Title: Vegetarian
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087399/00537
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Title: Vegetarian
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Horticultural Sciences Department
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: July 2009
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087399
Volume ID: VID00537
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Vegetarian Newsletter


A Horticultural Sciences Department Extension Publication on Vegetable Crops

Eat your Veggies!!!!!

Issue No. 547 July 2009



Panhandle Fresh Marketing Association Helps Farmers
Access a Larger Market

By: Daniel E. Mullins, Extension Agent IV
Santa Rosa County Northwest, Milton, Florida


The marketing of specialty fruits and vegetables continues to be a most challenging activity for
the small farmer. Typical methods such as U-pick, roadside and farmers' markets are important,
but the amount of produce that can be sold at a given time is often limited.

There has been a need to explore larger markets in the produce industry, but small farmers have
been reluctant. This is apparently due to the existing or perceived complexity of obtaining a
vendor ID number and meeting other requirements of the large chain stores.

The Panhandle Fresh Marketing Association, Inc. (PFMA) began as a not-for-profit organization
in November, 2007. The PFMA, a community-based food-system model, is a local effort to
assist farmers in pooling their resources and gaining access to larger markets in the industry.

"Panhandle Fresh" operates through the Team Santa Rosa Economic Development Council's
Agri-business Committee. Committee members include representatives of the IFAS Santa Rosa
County Extension office, IFAS West Florida Research and Education Center, and other farm
related organizations and businesses.

PFMA currently operates in a regional area including the Florida counties of Escambia, Santa
Rosa, Okaloosa and Walton, and the Alabama counties of Mobile and Baldwin. Andrea Sutrick
is the marketing manager, helping to provide the following services: accounting services,
matching of orders with available produce from members, Wal-Mart vendor ID number
(requiring a $3,000,000 hold harmless liability), and marketing of produce items.

Ten local farmers signed up with PFMA in 2008 and six participated in the program. During this
first year of operation, PFMA performed well above expectation, marketing over $124,655 in
fruits and vegetables. Watermelons represented 45% of overall sales, with green peanuts









accounting for 26% of sales. The remaining 28% was comprised of a variety of vegetables.
Over 20 farmers have currently signed up for the 2009 season.


Watermelons made up 45% of the overall sales through PFMA in 2008.


UF Involvement

Both the IFAS Santa Rosa County Extension office and the West Florida Research and
Education Center have been involved in this program from the inception. Representatives from
both IFAS organizations were involved in a series of planning meetings with the Agribusiness
Committee beginning in 2006. This work resulted in the hiring of an Alternative Crops
Manager, who helped market produce through PFMA during 2008, as well as establishing and
maintaining specialty crop demonstrations at the IFAS West Florida Research and Education
Center (WFREC).

Extension specialty crop demonstrations continue at the WFREC. Field, greenhouse and shade-
house production is featured during field days and other activities. Extension also offers
traditional programming which includes grower education, consultation, plant problem diagnosis
and cultural recommendations.






































Broccoli and turnips are cool season crops that are marketed through the PFMA.


More About the Panhandle Fresh Marketing Association

Go to the web site: http://www.panhandlefresh.com/


innanale rresn iviarKetng Association Logo.


* Attend the Florida Small Farms & Alternative Enterprises Conference
August 1 2, 2009 Osceola Heritage Park, Kissimmee, Florida
Cindy Anderson, Team Santa Rosa Executive Director is on the agenda with more details
about PFMA.
For more information go to: http://www.smallfarms.ifas.ufl.edu









*2009 Florida Young Farmer and Rancher Leadership Conference
July 18 19, 2009 The Plantation Golf Resort and Spa Crystal River Florida
Andrea Sutrick, PFMA Market Manager describes the program
http://www.floridafarmbureau. ore/programs/young farmers ranchers









Vegetarian Newsletter


A Horticultural Sciences Department Extension Publication on Vegetable Crops

Eat your Veggies!!!!!

Issue No. 547 July 2009



Keeping Tabs on Florida's Record-Size Vegetables

By: James Stephens, Emeritus Professor
UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department, Gainesville, Florida


From time to time, County Agents will be asked to verify the size of some Florida grown
vegetables as to whether or not it is a state record. Until 1989 official records had not been kept
just for Florida. Of course, the Guinness Book of World Records keeps up with those grown
anywhere, including Florida, but does not maintain a Florida file.

In 1989, we put in place a mechanism for tracking record Florida grown vegetables. I wanted to
send an update on the current procedures, and once again, I would like ask for the assistance of
County Agents in tracking record Florida grown vegetables. So, here is the procedure to be
followed:

Gardeners who grow a large-size vegetable and request that it be considered for record
status should inquire through the County Extension offices in their area. On their behalf,
a County Agent would contact Jim Stephens at (352) 392-1928 x 203 to determine if a
larger size is already on computer file. If none larger is on file, then the gardener may
proceed to establish his entry as an official Florida record.
The procedure involves the completion of the Official Entry Form as discussed here.
Upon verification as a record by me, I will enter the pertinent data and information about
the record, including the Official Entry Form, in the computers file kept in the Extension
Program Assistant's office located at Fifield Hall. From that point on, these files shall be
deemed the Official Record and the basis for determining the merits of subsequent entries
through the years.
The Official Entry Form is in two parts. Part I of the official rules outlines the
procedures that must be followed in order to have a vegetable specimen officially
designated as a Florida record. Part II Agent Certification Form, officially documents









the vegetable as to size and grower. It is not included in the newsletter. Copies may be
obtained from me at Gainesville.

Record Breaking Cucumber June 12, 2009

The latest record to be broken is the cucumber record of 4 lbs 7 oz held by Mr. Graham of
Suwannee County since 1992. The new record of 4 lbs 11 oz was set on June 12, 2009 by Mr.
Rick Maynard of Largo, Pinellas County, Florida. Congratulations Mr. Maynard!


New record cucumber at 4 lb 11 oz (June 12, 2009). Photo taken by: Andy Wilson, Pinellas
County Extension Office.











Is Your Vegetable a Florida Record? Check out the current records in Florida in the table below:


Florida Record-Size Vegetables
UF/IFAS, Horticultural Sciences Dept.
Jim Stephens Retired (352) 392-1928 x203
(Last update June 2009)


Vegetable
Bean, Lima
Beet
Boniata
Broccoli
Cabbage
Cantaloupe
Carrot
Cassava
Cauliflower
Chicory
Collard
Corn, sweet
Cucumber (wt)
Cucumber (length)
Cucumber
Armenian
Eggplant
Garlic
Gourd
Gourd, cucuzzi/
Snake
Honeydew
Jicama
Kohlrabi
Lettuce
Malanga
Melon, winter
Mustard
Okra, pod (wt)
Okra, pod (length)
Okra, stalk
Onion
Pepper
Potato, irish
Potato, sweet
Pumpkin
Radish, S.
Radish, W.
Radish, W.
Rutabaga


Variety
Pole
Detroit Red



Early Round Dutch

Chantenay



Magdeburg
Georgia
Skyscraper
Poinsett
Burpless
Japanese

Black Beauty
Elephant
Field's Common
Long Gourd

Tam-dew



Grand Rapids
unknown

India Fla. Broadleaf



La. Green Velvet
Grano
X3R Wizard
Frito #92

Atlantic Giant
Cherry Belle

Daikon


Size
9% in.
8 Ib. 1 oz.
12 lb. 10 oz.
5 Ib. 4 oz.
20 Ib. 9 oz.
35 Ib. 3 oz.
3 Ib. 1 oz.
33 Ib. 12 oz.
15 lb. 6 oz.
1 Ib. 3 oz.
14 ft. 3 in.
3 Ib.
4 Ib. 11 oz.
2 ft. 3 in.
2 ft. 6 in.


11 lb. 2 oz.
21 Ib. 8 oz.
19 Ib. 8 oz.
3 Ib. 10 oz.
29 Ib. 15 oz.
80 Ib. 13 oz.
20 Ib. 4 oz.
8 oz.
1 ft. 10 4 in.
19 ft. 10/2 in.
3 Ib. 11 oz.
1 Ib. 3.84 oz.
2 Ib. 13 oz.
44 Ib. 2 oz.
610 Ib.
5 Ib. 2 oz.
25 Ib.
23 Ib. 5 oz.
34 Ib. 3 oz.


County
St. Lucie
Duval
Seminole
Suwannee
St. Johns
Manatee
Pinellas
Palm Beach
Alachua
Alachua
Lake
Suwannee
Suwannee
Suwannee
Escambia

Palm Beach
St. Johns
Suwannee
Manatee

Escambia
Palm Beach
Duval
Suwannee
Palm Beach
Palm Beach
Palm Beach
Suwannee
Suwannee
Flagler
Manatee
Palm Beach
St. Johns
Palm Beach
Manatee
Palm Beach
Hillsborough
Alachua
Santa Rosa


Grower
Walter
Lewis
Phillips
Graham
Worley
Canniff
Nehls
Rose
Severino
Lazin
Granger
Graham
Graham
Graham
Harrison

Laluppa
Hester
Graham
Canniff

Harrison
Oppe
Faustini
Graham
Ozaki
Yee
Torcivia
Graham
Graham
Mikulka
Geraldson
Hyatt
Kight
Lee
Canniff
Frtiz
Breslow
Neilson
Comans


Date
04\12\95
05\30\98
03\05\91
06\06\93
05\28\97
06\19\03
04\16\93
02\12\07
2\19\92
02\13\86
08\01\07
06\21\00
06\12\09
06\29\92
08\01\96

01\17\92
05\20\93
08\08\95
08\20\07

08\04\96
01\26\93
06\05\93
05\06\97
01\12\96
01\17\97
01\23\04
06\28\93
06\28\93
10\27\94
08\07\90
04\12\02
05\23\89
01\08\05
06\08\01
01\31\06
1977
03\28\92
04\10\06











Squash, calabaza
Squash, hub.
Squash, banana
Squash, butternut
Squash, scal.
Squash, spaghetti
Squash, zucchini
Squash, Zucchini
hybrid
Squash, summer
Taro
Tomato
Turnip
Watermelon
Yam (True)
Yardlong Bean


LaPrima







Park's Black
Cross-pollinated

YSN


Brandywine Red


Carolina Cross


See the Official Guidelines starting on the next page.


36 Ib. 8 oz.
131 Ib. 12 oz.
47 Ib.
23 Ib. 12 oz.
3 Ib. 12 oz.
47 Ib. 9 oz.
14 lb. 10 oz.
16 lb. 6 oz.

6 Ib. 2 oz.
8 oz.
3 Ib. 4.3 oz.
21 Ib. 11 oz.
205 Ib.
12 Ib. 15 oz.
4 ft. 4 in.


Seminole
Santa Rosa
Putnam
Santa Rosa
Nassau
Duval
Nassau
Marion

Escambia
Palm Beach
Palm Beach
Santa Rosa
Levy
Palm Beach
Orange


Chitty
Bynum
Bryant
Bynum
Horne
Beck
Lynch
Licari

Harrison
Oppe
Ross/Doll
Comans
Bumgardner
Oppe
Yoganand


08\16\91
10\26\94
07\12\96
09\26\92
06\22\99
09\09\96
06\22\99
06\08\01

07\13\95
01\17\92
04\27\05
02\07\05
07\21\92
01\26\93
01\07\97










VC Form 1989-1
Official Entry Form Part I: Rule for Submitting Entries


Official Guidelines
State of Florida
Record Size Vegetables


Purpose: This form is to be used by county agents of the Florida Cooperative Extension Service, as a
means of certification for large-size vegetables grown in the counties of Florida. Florida produced
vegetables, certified by the Extension Service, and may be officially entered in the computerized records
kept in Gainesville by the State Extension Vegetable Specialist Jim Stephens. A file of largest-size
specimens grown in the state provides a means of answering the many inquiries received annually by
Extension concerning the status of a particular vegetable specimen.


Part I. Rules for submitting entries.


1. Records are kept in computer file at 1139 Fifield Hall, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32611. Phone: (352) 392-1928 ext. 203.


2. For a vegetable to be entered in the Florida record, the grower must process a
claim through the Extension Agent in the Florida County in which the vegetable
is grown.


3. The agent must weigh or otherwise measure the specimen, and check to see
that the specimen is not altered in any way which would add to its dimensions.
Note: Growers are advised to delay harvest until Agent advises grower to
harvest the specimen. Follow guidelines under Part II.


4. A photograph (black-white or color, color preferred) must accompany the
submitted record all the way to Gainesville.


5. Agents must certify the specimen as to the correct kind, type, or variety for
which the record is claimed.


6. Agent may first contact the Recording Specialist at Gainesville to determine
whether or not a larger specimen is already on record. If a larger specimen is
recorded, no further action is taken other than to notify the grower of such
information. Note: Records set prior to 1989 will be so noted. New entries
after 1988 will be recorded.










7. The State Specialist, upon receiving Part III of this form properly processed, may
review the claim with the submitting agent and has the option of seeing the
specimen before accepting it as an official state record.


8. The State Specialist is the final authority in designating any submitted specimen
as an official state record vegetable.


9. Once a vegetable specimen is duly recorded, the State Vegetable Specialist will
present a Certificate through the county agent to the grower in recognition of
the record.


10. State records will not be submitted to keepers of national records (usually the
Guinness Book of World Records). Such admission is the responsibility of the
grower.


11. Only those vegetables, kinds, types, or varieties shown on the official list will be
considered for entry into the official records under the auspices of this project.
The list is compiled by the State Vegetable Specialist and may be modified only
by his approval. (See item 14 below)


12. The official list also includes the rules for preparing a vegetable for
measurement or weighing. In most cases the specimen will be weighed.
However, some vegetables, such as beans, will need to be measured (pod
length).


13. All recorded largest vegetables prior to 1989 will be maintained in the files. Also
previous record-holders will be kept, after their records have been broken.


14. Vegetables: Bush bean, pole bean, lima bean, beet, cabbage, cantaloupe, carrot,
cauliflower, celery, sweet corn, cucumber, eggplant, endive, lettuce, mustard,
okra, onion, English pea, southern pea, bell pepper, Irish potato, radish
(summer), radish (winter), spinach, squash (summer), squash (winter) and
pumpkin, sweet potato, tomato, turnip, watermelon.


Reminder: Get a copy of the Official Entry forms from J.M. Stephens by calling (352)
392-1928 x 203.










Vegetarian Newsletter


A Horticultural Sciences Department Extension Publication on Vegetable Crops

Eat your Veggies!!!!!

Issue No. 547 July 2009



Practical Tips for EDIS Authors in the Plant Sciences


By: Danielle Treadwell, Assistant Professor, Horticultural Sciences Department,
Susan Clarendon, Plant Sciences Cluster Editor, EDIS Plant Sciences Group, UF-IFAS,
and
Eric Simonne, Associate Professor, Horticultural Sciences Department and Northeast District
Extension Director, UF-IFAS


The Electronic Data Information Source (EDIS), http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/, includes approximately
7,000 publication titles with information on topics covering the entire range of IFAS disciplines.
These online publications provide vital information at no cost, for homeowners, commercial
growers and other members of the public. Statistical reports indicate the EDIS Web site is visited
about a half million times every month.

This summary of EDIS procedures and practical tips for IFAS authors reflects several recent
procedural changes. Included are special notations for academic faculty located at Research and
Education Centers (RECs) and for county faculty, as well as information concerning who is
responsible for completing a procedure, and why a procedure is important. This article was
written primarily for authors whose home tenure department is Horticultural Sciences. We
recognize that many of the procedures discussed below are applicable to all authors in the Plant
Sciences departments (Agronomy, Environmental Horticulture, Horticultural Sciences (HOS),
and Plant Pathology); however, we encourage authors to clarify department-specific policies
with their department chair before submitting a manuscript to EDIS. We hope the summary
below will provide a clear understanding of the EDIS publication process.

Overview of the EDIS publication process:

1. Write: A lead author develops a manuscript independently or with co-authors. Academic
departments have their own policies for authorship of new EDIS publications. In HOS:

*County faculty authors: Academic faculty co-authorship is a requirement for EDIS
publications. Therefore, county faculty who wish to publish on EDIS should coauthor
with an academic faculty member.









Student authors. Department chairs may approve a manuscript written by an
undergraduate or graduate student with academic faculty sponsorship.

2. Review: Academic departments follow their own procedures for peer review of
manuscripts intended for publication in EDIS. In HOS, manuscripts are submitted to two
reviewers, preferably through the departmental EDIS coordinator. These reviewers
should include one county faculty member and one academic faculty member. When the
manuscript's authors are from two or more academic departments, the HOS review
policy allows the manuscripts to be reviewed within the second author's department in
lieu of an HOS academic faculty member.
For HOS academic faculty based in Gainesville, Carolyn Miller, executive secretary
to the HOS department chairman, coordinates the peer review for manuscripts.
For HOS faculty based in the RECs, the author is responsible for coordinating the
peer review for their own manuscript. Faculty accruing tenure in HOS are expected to
follow HOS EDIS publication procedures, including review procedures.
County faculty who are EDIS authors should follow review procedures of the
academic faculty author's home department.

3. Revise: Authors revise the manuscript according to reviewers' comments.

4. Manuscript Submittal Form (MSF) and manuscript submission: Once the reviewer's
comments have been incorporated, the manuscript is ready to be submitted to an EDIS
editor for the communications review. For each manuscript, authors must download and
complete an MSF. The MSF and instructions are located at:
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/faq/docs/checklist authors.pdf. The form requires the following
information:
One Statewide Goal and Focus Area most relevant to the manuscript. Goals and focus
areas are summarized below.The intended readership for the publication, including
academic, industry/commercial, general public, or any combination of these
audiences.
Designate a "contact author". The editor will remain in contact with this author
during the communications review. The author identified on the form as the contact
author will also be notified by editorial staff after the publication is online in terms of,
any questions that arise from readers.

Manuscripts that have never been published in EDIS are required to be submitted in an
MS Word file format. (Please refer to the EDIS tips for authors below.)

E-mail the completed MSF and the peer-reviewed EDIS manuscript to Susan Clarendon,
the plant sciences editor for EDIS publications. Send one completed MSF for each EDIS
manuscript submission. Susan can be reached at:

E-mail: suzvliz(@iufl.edu.
Telephone: 352-392-2411 Ext. 280










To identify EDIS editors assigned to other IFAS academic departments, consult the
following webpage: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topic authors by editor/

5. Creation of a database record: The Manuscript Submittal Form (MSF) is used by a
program assistant in the IFAS Communications Services Department (ICS) to create a
database record for the manuscript. Additionally, in some cases, administrative staff in
RECs create the database record for a new EDIS publication developed by faculty based
in those RECs.

6. Creation of a Digital Library Number (DLN) and an IFAS Publication Number
(IPN): The DLN is the name of the unique digital file assigned to each EDIS publication.
The cluster editor -- or a staff member who coordinates submission of manuscripts --
requests the computer-generated DLN. In some RECs, an administrative assistant
requests the DLN as part of the process of creating a database record for a new EDIS
publication. The editor assigns the IPN to the publication. For new publications
originating in the HOS department, the DLN and IPNs are now identical; the same
number is entered into two different database fields.

7. Editor reviews the manuscript. The cluster editor reviews the manuscript for grammar,
spelling, formatting, and other editorial aspects and communicates suggested changes to
the contact author. Editors are available to meet as needed with authors to discuss the
manuscript or can consult with the contact author over the phone or in e-mail, depending
on the author's preference.

8. Edited manuscript receives approval from author. Typically, the editor will e-mail
the edited manuscript to the contact author in an MS Word file. The "track changes"
feature in the MS Word file allows the contact author to review edits in detail if the
author wishes to do so. The author may elect to revise the manuscript to reflect the cluster
editor's recommendations, or the author may prefer to simply approve the editor's
recommended changes in part or in total.

9. Formatting for online publication. Once the author has approved the edited manuscript,
it is then passed to typesetting. EDIS publications are formatted using a software program
called the EDIS Authoring Tool (EAT) that was developed by computer programmers
within ICS. Graphic formatting for EDIS publications conforms to UF/IFAS-approved
specifications, including a two-column, downloadable PDF that accompanies the HTML
version of each EDIS publication. After the manuscript is formatted, it is proofread. Any
corrections noted in proofreading are then made to the manuscript.

10. Review of Formatted Manuscript. If issues specific to formatting -- especially in
regards to illustrations or tables -- arise during typesetting, the editor may e-mail the
formatted PDF to the contact author for review before advancing the manuscript to the
next step in the EDIS publication process. If the contact author requests to review the
formatted publication, the editor will also, in response to the author's request, e-mail the
formatted PDF to the author.









11. Manuscript Submitted into the EDIS Automated Routing System for Required
Approvals. At this final stage in the EDIS publication process, an e-mail is routed to the
following EDIS stakeholders, requesting approval (or rejection) of the manuscript. The
request is routed in the following order: editorial approval (cluster editor) -technical
approval (EDIS team) REC director approval (for faculty authors based in an REC) -
departmental chairman approval program leader approval (Dr. Joan Dusky).

After the edited, formatted manuscript has been submitted into the automated routing
system, and before the manuscript is published in EDIS, it is available for review online,
(in both the HTML version and the PDF). Any EDIS author (or IFAS administrator) who
wishes to review the document at this stage in the EDIS publication process can do so,
using the following URL: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/review DLN (for example,
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/review HS398).

12. Publication in EDIS: Immediately following approval by the program leader, the
manuscript is indexed and published online in EDIS. To see an EDIS publication, use the
following URL: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/DLN (For example:
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/HS398). The manuscript will appear on the new publications
mailing list and is added to an RSS feed that is syndicated to the EDIS Web site home
page.

13. To create an MS Word copy of the EDIS publication: As described in detail above,
the manuscript submitted for communications review is likely to undergo changes during
the publication process, including editing, typesetting, proofreading, and possibly, as
well, due to the contact author's review of the formatted manuscript. While the EDIS
system includes secure, redundant digital backup, if an author wishes to keep a copy of
an EDIS publication in an MS Word-file format, simply open the HTML manuscript in
EDIS using MS Word and save a copy of the publication as an MS Word file. Some
minor formatting glitches may be present, but this method provides an MS Word file
copy of the EDIS publication. Some authors prefer to use an MS Word file for the
purposes of subsequent revision to their EDIS publication.

14. Sunset Review: The lead author for an EDIS publication must review it every three years
to ensure the publication remains a reliable and relevant source of information. To date,
70 percent of the approximately 7,000 EDIS publications available to the public online
are new, newly revised, or have otherwise been approved by their lead author as current.

When an EDIS publication is ready for its Sunset Review, Melanie Mercer, the program
assistant for the EDIS editorial department, will contact the lead author to request a
review of the publication. If the author responds in writing to Ms. Mercer
(melaniem@ufl.edu) to approve the publication as still entirely current, she will then
update the publication footnote to show the date the author reviewed the publication and
approved it as still current. The author may choose, instead, to respond in writing to Ms.
Mercer to indicate that the EDIS publication in question is no longer current and should
be taken offline and archived.









Often authors will indicate -- after a review of their EDIS publication -- that revision is
necessary to keep the publication current. In communicating this information to Ms.
Mercer, the author should indicate whether the publication should be taken offline during
the revision or whether the publication can safely remain online for a limited duration
while the author is revising the publication.

Because of the critical nature of the information contained in many EDIS publications,
those that are not reviewed by their lead author every three years are taken offline and
archived. Archived EDIS publications are not cited in new EDIS publications, and
citations for archived EDIS publications may also be removed from EDIS publications
that are already online.

15. Revision. An EDIS publication can be revised at any time after the original publication
date. Changes that are grammatical or that affect formatting including extensive
changes of these kinds -- are considered to be a "minor revision." However, change to the
content of the publication -- including the content presented in text, illustrations, or in
tables -- is considered a "major revision."

For a major revision, e-mail to the appropriate editor a completed manuscript submission
form, including the name of the reviewer or the reviewers (depending on departmental
review policy) who have approved the revised manuscript. Publications that have
undergone a major revision are submitted by the editor into the EDIS automated routing
system (see Step 11, above.)

Some tips for EDIS authors:
* Large and complicated tables, as well as a large number of figures or combinations of figures
and tables can increase time required for typesetting and may also require special handling
for the PDF version of the publication.
* Because people view HTML pages using a wide variety of browsers, non-standard symbols
may not render accurately; unusual symbols should be avoided.
* The EAT structures the manuscript in headers with subheaders in a strict hierarchy. As a
result, text boxes or informational side-bars are difficult to handle without time-consuming
adjustments.
* Publication-related correspondence should be directed to the appropriate editor. See the EDIS
Publishing FAQ page, Who do I contact for editorial assistance? located at:
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/faq/pubfaq.html#editors
* If you wish to speak with an editor's supervisor, contact Ashley Wood, director, IFAS
Communication Services, amwood(@iufl.edu.
* The EDIS librarian and coordinator for computer applications is Diana Hagan,
dhagan(@ufl.edu.









UF-IFAS Extension Statewide Goals and Focus Areas for 2008-2012:


Program Leader

Joan Dusky
G1F1

G1F2

G1F3
G1F4
G1F5

Michael Springei
G2F 1
G2F2
G2F3
G2F4
G2F5


Marilyn Norman


G3F1
G3F2
G3F3


Joan Dusky
G4F 1
G4F2


Nayda Torres
G5F1
G5F2
G5F3
G5F4
G5F5

Nayda Torres
G6F 1
G6F2
G6F3
G6F4
G6F5


Goal/Focus Area


Goal 1 Agricultural, Natural Resource and Food Systems
Agricultural and Natural Resource Industry Profitability
and the Sustainable Use of Environmental Resources
Awareness of Agriculture's and Natural Resource's Importance
to an Economy that Ranges from Local to Global
Processing, Distribution, Safety, and Security of Food Systems
Protecting Florida from Existing and Emerging Pests and Diseases
Bio-energy: Sustaining and Fueling Florida

r Goal 2 Florida Environment
Water Resources
Sustainable Use of Freshwater and Terrestrial Ecosystems
Environmental Education
Conservation and Sustainable Use of Coastal and Marine Ecosystems
Climate Change: Mitigation and Adaptation


Goal 3 Youth Development


Life Skills Developed in Youth through Subject Matter Experiences
Organizational Strategies and Learning Environments for Youth Programs
Volunteer Development and Systems to Support Youth

Goal 4 Sustainable Landscapes
Commercial Horticulture/Urban Forestry Services
Residential Landscapes including Florida Yards and Neighborhoods
(FYN)


Goal 5 Individual and Family Development
Personal and Family Well-Being
Personal Financial Education
Health, Nutrition, and Food Safety
Sustainable Housing and Home Environment
Sustainable Organizations and Communities

Goal 6 Sustainable Living
Growth Management and Land Development
Citizen Engagement to Build Active Communities
Economic Development
Leadership Development for Elected Officials and Citizens
Water and Energy Resource Efficiency









Edward Osborne Goal 7 Professional Development
G7F 1 Program Development, Implementation, and Evaluation
G7F2 Faculty Orientation and Career Training
G7F3 Effective Communication and Technology Use
G7F4 Personal and Organizational Health
G7F5 Administration and Leadership

References:
* FAQs: Publishing on EDIS. Available at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/faq/pubfaq.html#headerl
* Diana Hagan, EDIS Librarian, dhagan@ufl.edu
* Jerry Bennett, Professor and Chair of the Agronomy Department, and Chair of the EDIS Plant
Sciences Publication Group, jmbti@ufl.edu
* Daniel Cantliffe, Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Horticultural Sciences Department,
dicant(kufl.edu




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