• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Little orphan Annie
 The raggedy man
 Curly Locks
 The funny little fellow
 The happy little cripple
 The rider of the knee
 Down around the river
 At Aunty's house
 The days gone by
 The bumblebee
 The boy lives on our farm
 The squirtgun uncle maked me
 The old tramp
 Old Aunt Mary's
 Winter fancies
 The runaway boy
 The little coat
 An impetuous resolve
 Who Santa-Claus wuz
 The nine little goblins
 Time of clearer twitterings
 The circus-day parade
 The lugubrious Whing-Whang
 Waitin' fer the cat to die
 Naughty Claude
 The south wind and the sun
 The jolly miller
 Our hired girl
 The boys' candidate
 The pet coon
 The old hay-mow
 On the sunny side
 A sudden shower
 Grandfather Squeers
 The pixy people
 A life-lesson
 A home-made fairy-tale
 The bear story
 Envoy
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Riley child-rhymes
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087567/00001
 Material Information
Title: Riley child-rhymes
Physical Description: 188, 1 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Riley, James Whitcomb, 1849-1916
Vawter, Will, 1871-1941 ( Illustrator )
Bowen-Merrill Company ( Publisher )
Braunworth, Munn & Barber
Publisher: Bowen-Merrill Company
Place of Publication: Indianapolis
Manufacturer: Braunworth, Munn & Barber, printers and bookbinders
Publication Date: 1899, c1898
Copyright Date: 1898
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Orphans -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Domestic animals -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Farm life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Aunts -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Grandfathers -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Leisure -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes, American   ( lcsh )
Juvenile poetry -- Indiana   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1899
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry   ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Indiana -- Indianapolis
United States -- New York -- Brooklyn
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: James Whitcomb Riley ; with Hoosier pictures by Will Vawter.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements precede text.
General Note: Title page and other preliminaries pages printed in black and red colors.
General Note: Pictorial front cover and spine; illustrated front endpaper.
General Note: Contains additional line-drawing margin decorations.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087567
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002236653
notis - ALH7130
oclc - 247974352

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Front Matter
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Half Title
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
    Frontispiece
        Page viii
    Title Page
        Page ix
        Page x
    Dedication
        Page xi
        Page xii
    Preface
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
    Table of Contents
        Page xv
        Page xvi
    List of Illustrations
        Page xvii
        Page xviii
        Page xix
        Page xx
        Page xxi
        Page xxii
    Little orphan Annie
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    The raggedy man
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Curly Locks
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    The funny little fellow
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    The happy little cripple
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    The rider of the knee
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Down around the river
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    At Aunty's house
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    The days gone by
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    The bumblebee
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    The boy lives on our farm
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    The squirtgun uncle maked me
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    The old tramp
        Page 75
    Old Aunt Mary's
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
    Winter fancies
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    The runaway boy
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
    The little coat
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
    An impetuous resolve
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Who Santa-Claus wuz
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
    The nine little goblins
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
    Time of clearer twitterings
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
    The circus-day parade
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
    The lugubrious Whing-Whang
        Page 119
        Page 120
    Waitin' fer the cat to die
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
    Naughty Claude
        Page 126
    The south wind and the sun
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
    The jolly miller
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
    Our hired girl
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
    The boys' candidate
        Page 144
    The pet coon
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
    The old hay-mow
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
    On the sunny side
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
    A sudden shower
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
    Grandfather Squeers
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
    The pixy people
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
    A life-lesson
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
    A home-made fairy-tale
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
    The bear story
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
    Envoy
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
    Back Cover
        Page 190
        Page 191
    Spine
        Page 192
Full Text









MAE

. . ........


W-W
4 "'MINE

.........MA
-'AM,




ma
te. e.;
mg

.... imp

























RILEY CHILD-RHYMES
WITH HOOSIER PICTURES























ofoer 0Qoofits B

Saimes W 6ifcomB @Tfeg



THE GOLDEN YEAR (En-
glish Edition).
A CHILD-WORLD.
NEGHBORLY POEMS.
SKETCHES IN PROSE AND
INTERLUDING VERSES.
AFTERWHILES.
PIPES O' PAN (Prose and
Verse).
RHYMES OF CHILDHOOD.
FLYING ISLANDS OF THE
NIGHT.
OLD-FASHIONED ROSES
(English Edition).
GREEN FIELDS AND RUN-
NING BROOKS.
ARMAZINDY.
POEMS HERE AT HOME.
RUBIYAT OF DOC SIFERS,
AN OLD SWEETHEART OF
MINE.











































2';


A-list'nin' to the witch-tales 'at Annie tells about


-."n.









RILEY



CHILD-RHYMES






JAMES WHITCOMB RILEY






WITH

HOOSIER PICTURES

BY


WILL VAWTER






INDIANAPOLIS AND KANSAS CITY
THE BOWEN-MERRILL COMPANY
MDCCC XC IX





































Copyright, 1890, 1896 and 1898

by
James Whitcomb Riley























Iraunwortlh, Munn & Barber,
Printers and Bookbinders,
16 Nassau Street, Brooklyn, N. Y





































WITH HALE AFFECTION AND ABIDING FAITH

THESE RHYMES AND PICTURES

ARE INSCRIBED

TO THE CHILDREN EVERYWHERE























He owns the bird-scngs of the hills-
The laughter of the April rills;
And his are all the diamonds set
In Morning's dewy coronet,-
And his the Dusk's first minted stars
That twinkle through the pasture-bars .
And litter all the skies at night
With glittering scraps of silver light;-
The rainbow's bar, from rim to rim,
In beaten gold, belongs to him.













,.. t ;
-































PAGE.
LITTLE ORPHANT ANNIE ... ...... ............. 23

THE RAGGEDY MAN .............. .... ... 2

CURLY LOCKS ............ .............. 2

THE FUNNY LITTLE FELLOW . .. . . .. 85

THE HAPPY LITTLE CRIPPLE .... .... .. .. . . 40

THE RIDER OF THE KNEE ............... .... .48

DOWN AROUND THE RIVER ................... 51

AT AUNTY'S HOUSE ... ... ................ 56

THE DAYS GONE BY .. ................. .. .60

THE BUMBLEBEE . . . . . 64

THE BoY LIVES ON OUR FAR. ................... 67

THE SQUIRTGUN UNCLE MAKE ME . . . .. 71

THE OLD TRAMP . . . . . 75

OLD AUNT MARY'S ........... .... .. 76

WINTER FANCIES ... .... .... .. .. 80

THE RUNAWAY BOY ......................85
(xv)










CONTENTS-Continued


THE LITTLECOAT ..... . . .. . 90g

AN IMPETUOUS RESOLVE . .. . ... . .95

WHO SANTY-CLAUS WUZ . . . . * 99

NINE LITTLE GOBLINS. ............ ....... 104

TIME OF CLEARER TWITTERINGS .. . . 109

THE CIRCUS-DAY PARADE . . . . 114

THE LUGUBRIOUS WHING-WHANG . . . .. 119

WAITIN' FER THE CAT TO DIE . . . . 121

NAUGHTY CLAUDE .. . . . . ... 126

THE SOUTH WIND AND THE SUN .. ............... 127

THE JOLLY MILLER . . . ; ... .136

OUR HIRED GIL ....... . . ........... 140

THE BOYS' CANDIDATE ....... ...... .... 144

THE PET COON .... .. .... .. ..... .. .. ... 145

THE OLD HAY-MOW ...... . ......... 148

ON THE SUNNY SIDE .... ...... ........... 152

A SUDDEN SHOWER ...... . .......... .156

GRANDFATHER SQUEERS . .......... * .. 160

THE PIXY PEOPLE . . . . . .. .167

A LIFE LESSON ... . . . ... ...... 171

A HOME-MADE FAIRY TALE . . . . .175

THE BEAR STORY .................. ..... 179

ENVOY . . . . . . 187


(xvi )
































S nA


WITCH-TALES FRONTISPIECE. -

THEY WAS TWO GREAT BIG BLACK THINGS A-STANDIN' BY HER SIDE .


AN' WHEN THEY TURNT THE KIVVERS DOWN .

LITTLE ORPHANT ANNIE-TAILPIECE . .

THE RAGGEDY MAN-TITLE . . ..

HE SHOWED ME THE HOLE 'AT THE WUNKS IS GOT .

CURLY LOCKS-TITLE .............

SIT ON A CUSHION AND SEW A FINE SEAM . .

THE FUNNY LITTLE FELLOW-TITLE . .

NEVER KNEW A BABY THAT WOULDN'T CROW FOR HIM .

THE HAPPY LITTLE CRIPPLE-TITLE . .

AN' I PECK ON-THE WINDER ...........

AN' COOKS A' EGG FER M ........ .

THE HAPPY LITTLE CRIPPLE-TAILPIECE .

(xvii)


. . 25

.. 27

. . 28

. . 29

........382
S. . 32



. . 85
.35

.. 37

. . 40

. . 41
. ..... 41

........ 45

.,47












ILLUSTRATIONS-Continued


THE RIDER OF THE KNEE .. . . ... 49

DOWN AROUND TuE RIVER-TITLE . . . .51

NOON-TIME AND JUNE-TIME DOWN AROUND THE RIVER . 53

DOWN AROUND TIE IVER--TAILPIECE . .. ..... .55

AT AUNTY'S HOUSE-TITLE .... . . ... 56

WE ET OUT ON THE PORCH . .. . . . 57

THE DAYS GONE BY-TITLE . . . . .60

INTHEORCHARD . . . . ..... 61

THE BUMBLEBEE ........... . . .65

THE BOY LIVES ON OUR FARM-TITLE ... . . .67

STAND UP LIKE HIM AN' DRIVE. .... ........ 69

THE SQUIRTGUN UNCLE MAKE ME-TITLE . . ... 71

THE SQUITGUN-TAILPIECE .

AN' NEN HE PEELED OFF THE BAR . . . .

THE OLD TRAMP . . 75

WE PATTER ALONG IN TIE DUST AGAIN . . 77

OLD AUNT MARY'S-TAILPIECE .......... . 79

WINTER FANCIES--TITLE . ......... .

WINTER WITHOUT AND WARMTH WITHIN . .. . 1

IIEE IN MY ROOM I'M AS SNUGLY SHUT .. . 4

AN' A GREA'-BIG PIG WENT BOOH!" .. . . 7

HUG WITE CLOSE ROUND HER NECK . ...... 89

THE LITTLE COAT ...... . 91




( xviii)












ILLUSTRATIONS--Contlined


THE LITTLE COAT-TAILPIECE ..... .. ....... 94

AN IMPETUOUS RESOLVE-TITLE . . .. . . 95

I'M GO'TO BE A BAKER ................. ... .96

A-SLINGIN' PIE-CRUST 'LONG THE ROAD . . .... 97

WHO SANTY-CLAUS WUz-TITLE . . . .. .99

AN' QUAR'L WITH HIS FROSTED HEELS . . . .. 101

WHO SANTA-CLAUS WUZ-TAILPIECE . . . ... .103

THE NINE LITTLE GOBLINS ... . . . 105

THE NINE LITTLE GOBLINS-TAILPIECE . . ... .108

TIME OF CLEARER TWITTERINGS-TITLE . . ... .109

WHERE THE SHELLBARK HICKORY TREE (RE-DRAWN FROM PHOTO) 111

THE CIBCUS-DAY PARADE . . . ... 115

HOW THE CAGES JOLTED PAST . . . . .. 117

AND, LAST OF ALL, THE CLOWN ... . . .. .118

THE LUGUBRIOUS WHING-WHANG-TITLE . . ... .119

WAITING' FER THE CAT TO DIE-TITLE . . .. .121

BAREFOOTED, HUNGRY, LEAN, ORNRY BOYS . .. .123

WHY YOU ROCK SO SLOW ? .... . . . . .125

NAUGHTY CLAUDE .... . . . .... 126

THE SOUTH WIND AND THE SUN-TITLE . . ... .127

THIS PAIR OF MERRY FAYS . . . . .131

THE JOLLY MILLER-TITLE . . . . ... .136

THAT CAT 0' YOURN I 'D KILL HER . . . .137

WUZPARCHIN' CORN FER THE RAGGEDY MAN . . ... .141

THE BOYS'CANDIDATE ....... ...... ...........144
(xix)












ILLUSTRATION s-Continued


THE PET COON-TITLE ... . . . . 145

AN' NEN WHEN BILLY FIGHTED ME . . . . 147

THE OLD HAY-MOW-TITLE . . . . .. .148

IN OUR HAY-MOW WHERE I KEEP STORE ..... ...... 149

ON THE SUNNY SIDE-TITLE . . . ..... .152

AS A ROMPING BOY ON THE SUNNY SIDE (RE-DRAWN FROM PHOTO) . 153

A SUDDEN SHOWER-TITLE ...... . . 156

SCHOOLGIRL FACES GLEAM FROM THE SHAWLS ABOUT THEIR HEADS. 157

A SUDDEN SHOWER-TAILPIECE ... . . . .159

GRANDFATHER SQUEERS-TITLE . . . .160

AND SMOKE LEAF-TOBACCO. ... . . . .163

GRANDFATHER SQUEERS-TAILPIECE . . . .166

THE PIXY PEOPLE-TITLE .. ... ..... . 167

WINGED ABOVE THE WALK ............... .169

A LIFE LESSON-TITLE ......... ..... .. 171

BUT HEAVEN HOLDS ALL FOR WHICH YOU SIGH . . .173

A HOME-MADE FAIRY-TALE-TITLE . . . .175

A LITTLE DUDE-FAIRY . . . . 177

ENVOY . . . . . . .185


(xx)






















RILEY CHILD-RHYMES




r'























LITTLE ORPHANT ANNIE
LITTLE Orphant Annie's come to our house to stay,
An' wash the cups an' saucers up, an' brush the
crumbs away,
An' shoo the chickens off the porch, an' dust the hearth,
an' sweep,
An' make the fire, an' bake the bread, an' earn her board-
an'-keep;
An' all us other childern, when the supper things is done,
We set around the kitchen fire an' has the mostest fun
A-list'nin' to the witch-tales 'at Annie tells about,
An' the Gobble-uns 'at gits you
Ef you
Don't
Watch
Out!


r









LITTLE ORPHANT ANNIE

Onc't they was a little boy wouldn't say his prayers,-
So when he went to bed at night, away up stairs,
His Mammy heerd him holler, an' his Daddy heerd him
bawl,
An' when they turn't the kivvers down, he wasn't there
at all!
An' they seeded him in the rafter-room, an' cubby-hole,
an' press,
An' seeked him up the chimbly-flue, an' ever'wheres, I
guess;
But all they ever found was thist his pants an' rounda-
bout:-
An' the Gobble-uns'll git you
Ef you
Don't
Watch
Out!


An' one time a little girl 'ud allus laugh an' grin,
An' make fun of everyone, an' all her blood an' kin;
An' onc't, when they was "company," an' ole folks was
there,
She mocked 'em an' shocked 'em, an' said she didn't care!
An' thist as she kicked her heels, an' turn't to run an' hide,
They was two great big Black Things a-standin' by her side,
24









LITTLE ORPHANT ANNIE


An' they snatched her through the ceilin' 'fore she knowed
what she's about!
An' the Gobble-uns'll git you
Ef you
Don'tWa
Watch
Out!
An' little Orphant Annie says, when the blaze is blue,
An' the lamp-wick sputters, an' the wind goes woo-oo!
An' you hear the crickets quit, an' the moon is gray,
An' the lightnin'-bugs in dew is all squenched away,-
You better mind yer parents, an' yer teachers fond an' dear,
An' churish them'at loves you, an' dry the orphant's tear,
An' he'p the pore an' needy ones 'at clusters all about,
Er the Gobble-uns'll git you
Ef you _
Don't
Watch
Out!


___:_ lik























,,\



O THE RAGGEDY MAN! He works fer Pa;
An' he's the goodest man ever you saw!
He comes to our house every day,
An' waters the horses, an' feeds 'em hay;
An' he opens the shed-an' we all ist laugh
When he drives out our little old wobble-ly calf;
An' nen-ef our hired girl says he can-
He milks the cow fer 'Lizabuth Ann.-
Aint he a' awful good Raggedy Man?
Raggedy! Raggedy! Raggedy Man!

W'y, The Raggedy Man-he's ist so good
He splits the kindlin' an' chops the wood;
An' nen he spades in our garden, too,
An' does most things 'at boys can't do!-







THE RAGGEDY MAN


He climbed clean up in our big tree
An' shocked a' apple down fer me-
An' nother'n', too, fer 'Lizabuth Ann-
An' nother'n', too, fer The Raggedy Man.-
Aint he a' awful kind Raggedy Man?
Raggedy! Raggedy! Raggedy Man!


An' The Raggedy Man, he knows most rhymes
An' tells 'em, ef I be good, sometimes:
Knows 'bout Giunts, an' Griffuns, an' Elves,
An' the Squidgicum-Squees 'at swallers themselves!
An', wite by the pump in our pasture-lot,
He showed me the hole 'at the Wunks is got,
'At lives 'way deep in the ground, an' can
Turn into me, er 'Lizabuth Ann!
Aint he a funny old Raggedy Man?
Raggedy! Raggedy! Raggedy Man!

The Raggedy Man-one time when he
Wuz making' a little bow-'n'-orry fer me,
Says When you're big like your Pa is,
Air you go' to keep a fine store like his-
An' be a rich merchunt-an' wear fine clothes ?-
Er what air you go' to be, goodness knows! "
An' nen he laughed at 'Lizabuth Ann,
An' I says "'M go' to be a Raggedy Man!-
I'm ist go' to be a nice Raggedy Man! "
Raggedy! Raggedy! Raggedy Man!

























CURLY LOCKS

C URLY Locks! Curly Locks! wilt thou be mine?
Thou shalt not wash the dishes, nor yet feed the
swine,-
But sit on a cushion and sew a fnc seam,
And feast upon strawberries, sugar and cream.


Curly Locks! Curly Locks! wilt thou be mine?
The throb of my heart is in every line,
And the pulse of a passion as airy and glad
In its musical beat as the little Prince had !
32










CURLY LOCKS


Thou shalt not wash the dishes, nor yet feed the swine!-
O I '11 dapple thy hands with these kisses of mine
Till the pink of the nail of each finger shall be
As a little pet blush in full blossom for me.



But sit on a cushion and sew a fine seam,
And thou shalt have fabric as fair as a dream,-
The red of my veins,, and the white of my love,
And the gold of my joy for the braiding thereof.



And feast upon strawberries, sugar and cream
From a service of silver, with jewels agleam,-
At thy feet will I bide, at thy beck will I rise,
And twinkle my soul in the night of thine eyes!



Curly Locks! Curly Locks! will thou 6c mine?
Thou shalt not wash the dishes, nor yet feed the swine,--
But sit on a cushion and sew a fine scam,
And feast upon strawberries, sugar and cream.
























W\VAS a Funny Little Fellow
SOf the very purest type,
For he had a heart as mellow
As an apple over-ripe;
And the brightest little twinkle
When a funny thing occurred,
And the lightest little tinkle
Of a laugh you ever heard!


His smile was like the glitter
Of the sun in tropic lands,
And his talk a sweeter twitter
Than the swallow understands;
35
-N







THE FUNNY LITTLE FELLOW

Hear him sing-and tell a story-
Snap a joke-ignite a pun,-
'Twas a capture-rapture-glory,
And explosion-all in one!

Though he hadn't any money-
That condiment which tends
To make a fellow honey "
For the palate of his friends;-
Sweet simples he compounded-
Sovereign antidotes for sin
Or taint,-a faith unbounded
That his friends were genuine.

He wasn't honored, may be-
For his songs of praise were slim,-
Yet I never knew a baby
That wouldn't crow for him;
I never knew a mother
But urged a kindly claim
Upon him as a brother,
At the mention of his name.

The sick have ceased their sighing,
And have even found the grace
36


<.~\ /











THE FUNNY LITTLE FELLOW


Of a smile when they were dying
As they looked upon his face;
And I've seen his eyes of laughter
Melt in tears that only ran
As though, swift dancing after,
Came the Funny Little Man.


He laughed away the sorrow,
And he laughed away the gloom
We are all so prone to borrow
From the darkness of the tomh;
And he laughed across the ocean
Of a happy life, and passed,
With a laugh of glad emotion,
Into Paradise at last.


And I think the Angels knew him,
And had gathered to await
His coming, and run to him
Through the widely-opened Gate-
With their faces gleaming sunny
For his laughter-loving sake,
And thinking, "What a funny
Little Angel he will make! "
39




















-;;;







I'M thist a little cripple boy, an' never goin' to grow
An' git a great big man at all!-'cause Aunty told
me so.
When I was thist a baby onc't, I failed out of the bed
An' got The Curv'ture of the Spine "-'at's what the
Doctor said.
I never had no Mother nen-fer my Pa runned away
An' dassn't come back here no more-'cause he was
drunk one day
An' stobbed a man in thish-ere town, an' couldn't pay
his fine!
An' nen my Ma she died-an' I got "Curv'ture of the
Spine! "








THE HAPPY LITTLE CRIPPLE


I'm nine years old! An' you can't guess how much I
weigh, I bet!-
Last birthday I weighed thirty-three!--An' I weigh thirty
yet!
I'm awful little fer my size-I'm purt' nigh littler 'nan
Some babies is!-an' neighbors all calls me "The Little
Man!"
An' Doc one time he laughed an' said: "I'spect, first
thing you know,
You '11 have a little spike-tail coat an' travel with a show! "
An' nen I laughed-till I looked round an' Aunty was
a-cryin'-
Sometimes she acts like that, 'cause I got Curv'ture of
the Spine."


I set-while Aunty's washin'-on my little long-leg stool,
An' watch the little boys an' girls a-skippin' by to school;
An' I peck on the winder, an' holler out an' say:
"Who wants to fight The Little Man 'at dares you all to-
day?"
An', nen the boys climbs on the fence, an' little girls
peeks through,
An' they all says: Cause you're so big, you think we're
'feard o' you! "








THE HAPPY LITTLE CRIPPLE


An' nen they yell, an' shake their fist at me, like I shake
mine-
They're thist in fun, you know, 'cause I got "Curv'ture
of the Spine!"


At evening, when the ironin's done, an' Aunty's fixed the
fire,
An' filled an' lit the lamp, an' trimmed the wick an'
turned it higher,
An' fetched the wood all in fer night, an' locked the
kitchen door,
An' stuffed the ole crack where the wind blows in up
through the floor-
She sets the little on the coals, an' biles an' makes the tea,
An' fries the liver an' the mush, an' cooks a egg fer me;
An' sometimes-when I cough so hard-her elderberry
wine
Don't go so bad fer little boys with Curv'ture of the
Spine! "


But Aunty's all so childish-like on my account, you see,
I'm 'most afeard she'll be took down-an' 'at's what
bothers me !-









THE HAPPY LITTLE CRIPPLE

'Cause ef my good ole aunty cover would git sick an' die,
I don't know what she'd do in heaven-till I come, by
an' by:-
Fer she's so ust to all my ways, an' everything, you know,
An' no one there like me, to nuss an' worry over so!-
'Cause all the little childerns there's so straight an' strong
an' fine,
They's nary angel 'bout the place with "Curv'ture of the
spine!"






(4, 14


1 ". r \


"



0L"

















THE RIDER OF THE KNEE


K NIGHTLY Rider of the Knee
Of Proud-prancing Unclery!
Gaily mount, and wave the sign
Of that mastery of thine.

Pat thy steed and turn him free,
Knightly Rider of the Knee!
Sit thy charger as a throne-
Lash him with thy laugh alone:

Sting him only with the spur
Of such wit as may occur,
Knightly Rider of the Knee,
In thy shriek of ecstasy.

Would, as now, we might endure,
Twain as one-thou miniature
Ruler, at the rein of me-
Knightly Rider of the Knee!
48


.7


























N OON-TIME an' June-time, down around the river!
Have to furse with 'Lizey Ann-but lawzy! I fer-
give her!
Drives me off the place, an' says 'at all 'at she's a-wishin',
Land o' gracious! time'll come I'll git enough o' fishing !
Little Dave, a-choppin' wood, never 'pears to notice;
Don't know where she's hid his hat, er keerin' where his
coat is,-
Specalatin', more'n like, he haint a-goin' to mind me,
An' guessin' where, say twelve o'clock,. a feller'd likely
find me!

5r f








DOWN AROUND THE RIVER


Noon-time an' June-time, down around the river!
Clean out o' sight o' home, an' skulkin' under kivver
Of the sycamores, jack-oaks, an' swamp-ash an' ellum-
Idies all so jumbled up, you kin hardly tell 'em !-
Tired, you know, but lovin' it, an' smilin' jes' to think at
Any sweeter tiredness you'd fairly want to drink it!
Tired o' fishin'-tired o' fun-line out slack an' slacker-
All you want in all the world's a little more tobacker!



Hungry, but a-hidin' it, er jes' a-not a-keerin':-
King-fisher gittin' up an' skootin' out o' hearing ;
Snipes on the t'other side, where the County Ditch is,
Wadin' up an' down the aidge like they'd rolled their
britches!
Old turkle on the root kindo-sorto drappin'
Intoo th' worter like he don't know how it happen!
Worter, shade an' all so mixed, don't know which you'd
orter
Say; th' worter in the shadder-shaddcr in the worter!



Somebody hollerin'-'way around the bend in
Upper Fork-where yer eye kin jes' ketch the endin'

52





-
-'N_









DOWN AROUND THE RIVER


Of the shiney wedge o' wake some muss-rat's a-makin'
With that pesky nose o' his! Then a sniff o' bacon,
Corn-bred an' 'dock-greens-an' little Dave a-shinnin'
'Crost the rocks an' mussel-shells, a-limpin' an' a-grinnin',
With yer dinner fer ye, an' a blessin' from the giver,
Noon-time an' June-time down around the river!


i.

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,, *'- r -_ -, -'












O NE time, when wez at Aunty's house-
'Way in the country !-where
They's ist but woods-an' pigs, an' cows-
An' all's out-doors an' a'irl
An' orchurd-swing; an' churry-trees-
An' churrics in 'em !-Yes, an' these-
Here red-head birds steals all they please,
An' tech 'em ef you dare!
, ... [ )
















W'y, wunst, one time, when we wuz there,
We et out on the orcy -where








AT AUNTY'S HOUSE


Wite where the cellar-door wuz shut
The table wuz; an' I
Let Aunty set by me an' cut
My vittuls up-an' pie.
'Tuz awful funny!-I could see
The red-heads in the churry-tree;
An' bee-hives, where you got to be
So keerful, goin' by;-
An' "Comp'ny there an' all!-an' we-
We ct out on the porch!


An' I ist et p'surves an' things
'At Ma don't 'low me to-
An' chickun-gizzurds-(don't like wings
Like Parunts does! do you?)
An' all the time, the wind blowed there,
An' I could feel it in my hair,
An' ist smell clover ever'where!-
An' a' old red-head flew
Purt' nigh wite over my high-chair.
When we et on the porch !

















- _^


THE DAYS GONE BY

O THE days gone by! 0 the days gone by!
The apples in the orchard, and the pathway through
the rye;
The chirrup of the robin, and the whistle of the quail
As he piped across the meadows sweet as any nightingale;
When the bloom was on the clover, and the blue was in
the sky,
And my happy heart brimmed over, in the days gone by.






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,~%*II~ c
FE C-.










THE DAYS GONE BY


In the days gone by, when my naked feet were tripped
By the honey suckle tangles where the water-lilies dipped,
And the ripples of the river lipped the moss along the brink
Where the placid-eyed and lazy-footed cattle came to drink,
And the tilting snipe stood fearless of the truant's wayward
cry
And the splashing of the swimmer, in the days gone by.


O the days gone by! 0 the days gone by!
The music of the laughing lip, the lustre of the eye;
The childish faith in fairies, and Aladdin's magic ring-
The simple, soul-reposing, glad belief in everything,-
When life was like a story, holding neither sob nor sigh,
In the golden olden glory of the days gone by.

















THE BUMBLEBEE


VOU better not fool with a Bumblebee!-
1 Ef you don't think they can sting-you'll see!
They're lazy to look at, an' kindo' go
Buzzin' an' bummin' around' so slow,
An' ac' so slouchy an' all fagged out,
Danglin' their legs as they drone about
The hollyhawks 'at they can't climb in
'Ithout ist a-tumble-un out agin!
Wunst I watched one climb clean 'way
In a jim'son-blossom, I did, one day,-
An' I ist grabbed it-an' nen let go-
An' "'Ooh-oo Honey! I told ye so!"
Says The Raggedy Man; an' he ist run
An' pullt out the stinger, an' don't laugh none,
An' says: "They has ben folks, I guess,
'At thought I wuz predjudust, more er less,-
Yit I still mountain 'at a Bumblebee
Wears out his welcome too quick fer me "

























har n.


THE BOY lives on our Farm, he's not
Afeard o' horses none!
An' he can make 'em lope, er trot,
Er rack, er pace, er run.
Sometimes he drives two horses, when
He comes to town an' brings
A wagon-full o' 'taters nen,
An' roastin'-ears an' things.
67









THE BOY LIVES ON OUR FARM


Two horses is a team," he says,-
An' when you drive er hitch,
The right-un's a "near-horse," I guess,
Er "off"-I .don't know which.-
The Boy lives on our Farm, he told
Me, too, 'at he can see,
By looking' at their teeth, how old
A horse is, to a T!


I'd be the gladdest boy alive
Ef I knowed much as that,
An' could stand up like him an' drive,
An' ist push back my hat,
Like he comes skallyhootin' through
Our alley, with one arm
A-wavin' Fare-ye-well! to you-
The Boy lives on our Farm !













Tie Squirtgu)

UIdle asked Ne.


UNCLE Sidney, when he wuz here,
Maked me a squirtgun out o' some
Elder-bushes 'at growed out near
Where wuz the brickyard-'way out clear
To where the toll-gate come!

So when we walked back home again,
He maked it, out in our woodhouse where
Wuz the old workbench, an' the old jack-plane.
An' the old 'pokeshave, an' the tools all lay'n'
Ist like he wants 'em there.

He sawed it first with the old hand-saw;
An' nen he peeled off the bark, an' got
Some glass an' scraped it; an' told 'bout Pa,
When he wuz a boy an' fooled his Ma,
An' the whippin' 'at he caught.
71
f:-~









THE SQUIRTGUN UNCLE MAKE ME


Nen Uncle Sidney, he took an' filed
A' old arn ramrod; an' one o' the ends
He screwed fast into the vise; an' smiled,
Thinkin', he said, o' when he wuz a child,
'Fore him an' Pa wuz mens.

He punched out the peth, an' nen he put
A plug in the end with a hole notched through;
Nen took the old drawey-knife an' cut
An' maked a handle 'at shoved clean shut
But ist where yer hand held to.

An' he wropt th'uther end with some string an' whiit
Piece o' the sleeve of a' old tored shirt;
An' nen he showed me to hold it tight,
An' suck in the water an' work it right
An' it 'ud ist squirt an' squirt!




























. OLD Tramp slep' in our stable
wunst,
An' The Raggedy Man he caught'
An' roust him up, an' chased him o:
Clean out through our back lot!


An' th' Old Tramp hollered back an' said,-
" "You 're a furty man!--To air!-
With a pair o'eyes like two fried eggs,
An' a nose like a Bartlutt pear!" ,:. '

A 2, .
.% ^ k.^ "y .- % 2 -.. ^", -,,':r- ,


ri













OLD AUNT MARY'S


WAS N'T it pleasant, 0 brother mine,
In those old days of the lost sunshine
Of youth-when the Saturday's chores were through,
And the Sunday's wood" in the kitchen, too,
And we went visiting, me and you,"
Out to Old Aunt Mary's?
It all comes back so clear to-day!
Though I am as bald as you are gray-
Out by the barn-lot, and down the lane,
We patter along in the dust again,
As light as the tips of the drops of the rain,
Out to Old Aunt Mary's!
We cross the pasture, and through the wood
Where the old gray snag of the poplar stood,
Where the hammering "red-heads hopped awry,
And the buzzard raised" in the clearing sky
And lolled and. circled, as we went by
Out to Old Aunt Mary's.
And then in the dust of the road again;
And the teams we met, and the countrymen;
76









OLD AUNT MARY'S


And the long highway, with sunshine spread
As thick as butter on country bread,
Our cares behind, and our hearts ahead
Out to Old Aunt Mary's.

Why, I see her now in the open door,
Where the little gourds grew up the sides and o'er
The clapboard roof!-And her face-ah, me!
Wasn't it good for a boy to see-
And wasn't it good for a boy to be
Out to Old Aunt Mary's?

And 0 my brother, so far away,
This is to tell you she waits to-day
To welcome us:-Aunt Mary fell
Asleep this morning, whispering, Tell
The boys to come! And all is well
Out to Old Aunt Mary's.




















3I






INTER without
And warmth within;
The winds may shout
And the storm begin;
The snows may pack
At the window pane,
And the skies grow black,
And the sun remain
Hidden away
The livelong day-
But here-in here is the warmth of May!







WINTER FANCIES


II

Swoop your spitefullest
Up the flue,
Wild Winds-do!
What in the world do I care for you?
0 delightfullest
Weather of all,
Howl and squall,
And shake the trees till the last leaves fall!



III

The joy one feels,
In an easy chair,
Cocking his heels
In the dancing air
That wreathes the rim of a roaring stove
Whose heat loves better than hearts can love,
Will not permit
The coldest day
To drive away
The fire in his blood, and the bliss of it!








WINTER FANCIES


IV
Then blow, Winds, blow!
And rave and shriek,
And snarl and snow
Till your breath grows weak-
While here in my room
I 'm as snugly shut
As a glad little worm
In the heart of a nut!












I,

JAif





WUNST I sassed my Pa, an' he
Won't stand that, an' punished me,-
Nen when he was gone that day,
I slipped out an' runned away.
I looked all my copper-cents,
An' climbed over our back fence
In the jimpson-weeds 'at growed
Ever'where all down the road.
Nen I got out there, an' nen
I runned some -an' runned again
When I met a man 'at led
A big cow 'at shocked her head.
85




4


ii! /I







THE RUNAWAY POY


I went down a long, long lane
Where was little pigs a-play'n';
An' a grea'-big pig went Booh! "
An' jumped up, an' skeered me too.


Nen I scampered past, an' they
Was somebody hollered "Hey! "
An' I ist looked everywhere,
An' they was nobody there.


I Want to, but I'm 'fraid to try
To go back. .An' by-an'-by,
Somepin' hurts my throat inside-
An' I want my Ma--an' cried.


Nen a grea'-big girl come through
Where's a gate, an' telled me who
Am I? an' ef I tell where
My home's at she'll show me there.


But I couldn't ist but tell
What's my name; an' she says well,
An' she tooked me up an' says
She know where I live, she guess.
86









THE RUNAWAY BOY

Nen she telled me hug wite close
Round her neck!--an' off she goes
Skipping' up the street! An' nen
Purty soon I 'm home again.

An' my Ma, when she kissed me,
Kissed the biggirl too, an' she
Kissed me-ef I p'omisc shore
I won't run away no more!

















THE LITTLE COAT


H ERE'S his ragged "roundabout"
Turn the pockets inside out:
See; his pen-knife, lost to use,
Rusted shut with apple-juice;
Here, with marbles, top and string,
Is his deadly "devil-sling.,"
With its rubber, limp at last
As the sparrows of the past!
Beeswax-buckles-leather straps-
Bullets, and a box of caps,-
Not a thing of all, I guess,
But betrays some waywardness-
E'en these tickets, blue and red,
For the Bible-verses said-
Such as this his mem'ry kept-
"Jesus wept."


















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THE LITTLE COAT


Here's a fishing hook-and-line,
Tangled up with wire and twine,
And dead angle-worms, and some
Slugs of lead and chewing gum,
Blent with scents that can but come
From the oil of rhodium.
Here-a soiled, yet dainty note,
That some little sweetheart wrote,
Dotting-"' Vine grows round the stump,"
And-" My sweetest sugar lump! "
Wrapped in this-a padlock key
Where he's filed a touch-hole-see!
And some powder in a quill
Corked up with a liver pill;
And a spongy little chunk
Of punk."


Here's the little coat-but O!
Where is he we've censured so!
Don't you hear us calling, dear?
Back! come back, and never fear.-
You may wander where you will,
Over orchard, field and hill;









THE LITTLE COAT


You may kill the birds, or do
Anything that pleases you!
Ah, this empty coat of his!
Every tatter worth a kiss;
Every stain as pure instead
As the white stars overhead:
And the pockets-homes were they
Of the little hands that play
Now no more-but, absent, thus
Beckon us.



























AN IMPETUOUS RESOLVE


W HEN little Dickie Swope's a man,
He's go' to be a Sailor;
An' little Hamey Tincher, he's
A-go' to be a Tailor:
Bud Mitchell, he's a-go' to be
A stylish Carriage-Maker;
An' when I grow a grea'-big man,
I'm go' to be a Baker !








AN IMPETUOUS IRESOIVE


An' Dick'll buy his sailor-suit
O' Hame; and Hame'll take it
An' buy as fine a double-rigg
As ever Bud can make it:
An' nen all three'll drive roun' fer me
An' we'll drive off togevver,
A-slingin' pie-crust 'long the road
Ferever an' forever






























ES' a little bit o' feller-I remember still-
Ust to almost cry fer Christmas, like a youngster will.
Fourth o' July's nothing' to it !-New Year's ain't a smell!
Easter-Sunday-Circus-day-jes' all dead in the shell!
Lawzy, though! at night, you know, to set around an' hear
The old folks work the story off about the sledge an' deer,
An' "Santy" skootin' round the roof, all wrapt in fur an'
fuzz-
Long afore
I knowed who
"Santy-Claus" wuz!
99








WHO SANTY-CLAUS WUZ


Ust to wait, an' set up late, a week er two ahead;
Couldn't hardly keep awake, ner wouldn't go to bed;
Kittle stewin' on the fire, an' Mother setting' here
Darnin' socks, an' rockin' in the skreeky rockin'-cheer;
Pap gap', an' wonder where it wuz the money went,
An' quar'l with his frosted heels, an' spill his liniment;
An' me a-dreamin' sleigh-bells when the clock 'ud whir
an' buzz,
Long afore
I knowed who
"Santy-Claus" wuz!




Size the fire-place up an' bigger how "Ole Santy" could
Manage to come down the chimbly, like they said he
would;
Wisht 'at I could hide an' see him-wunderd what he'd
say
Ef he sketched a feller layin' fer him thataway!
But I bet on him, an' liked him, same as ef he had
Turned to pat me on the back an' say, "Look here, my
lad,




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