• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Little John Bottlejohn
 Johnny's by-low song
 The owl and the eel and the...
 Alice's supper
 Phil's secret
 Mrs. Snipkin and Mrs. Wobblech...
 Geographi
 Jacky Frost
 The egg
 Bobbily Boo and Wollypotump
 The forty little ducklings
 The boy and the brook
 The shark
 Master Jack's song
 The hornet and the bee
 The three little chickens who went...
 Alibazan
 The pencil
 The difference
 Punkydoodle and Jollapin
 Lady's slipper
 A little song to sing to a little...
 A nonsense tragedy
 The palace
 Gret Gran'f'ther
 Day dreams
 The little gnome
 The little Dutchess
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Sundown songs
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087565/00001
 Material Information
Title: Sundown songs
Physical Description: 64 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Richards, Laura Elizabeth Howe, 1850-1943
Little, Brown and Company ( Publisher )
University Press (Cambridge, Mass.) ( Printer )
John Wilson and Son ( Printer )
Roberts Brothers (Boston, Mass.) ( Copyright holder )
Publisher: Little, Brown, and Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Manufacturer: University Press ; John Wilson and Son
Publication Date: 1899
 Subjects
Subject: Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Farm life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Wit and humor, Juvenile   ( lcsh )
Grandfathers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Fantasy -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's songs   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1899   ( lcsh )
Fantasy literature -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature -- 1899   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1899
Genre: Children's poetry
Fantasy literature   ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
United States -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Laura E. Richards ; illustrated.
General Note: Pictorial cover.
General Note: Without music.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087565
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002236595
notis - ALH7071
oclc - 07285658

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Little John Bottlejohn
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Johnny's by-low song
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The owl and the eel and the warming-pan
        Page 9
    Alice's supper
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Phil's secret
        Page 13
    Mrs. Snipkin and Mrs. Wobblechin
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Geographi
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Jacky Frost
        Page 19
    The egg
        Page 20
    Bobbily Boo and Wollypotump
        Page 21
    The forty little ducklings
        Page 22
        Page 23
    The boy and the brook
        Page 24
    The shark
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Master Jack's song
        Page 27
        Page 28
    The hornet and the bee
        Page 29
        Page 30
    The three little chickens who went out to tea, and the elephant
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Alibazan
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The pencil
        Page 36
    The difference
        Page 37
    Punkydoodle and Jollapin
        Page 38
    Lady's slipper
        Page 39
        Page 40
    A little song to sing to a little maid in a swing
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    A nonsense tragedy
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    The palace
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Gret Gran'f'ther
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Day dreams
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    The little gnome
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
    The little Dutchess
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text







SUNDOWN SONGS





BY

LAURA E. RICHARDS
AUTHOR OF "CAPTAIN JANUARY," "THE JOYOUS STORY OF TOTO,"
TOTO'S MERRY WINTER," ETC.


ILLUSTRATED












BOSTON
LITTLE, BROWN, AND COMPANY






















Copyright, 1890,
BY ROBERTS BROTHERS


Copyright, 1899,
BY LITTLE, BROWN, AND COMPANY

All rights reserved.






















unibersityg Wres
JOHN WILSON AND SON, CAMBRIDGE, U.S. A





































CONTENTS.



PAGE
LITTLE JOHN BOTTLEJOIIN . . .. 5
JOHNNY'S BY-LOW SONG ... . ... 7
THE OWL AND THE EEL AND THE WARMING-PAN . .. .9
ALICE'S SUPPER ...... .... .. . . ... 10
PHIL'S SECRET .. .. .. .. . .. 13
MRS. SNIPKIN AND MRS. WOBBLECHIN . . .14
GEOGRAPHI .. .. . . .. .. 16
JACKY FROST .. .... . ... 19
THE EGG . . . . 20








4 CONTENTS.

PAGE

BOBBILY BOO AND WOLLYPOTUMP .. ..... 21
TIE FORTY LITTLE DUCKLINGS . .. . .. 22
THE BOY AND TIE BRlOOK. . . . 24
THE SHARK . . . . 25
MASTER JACK'S SONG . . . ... 27
THE HORNET AND THE BEE. . . .. 29
THE THREE LITTLE CHICKENS WO10 WENT OUT TO TEA, AND THE
ELEPHANT .... .. . . . 31
ALIBAZAN . .. . .. . 34
THE PENCIL . . .. .. 36
THE DIFFERENCE . .. . . 37
PUNKYDOODLE AND JOLLAPIN .. .. . 38
LADY'S SLIPPER . . . . 39
A LITTLE SONG TO SING TO A LITTLE IMAID IN A SWING . 41
A NONSENSE TRAGEDY . . . . 44
THE PALACE . ........ . 47
GRET GRAN'F'TIIE . . . 49
DAY DREAMS . . . . 54
THE LITTLE GNOME .......... ... ....58
THE LITTLE DUTCIESS . . . 62































LITTLE JOHN BOTTLEJOHN.


LITTLE John Bottlejohn lived on the hill,
And a blithe little man was he.
And he won the heart of a pretty mermaid
Who lived in the deep blue sea.
And every evening she used to sit
And sing on the rocks by the sea,
"Oh! little John Bottlejohn, pretty John Bottlejohn,
Won't you come out to me ?"






6 LITTLE JOHN BOTTLEJOHN.

Little John Bottlejohn heard her song,
And he opened his little door.
And he hopped and he skipped, and he skipped and he hopped,
Until he camn down to the shore.
And there on the rocks sat the little mermaid,
And still she was singing so free,
"Oh! little John Bottlejohn, pretty John Bottlejohn,
Won't you come out to me ?"

Little John Bottlejohn made a bow,
And the mermaid, she made one too,
And she said, "Oh! I never saw any one half
So perfectly sweet as you!
In my lovely home neathh the ocean foam,
How happy we both might be!
Ohl! little John Bottlejohn, pretty John Bottlejohn,
Won't you come down with me ?"

Little John Bottlejohn said, Oh, yes !
I'11 willingly go with you.
And I never shall quail at the sight of your tail,
For perhaps I may grow one too."
So he took her hand, and lie left the land,
And plunged in the foaming main;
And little John Bottlejohn, pretty John Bottlcjohn,
Never was seen again.







JOHNNY'S BY-LOW SONG.


JOHNNY'S BY-LOW SONG.

HERE on our rock-away horse we go,
Johnny and I, to a land we know,-
Far away in the sunset gold,
A lovelier land than can be told.

Chorus. Where all the flowers go niddlety nod,
Nod, nod, niddlety nod!
Where all the flowers go niddlcty nod,
And all the birds sing by-low!
Lullaby, lullaby, by-low.

The gates are ivory set with pearls,
One for the boys, and one for the girls:
So shut your bonny two eyes of blue,
Or else they never will let you through.

Chorus. Where all the flowers go niddlety nod,
Nod, nod, niddlety nod!
Where all the flowers go niddlety nod,
And all the birds sing by-low!
Lullaby, lullaby, by-low!

But what are the children all about?
There's never a laugh and never a shout.
Why, they all fell asleep, dear, long ago;
For how could they keep awake, you know?






8 JOHNNY'S BY-LOW SONG.

Chorus. When all the flowers went niddlety nod,
Nod, nod, niddlety nod!
When all the flowers went niddlety nod,
And all the birds sang by-low!
Lullaby, lullaby, by-low.

And each little brown or golden head
Is pillowed soft in a satin bed,-
A satin bed with sheets of silk,
As soft as down and as white as milk.

Chorus. And all the flowers go niddlety nod,
Nod, nod, niddlety nod!
And all the flowers go niddlety nod,
And all the birds sing by-low!
Lullaby, lullaby, by-low.

The brook in its sleep goes babbling by,
And the fat little clouds are asleep in the sky;
And now little Johnny is sleeping too,
So open the gates and pass him through.

Chorus. Where all the flowers go niddlety nod,
Nod, nod, niddlety nod!
Where all the flowers go niddlety nod,
And all the birds sing by-low!
Lullaby, lullaby, by-low.






THE OWL AND THE EEL. 9


N


THE OWL AND THE EEL AND THE
WARMING-PAN.

THE owl and the eel and the warming-pan,
They went to call on the soap-fat man.
The soap-fat man he was not within:
He'd gone for a ride on his rolling-pin.
So they all came back by the way of the town,
And turned the meeting-house upside down.






10 ALICE'S SUPPER.


ALICE'S SUPPER.

FAR down in the meadow the wheat grows green,
And the reapers are whetting their sickles so keen:
And this is the song that I hear them sing,
While cheery and loud their voices ring:
"'T is the finest wheat that ever did grow!
And it is for Alice's supper, ho! ho!"


Far down in the valley the old mill stands,
And the miller is rubbing his dusty white hands;
And these are the words of the miller's lay,
As he watches the millstones a-grinding away:
"'T is the finest flour that money can buy,
And it is for Alice's supper, hi! hi!"







ALICE'S SUPPER.


Downstairs in the kitchen the fire doth glow,
And Maggie is kneading the soft white dough;
And this is the song that she's singing to-day,
While merry and busy she's working away:
"'T is the finest dough, by near or by far,
And it is for Alice's supper, ha! ha!"

---"". ,:', 'i, 'I,,,, ,t MINI'






12 ALICE'S SUPPER.

And now to the nursery comes Nannie at last,
And what in her hand is she bringing so fast ?
'Tis a plate full of something all yellow and white,
And she sings as she comes with her smile so bright:
"'Tis the best bread-and-butter I ever did see!
And it is for Alice's supper, he! he!"


7~e
'j f1-






PHIL'S SECRET.


PHIL'S SECRET.

I KNOW a little girl,
But I won't tell who!
Her hair is of the gold,
And her eyes are of the blue.
Her smile is of the sweet,
And her heart is of the true.
Such a pretty little girl!-
But I won't tell who.

I see her every day,
But I won't tell where l
It may be in the lane,
By the thorn-tree there.
It may be in the garden,
By the rose-beds fair.
Such a pretty little girl!-
But I won't tell where.

I '1 marry her some day,
But I won't tell when!
The very smallest boys
Make the very biggest men.
When I'm as tall as father,
You may ask about it then.
Such a pretty little girl! -
But I won't tell when.






14 MRS. SNIPKIN AND MRS. WOBBLECHIN.


MRS. SNIPKIN AND MRS. WOBBLECHIN.

SKINNY Mrs. Snipkin,
With her little pipkin,
Sat by the fireside a-warming of her toes.
Fat Mrs. Wobblechin,
With her little doublechin,
Sat by the window a-cooling of her nose.

Says this one to that one,
Oh, you silly fat one,
Will you shut the window down? You're freezing me to death I"
Says that one to t'other one,
"Good gracious, how you bother one!
There is n't air enough for me to draw my precious breath !"





MRS. SNIPKIN AND MRS. WOBBLECHIN.


Skinny Mrs. Snipkin
'Took her little pipkin,
Threw it straight across the room as hard as she could throw;
Hit Mrs. Wobblechin
On her little doublechin,
And out of the window a-tumble she did go.





5 GEOGRAPHIC.


4


GEOGRAPHIC.

[AIR: There was a maid
in my countree.]

THERE was a man in
Manitoba,
The only man that ever
was thar;
His name was Nicholas
Jones McGee,
And he loved a maid
in Mirimichi.


Chorus.

Sing ha! ha! ha! for
Manitoba!
Sing he! he! he! for
Mirimichi I
Sing hi hil hi! for
Geographi!
And that's the lesson
for you and me.






GEOGRAPHIC.


There was a man in New
Mexico,
He lost his grandmother
out in the snow;
But his heart was light,
and his ways were free,
So he bought him another
in Santa F.

Chorus.
Sing ho ho! ho! for New
Mexico!
Sing he! he! he! for Santa
Fd!
Sing hi hi! hi for Geog-
raphi!
And that's the lesson for
you and me.




There was a man in
Austra-li-a,
He sat and wept on
the new-mown hay;
S- He jumped on the tail
of a kangaroo,
And rode till he came


to Kalamazoo.


).






GEOGRAPHIC.


Chorus. Sing hey! hey! hey! for Austra-li-a!
Sing hoo! hoo! hoo! for Kalamazoo!
Sing hi! hi! hi! for Geographi!
And that's the lesson for me and you.




















There was a man in Jiggerajum,
He went to sea in a kettle-drum;
He sailed away to the Salisbury Shore,
And I never set eyes on that man any more.

Chorus. Sing hum! hum! hum! for Jiggerajum
Sing haw! haw! haw! for the Salisbury Shore!
Sing hii! hi! hi! for Geographi!
And that's the lesson the whole world o'er.






F19:


JACK FROST.

JACKY FROST, Jacky Frost,
Came in the night;
Left the meadows that he crossed
All gleaming white.
Painted with his silver brush
Every window-pane;
Kissed the leaves and made them blush,
Blush and blush again.

Jacky Frost, Jacky Frost,
Crept around the house,
Sly as a silver fox,
Still as a mouse.
Out little Jenny came,
Blushing like a rose;
Up jumped Jacky Frost
And pinched her little nose.


JACKY FROST.






THE EGG.


THE EGG.

OH! how shall I get it, how shall I get it, -
A nice little new-laid egg ?
My grandmamma told me to run to the barnyard,
And see if just one I could beg.

"Mooly-cow, Mooly-cow, down in the meadow,
Have you any eggs, I pray ?"
The Mooly-cow stares as if I were crazy,
And solemnly stalks away.

"Oh Doggie, Doggie, perhaps you may have it,
That nice little egg for me."
But Doggie just wags his tail and capers,
And never an egg has he.

"Now, Dobbin, Dobbin, I'm sure you must have one,
Hid down in your manger there."
But Dobbin lays back his ears and whinnies,
With "Come and look, if you dare!"

"Piggywig, Piggywig, grunting and squealing,
Are you crying 'Fresh eggs for sale'?"
No! Piggy, you're very cold and unfeeling,
With that impudent quirk in your tail.

"You wise old Gobbler, you look so knowing,
I'm sure you can find me an egg.
You stupid old thing! just to say 'Gobble-gobble!'
And balance yourself on one leg."







BOBBILY BOO AND WOLLYPOTUMP. 21

Oh! how shall I get it, how shall I get it,-
That little white egg so small ?
I've asked every animal here in the barn-yard,
And they won't give me any at all.

But after I'd hunted until I was tired,
I found -not one egg, but ten!
And you never could guess where they all were hidden,-
Right under our old speckled hen!




BOBBILY BOO AND WOLLYPOTUMP

BOBBILY Boo, the king so free,
He used to drink the Mango tea.
Mango tea and coffee, too,
He drank them both till his nose turned blue.

Wollypotump, the queen so high,
She used to eat the Gumbo pie.
Gumbo pie and Gumbo cake,
She ate them both till her teeth did break.

Bobbily Boo and Wollypotump,
Each called the other a greedy frump.
And when these terrible words were said,
They sat and cried till they both were dead.






22 THE FORTY LITTLE DUCKLINGS.






ropTY LTTLE ck L I4J
i' i 'l "?ll i l
.. ',*i^ r,' '.WI "
,' i ,







[A story with a certain amount of truth in it.]
THE forty little ducklings who lived up at the farm,
They said unto each other, "Oh the day is very warm !"
They said unto each other, "Oh! the river's very cool!
The duck who did not seek it now would surely be a fool."
The forty little ducklings, they started down the road;
And waddle, waddle, waddle, was the gait at which they goed.
The same it is not grammar, you may change it if you choose, -
But one cannot stop for trifles when inspired by the Muse.
They waddled and they waddled and they waddled on and on,
Till one remarked, Oh! deary me, where is the river gone ?
We asked the Ancient Gander, and he said 't was very near.
He must have been deceiving us, or else himself, I fear."






THE FORTY LITTLE DUCKLINGS. 23

They waddled and they waddled, till no farther they could go:
Then down upon a mossy bank they sat them in a row.
They took their little handkerchiefs and wept a little weep,
And then they put away their heads, and then they went to sleep.

There came along a farmer, with a basket on his arm,
And all those little duckylings he took back to the farm.
He put them in their little beds, and wished them sweet repose,
And fastened mustard plasters on their little webby toes.

Next day these little ducklings, they were very, very ill.
Their mother sent for Doctor Quack, who gave them each a pill;
But soon as they recovered, the first thing that they did,
Was to peck the Ancient Gander till he ran away and hid.






THE BOY AND THE BROOK.


THE BOY AND THE BROOK.


SAID the boy to the brook that was rippling away,
" Oh, little brook, pretty brook, will you not stay ?
Oh, stay with me, play with me, all the day long,
And sing in my ears your sweet murmuring song.'
Said the brook to the boy as it hurried away,
"And is't for my music you ask me to stay?
I was silent until from the hillside I gushed;
Should I pause for an instant, my song would be hushed."

Said the boy to the wind that was fluttering past,
" Oh, little wind, pretty wind, whither so fast ?
Oh, stay with me, play with me, fan my hot brow,
And ever breathe softly and gently as now."
Said the wind to the boy as it hurried away,
" And is 't for my coolness you ask me to stay ?
'T is only in flying you feel my cool breath;
Should I pause for an instant, that instant were death."

Said the boy to the day that was hurrying by,
" Oh, little day, pretty day, why must you fly ?
Oh, stay with me, play with me, just as you are;
Let no shadow of evening your noon-brightness mar."
Said the day to the boy as it hurried away,
"And is 't for my brightness you ask me to stay ?
Know, the jewel of day would no longer seem bright
If it were not clasped round by the setting of night;"






THE SHARK.


N11



*^^^Bjir-











THE SHARK.
OH! blithe and merrily sang the shark,
As he sat on the house-top high:
A-cleaning his boots, and smoking cheroots,
With a single glass in his eye.


--






26 THE SHARK.

With Martin and Day he polished away,
And a smile on his face did glow,
As merry and bold the chorus he trolled
Of "Gobble-em-upsky ho !"
He sang so loud he astonished the crowd
Which gathered from far and near.
For they said, "Such a sound, in the country round,
We never, no, never did hear."
He sang of the ships that he'd eaten like chips
In the palmy days of his youth.
And he added, "If you don't believe it is true,
Pray examine my wisdom tooth!"
He sang of the whales who 'd have given their tails
For a glance of his raven eye.
And the swordfish, too, who their weapons all drew,
And swor'd for his sake they'd die.
And he sang about wrecks and hurricane decks
And the mariner's perils and pains,
Till every man's blood up on end it stood,
And their hair ran cold in their veins.
But blithe as a lark the merry old shark,
He sat on the sloping roof.
Though he said, "It is queer that no one draws near
To examine my wisdom toof!"
And he carolled away, by night and by day,
Until he made every one ill.
And I'11 wager a crown that unless he's come down
He is probably carolling still.






MASTER JACK'S SONG.


MASTER JACK'S SONG.
[Written after spending the Christmas Holidays at Grandmamma's.]
You may talk about your groves,
Where you wander with your loves;
You may talk about your moonlit waves that fall and fl
Something fairer far than these
I can show you, if you please;
'Tis the charming little cupboard where the jam-pots grc


ow;


)W.


Chorus.
Where the jam-pots grow!
Where the jam-pots grow!
Where the jelly jolly, jelly jolly jam-pots grow.
The fairest spot to me,
On the land or on the sea,
Is the charming little cupboard where the jam-pots grow.

There the golden peaches shine
In their syrup clear and fine,
And the raspberries are blushing with a dusky glow;
And the cherry and the plum
Seem to beckon you to come
To the charming little cupboard where the jam-pots grow.
Chorus.
Where the jam-pots grow!
Where the jam-pots grow!
Where the jelly jolly, jelly jolly jam-pots grow.
The fairest spot to me,
On the land or on the sea,
Is the charming little cupboard where the jam-pots grow.






28. MASTER JACK'S SONG.

There the sprightly pickles stand,
With the catsup close at hand,
And the marmalades and jellies in a goodly row!
While the quinces' ruddy fire
Would an anchorite inspire
To seek the little cupboard where the jam-pots grow.
Chorus.
Where the jam-pots grow!
Where the jam-pots grow!
Where the jelly jolly, jelly jolly jam-pots grow.
The fairest spot to me,
On the land or on the sea,
Is the charming little cupboard where the jam-pots grow.

Never tell me of your bowers
That are full of bugs and flowers!
Never tell me of your meadows where the breezes blow I
But sing me, if you will,
Of the house beneath the hill,
And the darling little cupboard where the jam-pots grow.
Chorus.
Where the jam-pots grow!
Where the jam-pots grow!
Where the jelly jolly, jelly jolly jam-pots grow.
The fairest spot to me,
On the land or on the sea,
Is the charming little cupboard where the jam-pots grow.






THE HORNET AND THE BEE.


THE HORNET AND THE BEE.

SAID the hornet to the bee,
Pray you, will you marry me ?
Will you be my little wife,
For to love me all my life?
You shall have a velvet cloak,
And a bonnet with a poke.
You shall sit upon a chair
With a cabbage in your hair.
You shall ride upon a horse,
If you fancy such a course.
You shall feed on venison pasty
In a manner trig and tasty;
Devilled bones and apple-cores,
If you like them, shall be yours.
You shall drink both rum and wine,
If you only will be mine.
Pray you, will you marry me?"
Said the hornet to the bee.

Said the bee unto the hornet,
Your proposal, sir, I scorn it.
Marry one devoid of money,
Who can't make a drop of honey?
Cannot even play the fiddle,
And is pinched up in the middle?
Nay, my love is set more high.






THE HORNET AND THE BEE.

Cockychafer's bride am I.
Cockychafer whirring loud,
Frisking free and prancing proud,
Cockychafer blithe and gay,
He hath stole my heart away.
Him alone I mean to marry,
So no longer you need tarry.
Not another moment stay!
Cockychafer comes this way.
Your proposal, sir, I scorn it!"
Said the bee unto the hornet.

So the cockychafer came,
Took the bee to be his dame.
Took the bee to be his wife,
For to love her all his life.
Wedding dress of goblin green,
Hat and feathers for a queen,
Worsted mittens on her feet,
Thus her toilet was complete.
Then when it was time to dine,
Cockychafer brought her wine,
Roasted mouse and bunny-fish,
Porridge in a silver dish;
Lobster-claws and scalloped beast.
Was not that a lovely feast?
But when it was time to sup,
Cockychafer ate her up.
Thus concludes the history
Of the hornet, and the bee.





THE THREE LITTLE CHICKENS.


THE THREE LITTLE CHICKENS WHO WENT
OUT TO TEA, AND THE ELEPHANT.

LITTLE chickens, one, two, three,
They went out to take their tea,
Brisk and gay as gay could be,
Cackle wackle wackle!
Feathers brushed all smooth and neat,
Yellow stockings on their feet,
Tails and tuftings all complete,
Cackle wackle wackle!

"Very seldom," said the three,
"Like of us the world can see,
Beautiful exceedingly,
Cackle wackle wackle!
Buch our form and such our face,
Such our Cochin China grace,
We must win in beauty's race,
Cackle wackle wackle!"

Met an elephant large and wise,
Looked at them with both his eyes:
Caused these chickens great surprise,
Cackle wackle wacklo!
Why," they said, "do you suppose
Elephant doesn't look out of his nose,
So very conveniently it grows?
Cackle wackle wackle!






32 THE THREE LITTLE CHICKENS.


"Elephant with nose so long,
Sing us now a lovely song,
As we gayly trip along,
Cackle wackle wackle!
Sing of us and sing of you,
Sing of corn and barley too,
Beauteous beast with eyes of blue,.
Cackle wackle wackle!"
















Elephant sang so loud and sweet,
Chickens fell before his feet;
For his love they did entreat,
Cackle wackle wackle.
"Well-a-day! and woe is me!
Would we all might elephants be!
Then he'd marry us, one, two, three,
Cackle wackle wackle!"






THE THREE LITTLE CHICKENS. 33

Elephant next began to dance:
Capered about with a stately prance
.Learned from his grandmother over in France,
Cackle wackle wackle!
Fast and faster 'gan to tread,
Trod on every chicken's head,
Killed them all uncommonly dead,
Cackle wackle wackle!
















MORAL.
Little chickens, one, two, three,
When you're walking out to tea,
Don't make love to all you see,
Cackle wackle wackle!
Elephants have lovely eyes,
But to woo them is not wise,
For they are not quite your size!
Cackle wackle wackle!






ALIBAZAN.


ALIBAZAN.

ALL on the road to Alibazan,
A May Day in the morning,
'T was there I met a bonny young man,
A May Day in the morning;
A bonny young man all dressed in blue,
Hat and feather and stocking and shoe,
Ruff and doublet and mantle too,
A May Day in the morning.

He made me a bow, and he made me three,
A May Day in the morning;
He said, in truth, I was fair to see,
A May Day in the morning.
"And say, will you be my sweetheart now?
I'11 marry you truly with ring and vow;
I've ten fat sheep and a black-nosed cow,
A May Day in the morning.

"What shall we buy in Alibazan,
A May Day in the morning?
A pair -of shoes and a feathered fan,
A May Day in the morning.
A velvet gown all set with pearls,
A silver hat for your golden curls,
A pot of pinks for my pink of girls,
A May Day in the morning."






ALIBAZAN. 35


All in the streets of Alibazan,
A May Day in the morning,
The merry maidens tripped and ran,
A May Day in the morning.
And this was fine, and that was free,
But he turned from them all to look on me;
And "Oh! but there's none so fair to see,
A May Day in the morning."

All in the church of Alibazan,
A May Day in the morning,
'T was there I wed my bonny young man,
A May Day in the morning.
And oh! 'tis I am his sweetheart now!
And oh! 'tis we arc happy, I trow,
With our ten fat sheep and our black-nosed cow,
A May Day in the morning.






36 THE PENCIL.

THE PENCIL.

OH, could I find the forest
Where the pencil-trees grow!
Oh, might I see their stately stems
All standing in a row!
I'd hie me to their grateful shade,
In deep, in deepest bliss;
For then I need not hourly hear
A chorus such as this:

Chorus. Oh, lend me a pencil, please, Mamma!
Oh, draw me some houses and trees, Mamma!
Oh, make me a floppy
Great poppy to copy,
And a horsey that prances and gees, Mamma!

The branches of the pencil-tree
Are pointed every one;
Ay! each one has a glancing point
That glitters in the sun.
The leaves are leaves of paper white,
All fluttering in the breeze;
Ah! could I pluck one rustling bough,
I'd silence cries like these:

Chorus. Oh, lend me a pencil, do, Mamma!
I've got mine all stuck in the glue, Mamma!
Oh, make me a pretty
big barn and a city,
And a cow and a steam-engine, too, Mamma!






THE DIFFERENCE. 37

The fruit upon the pencil-tree
Hangs ripening in the sun,
In clusters bright of pocket-knives,-
Three blades to every one.
Ah! might I pluck one shining fruit,
And plant it by my door,
The pleading cries, the longing sighs,
Would trouble me no more.

Chorus. Oh, sharpen a pencil for me, Mamma!
'Cause Johnny and Baby have three, Mamma!
And this is n't fine!
And Hal sat down on mine!
So do it bce-yu-ti-ful-lee, MI;IIIIIL!

THE DIFFERENCE.
EIGHT fingers,
Ten toes,
Two eyes,
And one nose.
Baby said
When she smelt the rose,
"Oh! what a pity
I've only one nose !"
Ten teeth
In even rows,
Three dimples,
And one nose.
Baby said
When she smelt the snuff,
"Deary me!
One nose is enough."






PUNKYDOODLE AND JOLLAPIN.


PUNKYDOODLE AND JOLLAPIN.

OH, Pillykin Willykin Winky Wee!
How does the Emperor take his tea?
He takes it with melons, he takes it with milk,
He takes it with syrup and sassafras silk;
He takes it without, he takes it within.
Oh, Punkydoodle and Jollapin!

Oh, Pillykin Willykin Winky Wee!
How does the Cardinal take his tea?
He takes it in Latin, he takes it in Greek,
He takes it just seventy times in the week;
He takes it so strong that it makes him grin.
Oh, Punkydoodle and Jollapin!

Oh, Pillykin Willykin Winky Wee!
How does the Admiral take his tea?
He takes it with splices, he takes it with spars,
He takes it with jokers and jolly jack tars,
And he stirs it round with a dolphin's fin.
Oh, Punkydoodle and Jollapin!

Oh, Pillykin Willykin Winky Wee!
How does the President take his tea?
He takes it in bed, he takes it in school,
He takes it in Congress against the rule;
He takes it with brandy, and thinks it no sin.
Oh, Punkydoodle and Jollapin!





LADY'S SLIPPER. 39


LADY'S SLIPPER.

Y lady she rose from her bower, her bower,
All under the linden tree.
'T was midnight past, and the fairies' hour,
And up and away must she.





40 LADY'S SLIPPER.

She's pulled on her slippers of golden yellow,
Her mantle of gossamer green;
And she's away to the elfin court,
To wait on the elfin queen.
Oh, hone! my lady's slipper,
Oh, hey! my lady's shoe.
She's lost its fellow, so golden yellow,
A-tripping it over the dew.
And now she flitted, and now she stepped,
Through dells of the woodland deep,
Where owls were flying, awake, awake,
And the birds were sitting asleep.
And now she flitted, and now she trod,
Where the mist hung shadowy-white;
And the river lay gleaming, sleeping, dreaming,
Under the sweet moonlight.

Oh, hone my lady's slipper,
Oh, hey! my lady's shoe.
She's lost its fellow, so golden yellow,
A-tripping it over the dew.
And now she passed through the wild marsh-land,
Where the marsh-elves lay asleep;
And a heron blue was their watchman true,
Good watch and ward for to keep.

But Jack-in-the-Pulpit was wake, awake,
And saw my lady gay;
And he. reached his hand as she fluttered past,
And caught her slipper away.






A LITTLE SONG TO SING. 41

Oh, hone! my lady's slipper,
Oh, hey! my lady's shoe.
She's lost its fellow, so golden yellow,
A-tripping it over the dew.

Oh! long that lady she searched and prayed,
And long she wept and besought;
But all would not do, and with one wee shoe
She must dance at the elfin court.

But she might have found her slipper, her slipper,
It shone so golden-gay;
For I am no elf, yet I found it myself,
And I brought it home to-day.

Oh, hone! my lady's slipper,
Oh, hey! my lady's shoe.
She's lost its fellow, so golden yellow,
A-tripping it over the dew.

A LITTLE SONG TO SING TO A LITTLE MAID
IN A SWING.
IF I were a fairy king,
(Swinging high, swinging low,)
I would give to you a ring,
(Swinging, oh !)
With a diamond set so bright
That the shining of its light
Should make morning of the night,
(Swinging high, swinging low,)
Should make morning of the night.
(Swinging, oh!)






A LITTLE SONG TO SING.

On each ringlet as it fell
(Swinging high, swinging low,)
I would tie a golden bell;
(Swingng, oh!)
And the golden bells would chime
In a little merry rhyme,
In the merry summer-time,--
(Swinging high, swinging low,)
In the happy summer-time.
(Swinging, oh!)


You should wear a satin gown
(Swinging high, swinging low,)
All with ribbons falling down;
(Swinging, oh !)
And your little darling feet,
Oh, my Pretty and my Sweet,
Should be shod with silver neat,-
(Swinging high, swinging low,)
Shod with silver slippers neat.
(Swinging, oh !)


All the flowers in the land
(Swinging high, swinging low,)
You should hold in either hand;
(Swinging, oh!)






A LITTLE SONG TO SING. 43


And the myrtle and the rose
Should spring up beneath your toes,
For to gratify your nose, -
(Swinging high, swinging low,)
For to gratify your nose.
(Swinging, oh!)

But I'm not a fairy, Pet,
(Swinging high, swinging low,)
Am not even a king as yet;
(Swinging, oh!)
So all that I can do
Is to kiss your little shoe,
And to make a queen of you, -
(Swinging high, swinging low,)
Make a fairy queen of you.
(Swinging, oh !)






44 A NONSENSE TRAGEDY.


A NONSENSE TRAGEDY.

BROWN owl sat on a caraway tree, "
Ruffly, puffly, great big owl;
Who so learned and wise as he?
Huffly, snuffly, eminent fowl.

Black bat hung by a twig of the tree,
Blinkety, winkety, blind old bat; .'.Ij
Paying his court to the bumble-bee,
Fuzzy bee, buzzy bee, yellow and fat.

"Oh!" said the owl, "but the sun is
so bright,
Blazing, crazing, fiery sun, ."'
How can I possibly wait till night ?
Sweltering, meltering, not much fun!"

"Oh!" said the bat, "if a cloud would come,
Showery, lowery, nice gray cloud,
I'd take my love to my cavern home,
T a Happily, flappily, pleased and proud."

"Oh said the bee, "but
if that be all,
Whimpering, simpering,
blear-eyed bat,
Yonder's a cloud coming up at your call,
Scowling, growling, black as your hat."






A NONSENSE TRAGEDY.


"Oh said the owl and the bat together:
"Rollicky, jollicky, nice fat cloud,
Give us some good, black, thundery weather;
Roar away, pour away, can't be too loud!"


Up came the cloud, spreading far and wide,
Billowy, pillowy, black as night;
Brisk little hurricane sitting inside,
Blow away, strow away, out of sight.


Off went the owl like a thistle-down puff,
Ruffly, huffly, rolled in a ball;
Off went the bat like a candle-snuff,
Fly away, die away, terrible fall.






46 A NONSENSE TRAGEDY.

Off went the twig, and off went the tree,
Crashing, smashing, splintering round;
Nothing was left but the bumble-bee,
And who so merry, so merry as she,
As she laughed, "Ho! ho!" as she laughed, "He! he!
Creep away, sleep away, hole in the ground."







THE PALACE. 47






-.




IT 's far away under the water,
And it's far away under the sea,
There's a beautiful palace a-waiting
For my little Rosy and me.





-A.













The roof is made of coral,
And the floor is made of pearl,
And over it all the great waves fall
With a terrible tumble ana whirl.
With a terrible tumble ana whirl.






THE PALACE.


The fishes swim in at the window,
And the fishes swim out at the door,
And the lobsters and eels go dancing quadrilles
All over the beautiful floor.


--^z^^"^-:: _.._
There's a silver throne at one end,
And a golden throne at the other;
And on them you see, as plain as can be,
"Queen Rosy" and "Queen Mother."

And I will sit on the silver throne,
And Rosy shall sit on the gold;
And there we will stay, and frolic and play,
Until we're a thousand years old.


~-~-~--~--~






GRET GRAN'F' THEIR. 49


_____nm~~e 7


WHAT! take Gret Gran'f'ther's musket,
Thet he kerried at Bunker Hill,
An' go a-gunnin' fer sparrers
With Solomon Judd an' Bill ?

You let thet musket alone, Dan'l!
An' git down fiom thet air stool.
You've just time enough to hold this yarn
Afore ye go off to school.


Thar! don't ye wriggle an' twist, sonny!
The yarn's fer yer own new socks;
It's safer to hold than muskets,
With their triggers an' riggers an' locks.


SAl






GRET GRAN'F'THER.


A musket to shoot at sparrers!
Wal, boys is up to sech tricks!
An' thet old un, too, thet ain't been tetched
Sence seventeen seventy-six!

But I set more store by its rusty stock
Than the finest money could buy;
An' if you'll stan' stiddy, Dan'l,
I'll tell ye the reason why.

You never seed Gret Gran'f'ther,
But you've seed his picture boy,
With the smilin' mouth, an' the big brown eyes
Jes' brimmin' with life an' joy.

Wal! he war' n't like thet when I seed him,
But his sperrit was lively still,
Fer all his white hair an' empty sleeve,
As it was at Bunker Hill.

An' many's the time he's told me,
Settin' here in this very cheer,
Of the fust time he shouldered thet musket,
In the Continental year;

How out in the field a-mowin',
He seed the bay'nets glance,
An' ran fer his gun with a lighter heart
Than ever he went to a dance.

Jest as he was, in his shirt-sleeves
(Fer the day was warm and bright),
An' no hat, but shoulderin' his musket,
Gret Gran'f'ther went to the fight.






GRET GRAN'F'THER.


An' thar upon Bunker hillside,
Whar the smoke hung thick an' gray,
He went a-gunnin' fer redcoats,
As you'd go fer sparrers to-day.

Hey! but the balls were whistlin'!
An' the flashes kenm thick an' fast;
But whose-ever musket hed fust word,
Gret Gran'f'ther's hed the last.

Then a gunner was shot beside him,
Thet handled a six-pound gun,
An' they called fer a man to tend her;
An' Gran'f'ther said he was one.

"I ain't never fired a gun," said he,
"But I'll do my prideful best;
An' ef all you want is a man, Colonel,
Mebbe I'm as good as the rest."

An' I reckon he was! fer he stood thar,
An' fired thet six-pound gun,
Till every redcoat within his range
Hed either dropped or run.
Then all of a suddent thar kern a crack,
A flash an' a twinge an' a thrill,
An' Gran'f'ther's right arm dropped by his side,
An' hung thar, limp an' still.

Jest fer a moment, I've heard him say,
The hull world seem to reel;
An' a hummin' sound went through his ears,
Like Gran'm'ther's spinnin'-wheel.







GRET GRAN'F'THER.


But he hadn't no time for faintin',
Nor he hed n't no time for pain;
"It's well I'm left-handed!" says Gran'f'ther,
An' he fired the gun again.

Bimeby, when the Colonel found him,
Arter the fight was done,
He was lyin', all black like a nigger,
An' senseless, along by his gun.

Then the boys made a kind o' stretcher,
An' jest as they laid him a-top,
"The balls was all gone," he says, Colonel,
So I was obleeged to stop."

Yes! thet was the way Gret Gran'f'ther fit,
An' the way he lost his arm ;
But he shot with his left till the land was free,
An' then he kern back to the farm.

An' he laid his musket acrost them hooks,
An' thar it s laid to this day;
An' spite o' you ,an' the sparrers, Dan'l,
Thar 's whar it's a-goin to stay.

The school-bell! run now, sonny boy!
An' thank ye for standing' still.
What's thet? Ay Hurrah fer Gret Gran'f'ther!
An' hurrah fer Bunker Hill!






DAY DREAMS.


DAY DREAMS.
WHiTE wings over the water,
Fluttering, fluttering over the sea,
White wings over the water,
What are you bringing to me?
A fairy prince in a golden boat,
With golden ringlets that fall and float,
A velvet cap, and a taffety cloak,
This you are bringing to me.
Fairy, fairy princekin,
Sailing, sailing hither to me,
Silk and satin and velvet,
What are you coming to see ?
A little-girl in a calico gown,
With hair and eyes of dusky brown,
Who sits on the wharf of the fishing-town,
Looking away to sea.





56 DAY DREAMS.

Golden, golden sunbeams,
Touch me now with your wands of gold;
Make me a beautiful princess,
Radiant to behold. ,






DAY DREAMS. 57

Blue and silver and ermine fine,
Diamond drops that flash and shine;.
So shall I meet this prince of mine,
Fairer than may be told.

White wings over the water,
Fluttering ever farther away;
Dark clouds shrouding the sunbeams,
Sullen and cold and gray.
Back I go in my calico gown,
Back to the hut in the fishing-town.
And oh, but the night shuts darkly down
After the summer day!





58 THE LITTLE GNOME.


THr


~NQN1W


7n'4k


ONCE there lived a little gnome
Who had made his little home
Right down in the middle of the earth, earth, earth.
IHe was full of fun and frolic,
But his wife was melancholic,
And he never could divert her into mirth, mirth, mirth.


L rT' -r L







THE LITTLE GNOME.


He had tried her with a monkey
And a parrot and a donkey,
And a pig that squealed whenever
he pulled its tail, tail, tail.
But though he laughed himself
Into fits, the jolly elf,
Still his wifey's melancholy did not
fail, fail, fail.4
I will hie me," said the gnome,
"From my worthy earthy home:
I will go among the dwellings of
the men, men, men.
THE BLINKING BEAR.
SSomething funny there must be,
,--- -~..';-- That will make her say' He, he!'
SI will find it and will bring it
ler again, 'gain, 'gain."
THE PATTYPOL.
So he travelled here and there,
And he sa~w the Blinking Bear, '
And the Pattypol whose eyes are in .
his tail, tail, tail.
And he saw the Linking Gloon, .
Who was playing the bassoon,
And the Octopus a-waltzing with the
whale, whale, whale.
He saw the Chingo Chee,
And a lovely sight was he, -
With a ringlet and a ribbon on his
nose, nose, nose, THE LINKING GLOON.






60 THE LITTLE GNOME.

And the Baggle, and the Wogg,
And the Cantilunar Dog,
SWho was throwing cotton-flannel
at his foes, foes, foes.
1,, All these the little gnome
ir' Transported to his home,
-'' And set them down before his
weeping wife, wife, wife;
S_-j. But she only cried and cried,
And she sobbywobbed and
S6sighed,
Till she really was in danger of
her life, life, life.
Then the gnome was in despair,
And he tore his purple hair,
THE OCTOPUS AND WHALE. And he sat him down in sorrow
". on a stone, stone, stone.
I, too," he said, will cry,
STill I tumble down and die,
For I've had enough of laugh-


BA E 'lone."










THE GAGGLE. THE WOOG. THE CHINGO CHEE.






THE LITTLE GNOME.


His tears they flowed away,
Like a rivulet at play,
With a bubble, gubble, rubble, o'er the ground, ground, ground,
But when this his wifey saw,
She loudly cried "Haw, haw !
Here at last is something funny you have found, found, found."

She laughed, "Ho, ho! he, he "
And she chuckled loud with glee,
And she wiped away her little husband's tears, tears, tears.
And since then, through wind and weather,
They have said "He, he !" together,
For several hundred thousand merry years, years, years.


THE CANTILUNAR DOG.






62 THE LITTLE DUCHESS.


NCE there lived a little Dutchess,
Just beside the Zuyder Zee;
Short and stout and roly-poly,
S' As a Dutchess ought to be.

..c .had pigs and she had poultry,
She had lands and she had gold;
i.\i1 she loved the Burgomaster,--
Lived him more than can be told.

'" Sumly, burly Burgomaster,
\\ill you have me for your love ?
Y.i.u shall be my pouter-pigeon,
I will be your turtle-dove.

"You shall have my China porkers,
'-_----- You shall have each Dorking hen;
- Take them with your loving Dutchess,
Oh, you Dutchiest of men !"






THE LITTLE DUTCHESS. 63

Loudly laughed the Burgonaster,
"Naught I care for Dorking fowls;
Naught for pig, unless 'tis roasted,
And on that my doctor scowls.

"Frumpy, stumpy little Dutchess,
I do not incline to wed.
Keep your pigs and keep your poultry!
I will take your gold instead.










.. ..




"I will take your shining florins,
I will take your fields' rich hoard;
You may go and tend your l.i.i'.
Till your spirits be restored."

Loudly wept the. little Dutchess,
Tending sad each China pig;
Loudly laughed the Burgomaster
'Neath his merry periwig.







64 THE LITTLE DUTCHESS.


Till the Dutchy people, angry
Conduct such as this to see,
Took and plumped the pouter-pigeon
Right into the Zuyder Zee.


-u ^ L ;' -/; *0.-i. -*^ -: ^-.
.. .. ......

7-







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