades, when a brilliant
flash of lightning, followed by a tremendous peal
of thunder, made every one start to their
feet.
"God help those who are homeless in such a
storm as this!" said Severin seriously. "This is
no storm to play with, and, Adelbert, you ought
to thank God that you are now under shelter,
humble though it is!"
Adelbert bowed his head reverently. He felt
the tears rising to his eyes, but his embarrass-







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


ment was removed by the entrance of Bastel's
mother, who said:
"Now, husband, and you boys, if you want to
enjoy this fine trout-and it is a beauty-you
had better come and have it while it is hot."
This intimation met the approval of every
person, and they all sat down to supper-and it
would be hard to say who enjoyed it most.
After the table had been cleared the chairs were
drawn round the fire, and, regardless of the storm
which was still raging outside, the assembled
party enjoyed a pleasant conversation, in which
Severin narrated his experiences of Hamburg
twenty years before Adelbert was born, and the
latter in turn told him all about how it was at
present. As the storm continued Severin lighted
his pipe and went to the door for a few moments.
When he returned he said:
"I think, boys, that the storm is pretty well
over, so you can go to bed now; but before you do
so you must thank God that it has been no worse."
"Yes, father," said Bastel. "I am tired enough,
I know, and as for Adelbert here, he must be-"







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


and here he turned round to Master Brockmann
and saw that he was fast asleep in his chair.
"Hallo! father," said he, "the dustman has
been here before you, and carted Adelbert off to
the land of dreams."
"Leave him alone, Bastel," said his mother;
"I'll see that he gets to bed properly. I'll be
bound that this is the hardest day's work ever
he did in his life, and if he does not sleep soundly
to-night he ought never to have another break-
fast. What say you, Severin?"
"You are quite right, old woman," replied her
husband; "and I think the young gentleman will
remember this day as long as he lives."
The wife of the charcoal-burner carefully un-
dressed Adelbert, and the strong arms of Severin
soon lifted him into a comfortable, clean, downy
bed. As the stalwart man covered him up ten-
derly, he said to his wife:
"He is as dead as a log of wood; I hope no
harm has befallen him. However, Hans will be
in Ilsenburg by this time, and his mother will
know all about him, so I hope his absence from







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


home won't disturb their rest. Hans will be here
in the morning if the weather keeps right, and
then we will know what to do. We have only
done our duty, wife. Perhaps Bastel may get
into a similar trouble in the city some day, and
may require a friendly hand to assist him. Who
knows?"
"Ah! indeed, Severin," replied his wife; "as
you say, who knows?"
When morning broke Severin and his son were
up betimes and off to the kiln. As morning ad-
vanced the charcoal-burner's wife began her day's
duties, but Adelbert slumbered on as though he
would never wake.
"I will let him sleep for an hour or two more,"
said the mistress; "he will be all the better for
it; and when he has a nice wash in the brook
and a hearty breakfast he will be the better able
for his journey home to-day."
In due time Severin and his son came for
breakfast, and announced that Hans had not
yet returned from Ilsenburg.
"We must keep the boy here, wife, till Hans







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


returns. Perhaps the brooks are swollen or the
pathway is blocked up, and if a strong man like
Hans cannot make his way through, it would
be worse than foolish to think that two boys like
these could succeed in making the journey. In
the meantime Bastel must come and assist me
with the kiln. I want to build up a fresh one,
and require some logs split."
"Yes, father," said Bastel willingly; "and
Adelbert, I think, would like to go also; it would
be fun for him to be a charcoal-burner for an
hour or two."
After a simple but plentiful breakfast Severin
and the boys set out for the kiln, where they at
once set to work, Adelbert taking his instructions
from Bastel, but making sad blunders in his
work. He chopped and drove with all his
strength, but could not break up one log to be of
any use; while he was struggling to break up
one, Bastel had quite a heap strewed round about
him. Adelbert felt ashamed at his awkwardness,
made another attempt, which, however, only re-
sulted in failure, tired arms, and blistered hands.







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


At last he threw down the axe, and, quite crest-
fallen, he turned to the charcoal-burner and said,
almost with tears in his eyes:
"You are quite right, Severin; I am not able
to be a worker in the forest; it is a fine place for
pleasure, but I think I am better adapted for a
town life."
"I thought a little practice would serve to open
your eyes to the truth of what I was saying to
you. Every man in his place, I say. An oak-
tree will turn into a birch before you will become
a charcoal-burner. Providence destined you for
a city life and Bastel there for what he is doing
now, and I have no doubt he will be a capital
workman at his trade before long. You are quite
right to throw down the axe, and you had best
go and amuse yourself in some other way now.
Gather some strawberries-they are very nice,
and they will refresh you; and you can also get
some for Bastel and me at the same time."
Adelbert acted upon this advice, and was soon
busy amidst the strawberry bed. Having filled
his basket with the berries, he was returning to







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


the kiln in a thoughtful mood when the sound
of a well-known voice roused him from his
reverie, and caused his heart to beat with delight.
"Adelbert, my dear boy, where are you?" and
in a moment he was caught in the loving arms
of his mother, who kissed and scolded him in
turns, while his father stood by, looking very
stern, but not saying anything.
Adelbert at once admitted how foolish he had
been in leaving home without the permission of
his parents, and besought their forgiveness. He
then proceeded to describe the kindness of Severin
and his family. As he was talking his mother
looked admiringly at Bastel, and thanked him
for the kindness which he had shown to her
son.
"My good boy," said she, "you must return
with us to Hamburg. Adelbert tells me you have
never seen our great city. In the meantime, how-
ever, I hope you will accompany my son to Ilsen-
burg, where we have to stay a few days before
we leave for home." Turning to Adelbert, she
added, You naughty boy: you do not know what
(141) G







98 EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.
trouble and anxiety you have caused us by your
folly. If this good man here had not sent a
messenger last night I should not have closed my
eyes, especially when that dreadful storm came
on. We detained the messenger till this morn-
ing, when we started with horses and donkeys,
as we learned that there were no carriage ways
through the forest thus far. We have brought
some dry clothes for you, and it is a fortunate
thing we did, for you are scarcely fit to be seen.
Why, you look as if you had been begging for a
month, and your clothes are so ragged that they
will scarcely hang together on your body."
Adelbert accompanied his mother to the cottage,
and in the course of a few minutes he reappeared
in a comfortable, clean, tidy suit of clothes, which
made a vast difference for the better on him.
Bastel cast a longing glance at him, as if he felt
the poverty of his own common clothes as com-
pared with those of Adelbert; but his father only
smiled, as he said:
"What! is this the finely dressed young gentle-
man who came to me all tattered and torn yes-







EVERY MAN IN HIS PLACE.


terday, to learn how to burn charcoal? I would
not have known him." Every one laughed except
Adelbert-he hung his head and looked very
much ashamed of himself.
However, his good sense came to his rescue
and after thinking for a moment or two he said
honestly:
"Well, mother, I deserve the rebuke. What
Severin says is quite right, and I hope I won't
forget it as long as I live." Holding out his hand
to the charcoal-burner he said, "When you told
me last night about every man keeping his place
I scarcely understood what you meant, but now
I clearly see it all. Pray forgive me, and I thank
you for the lesson."
"That," said his father, deliberately, "is the
most sensible remark I have heard you make for
a long time, and the remark made by this worthy
man is well worth remembering. But in the
meantime let bygones be bygones. As we have
only about two hours to stay here, let us have
something to eat, and while we are waiting for
it let us talk about something better than a little




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