Title: Vegetarian
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087399/00466
 Material Information
Title: Vegetarian
Series Title: Vegetarian
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Horticultural Sciences Department
Publication Date: August 2003
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087399
Volume ID: VID00466
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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/,l=, VEGETARIAN NEWSLETTER





(Note: Anyone is free to use the information in this newsletter. Whenever possible, please give credit to the authors.
The purpose of Irade names in this publication is solely for Ihe purpose of providing information and does not
necessarily conslilute a recommendation of Ihe product.)




M Print Version

* GCREC SPRING 2003 TOMATO VARIETY EVALUATION
* DIPLOID AND TRIPLOID WATERMELON VARIETY EVALUATION, GCREC-SPRING 2003
* GCREC TRIPLOID MINIWATERMELON VARIETY EVALUATION, SPRING 2003
* CONTAINER GARDENING SUCCESS REQUIRES THE RIGHT POTTING MEDIUM
* SWEET CORN PRODUCTION IN FLORIDA





** ** UPCOMING EVENTS CALENDAR

South Florida Drip Irrigation School: Managing Water and Nutrients in Vegetable Production. Miami-Dade
County Extension Service Office. August 21, 2003 from 8:15 2:00.
AgriTech Strawberry Conference. Plant City. August 26-27, 2003. Florida Strawberry Growers Association:
http://www.straw-berry.org/
Florida Tomato Institute. Ritz-Carlton Hotel. Naples. September 4, 2003. Contact Bill Stall at
wms@ifas.ufl.edu
49th Conference of the InterAmerican Society for Tropical Horticulture. Fortaleza, Brazil, Aug. 31- Sept. 5,
2003.
ISHS International Symposium on Protected Culture in a Mild-Winter Climate. Renaissance WorldGate
Hotel Kissimmee, Fla. March 23-27, 2004. Contact: Daniel Cantliffe at djc@ifas.ufl.edu


GCREC SPRING 2003 TOMATO VARIETY EVALUATION

A replicated tomato variety trial was conducted in spring 2003 at the Gulf Coast Research and Education Center-
Bradenton located in west-central Florida to evaluate 28 fresh market tomato commercial and experimental hybrids.
Seeds were sown on 9 January into planter flats (1.5 x 1.5 x 2.5-inch cells) containing a commercial mix. Transplants
were fertilized periodically with a liquid 20-20-20 (N-P205K20) to sustain growth during production. Plants were
conditioned before transplanting by limiting water and nutrients in the final phase of production.


Page 1







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The Eau Gallie fine sand in the experimental area was prepared in mid-February. Beds were formed and fumigated
with methyl bromide:chloropicrin, 67:33 at 350 Ib/treated acre. Banded fertilizer was applied in shallow grooves on the
bed shoulders after the beds were pressed and before the black polyethylene mulch was applied. The total fertilizer
applied was equivalent to 282-70-392 Ib N-P205-K20/A. The final beds were 32-in. wide and 8-in. high, and were
spaced on 5-ft centers with six beds between seepage irrigation/drainage ditches, which were on 41-ft centers.
Transplants were set in the field on 5 March and spaced 24 in. apart in single rows down the center of each bed.

Fruit were harvested three times at or beyond the mature-green stage on 12 May, 27-28 May and 15 June. Tomatoes
were graded as cull or marketable by U.S. standards for grades and marketable fruit were sized by machine (see
footnotes Table 1 for specifications). Marketable fruits of each size were counted and weighed, cull fruits were
weighed.

Seasonal yields from three harvests ranged from 1912 cartons/acre for 'Florida 47' to 3223 cartons/acre for Fla. 8135
(Table 1). Fourteen other entries had yields similar to those of Fla. 8135. All entries produced yields greater than the
state average yield for spring 2000 of 1693 cartons/acre. Yields of extra-large fruit varied from 1634 cartons/acre for
'Florida 47' to 2893 cartons/acre for TY02-1276. Yields of TY02-1276 extra large fruit were similar to those of 12 other
entries. Large fruit yields ranged from 141 cartons/acre for HA 3603 to 484 cartons/acre for Fla. 8135. Cull fruit for the
entire season varied from 14% by weight for 'Sebring' to 43% for HA-3603. Radial cracks and small fruit were the
principal defects during the latter part of the season. Average fruit weight was from 6.2 oz for ACR 242 XLT to 8.2 oz
for HA-3072. TYLC- infected plants ranged from 0 for several entries to 31% for 'Florida 47'. Over 85% of the entries
had at least one infected plant.

Yields in the spring 2003 season were similar to those in recent spring seasons at this location. Exceptional
experimental hybrid performers in spring 2003 were Fla. 8135, Fla. 8093, XTM 0233, ACR 2012, and TY02-1276.
Many experimental hybrids produced yields well above those of the standard commercial hybrids.


Table 1. Seed source, total marketable yields, average marketable fruit weight, and cull percentages for
fresh market tomato entries in spring 2003 (Harvest Dates: 12 May, 27-28 May, and 12 June 2003).

Total Harvest


Total


Entry

Fla. 8135


Seed Source

GCREC-UF


TY02-1276 Hazera

XTM0233 Sakata


Fla. 8093


GCREC-UF


ACR 2012 Abbott & Cobb


XTM 0231 Sakata

STM0227 Sakata


EX1432427

Florida 91

Fla. 8134

Fla. 7964


Seminis


Seminis

GCREC-UF

GCREC-UF


TY02-1273 Hazera


X-Large


Large


Medium


--------(cartons/A)1-----


3223 a3

3036 ab


2663 ab

2893 a


3035 ab 2516 a-d

3023 a-c 2627 a-c


2807 a-d


2210 b-f


2803 a-d 2494 a-d

2770 a-e 2510 a-d

2733 a-e 2498 a-d

2720 a-e 2481 a-d

2707 a-e 2289 a-e

2693 a-e 2178 b-f

2691 a-e 2423 a-e


484 a

123i


76 b-i

20 h-i


432 a-c 87 b-f

325 b-g 71 c-i


448 ab


150 a


267 d-i 41 e-i

230 e-i 29 f-i


221 e-i


202 f-i 38 e-i

350 a-f 69 c-i

408 a-d 106 a-c

225 e-i 43 d-i


Culls Avg Fruit
(%)2 VVt (oz)


17 g-i

21 e-i

19 f-i

20 e-i

28 c-e

17 f-i

17 f-i

19 f-i

18 f-i

23 d-h

21 e-i

25 c-f


6.8 g-i

8.0 ab

6.8 g-i

7.0 e-i

6.7 h-j

7.4 c-f

7.3 d-g

7.7 a-d

7.5 b-e

6.8 f-i

6.7 g-j

7.5 b-e


Page 2







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ACR 242
XLT

Fla. 8092


Abbott & Cobb


GCREC-UF


XTM 0230 Sakata


HA-3072

Sebring


Hazera


Syngenta


XTM0112 Sakata


Fla. 7973


ACR 42 XLT


Fla. 8059


GCREC-UF


Abbott & Cobb


GCREC-UF


RFT 1092 Syngenta


ACR 32 XLT


Abbott & Cobb


2670 a-e


2089 b-f


2660 a-e 2457 a-d

2597 a-e 2291 a-e

2566 b-e 2406 a-e

2531 b-f 2243 b-f

2482 b-f 2015 c-f

2472 b-f 2081 b-f


2466 b-f

2378 c-f


2102 b-f

1985 d-f


2376 c-f 2015 c-f


2369 d-f


1815 ef


478 a 104a-d

174 g-i 28 f-i

269 d-i 37 e-i


144i


245 e-i 42 e-i

371 a-e 96 a-e

311 b-h 80 b-h

280 c-i 83 b-g

340 a-f 53 c-i

306 b-h 55 c-i

420 a-d 134 ab


HA-3073

RFT 0871


Hazera


Syngenta


RFT 0252 Syngenta


HA-3603


Hazera


Florida 47 Seminis


2288 d-f 2127 b-f

2232 d-f 2006 c-f

2228 d-f 2039 b-f


2124 ef

1912 f


1956 d-f

1634 f


146i


181 g-i 45 c-i

166 hi 23 g-i


141 i


26 f-i


224 e-i 54 c-i


1Carton = 25 Ibs. Acre = 8712 Ibf. Grading belt hole sizes: X-Large = no belt,
2.51"; Medium = 2.5"-2.26"; and Cull < 2.25".
2By weight.
3Mean separation in columns by Duncan's multiple range test, 5% level.


greater than 2.75"; Large = 2.75"-


(Maynard Vegetarian 03-08)


DIPLOID AND TRIPLOID WATERMELON VARIETY EVALUATION, GCREC-SPRING 2003

Diploid (seeded) watermelons generally weigh from 18 to 35 Ib and represent about half of the commercial crop grown
in Florida. Triploid (seedless) watermelons usually weigh 15 to 22 Ib and are grown in Florida on about the other half
of the acreage. The proportion of the Florida crop devoted to triploid production is increasing each year. Icebox
watermelons weigh 6 to 12 Ib each and are grown on a very small acreage. Personal size or miniwatermelons were
introduced in 2003; these fruit weigh 3 to 7 lb. each. Florida produced 8.6 million cwt of watermelons of all types from
24,000 harvested acres in 2000-2001, which provided an average yield of 310 cwt/acre. The average price was
$5.70/cwt resulting in a crop value of over $42 million which accounted for 2.5% of the gross value of the state's
vegetable crops.

The objective of these trials was to evaluate the performance of triploid and diploid watermelon varieties under west-
central Florida conditions.


Page 3


16 g-i

22 e-h

21 e-i

31 b-d

14i

24 d-h

23 e-h

25 d-g

16 hi

32 bc

22 e-h


6.2j


7.5 c-e

7 e-i


8.2 a


7.3 d-g

6.8 g-i

7.2 d-h

7.1 e-i

6.8 f-i

7.0 e-i


6.5 ij


43 a


31 b-d

19 f-i

36 ab

24 d-h


7.8 a-d

7.3 d-g

7.7 a-d

7.9 a-c

7.3 d-g







http://peaches/hochmuth/vegetarian.htm


The EauGallie fine sand was prepared in early February by incorporation of 0-0.8-0 Ib N-P205-K20 per 100 linear bed
feet (Ibf). Beds were formed and fumigated with methylbromide:chloropicrin, 67:33 at 2.3 lb/100 Ibf. Banded fertilizer
was applied in shallow grooves on the bed shoulders at 3.1-0-4.3 Ib N-P205-K20/100 Ibf afterthe beds were pressed
and before the black polyethylene mulch was applied. The total fertilizer applied was equivalent to 150-40-208 Ib N-
P205-K20/A. The final beds were 32-in. wide and 8-in. high, and were spaced on 9-ft centers with four beds between
seepage irrigation/drainage ditches, which were on 41-ft centers.

Diploid entries were direct seeded on 26 February and triploid entries were transplanted on 4 March at 3-ft in-row
spacing. Eight-plant triploid plots were arranged on two beds with ten-plant diploid plots in beds on each side. Diploids
were replicated four times and triploids three times.

Watermelons were harvested twice; during the 15-22 May and 3-9 June periods. Marketable (U.S. No. 1 or better) fruit
according to U.S. Standards for Grades of Watermelons were separated from culls and counted and weighed
individually. Fruit 12 Ibs and larger were assumed to be marketable. Six fruit from each entry at the first harvest were
used to determine soluble solids (a measure of sweetness) with a digital, hand-held refractometer.

Total diploid yields (Table 1) varied from 424 cwt/acre for 'Delta' and 98212 to 729 cwt/acre for 'Montreal'. Twenty-one
other entries had yields similar to those of 'Montreal'. Average fruit weight over the entire season ranged from 18.5 Ibs
for 'Fiesta' to 25.4 Ibs for 'Dulce'. Fruit per plant varied from 1.5 for 'Delta', WX 264, and 98212 to 2.4 for HSR 2965.
Cull fruit ranged from 2% by weight for SSC 46104 to 20% for WX 264. Soluble solids ranged from 11.6% for
'Celebration' to 13.6% for HSR 2965. Soluble solids for all entries exceeded the 10% specified of optional use to
designate very good internal quality in the U.S. Standards for Grades of Watermelons.

Diploid watermelon variety evaluations have been conducted at this location each spring season since 1991. The
highest yields of individual varieties ranged from 439 cwt/acre in 1996 to 1062 cwt/acre in 1993. In spring 2003, the
highest yield was 729 cwt/acre which was somewhat less than the 12-year average yield of 773 cwt/acre.

Total triploid yields (Table 2) ranged from 195 cwt/acre for USS 2121 to 959 cwt/acre for WX 28. Twenty-seven other
entries produced yields statistically similar to those of WX 28. Average fruit weight for the entire season varied from
13.7 Ibs for USS 2121 to 26.5 Ibs WX 28. The number of fruit per plant ranged from 0.9 for USS 2121 to 3.4 for
'Superseedless 7171'. Cull fruit ranged from 2% for RWT 8145 to 38% for ZG 8801. Soluble solids concentrations
were high ranging from 11.4% for 'Dillion' to 13.9% for USS 2330.

Seedless watermelon variety trials have been conducted at this location each spring season since 1988. The highest
yields ranged from 507 cwt/acre in 1996 to 1253 cwt/A in 2002. The highest yield in 2003 was 959 cwt/acre which
greatly exceeded the 877 cwt/acre average high during the entire 16-year period.

These reports in their entirety are available from the author as GCREC Research Reports. They are also available on
the GCREC website (gcrec.ifas.ufl.edu).


Table 1. Total yields, average fruit weight, fruit per plant, percentages of cull fruit, and soluble solids of
diploid watermelons. Gulf Coast Research and Education Center, Bradenton. Spring 2003.


Weight Avg Fruit per Cull Soluble Solids
Entry Seed Source (cwt/A) Fruit Plant (%)2 )
(Ib) Plant (%)2 (%)

Montreal Sunseeds 729 a3 19.9 c-f 2.4 a 6 b-d 12.2 d-f

Dulce Willhite 723 a 25.4 a 1.8 a-c 4 b-d 12.2 c-f

HSR 2965 Hollar 698 ab 19.2 ef 2.4 a 9 a-d 13.6 a

Jamboree Syngenta 677 ab 20.9 c-f 2.1 a-c 6 b-d 12.2 d-f

summer Flavor Abbott & Cobb 672 a-c 19.2 ef 2.3 ab 6 b-d 12.1 d-f
790



Page 4







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RWM 8151

Sangria

Daytona

ZG 8903

Summer Flavor
800

01

HSR 3028

SSC 46104

Rojo Grande

Mardi Gras

HSR 2955

Jube-ette

HSR 3034

Celebration

Fiesta

Sentinel

ZG 8901

Gold Strike

ZG 8902

WX264

Delta

98212

1Acre = 4840 Ibf.


Syngenta

Syngenta

Sakata

Zeraim Gedera

Abbott & Cobb

Willhite

Hollar

Shamrock

Willhite

Syngenta

Hollar

Willhite

Hollar

Syngenta

Syngenta

Seminis

Zeraim Gedera

Willhite

Zeraim Gedera

Willhite

Seminis

Sakata


668 a-c

662 a-c

646 a-c

634 a-d


24.3 ab

19.2 ef

21.1 c-f

20.0 c-f


615 a-d 21.3 c-e


609 a-d

604 a-d

591 a-d

579 a-d

572 a-d

564 a-d

564 a-d

555 a-d

550 a-d

540 a-d

522 a-d

519 a-d

497 b-d

496 b-d

461 cd

424 d

424 d


22.2 bc

20.3 c-f

20.5 c-f

19.6 c-f

21.0 c-f

20.3 c-f

20.5 c-f

19.8 c-f

20.3 c-f

18.5 f

21.9 cd

18.9 ef

20.2 c-f

19.0 ef

19.4 d-f

19.5 d-f

18.7 ef


2By weight.
3Mean separation in columns by Duncan's multiple range test, 5% level.


Table 2. Total yields, average fruit weight, fruit per plant, percentage of cull fruit, and soluble solids of
triploid watermelons. Gulf Coast Research and Education Center, Bradenton. Spring 2003.


Seed Source


Willhite

Syngenta


Weight
(cwt/A)1

959 a3

932 ab


Avg
Fruit Wt
(Ib)

26.5 a

20.4 b


Soluble
Fruit per Cull Soldsuble
Plant (%)2 Sol

2.3 a-e 6 bc 12.2 ab

3.0 a-c 2c 13.1 ab


Page 5


1.7 a-c

2.2 a-c

1.9 a-c

2.0 a-c

1.8 a-c

1.8 a-c

1.9 a-c

1.8 a-c

1.8 a-c

1.8 a-c

1.9 a-c

1.7 a-c

1.8 a-c

2.0 a-c

1.9 a-c

1.6c

1.9 a-c

1.6 bc

1.8 a-c

1.5c

1.5c

1.5c


3 cd

10 a-d

11 a-d

9 a-d

13 a-d

10 a-d

12 a-d

2d

5 b-d

13 a-d

7 b-d

13 a-d

11 a-d

12 a-d

11 a-d

12 a-d

15 ab

14 a-c

10 a-d

20 a

13 a-d

13 a-d


12.6 a-f

13.4 a-c

13.0 a-e

13.5 ab

12.7 a-f

13.0 a-e

13.4 a-c

12.5 a-f

12.3 b-f

11.9 ef

12.6 a-f

12.2 c-f

13.5 ab

11.6f

12.9 a-e

12.9 a-e

13.0 a-e

12.8 a-e

13.2 a-d

13.1 a-e

13.4 ab

13.1 a-e


Entry


WX28

RWT 8145









Super Seedless 7177

Dillon

HA 5015

Millionaire

Cooperstown

Super Seedless 7187

Super Seedless 7167

SWT 6903

HSR 3005

Tri-X Palomar

Sweet Slice

Revolution

USS 2330

Sunny

HA 5002

SSC 31829

Olympia

SWT 8706

Tri-X 313

XP 4510759

Sweet Delight

Fandango

USS 2286

Sugar Slice

Summer Sweet 5244

SR8021WM

ZG-8016

Trillion

Gypsy

Omega

Talladega

USS 2231


http://peaches/hochmuth/vegetarian.htm

Abbott & Cobb 911 ab 17.6 c-g

Hazera 893 a-c 18.2 b-e

Hazera 882 a-d 19.9 be

Harris Moran 844 a-e 18.0 c-f

Seminis 834 a-e 17.3 d-g

Abbott & Cobb 810 a-e 17.7 c-g

Abbott & Cobb 807 a-e 18.4 b-f

Sakata 788 a-e 17.6 c-g

Hollar 779 a-e 17.6 c-g

Syngenta 766 a-e 17.2 e-h

Willhite 759 a-e 17.1 e-h

Sunseeds 753 a-f 19.0 b-e

U.S. Seedless 747 a-f 18.2 b-f

Willhite 745 a-f 19.7 b-d

Hazera 736 a-f 18.0 c-g

Shamrock 716 a-f 16.6 e-h

Seminis 714 a-f 18.6 b-e

Sakata 706 a-f 17.4 d-g

Syngenta 700 a-f 16.9 e-h

Seminis 699 a-f 17.0 e-h

Syngenta 697 a-f 18.3 b-f

Shamrock 688 a-f 17.8 c-g

U.S. Seedless 669 a-f 16.7 e-h

Willhite 656 a-f 16.8 e-h

Abbott & Cobb 651 a-f 17.8 c-g

Sunseeds 644 a-f 16.8 e-h

Zeraim Gedera 621 b-g 16.0 f-i

Abbott & Cobb 621 b-g 16.7 e-h

Harris Moran 569 c-g 17.2 e-h

Seminis 552 d-g 19.0 b-e

Sakata 541 e-g 17.1 e-h

U.S. Seedless 508 e-g 16.0 f-i


Page 6


3.4 a

3.3 a

2.8 a-d

2.9 a-d

3.0 ab

2.8 a-d

2.8 a-d

2.8 a-d

2.8 a-d

2.9 a-d

2.8 a-d

2.5 a-e

2.5 a-e

2.3 a-e

2.5 a-e

2.7 a-d

2.5 a-e

2.5 a-e

2.7 a-d

2.5 a-e

2.4 a-e

2.4 a-e

2.5 a-e

2.4 a-e

2.5 a-e

2.4 a-e

2.4 a-e

2.3 a-e

2.0 b-e

1.9 b-f

2.3 a-e

2.1 b-e


4c

6 bc

8 bc

7 bc

12 a-c

7 bc

10 a-c

3c

4c

7 bc

7 bc

4c

14 a-c

5 bc

8 bc

6 bc

5 bc

5 bc

12 a-c

4c

10 a-c

8 bc

7 bc

9 bc

10 a-c

9 a-c

10 a-c

9 bc

13 a-c

18 ab

8 bc

11 a-c


13.6 a

11.4 b

13.5 a

13.2 ab

13.5 a

12.3 ab

12.2 ab

13.6 a

12.4 ab

13.6 a

13.6 a

13.3 a

13.9 a

13.5 a

12.6 ab

13.7 a

13.3 a

12.9 ab

12.3 ab

12.3 ab

12.8 ab

12.5 ab

13.3 a

13.5 a

12.5 ab

12.1 ab

13.5 a

12.3 ab

13.4 a

12.9 ab

13.4 a

13.3 a







http://peaches/hochmuth/vegetarian.htm


ZG-8818 Zeraim Gedera 471 e-h 15.5 g-i 1.9 b-f 21 a 13.9 a

ZG 8801 Zeraim Gedera 458 e-h 17.4 c-g 1.6 d-f 38 a 12.9 ab

Genesis Shamrock 421 f-h 15.5 g-i 1.7 d-f 11 a-c 13.2ab

Imagination Syngenta 421 f-h 14.8 hi 1.8 c-f 22 a 12.3 ab

HSR2920 Hollar 322 gh 14.0 i 1.4ef 9a-c 13.4a

USS 2121 U.S. Seedless 195 h 13.7 i 0.9 f 9 a-c 12.6 ab

1Acre = 4840 Ibf.
2By weight.
3Mean separation in columns by Duncan's multiple range test, 5% level.


(Maynard Vegetarian 03-08)


GCREC TRIPLOID MINIWATERMELON VARIETY EVALUATION, SPRING 2003

Triploid miniwatermelons, also called personal-size watermelons, were introduced in 2003. There are no officially
assigned weight parameters to this new class of watermelons, however, they generally might be considered to weigh
3-8 Ibs each. Production thus far is quite small, but they have been well-received by consumers so production is
expected to increase.

Nine commercial or experimental hybrids (Table 1) were evaluated in the spring 2003 season at GCREC-Bradenton.
Seeds were planted in a peat-lite growing mix in planter flats (1% x 1% x 2% in. cells) on 4 February. The watermelon
transplants were grown by a commercial plant grower.

The EauGallie fine sand was prepared in mid February. Beds were formed and fumigated with
methylbromide:chloropicrin, 67:33 at 350 Ib/treated acre. Banded fertilizer was applied in shallow grooves on the bed
shoulders after the beds were pressed and before the black polyethylene mulch was applied. The total fertilizer
applied was equivalent to 150-40-208 Ib N-P205-K20/A. The final beds were 32-in. wide and 8-in. high, and were
spaced on 5-ft centers with six beds between seepage irrigation/drainage ditches, which were on 41-ft centers.

The transplants were set in holes punched in the polyethylene mulch on 11 March at 2.5-ft in-row spacing that
provided 12.5 ft2/plant. The replicated plots were 20 ft long and had eight plants each and were repeated four times in
a randomized, complete block design. 'Summer Flavor 800' watermelon transplants were planted in every fourth hole
to serve as the diploid pollenizer.

Watermelons were harvested on 22 and 30 May. Marketable (U.S. No. 1 or better) fruit according to U.S. Standards
for Grades of Watermelons were separated from culls and counted and weighed individually. Six fruit from each entry
were used to determine soluble solids (a measure of sweetness) with a digital, hand-held refractometer, polar and
equatorial dimensions, rind thickness, flesh color, and the incidence and severity of hollowheart.

Yield data calculations did not include the 'Summer Flavor 800' pollenizer area, but were determined as if the
miniwatermelons were planted on the entire acre. Yield data were calculated in three formats based on individual fruit
weight: 4 to 6 Ib.; 3-7 Ib.; and 3-8 lb. because there are no generally agreed weight parameters for minimelons at this
time.

Fruit number per acre of 4-6 lb. fruit varied from 1924 for 'Bambino' to 6861 for 'Vanessa' while weight per acre ranged
from 96 cwt/acre for 'Bambino' to 349 cwt/acre for 'Vanessa'. Average fruit weight was similar among all entries. Fruit
per plant varied from 0.6 for 'Bambino' to 2.0 for 'Vanessa'.


Page 7







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For fruit in the 3-7 lb. weight class, fruit per acre ranged from 4102 for 'Bambino' to 10,128 for ZG 8905. On the basis
of weight, yields varied from 220 cwt/acre for 'Bambino' to 514 cwt/acre for 'Vanessa'. Average fruit weight varied
from 4.9 Ib for ZG 8905 to 5.9 Ib for 'Extazy'. Fruit per plant ranged from 1.2 for 'Bambino' to 2.9 for ZG 8905 and
'Vanessa'.

For fruit in the 3-8 lb. class, fruit per acre varied from 4901 for 'Bambino' to 11,217 for 'Vanessa'. Weight ranged from
277 cwt/acre for 'Bambino' to 604 cwt/acre for 'Vanessa'. Average fruit weight varied from 5.0 lb. for ZG 8905 to 6.4
lb. for 'Extazy'. Fruit per plant ranged from 1.4 for 'Bambino' to 3.2 for 'Vanessa'.

Regardless of weight parameters, 'Vanessa', 'Petite Perfection', ZG 8905, and RWT 8149 proved to be the highest
yielding minimelons in this trial. SR 8102WM, although producing acceptable yields, must be disqualified because
many fruit were found to contain seeds and the rind was extremely brittle.

Soluble solids varied from 11.4% for ZG 8905 to 14.4% for 'Petite Perfection'. Accordingly, soluble solids in all
entries far exceeded the 10% specified for optional use in the U.S. Standards for Grades of Watermelons to describe
very good internal quality. Hollowheart did not vary among the entries although minor all separations were noted in
'Bambino', RWT 8149, SR 8102WM, SR 8103WM, and ZG 8905.

If 3-9 lb. is considered to be an acceptable weight for minimelons, then a very high proportion of RWT 8149 (98%),
'Vanessa' (98%), 'Petite Perfection' (97%), 'Extazy' (92%) fruit were in the acceptable minimelon weight range. A high
proportion, 20% or more of SR 8102WM, ZG 8905, SR 8103 WM, and 'Bambino' fruit did not fall in the 3-9 lb. range.
If 3-7 lb. minimelons are desired, RWT 8149 (75%), ZG 8905 (75%), 'Vanessa' (80%), and 'Petite Perfection' (81%)
produced a high proportion of fruit in this weight class.

Triploid minimelons are an exciting new class of watermelons that are of special interest to one to two person
households, households with children, and occasional watermelon consumers. It is likely that they will become a
permanent segment of the watermelon market, but its size is difficult to estimate at this time.

This report in its entirety is available from the author as a GCREC Research Report. It is also available on the
GCREC website (http://gcrec.ifas.ufl.edu).


Table 1. Miniwatermelon entries, fruit descriptions, and seed sources. Gulf Coast Research &
Education Center, Bradenton. Spring 2003.

Entry Description Source

Bambino Round/oval. (7.5 x 7.7 inches). Medum-green rind. Rind-0.7 inches thick. Seminis
Flesh color-4.1.1

Exty Oval. (7.4 x 7.8 inches). Indistinct, hazy, wide, dark-green stripe on light- Hazera
tazy green background. Rind-0.7 inches thick. Flesh color-4.4.

Petite Oval/round. (7.1 x 7.3 inches). Distinct, narrow medium-green stripe on Syngenta
Perfection light-green background. Rind-0.3 inches thick. Flesh color-3.5.

RWT 8149 Round/oval. (6.8 x 7.0 inches). Fine, very dark-green lines on a dark-green Syngenta
background. Rind-0.3 inches thick. Flesh color-4.0.


SR 8101WVM Round/oval. (7.5 x 7.7 inches). Distinct, narrow, dark-green stripes on Sunseeds
medium-green background. Rind-0.7 inches thick. Flesh color-4.0.

Round/oval. (7.4 x 7.6 inches) Distinct, narrow, dark-green stripe on
SR 8102WM medium-green background. Rind-0.5 inches, very brittle. Many fruit were Sunseeds
seeded. Flesh color-3.9.

SR 8103WM Round. (7.6 x 7.5 inches). Narrow, distinct, dark-green stripe on light-green Sunseeds
background. Rind-0.6 inches thick. Flesh color-3.6.

\/man Round. (6.8 x 7.0 inches). Dark-green rind. Rind-0.5 inches thick. Flesh Rmpprl


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-_- ---. COlor-3.). -----

ZG 8905 Oval. (6.4 x 7.2 inches). Narrow, medium-green stripe on light-green Zeraim Gedera
background. Rind-0.4 inches thick. Flesh color-3.5.

1Flesh color: 1 = light pink, 5 = deep red.


(Maynard Vegetarian 03-08)


CONTAINER GARDENING SUCCESS REQUIRES THE RIGHT POTTING MEDIUM

The production of vegetables and culinary herbs in containers is on the increase. Though proper fertilization, watering,
pest control and other practices are important, the choice of a potting medium is the most basic and important
consideration.

A good potting medium has the ability to retain nutrients and moisture for extended periods of time yet is porous
enough to allow sufficient air to reach the root system. There are many "recipes" for making one's own potting
mixture. Almost any gardening book, garden center, nursery or Extension office can provide one. Most urban
gardeners however, find it impractical to make their own and prefer to purchase bulk or prepackaged potting mixtures.

Most potting mixtures available to urban gardeners are offered prepackaged in various sized containers ranging in
volume from one quart to four cubic feet or more. The quality of commercial potting media products varies from poor
to excellent, depending upon the ingredients used and the ratio of coarse to fine particles.

How to Choose a Good Potting Medium

First, gardeners should resist the urge to use soil or "yard dirt" as a container medium or adding it to increase
the volume of a commercial potting mixture. This is a common practice and often defeats the purpose of using
an artificial medium by introducing plant damaging pathogens and adding excessive density and weight to the
medium. Even a soil that produces high quality vegetables in the garden will not perform the same when
placed in a container.
Quality potting mixtures have the right balance of coarse, medium and fine textured particles. Some of the
basic ingredients currently used include perlite, vermiculite and pine bark as coarse components plus one or
more fine textured ingredients to enhance the nutrient and moisture holding ability.
Don't purchase a heavy, fine textured product that has the look and feel of "dirt". Such a potting medium
becomes compacted, difficult to wet when dry and retains too much moisture once saturated.
Determine if the potting medium includes other amendments. Has the pH been adjusted to an optimum range
for vegetable production? Some of the high quality products are amended with dolomitic limestone when
required, to raise the pH and to ensure that calcium and magnesium levels are adequate.

Some prepackaged potting mixes include "starter" fertilizer. Others might also contain controlled or slow release
products that provide nutrients for weeks or months. Have micro-nutrients or minor elements been added? Knowing
what amendments have been included by the manufacturer allows the gardener to adjust fertilization practices during
the growing season.

Too often gardeners try their hand at container gardening and fail, blaming themselves for a lack of horticultural
expertise. In many cases the failure is the result of using the wrong potting mixture. Though there are some excellent
products on the market, there are some that are downright sorry. Success depends upon choosing the right one.

(Dan Mullins, ext. agt. IV, Santa Rosa County -Vegetarian 03-08)


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SWEET CORN PRODUCTION IN FLORIDA

Florida continues as the nationwide leader in the production of fresh market sweet corn followed by California.
Growers in Florida planted 41,000 acres and harvested 38,900 acres in 2001-02. The total production was 12.7 million
42-pound crates valued at $100.3 million. The value per crate averaged $7.85. Growers received prices of $10.61 per
crate during August to December and $7.62 during January to July. The average state yield was 329 crates per acre.
The Everglades region continues to lead production with about 60 percent, followed by the Southeast and Southwest
regions with 25 percent.

Popular yellow sweet corn varieties include: ACX844 Abbott & Cobb; GSS-0966VP Syngenta; Flagship II Seedway,
and Summer Sweet 8100R Abbott A& Cobb. Bicolor varieties used include: BSS-0977VP Syngenta; ACX538 Abbott
& Cobb; Summer Sweet 8102 Abbott & Cobb; and Big Time VP Syngenta. White varieties are not planted in large
acres but include: Summer Sweet 8101R Abbott & Cobb: Boreal VP Syngenta; WWS-1921 Syngenta; and White
Saturn Seedway.

A spring sweet corn variety trials were conducted in Central Florida in 2002 for white and 2003 for yellow varieties of
Sh2 types. Plots were three rows wide, 25 feet long and replicated four times in a randomized complete block. Seeds
were planted in early March eight inches apart within the 42 inch rows. A limited number of varieties were evaluated.
Results of the yellow varieties are in Table 1 and the white varieties in Table 2. Yields are lower than the state
average due to variables in water control on the Wabasso sand during both years.

The ear tip fill (data not shown) for AC7311 was 3.8 on a scale of 1 to 5 where anything below 3.5 is not acceptable.
AC7311 also had an ear diameter of 5.2 cm, which is on the large size. AC7311 might be better adapted for fall
production in Central Florida. Boreal's production was lower than expected and was probably due to having two plots
in a section of the field where moisture levels were too high. Evaluation data from one season in one location is
valuable, but needs more testing before good recommendations can be made.


Table 1. Yellow Sh2 sweet corn variety trial results, Apopka, FL. 2002.

Variety Source Days to 42- Ib Ear (cm)
Harvest Crates/A
Diameter Length

8111R Abbott & Cobb 75 297az 4.9ab 19.3a

8101R Abbott & Cobb 76 285ab 4.8b 18.3cd

Tahoe Rogers 74 273ab 4.7b 18.7b

Vail Rogers 75 262ab 4.7b 18.1de

7111 Abbott & Cobb 69 231ab 5.0a 17.9e

7311 Abbott & Cobb 68 225ab 5.2a 18.6b

Boreal Rogers 76 218b 4.7b 18.5bc

zMeans separation in columns by Duncan's Multiple Range Test, 5% level.

Table 2. White Sh2 sweet corn variety trial results, Apopka, FL. 2003


Variety Source Days to 42-lb Ear (cm)
etyHarvest Crates/A Diameter Length


Cronus Siegers 70 288az 4.9a 17.8b


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Prime Plus Siegers 74 221a

Winstar Siegers 75 240a

SS8100R Abbott & Cobb 78 210a

zMeans separation in columns by Duncan's Multiple Range Test, 5% level.


(White Vegetarian 03-08)




Extension Vegetable Crops Specialists


Daniel J. Cantliffe
Professor and Chairman
John Duval
Assistant Professor, strawberry
Chad Hutchinson
Assistant Professor, vegetable
production
Elizabeth M. Lamb
Assistant Ptofessot. piocduction
Yuncong Li
Assistant Ptofessot. soils
Donald N. Maynard (lelited)
Ptofessot. varieties
Stephen M. Olson
Ptofessot. small fans


Mark A. Ritenour
Assistant Ptofessot. posthatvest
Steven A. Sargent
Professor, postharvest
Eric Simonne
Assistant Professor, vegetable nutrition
William M. Stall
Ptofessot and EDITOR. weed control
James M. Stephens (telitedc
Ptofessot. vegetable gardening
Charles S. Vavrina
Ptofessot. Itansplants
James M. White
Associate Ptofessot. organic fanning


Related Links:
University of Florida
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Horticultural Sciences Department
Florida Cooperative Extension Service
North Florida Research and Education Center Suwannee Valley
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center Dover
UF/IFAS Postharvest


* q0 % 00 .60 w ILO'


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4.6b

4.9a


19.3a

19.0a

19.5a


4.7ab


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