• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 The babes in the wood
 A serious case
 Trial by jury
 A frugal meal
 Naughty kits
 Poor bully's fall
 The fishing club
 Pussie's speech
 Pup's scolding
 Dandy Tom
 The pussies' picnic
 Trying it on
 Under the mistletoe
 You must not play with father...
 Their mothers' pride
 In a hurry
 The tubbing
 Mrs. Carlo's new hat
 Pussies at play
 Making friends
 Christmas waits
 Pussykins' party
 A hunting mishap
 What can it be?
 A lesson in pronounciation
 The salt sea
 Mr. Crow and the puppies
 The garden party
 The cats in the kitchen
 Enough to make a cat laugh
 A mystery
 Breaking up for the holidays
 At the dentist's
 When they were young
 A crusader
 How Tiny got the door open
 Only room for three
 A puppy's pranks
 Don't you think they're like their...
 The cats' excursion
 The first skate of the season
 Doggie and the glove
 A puzzle for pus
 How to produce the voice
 Mouse of jugged hare?
 The tail end
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Pussies and puppies
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087572/00001
 Material Information
Title: Pussies and puppies
Physical Description: 96 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wain, Louis, 1860-1939
S. W. Partridge & Co. (London, England) ( Publisher )
Hazell, Watson & Viney ( Printer )
Publisher: S.W. Partridge & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Hazell, Watson & Viney, Ld.
Publication Date: [1899?]
 Subjects
Subject: Cats -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Dogs -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Wit and humor, Juvenile -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1899
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
England -- Aylesbury
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Louis Wain.
General Note: Date of publication from publisher's advertisements on endpapers and back cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087572
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002239290
notis - ALH9817
oclc - 263164058

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Advertising
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Half Title
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
    The babes in the wood
        Page 7
    A serious case
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Trial by jury
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    A frugal meal
        Page 13
    Naughty kits
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Poor bully's fall
        Page 16
        Page 17
    The fishing club
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Pussie's speech
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Pup's scolding
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Dandy Tom
        Page 25
    The pussies' picnic
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Trying it on
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Under the mistletoe
        Page 33
    You must not play with father time
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Their mothers' pride
        Page 36
        Page 37
    In a hurry
        Page 38
        Page 39
    The tubbing
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Mrs. Carlo's new hat
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Pussies at play
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Making friends
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Christmas waits
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Pussykins' party
        Page 51
    A hunting mishap
        Page 52
        Page 53
    What can it be?
        Page 54
    A lesson in pronounciation
        Page 55
    The salt sea
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Mr. Crow and the puppies
        Page 58
        Page 59
    The garden party
        Page 60
        Page 61
    The cats in the kitchen
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Enough to make a cat laugh
        Page 64
        Page 65
    A mystery
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Breaking up for the holidays
        Page 68
        Page 69
    At the dentist's
        Page 70
        Page 71
    When they were young
        Page 72
        Page 73
    A crusader
        Page 74
        Page 75
    How Tiny got the door open
        Page 76
        Page 77
    Only room for three
        Page 78
        Page 79
    A puppy's pranks
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
    Don't you think they're like their father?
        Page 83
    The cats' excursion
        Page 84
        Page 85
    The first skate of the season
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Doggie and the glove
        Page 88
        Page 89
    A puzzle for pus
        Page 90
    How to produce the voice
        Page 91
    Mouse of jugged hare?
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
    The tail end
        Page 96
    Advertising
        Page 97
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text




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S. W. PARTRIDGE &


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*'S i- 9) -,.. ,,, .. .- i




I') Z I (


PUSSIES AND PUPPIES



















































AN INTRUDER.
From a Water Colour Drawing by Louis Wain.


Z, W %. r



















USSIES


AND

PUPPIES
BY
Louis
WAIN

LONDON
SS. W. PARTRIDGE & CO.
8 & 9, PATERNOSTER ROW ,






















































PRINTED BY

HAZELL, WATSON, AND VINEY, LD.,

LONDON AND AYLESBURY.












a..


.4..-


-"- A
'- -! 5, *.. ^ .
*, -- : ^


CONTENTS.


THE BABES IN THE WOOD

A SERIOUS CASE

A TRIAL BY JURY.

A FRUGAL MEAL

NAUGHTY KITS
POOR BULLY'S FALL
THE FISHING CLUB

PUSSIE'S SPEECH
PUP'S SCOLDING

DANDY TOM .
THE PUSSIES' PICNIC
TRYING IT ON

THE REHEARSAL

UNDER THE MISTLETOE.
YOU MUST NOT PLAY WITH
THEIR MOTHERS' PRIDE

IN A HURRY.

THE TUBBING
MRS. CARLO'S NEW HAT
PUSSIES AT PLAY

MAKING FRIENDS .
THE WAITS .


PAGE

7
8

10
IO
13

S14
S16
18

20
22


FATHER TIME


S25
26

28

30

S33

S34
S 36

S 38

40
S42

S44
S46

S48


m






6

PUSSYKINS' PARTY 51
A HUNTING MISHAP 52
WHAT CAN IT BE?. 54
A LESSON IN PRONUNCIATION 55
THE SALT SEA 56
MR. CROW AND THE PUPPIES 58
THE GARDEN PARTY 60
THE CATS IN THE KITCHEN 62
ENOUGH TO MAKE A CAT LAUGH. 64
A MYSTERY 66
A CAT AND DOG STORY .67
BREAKING UP FOR THE HOLIDAYS. 68
ONLY ROO[I FOR THREE 70
WHEN THEY WERE YOUNG 72
A CRUSADER. 74
HOw TINY GOT THE DOOR OPEN. 76
AT THE DENTIST'S. 78
"A PUPPY'S PRANKS .
DON'T YOU THINK THEY'RE LIKE THEIR FATHER? 83
THE CATS' EXCURSION .84
THE FIRST SKATE OF THE SEASON 86
DOGGIE AND THE GLOVE .. 88
A- PUZZLE FOR PUSS 90
How TO PRODUCE THE VOICE 91
MOUSE OR JUGGED HARE? 92
THE TAIL END 96




-" "












THE
._ BABES
IN THE
WOOD.



MqWO little pussies, losing their way,
Find themselves in the wood astray,
After the night comes on.

Sadly they utter a plaintive cry,
Lest they should hunger, and thirst, and die,
After the night comes on.

Bunnies, aroused by the doleful sound,
Pop their heads up out of the ground,
After the night comes on.






A SERIOUS CASE.

"NERVOUS debility, I think. Let me see
your tongue. Ah, I thought so! What
did you have for supper last night?"
Only a very light meal, I assure you, doctor.
Three mice and "
"Three blind mice?"
Well, one of them was rather short-sighted,
but-- "
"If you follow my advice, you will never
touch a blind mouse. It is very bad for the
digestion. I see that.I shall have to put you
on a rigid diet. You may take a nice tender
mouse cutlet now and then, but no potted
meat of any kind."
"And what about fish, doctor?"
"You may eat a shark or a whale once
a week, if your appetite is equal to it, but
nothing else. And you must take plenty of
exercise. Twice a day, in the open air, run
after your tail fifty times. Take a dose of
quinine every morning, and come and see me
again in a fortnight. Next patient, please!"







4i ;d ~cpI~qsi~~% .'1~~ia-
7w -----o














x ,
A, SERIO
Ii )














/I -f-"








A SERIOUS CASE.






A TRIAL BY JURY.

YUID you ever hear of it, children?
Oh, that was a trial indeed!
It must have been in the dog-days,
I think we are all agreed.
For the Lord Chief Justice Poodle
Sat in the judge's place,
Through his spectacles staring gravely
Into the culprit's face.

Old Dash for the prosecution,
Big Rex for the defence,
With Towser the little lawyer,
Crammed full of common sense.
And beyond the great square table,
With its paper, ink, and pen,
In a wise and solemn conclave,
Sat twelve dog-jurymen.
















It el
'I'
wJ i


p


S/".jI
a;braML


A TRIAL BY JURY.


I'i. ''


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.*


L~--.
~-4~C





Now, Dash had made his oration,
Which the listeners said was fine;
And Rex, the total abstainer,
Had left off his bark and whine.
Judge Poodle, he wiped his glasses,
And, turning his curly head,
"Gentle-dogs of the jury,
What is your verdict?" he said.

Then the foreman of the jury
Rose slowly and solemnly.
("Give a dog a bad name, and hang
him!"
Snarled a cur of low degree.)
"My lord, we agree in our verdict;
The dog is guilty!" quoth he;
"But we recommend him to mercy
Because-he's no worse than we. "


M. E. R.





\1/,.


A FRUGAL MEAL.

VISH-CAKES, mother?"
"Yes, dear."
"And may I have some pickles ?"
No, darling; pickles don't go well
with fish-cakes."











NAUGHTY KITS.


y H, deary, deary me.!
How sad it is to
see
These little kits, scarce
one year old,
Who oughi to be as good
as gold,
As naughty as can be!

Oh, fie! oh, fie! oh, fie!
No wonder that they cry,
For Mother's sent them
off to bed,


'*'-.-/..




'5
And worse than all, has sternly said
They shall not taste her pie!
Mi-ew! mi-ew! mi-ew!
I wonder if it's true
That when those kits went out of
town
They knocked a brand
new scarecrow
down,
And chased some
chickens too ?
Oh, deary, deary me!
I'm sure you'll all -
agree
A better cat is Master
Jim;
It does one good to
look at him
In Baby's nursery! I .H.






POOR BULLY'S FALL.


I. \
i WM
,- QL

"WHAT'S THE MATTER?"


" '4OW, what's been done to
Bully,
What have you done, I say?
He's had a fall, a dreadful fall,
He's very ill to-day."

" We went to have a swing, sir,
We went to have a swing;
We mounted high towards the
sky-
It was a pleasant thing."


" But Bully's head is aching;
You have not told me all.
Now, tell me-tell how Bully fell;
I'm sure he's had. a fall."

"We put him on the swing, sir,
We put him on the swing.
We told him twice, as good advice,
To only sit and cling.






But when
But when
You see his feet
off the
seat-
He did not
tell us
why.


" We hope
he'll soon
be well,
sir,
We hope
he'll soon
be well.
He's rather
fat (you've
noticed that),
And that is
why he
fell! J


we mounted high, sir,
we mounted high,
slipped


r I
-''




I'-
1,"

k4/


"HOLD ON, BULLY !


Pussies and Puppies.


5






THE FISHING CLUB.

sPORTING Master Fluffie
Said, I'm fond of fish-
Roach, and dace, and minnows
Make a dainty dish."

Forthwith he consulted
With some cats he knew.
"Quite so!" they responded;
"That is what we'll do!"

What was their intention ?
Just to start a club!
Twice a week they fish with
Paste, or worm, or grub!

But, as proverbs tell us,
"There is many a slip,"
So a careless fisher
Got a sudden dip.































_ j~









A FISHING CAT-- PH





A FISHING CAT-AS-TRO-PHE!





PUSSIE'S SPEECH.
A RECITATION.

M- IAOW! boys
S -' and girls!
I'se only a poor
-. Pussie; an' Ise
/i most out o' breff
S' a-runnin' from
S' de man dat
frowed de boot-
jack at my old
head. But what
S'I se going' to tell
--k."1q," you -is about
dat dare old
waspy which came to kiss me friendly
like, and den stung me wid his sting
most drefful bad. Miaow! miaow!
miaow!





Naughty waspy, him is a wicked
story-teller; him said he like me and
smole a pretty smile, but when he
touched me.he dropt nasty poison
which burns red hot in pussie's blood
and makes poor pussie cry. Miaow,
miaowowow !
When waspy smile, make sure
waspy got no sting. When wasp-like
wine-glass smile, make sure wine-glass
got no sting. De sting is wicked-spirit
hiding in de cup; him want to bite
big men. Little boy be big man some
day; de sting smile-like on little boy;
but little boy take care. Keep away
from waspy, and from waspy's nest;
signee pledge againstt waspy and waspy
sting, den boy and girl will nebber cry
like poor old pussie, Miaow, miaow,
miaowyiowy I






PUP'S SCOLDING.

Sf H, Puppy, it's very annoying,
AF The trouble I have'to endure;
\ hy .c'ill you be always destroying
jf ,", \'Whatever I try to secure ?
The frock I've been making for
dolly;
The counterpane, too, for
her bed;
SHer hat, trimmed with
velvet and holly,
a shred.
YOU NAUGHTY PUP !"

You set all I tell you at nought, sir;
You worry me out of my wits,
And only to-day you were caught, sir,
In pulling my dolly to bits.
My poor little dolly! she never
Did anything naughty to you,
But patted and stroked you whenever
I patted and petted you too.






This morning when
out with me
walking,
I told you to keep
S at my side,
But wasn'tt a bit
V 'of good talking,
Far over the
meadows you
hied.
POOR DOLLY!
PoO Y You caused me a
lot of concern, sir,
By getting half-drowned in the bog;
Though I called you, you would not return, sir;
You're a most disobedient dog!

Come! what I am saying is true, Pup,
I'm dreadfully sorry
to scold,
But if you are naughty
in youth, Pup,
What will you be
like when you're ...
old ? BING SCOLDED.





24
Well, first you must learn
to obey, sir;
And, Puppy, it's easy
.t'io see
That if you don't alter
your way, sir,
"A terrible dog you willbe.

'"i- k Oh, Puppy, dear Pup-
why,- he's crying!
I don't think he ever
"LEARN TO OBEY, SIR!" pretends-
His manners, you see,
are so trying-
There, come along,
Pup, and be friends! i
I'll scold you no more.
Come, be petted!
Oh, shame! it's my
honest belief
Your little black eye, sir,
is wetted
With tears of a -real
puppy grief. 'S CRYING





25
DANDY TOM.


X HAT a swell
Sand a stiff
mouth could make


!If a tall hat, and a cane,
collar, and a straw in his
any one a gentlecat, surely
rThomas, Esq., must be in
the very front rank. And
what a beautiful swagger
there is in his walk!
But I am sorry to say
he has not paid for his
hat, and if the hatter is
not very generous, Tom
is likely to get into
trouble. Are
there not some
other dandies
who wear- a
i fifteen-shil-
/ \V ling hat when
they ought to
be content
with a shil-
ling one?






THE PUSSIES' PICNIC.

Tt EAR the horn! hear the horn!
W hurry up, I say,
For dinner will be ready in a trice,
And little will be left, you know, for
those who stop away,
For father Tabb is very fond of
mice.

Leave the swing a little while, drop your bat
and ball;
And those who wish for dinner gather round;
Cook has brought the dishes, but Tibb has had
a fall,
And spilt his lemonade upon the ground.
But that was quite an accident, as any one can tell,
For Blackyback was creeping in the way;
Tibb does not stop to mop it up or wonder why
he fell,
But gets some more as quickly as he may.
The knives and forks and dishes now make a
merry din,
And I am left all lonely and forlorn. [begin,
Oh, pussies! oh, dear pussies! let me say ere you
Please don't forget the cat that blows the horn !




















It '
. *~. -


,A- .i


-C


*~7 *-~~n ~i


THE PUSSIES' PICNIC.


hw-=2mL--,


1-


;r-~da" c~






TRYING IT ON.

" Df OOD morning, sir. What can I do for
Syou this morning ?"
If you please, I want a new--a new--"
"I understand, sir. You need not mention
the dreadful word. I have a new stock just
arrived. Kindly see how this fits you, sir."
"It feels very com-fort-a-ble for a muz-for
a head-dress, but are you sure it is in the
fashion ?"
The latest pattern, sir. Suits you exactly,
sir. And it matches your rosette perfectly.
You will find it very well ven-ti-la-ted, so there
will be no danger to your health."
What is the price of it, please ?"
Six beef bones, sir."
Would chicken bones do instead ?"
"Very sorry, sir, but I cannot take less
than beef bones."
Qh, all right, I dare say I can manage.
I have come out without my purse, but I will
send you the bones presently by Parcel Post.
Good morning."

























Krlb



.. ..... .....


TRYING IT ON.







/ THE OPENING




" -, -
\~f^
.-
\ -.. ,, .- .


THE REHEARSAL.







LOUDER LOUDER!

V. (2- I,,I~~

/~








/ *-


LOUDER STILL! LOUDER' CO AT IT'! "
THE REHEARSAL.






NOW THEN
LOUDER!
BANG !!'


/


(J- /= --.- '

.s /

., .
,;'^

.;" I' 1 ,- .

... .... .- 1 '


', i ,. .
^ i \ / 1


THANK YOU


THE REHEARSAL.


Z'-


!






UNDER THE MISTLETOE.


A VERY lively
-A Christmas
There were some


time the Pussies had last
at Miss Tabitha's party.
nice mouse patties for sup-
per, and
1 plenty of
S mew-sic,
and seve-
ral brisk
As games,
Si until they
got so
T tired that
their tails

dropped
off. From
the middle
of the ceil-
ing there
was hang-
ing a piece
of mistle-
toe. Iwon-
der what
\ .'that was
al for ?


Pupsws qndt Puppie,


I.






YOU MUST NOT PLAY
WITH FATHER TIME.

" WONDER whatever the
I thing can be ?
Yap! yap!" said Turk, "it
seems to me
It's come from the ticking clock
up there,
To tell us the time of day.
So, Pup, for dinner we should
prepare-
'Tis nearly twelve, they say."

" I don't believe you, Mr. Turk,
It's something makes the
clock to work,
And never meant to tell
f us that.
It came when the loud
Sell rang.
Oh, please don't give it
so hard a pat,
It might go off bang!
bang ,






You foolish Pup," said Turk, "you see
It's just as hard as hard can be,
And far too big and strong to break
With such a gentle stroke;
So let us give it a little shake-
Oh, hark! I thought it spoke."
I fear 'twas something spoke in the clock,
For I plainly heard it go 'shock, shock,'
And the hands, oh, look, have ceased to go,"
Said Pup, in a startled tone.
Oh, what will happen I'd like to know;
Why didn't you let it alone ?"
Then came a crash, a jangle and bang-
No bell so loudly ever rang;
And Pup, poor Pup, with sudden pain,
Gave forth a frightened wail.
For the weight / .
behind had ,,
snapped its
chain, /
And fellwith a /
thud on his f.
tail I ,


J. L.





THEIR MOTHERS' PRIDE.

T WO cats and two kittens-
Now which would you say
Of the two doting mothers
Is proudest to-day?

Two cats and two kittens
Which pussie would grieve
With the bitterest anguish
Her darling to leave?

Two cats and two kittens
Which mother would wail
If her hopeful young offspring
Were drowned in the pail ?

Two cats and two kittens-
Which mamma's advice
Will best train her young one
To capture the mice?





























































THEIR MOTHERS' PRIDE.


fu4 s Oxo


sk;


L~;i~)C1II~L~cct~f~~





IN A HURRY.

'VE been invited out, sir!
I'm very pleased, you know;
"" Had you been asked, no doubt, sir,
You would have liked to go.
"So if you do not mind, please,
(I haven't long to stop),
Just cut my hair behind, please,
And trim it on the top.
" My whiskers should be curled, sir-
But time is flying fast;
I would not for the world, sir,
Arrive among the last.
" My friends would think it rude, too,
Should I be very late,
And might eat all the food, too;
For no one likes to wait."
J. L.














AAlm





















t p
u 4












wr


A.s "

4,'








I r ; k~ r~dl


THE PUSSY-CATS' BARBER.
















CouVj flhr


THE TUBBING.

tOWEL and tub, tub and towel,
Why should a bath make a good kitten
howl ?
Tub and towel, towel and tub,
Is it not bracing to have a good rub?

Soap and sponge, sponge and soap,
Better to laugh than to cry or to mope.
Sponge and soap, soap and sponge,
'Tisn't so bad when you've taken the plunge.





















0"


_i T


V/


TH-E TUBBING.
THE TUBBING.


:r


-.t
k~;~;g"~"~~~
-._ny


f~~~VJa;h.


-..., ,
~


"~~Tlo






MRS. CARLO'S NEW HAT.

REAT Mrs. Carlo sat down on the mat
And said, I have only a moment to
stay,
So tell your dear mother I've bought
a new hat,
And thought I would pay her a visit
to-day."

Then Puppy looked up with a smile of surprise:
My mother has gone to the market," he said,
" But when she returns with whatever she buys,
I'll tell her you called with thing on your head."

Said great Mrs. Carlo, I think I will stay,
Dear Pup, till your mother comes back from
the town;
I'll rest me just here, if I'm not in the way,"
And the great Mrs. Carlo lay peacefully down.

Alas! on the hat in her slumber she rolled,
She crumpled the straw, and the feather she
broke.





43
Her uncovered head felt a little bit cold,
And great Mrs. Carlo in terror awoke.

Then, just at that X1 mor
Pup's mother retur
And said, as her vi
w e p t i n \ despair,
"I'm grieved, Mrs. Carlo
find you con- cer
By something t
sensible dogs never w


nent
*ned,


Y, to
ned
hat
ear.
L.

























PUSSIES AT PLAY.

nID you ever see kittens so happy and gay
As dear little Tab and her playmate to-day?
Now down to the earth, and now up to the sky,
With no one to tease them till Squaller came by.
Old Squaller was angry because, I am told,
The milk in his saucer this morning was cold;
And when in the garden the kittens he' spied,
"It's time that you went to your lessons!" he cried.
"And when I'm unhappy it makes matters worse
To see any cats who are just the reverse."







He ran to the see-saw to chase them away,
Too peevish himself to let other folks play.
But he didn't go far, for the two kittens found
Some ripe rosy apples that lay on the ground,
And threw such a shower at his peevish old head,
He thought it much better to leave them instead!
And when by the fire he lay cosily curled,
He thought: "It's not well to be cross with the world."
J. L.





46
MAKING FRIENDS.

O call on Punch, Jack, Bob, and Prin,
Three dusky doggies came one day;
And thus they did the talk begin
In a polite and pleasant way:
"We hope we find you all quite well-
We're strangers here, as you can tell;
We've travelled from a .foreign land,
Dear friends, to shake you by the hand.


" From sunny France we've sailed away,
Across the rolling waves of blue;
And now we've all arrived to stay
And pass a happy time with you."
Prin slumbered on, but all the rest
Gave welcome to each stranger-guest,
And said, "Pray share our biscuits now!
We're glad to see you-bow-wow-wow!"






















K:


t.. FLi~


A FRIENDLY CALL.


.I
.I


c



a
p;r






.I ~b In






CHRISTMAS


O0 you know


Grimalkin


Square ?


It is very quiet there.


But each year, when Christmas waits
Play at Mother Tiptoes' gates,
Baby Tiptoes wakes from sleep,


Granny Purr


begins to weep,


Master Tom beside


the fire


Miaows


and sphitz with


rage most


dire;


Humps his back and


cuts a caper,


'Cause he cannot read the paper!


Well, you scarcely would


believe,


When they came this Christmas Eve,


WVAI TS.


















-I Avi


U,


THE CHRISTMAS WAITS.






Horrid trumpet pom-pommed thrice


'Neath


the window-" Three


mice.


Tiptoes then was heard


"Who will


to say,


send those waits away ?


I will give a lovely toy
To that Pussy, girl or boy,
Who will drive them from the
house,
And, as a treat, some potted mouse!"
How they tried to make them go


Best the artist's hand will
But I think 'twas Tiptoes'


show;
daughter


Did it with a jug of water!


L. H.


blind













I, I,


PUSSYKINS' PARTY.

Z VERY nice party had Pussykins Mew,
S The guests came in white, and in pink,
and in blue.
There were merry young kittens and tabithas
prim,
Whose coats and whose whiskers were silky and
trim.
At supper the darlings had everything nice,
And afterwards played at cat's-cradle and mice,
At skipping, at jumping, and mewsical chairs,
Whilst some little kitties sat out on the stairs.
When that party was over, each pussy-cat said,
"Miaou, Ma'am, and thank you," and went
home to bed. H.







A HUNTING MISHAP.


,TARTING
merry trot,


"A-HUNTING WE WILL GO."

So off a-hunting


will go."

But as the river edge
they win,
Oh, sad -- N
mishap, ,
Turk ''
tumbles/
in!


A FRIEND IN
NEED


.p) '
tv


These two puppies, Turk
and Spot,
Said, "The world is all
aglow,


we


STREAM,


"Oh, save me, Spot!"
he seems to shout,
" Pull hard! and I will


kick about."


at a







So Spot hung on with might
and main,
And dragged him to the shore
P again,
5% -Quite out of breath, as
you may guess,

IS A FRIEND INDEED.

And frightened more
than he'd confess.

They trotted home
less gay, no doubt,
Than they had been
SAVED!

tip, "' on starting out.
S"Oh, Spot, I'll do"'-
i. .' Turk seems to say-
As much for you,
"I'LL DO AS MUCH FOR YOU ANOTHER DAY. anOther day." J. L.







WHAT CAN IT BE?

TURK AND SNAP.
W, / 'HATEVER'S that? Oh, tell
Such sounds we
never heard.
It isn't I. It can't
'lbe you-
For that would be
,. absurd.

TABBY.
I'11 sing to you in
changing keys,
"WHATEVER'S THAT?" But won't detain
you long;
My little song is sure to please,
I'll sing my little song.

TURK AND "'
SNAP.
It is no doubt a
pretty thing- a
This little song /
you know;
But, dear Miss .
Tabby, while
you sing,
Excuse us-
We must go. -\ -- --,-
J. L. PUSSIE'S SONG.


















A LESSON IN PRONUNCIATION.

" T WISH you could speak more plainly,
I Puppy. Your accent is shocking. Now,
say Miaow."
I Bow-wow."
No, Puppy, that won't do. You've got
the vowels nearly right, but your consonants
are quite wrong. Try again-Miaow."
Wow-wow."
Dear, dear, how you try my patience! I
must send for a doctor and get him to take off
the tip of your tongue. Perhaps that will make
it easier for you. Good-bye."
Bow-wow-wow-wow-wow."




56
THE SALT SEA.

"4YrH, dear! After I've paid five shillings for
an excursion ticket to the sea-side, and
then to find that somebody's been and gone and
put some salt in the water."
I'm sorry you're so disappointed. Shall
I explain it to you ?"
"Miaow! miaow! Yes, please explain, as
quick as you can. Oh, my poor throat!"
"Well; you understand about evaporation,
don't you? You see--"
"No, indeed, I can't. It's got into my
eyes now. Never no more will I--"
"You are aware, of course, that when
the sun shines vertically upon the tropical
areas-
"Areas! Oh dear, I wish I was home
in the area now, with a saucer of milk to get
this horrid taste out of my throat! And I
believe it's got into my lungs. Miaow, miaow,
miaow !








































































"WHO PUT THE SALT I' THIS WATER?'






AND THE PUPPIES.


I" XW E care not if the
W should fall;
We care not if the


rain

rain


should stop.
This shelter snug," the Puppies cried,


4" Will keep off every
drop."


But Mr. Crow
search


was on


I -


tiny

the s.

For any mischief he could
do,


And said,


" That seems a


_11


pleasant perch !
It must be meant for me,
not you--


" Oh dear! oh dear!" the Puppies cried,


Why,
from
There's


this
fun.
Mr.


is very far


Crow


yonder side!
Now, Mr. Crow,


on

what


have you done ? "


i


MR. CROW


d







"We never tease you, Mr.
Crow,
SWe never would. Come
down from there.
S' )i This shelter snug is ours,
sr. you know.
Your conduct, sir, is most unfair."


"Such tricks are mean;
such tricks are vain.
You really are a selfish
thing.
You shall not serve us
so again.


' .. ....

Now, Spot, secure his
other wing."


The rain began
showers;
The Puppies'


seemed to grow.
They said again, This'
shelter's ours,
We mean to keep it, Mr.
Crow."
J. L.


to fall in

anger


S *ti
b i- -

- I I






THE GARDEN PARTY.

WAS the function of the season,
X And without sufficient reason,
Not a pussy of distinction but was anxious to
be there;
Oh! the strife and emulation
To secure an invitation!
Then the all important question for the ladies
-what to wear ?
After weeks of weary waiting,
Wet days, fine days alternating,
Dawnedpat length in brilliant sunshine the
grand garden-party day.
And the pussies flocked in dozens
With their sisters, aunts, and cousins,
To the" house upon the hill-top, where the
Festival held sway.
With so many lovely faces
Setting off their furs and laces,
Cream in plenty, waiters, twenty, garden chairs
and shady trees,
All the guests were sweetly gracious,
And with smiles most efficacious
Showed their hostess very plainly that she had
not failed to please.




















'I'"I


~Li


'I il


I.


THE GARDEN PARTY.






THE CATS IN THE KITCHEN.

SOW, here's a chance we do not often get;
It's one, perhaps, we never had before.,
If cook returns and finds the things upset,
We shall not have such frolic any more.

But as she's gone a-marketing to-day,
She won't be back till after nine o'clock;
So, let us have an hour of merry play,
For when she comes we're sure to hear her
knock.

Then off they romped, the cups aLnd plates
among;
They spilt the milk down startled Tabby's
nose!
Upon the gasalier they gaily swung,
And climbed upon the dresser shelf in rows!

So great their fun, they noticed not the clock.
Alas! time flies so quickly when we play.
And cook returned-they did not hear her knock,
Nor did they wait to hear what she would


say


J. L.










I.

*~~ I "





r-.- --r R


4"-,
K, .):


4.,. .-
.,, .


-cr-
~01


f ~ipi~
~u;;~i7,:d







N-


ENOUGH

WHAT a funny


TO MAKE

story!


Excuse me if I grin;
Such jokes almost compel me
To jump out of my skin.





















A CAT LAUGH.

My sides are nearly splitting,


And I


am aching so,


I must let off my spirits
Through my fantastic
Pussies and Puppies.


toe.


~errSC-l C"lrWI~Sb~i~ --C~























A MYSTERY.

n 'M Very funny how that door keeps
moving! It can't be the wind, because
it's indoors. And there's no man behind it,
for if there was a man there, he would walk
in. I'll go round and see- Bow, wow, wow.
Miaow, miaow.







I.,


411


_______ -.- ...-

A CAT AND DOG STORY.


/`~


.K


3..

-.~" -


1_________1__1_~ _1_____(________1__l____l_____ _____~


L O;str.


it jj







BREAKING UP FOR THE HOLIDAYS.


" URRAH! hurrah! hurrah! The time has come at
last!
The jolly, jolly holidays are near,
For Christmas, merry Christmas, is coming very fast,
The best of all the seasons of the year.


" So pack up all the spelling-books, the pencils, and the chalk,
There's not another lesson to be done;
And. tell each other what to do as loud as you can talk-
Of course, it's rather noisy, but it's fun.


"There's White has got his tail between the hinges and
the lid!
You talk so loud, you cannot hear him yell;
And Tabb has tipped a pot of ink on Puffy Purrer's head-
He'd like to make us fancy that it fell!


" Now ready all! and let us give another hearty cheer,
As all the packing up is safely done:
Hurrah! hurrah! hurrah! for the time that's very near-
The season of festivity and fun."
J. L.










- ~ ~ ~ O sii ~p

lo p. ERn
1: 1~1~a1



0 : ~; \; r ,~


GETTING READY FOR THE HOLIDAYS.






AT THE DENTIST'S.

SISS TABITHA had suffered very badlyfrom
toothache for six weeks. The pain was so
sharp that it was beginning to make her thin. She
was losing her appetite, too, and she would not
even touch a beautiful stale sprat that was lying in
a corner of the back garden.
A friend gave her some, tooth powder, which
she rubbed on every morning and evening with the
softest part of her paws. But still-oh, dear !-her
aching tooth smarted so much that she decided she
would have it out.
The first time she crept up the steps of the
dentist's house, the tooth suddenly got better, so
she went home again. Then it got worse than
ever. So the second time she went right in to see
the dentist. She had no sooner sat down in the
chair and opened her mouth, than he put in his
pincers. There was one sharp pull, and it was all
over. And from the way Miss Tabitha danced for
joy down the front steps, you would have thought
she was a young kitten!













I -L :1
-' I~


*I


-<: I ,


AT THE DENTIST'S.


-.:Z



















WHEN


THEY WERE
YOUNG.


WH~HEN they were young they thought
ml it right
To scratch, and squall, and mew;
And climb up trees a giddy height
To get a pleasant view.
And though the tree had many boughs,
They thought it better fun
To leave the rest for other cats,
And scramble on to one.





73
But that was in their kitten days.
Two only now remain;
For two were sent to Wimbledon,
And two were sent to Spain.

But where the other two are gone
I don't remember now-
Ah! here they are. Still laughing o'er
Their frolic on the bough. j. L.




74
A CRUSADER.

BEWARE.! Do not approach too
near!
There's danger in the way.
A valiant knight doth now appear
In armour for the fray.
His warlike helmet seems to speak
Of deeds of high renown;
Of heroes such as bravely seek
To cast some tyrant down.
He is a most courageous knight,
So boldly will -he dare!
No butcher's boy d6th him affright
Nor gentle pussy scare.
In his campaigns no soldier dies,
No -helpless victim groans;
And for his feats he asks no prize
But a few tasty bones.










































r





































A VALIANT KNIGIIT.
I
./ ... ..







HOW TINY GOT THE DOOR OPEN.


MRS. TINY'S kitten was round and soft like a little grey
ball, and it lay in a comfortable basket, on the floor
of a cupboard, not far from the kitchen fire.
Mrs. Tiny generally went mouse-hunting of an evening,
leaving her baby asleep. One cold night she had been out
longer than usual, and when she returned, found that every-
body was gone to bed. But she heard the baby kitten
crying piteously for its mother.
So she marched straight to the well-known corner, and
discovered that some one had accidentally shut the cupboard
door, and she could not possibly
open it.
"Mew, mew, mew," cited Ci.
kitty, inside.
Mow-ow, how shall I :.t
in?" said mamma, outside.
"Mew, mew! Open the
door!" wailed the
kitty.
Mrs. Tiny tried
the door, but it was of
no use, and then she
sat down outside to
think.' l
Then she went
silently up the stairs
to the door of a room -
at the end of a passage; -
and taking hold of the MRS. TINY AND KITTY.






corner of a mat, she scraped it
up and down against the door,
over and over again, so that it
sounded like a strange sort of
knocking.
At first Miss Hilda thought -
it was rats. When she came to
the door, with a lighted candle,
and saw it was Tiny, she wondered
what was the matter. It was _
evident that Tiny wanted her "MEW, MEW! OPEN THE DOOR!"
mistress to follow her; so she
went down to the kitchen, where the yells of the kitten
could clearly be heard. Mrs. Tiny paused before the closed
cupboard, and looked up mutely into Miss Hilda's face.
"I never saw anything more intelligent," said Miss
Hilda, as she turned the handle. The next instant out
came kitty, who was soon rubbing her little cold, wet nose
comfortably in her mother's warm black fur.
"I could have explained it
all much more -'s i easily and
quickly if Miss 'Hilda had been
a cat," said Mrs. Tiny to herself,
when the kitchen J was dark and
quiet again. "OUT CAME KITTY." But, after all,
she was not as stupid as I ex-
pected. And if ever you let any one shut the cupboard door
again when I'm out, I'll give you a good scratching. Do
you hear, Kitty?"
Purr," said the kitten, sleepily, and that was all the
answer she made.







"ONLY ROOM FOR THREE."

-a H, go away, Miss
Pussykins,
You really ought to
1060 see
"-The chair's full up, we
S' ," ., ,,9 i .. can't have you,
(i / However loud you like
'' to mew-
There' s
r --o n '1 y
room for
Threee"

"' Though
li t t title

like little
.."- boys,

Should try to be polite,
Still, this one fact is very clear-
We won't give up to you, my dear,
From morning until night."







Then Pussykins grew very cross,
And said it was not fair,
And called them naughty puppy dogs
To get upon her chair.

"You've been there such a long, long time!
It's surely my
turn now;"
To which those '.-
little pups ~ \'*
replied,
"Yap! Yap!" J '"I
and "Bow-
WOW-Wow! ,

Then Pussy
leapt upon
the chair
As slily as
could be,
And cried, "Ah,
no0w, you
puppy dogs, IV
There's only '"
room for r
mze / L.






A PUPPY'S


His


name


it was


nocent,
And "innocent"


" Sweet


he looked,


doubt;


He sat him down one day, in-
tent


On something fresh
about.


to think


"Aha! my little
he;


"If I can catch it


tail," said


now," he


growled,
"A circle I shall surely be!"


I1


In-


no


PRANK]ES.






At last he caught
he howled!


it-and


And then he sat him down
once more,


And


as he licked


his tail


so sore,


Said, "I was silly to intend
To join my head and latter end;


never try


again-Hullo!


"A tail!


as I'm


pup! Ho! ho!
Now, could I but
get hold of
that!" He,did!


Pussies and Puppies.


I'll


r,
;" 1J~~
~I
\.r
x\~
~





SBut Mistress
SPussycat, I
w m To whom the 'i I
tail belonged,
objected,
And gave him what he ne'er expected,
For he was loth to let it go,
While Pussy, screaming, tugged it so,
That Puppy's head got fixed at length,
And then, exerting all her strength,
i Puss freed, herself,
and, oh, dear,
dear!
1 There was a dreadful
scene, I fear!
Soon afterwards they met again,
And each was smarting still with pain;
Said Puss, We're
comrades in mis- ..-,
fortune now, -
Come, let's be friends.",
Pup meekly said,
Bow-wow!" .- ..




83
DON'T YOU THINK THEY'RE
LIKE THEIR FATHER?

~uHEIR
father is
a very ,
learned
Professor at
the Univer-
sity of Dog-
ford. He / -
is anxious /-/
that his
children *Q \
may also t
become
scholars \, /
and wear
spectacles
in time.





THE CATS' EXCURSION.

WO waggons full of pussies
Once started for a drive;
It was the greatest wonder
They all reached home alive.

An accident soon happened
Which spilt the foremost load:
The waggon tumbled over
And pitched them on the road.

The axle-tree was broken,
And loosened were the wheels,
The pussy who was driving
Took quickly to his heels.

A doctor who was sent for,
Was soon upon the ground
And found, except for bruises,
That all were safe and sound.
















Akh,
g -~

: -4.

H;.


THE CATS' EXCURSION.


(CYI
3-
~3c~ c
:-.':\~t




86
THE FIRST SKATE OF THE
SEASON.

fYVER the icy tide they glide
(I'm sorry for those who don't);
Here and there the ice will bear,
Though here and there it won't.
Hark! a crash-! too thin, too thin,
Tab and his wife are in, are in;
Water over the nose and chin!
But Puffy's pluck and Grippy's rope
Each ready aid extends.
They cheer with golden words of hope
Their poor unlucky friends.
Hark! a shout-"Ah! now they're out!"
Full praise the deed deserves,
For when another's in distress
True courage never swerves.
J. L.












































Wain
~PciU VIo i-'l.


THE FIRST SKATE OF THE SEASON.


It


~
-





DOGGIE AND THE GLOVE.

"`7OU hungry young puppy!
How starved you must feel
To want to partake of
A glove for your meal!

"'Twill spoil your digestion
And make you quite ill,
And the doctor will see you
And give you a pill."

"You funny boy, Tommy,
To think that I love
To eat for my dinner
A skinny old glove.

"The glove is my master's;
I'm taking great care
To save it from thieves when
He wants it to wear."






















































..loi.tW. .. _,. -^ S ,;.',.,. ^^ '.

-- ... E "AND THE GLOVE.----

DOGGIE AND THE GLOVE.






A PUZZLE FOR PUSS.

SARON VON
GLEICHEN
,'- had a favourite cat
k ,-/ which was very
S ---- much puzzled by
the mirror in his
room. At first she kept running
around it, hoping to catch the cat
she saw in the glass. After finding
that there was no other cat outside
the glass but herself, she began to
think.there must be one inside. So
she put out her forepaw and carefully
felt the glass on both sides, trying to
find out how thick it was. She soon
discovered, however, that if there was
a hole in the glass, it was not deep
enough to hold a cat, so she gave up
the whole thing as a mystery.





HOW TO PRODUCE
THE VOICE.

Doh!


Ray







Ya-ow!


\\'
=i






OR JUGGED


HARE?

I.

"1'AITER! this mouse


is a week


old."


" Very sorry, sir, I


am sure,


sir.


" Bring me

quickly.


something

I can't


here all day, because I

must catch the 2.30."


else

stay


MOUSEiS























































I'


MOUSE OR JUGGED HARE?


~%
--~----~Z'
-'-~-
-t:-.





2"







mix it


up


pepper,


and colouring


and then c
Hare, and


all right."

IV.


"A capital
Bring me
"Very sorry,
cook says


dish,


waiter!


some more.
sir, but the
it's 'off,' and


it takes a whole week


to make."


"Just


mustard,


with
salt,


matter,


aall it Jugged
he'll take it















S.
x


4)


MOUSE OR JUGGED HARE?


I I







THE TAIL END.


T HE tail end of the
book
Is the end of the tales,
Of dogs' tales
And cats' tales;
Of cats' tails
And dogs' tails.
The tail end of the
book
Is the end
of the !-


tails.




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