Title: Vegetarian
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 Material Information
Title: Vegetarian
Series Title: Vegetarian
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Creator: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Horticultural Sciences Department
Publication Date: November 2000
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Bibliographic ID: UF00087399
Volume ID: VID00433
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Vegetarian Newsletter

A Vegetable Crops Extension Publication
University of Florida
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Cooperative Extension Service
Vegetarian 00-11
November 2000

"Index Page


- Adobe Acrobat

VEGETABLE CROPS CALENDAR

COMMERCIAL VEGETABLES

GCREC Tomato Variety Evaluation, Spring 2000

GCREC Diploid Watermelon Variety Evaluation, Spring 2000

GCREC Triploid Watermelon Cultigen Evaluation, Spring 2000

Effect of Blue Mulch on Melon Production

Evaluation of Cultivars for Pumpkin Production in North Florida

VEGETABLE GARDENING

NO ARTICLE THIS MONTH

List of Extension Vegetable Crops Specialists

(Note: Anyone is free to use the information in this newsletter. Whenever possible, please give credit to the authors. The purpose of trade names in
this publication is solely for the purpose of providing information and does not necessarily constitute a recommendation of the product.)




......... .................... ... .. .j


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13th Annual Suwannee Valley Growers Shortcourse and Tradeshow Saturday, Dec. 9, 2000 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, Suwannee
County Agricultural Coliseum, Live Oak. Shortcourse will feature presentations on internet marketing, marketing issues, protected
agriculture, hydroponics, biological control, biotechnology, variety trials, seed industry updates, forestry, and fruit crops management.
The tradeshow offers booths from agricultural industry suppliers. An open house of the North Florida Research and Education Center -
Suwannee Valley will follow the conference. For more information, call NFREC-SV at 904-362-1725.
Gadsden Tomato Forum December 7, Registration: 8:00 AM til 9:00 AM, Quincy Golf Club, Soloman Dairy Road, Quincy, FL. 2.5
CEU's approved for Certified Crop Advisers. Sponsored lunch. For more information, contact the Gadsden County Extension Office,
850-875-7255.









GCREC Tomato Variety Evaluation, Spring 2000


In 1998-99, 43,400 acres of tomatoes were harvested in Florida, yielding 61.3 million 25-pound cartons worth over $460 million. Tomatoes
accounted for almost 30% of the total value for all vegetables grown during 1998-99, making it the most important vegetable produced in
the state. The Palmetto-Ruskin area (west-central Florida) accounted for over 36% of the state's total fresh market tomato production in
1998-99.

A tomato variety trial was conducted in spring 2000 at the Gulf Coast Research & Education Center-Bradenton located in west-central
Florida to evaluate fresh market tomato varieties and breeding lines. Eighteen large-fruited and five plum/saladette entries were evaluated
in a replicated yield trial.

Seeds were sown on 11 January into planter flats (1.5 x 1.5 x 2.5-inch cells) containing a commercial mix of vermiculite, Canadian
sphagnum peat and poly beads and then covered with a layer of coarse vermiculite and germinated in a greenhouse. Plants were
conditioned before transplanting by limiting water and nutrients in the final phase of production.

The EauGallie fine sand was prepared in early February. Beds were formed and fumigated with methyl bromide: chloropicrin, 67:33 at 2.3
Ib/100 Ibf. Banded fertilizer was applied in shallow grooves on the bed shoulders after the beds were pressed and before the black
polyethylene mulch was applied. The total fertilizer applied was equivalent to 203-0-283 Ib N-P205-K20/A. The final beds were 32 in. wide
and 8 in. high, and were spaced on 5 ft centers with six beds between seepage irrigation/drainage ditches which were on 41 ft centers.

Transplants were set in the field on 2 March and spaced 24 in. apart in single rows down the center of each bed. Transplants were
immediately drenched with water containing 16 fl. oz./acre of imidacloprid for silverleaf whitefly control. Four replications of 10 plants per
entry were arranged in a randomized complete block design. Plants were lightly pruned, staked and tied.

Plants were scouted for pests throughout the season. Lepidopterous larvae, leafminers and silverleafwhitefly were the primary insects
found. Bacillus thuringiensis, insecticidal soap, spinosad, buprofezin, endosulfan, tebufenozide, and permethrin were used according to
label instructions to manage insect pest populations during the season. A preventative spray program using maneb, mancozeb, and
chlorothalonil was followed for management of plant pathogens. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus affected plants were removed and disposed
of early in the season, but were allowed to remain after the second tie.

Fruit were harvested at or beyond the mature-green stage on 10 and 22 May and 2 June. Tomatoes were graded as cull or marketable by
U.S. standards for grades and marketable fruit were sized by machine. Both cull and marketable fruit were counted and weighed.

Fresh Market Early Harvest Yields: Early yields ranged from 781 25-lb cartons/acre for RFT 6153 to 1974 cartons/acre for HA-3017 (Table
1). Two other entries, 'Agriset 761' and Fla. 7885 had yields similar to HA-3017. Extra large fruit yield varied from 721 cartons/acre for RFT
6153 to 1598 cartons/acre for 'Agriset 761'. Five other entries; HA-3017, Fla. 7885, ASX 9100, 'Florida 47', and PS 150535 had early extra
large fruit yields similar to those of 'Agriset 761'. Large fruit yields varied from 50 cartons/acre for RFT 6153 to 376 cartons/acre for
HA-3017. Average fruit weight for the early harvests ranged from 6.4 oz for NC 96365 and 'Sun Chaser' to 8.2 oz for PS 150535. Plant
stand was significantly lower for HA-3017 and 'Sun Chaser' than the other entries. Cull fruit by weight for the early harvests varied from 8%


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for 'Solimar' to 23% for Fla. 7922 and 'Sanibel'. The principal defects were blossom-end rot, large blossom scars, persistent green
shoulders and rough shoulders.

Seasonal yields from three harvests ranged from1968 cartons/acre for RFT 6153 to 3247 cartons/acre for Fla. 7885 (Table 2). Seven other
entries had yields similar to those of Fla. 7885. All entries produced yields greater than the state average yield for spring 1998-99 of 1591
cartons/acre.

Yields of extra large fruit varied from 1392 cartons/acre for NC 96365 to 2611 cartons/acre for PS 150535. Ten other entries had extra large
fruit yields similar to those of PS 150535. Large fruit yields ranged from 230 cartons/acre for 'Sunbeam' to 726 cartons/acre for NC 96365.
Cull fruit for the entire season varied from 11% for PS 150535 to 25% for 'Sanibel' and 'Solar Set'. Blossom-end rot and persistent green
shoulder affected fruit were the principal defects. Average fruit weight was from 5.8 oz for NC 96365 to 7.8 oz for 'Agriset 761', PS 150535,
and 'Florida 91'. The incidence of tomato yellow leaf curl virus infection was low and varied from none for HA-3017, 'Agriset 761', and PS
150535 to 13% for RFT 6153, but there was no significant difference among the entries.

Overall, total marketable yields surpassed those obtained at this location in recent spring seasons. In spring 2000, yields ranged from over
1900 cartons/acre to more than 3200 cartons/acre.

The proportion of extra-large fruit was very high, e.g. about 88% of the PS 150535 and Florida 91 fruit were in this size category.
Exceptional experimental hybrid performers in spring 2000 were Fla. 7885, HA-3017 and PS 150535. Fla. 7885 and HA-3017 were also
stellar producers in the fall 1999 trials.


Table 1. Seed source, early marketable yields, average marketable fruit weight, cull percentages, and plant
stands for fresh market tomato entries in the first and second harvest, 10 May 2000 and 22 May 2000. Spring
2000.


Early Harvest

Total X-Large Large Medium
Entry Source edu
-----------------(cartons/A)----------


I I I IIII


1517 ab


1598 a


1419 a-c

1343 a-d

1377a-c

1414 a-c

1044 c-e

1156 b-e


828 e

839 e


376 a 81 a


194 b-e 17 c-e

221 b-d 44 bc

147 c-f 16 c-e

IO5 d-f I3 de

64f S

208 b-e 29 c-e

59 f 3e

307 ab 73 a

291 ab 65 ab


Culls
(%)2


15 a-c


13 a-c

13 a-c

16 a-c

13 a-c

9 bc

15 a-c

17 a-c

14 a-c

18 a-c


Avg
Fruit Wt
(oz)


7.1 c-f


8.1 a

7.1 c-f

7.3 a-e

8.0 a-c

8.2 a

7.5 a-d

8.0 a-c

6.4 f

6.4 f


Plant
Stand
(%)


93 b


100 a

100 a

100 a

100 a

98 ab

100 a

100 a

100 a

93 b


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HA-3017


Agriset 761

Fla 7885

ASX 9100

Florida 47


PS 150535

Fla 7816

Florida 91

NC 96365

Sun Chaser


Hazera


Agrisales

GCREC


Agrisales

Asgrow

Petoseed

GCREC

Asgrow

NCAES

Petoseed


1974 a3

1809 ab

1685 a-c

1507 b-d

1495 b-d

1482 b-d

1280 c-e

1218 d-f

1208 d-f

1195 d-f


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Solimar Asgrow 1193 d-f 1089 c-e 93 ef 11 de

Fla 7922 GCREC 1170 d-f 871 e 261 bc 37 cd

Solar Set Asgrow 1163 d-f 927 de 198 b-e 38 cd

Sanibel Petoseed 1141 d-f 1039 c-e 94 ef 8 de

PS 23497 Petoseed 1066 d-f 875 e 155 c-f 36 cd

Sunbeam Asgrow 993 ef 929 de 58f 6e

Sunguard Asgrow 934 ef 766 e 142 c-f 25 c-e

RFT 6153 Agrisales 781 f 721 e 50 f 10de


1 Carton = 25 Ibs. Acre = 8712 Ibf. Grading belt hole sizes: X-Large = no belt,
2.75"; medium=2.5"; and Cull=2.25".
2 By weight.
3 Mean separation in columns by Duncan's multiple range test, 5% level.


Table 2. Total marketable yields, average marketable fruit
tomato entries in spring 2000. (Harvest Dates: 10 and 22 l


Entry



Fla 7885


HA-3017

Agriset 761

PS 150535

Solimar

Fla 7816

ASX 9110

Florida 47


Total Harvest


Total X-Large Large

------------------(cartons/A)----------


3247 a4

3185 ab

3072 a-c

2941 a-d

2883 a-e

2775 a-e

2752 a-e

2635 a-f


2487 ab


2336 a-c

2580 a

2611 a

2323 a-c

2120 a-e

2216 a-d

2248 a-d


620 a-c


655 ab

421 b-f

286 ef

466 b-f

536 a-d

433 b-f

322 d-f


8c

23 a

20 a-c

23 a

16 a-c

15 a-c

19 a-c

21 ab


7.5 a-d

6.5 ef

6.8 d-f

7.8 a-c

7.2 b-f

8.1 ab

7.4 a-e

8.0 a-c


100 a

100 a

100 a

100 a

98 ab

100 a

100 a

98 ab


greater than 2.75"; Large =


weight, and cull percentages for fresh market
Aay, 2 June, 2000).




Medium Av
Culls g TYLCV3
(%)2 Fruit Wt
(oz)


139 b-e 15ab 6.8a-d 5 a


195 b 18 ab 6.6 b-d Oa

71 ef 17 ab 7.8a a

44 f 11 b 7.8a a

94 d-f 16ab 7.1a-c 3a

119 b-f 21 ab 6.8 a-d 3a

104 c-f 18 ab 6.8 a-d 10 a

66 ef 16ab 7.4 ab 10 a


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Sunbeam

Florida 91


PS 23497


Sanibel


NC 96365

Solar Set

Fla 7922


Sunguard

Sun Chaser


RFT 6153


2581 b-f

2571 b-f

2501 c-f

2497 c-f

2410 c-f

2352 d-f

2296 d-f

2262 d-f

2241 ef

1968 f


2297 a-d

2278 a-d


1697 c-f

2040 a-f

1392 f

1801 b-f

1476 ef

1623 c-f

1409 f

1594 d-f


230 f

251 ef

619 a-c

378 c-f

726 a

467 b-f

654 ab

497 a-e

628 ab

308 d-f


1 Carton = 25 Ibs. Acre = 8712 Ibf. Grading belt hole sizes
2.75"; medium=2.5"; and Cull=2.25".
2 By weight.
3 Tomato yellow leaf curl virus.
4 Mean separation in columns by Duncan's multiple range


54 ef 18 ab 7.3ab 5a

42 f 18 ab 7.8a 3a

185 bc 22a 6.1cd 10a

80d-f 25 a 7.4 ab 3 a

292 a 16 ab 5.8 d 8a

83d-f 25 a 6.6 b-d 3 a

166 b-d 22a 5.9 d 8a

142 b-e 18ab 6.5 b-d 3a

204 b 20 ab 6.1cd 10a

65 ef 23 a 7.3 ab 13 a


:X-Large = no belt, greater than 2.75"; Large =



test, 5% level.


(Maynard, Vegetarian 00-11)


GCREC Diploid Watermelon Variety Evaluation, Spring 2000


Diploid (seeded) watermelons generally weigh from 18 to 35 Ib and represent most of the commercial crop grown in Florida. Icebox
watermelons weigh 6 to 12 Ib each and are grown on a very small acreage. Triploid (seedless) watermelons, usually weighing 12 to 18 Ib,
are grown in Florida on an increasing scale. Florida produced 10.5 million cwt of watermelons of all types from 35,000 harvested acres in
1998-99 which provided an average yield of 300 cwt/acre. The average price was $6.90/cwt resulting in a crop value of over $72 million
which accounted for 4.6% of the gross value of the state's vegetable crops.

'Allsweet' and blocky 'Crimson Sweet' types are the most commonly grown diploid watermelons in Florida. Hybrids have replaced
open-pollinated varieties in most production areas.

The purpose of this trial was to evaluate some of the recently introduced commercial varieties and experimental lines of the blocky
'Crimson Sweet' and 'Allsweet' types.

The EauGallie fine sand was prepared in early February when beds were formed and fumigated with methyl bromide: chloropicrin. Banded
fertilizer was applied in shallow grooves on the bed shoulders after the beds were pressed and before application of the black polyethylene
mulch. The total fertilizer applied was equivalent to 148-40-206 Ib N-P205-K20/acre. The final beds were 32-in. wide and 8-in. high and were
spaced on 9-ft centers, with four beds between seepage irrigation/drainage ditches which were on 41-ft centers. The diploid watermelons
were planted in rows adjacent to the ditches and also served as pollenizers for triploid watermelons that were being evaluated in the two
center beds of each land.


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Watermelon seeds were planted on 22 February in holes punched in the polyethylene mulch at 3-ft in-row spacing. Seedlings were thinned
at the two true-leaf stage to one per hole. Thirty-four entries were included in the trial. The 30-ft long plots had ten plants each and were
replicated four times in a randomized complete-block design. Weed control in row middles was accomplished by cultivation and application
of paraquat. Plant stands recorded just before vines grew together showed no significant difference among plots. Pesticides were applied
as needed for control of silverleaf whitefly endosulfann and imidacloprid), gummy stem blight (chlorothalonil and azoxystrobin), and
lepidopterous larvae (Bacillus thuringiensis, spinosad and methomyl).

Watermelons were harvested on 15-25 May and 30 May -15 June. Marketable fruit (U.S. No. 1 or better) according to U.S. Standards for
Grades of Watermelons were separated from culls and counted and weighed individually. Fruit 12 Ibs and larger were assumed to be
marketable. Soluble solids (a measure of sweetness) determinations were made with a digital, hand-held refractometer on six fruit of each
entry at each harvest, polar and equatorial dimensions were obtained and the incidence of hollowheart was recorded for these fruits. Cell
separations, however slight, were noted as hollowheart, even though the fruit may be commercially acceptable.

Early yields, based on the first of two harvests, ranged from 0 for 'Royal Sweet' to 341 cwt/acre for 'Celebration' ( Table 1). Nineteen other
entries had early yields similar to those of 'Celebration'. Average fruit weight ranged from 18.9 Ibs. for 'Royal Star' to 33.6 Ibs. for WX-22.

Total yields varied from 557 cwt/acre for SWD 8307 to 958 cwt/acre for XWD 7201. Only seven other entries had yields similar to those of
XWD 7201. Average fruit weight over the entire season ranged from 19.6 Ibs. for 'Fiesta' to 27.0 Ibs for WX-22. 'Royal Star' and WX-15
average fruit weight was 26.4 lb. and a number of other entries had substantial average fruit weights. Fruit per plant varied from 1.5 for
'Summer Gold' to 2.4 for XWD 7302 and RWM 8102. Soluble solids concentrations ranged from 12.1% for 'Summer Gold' to 14.2% for
'Sentinel'. Seasonal average soluble solids for all entries exceeded the 10% specified for optional use to designate very good internal
quality in the U.S. Standards for Grades of Watermelons (U.S. Dept. Agr., 1978). The incidence of hollowheart in those fruit sampled varied
from 19% in ACX 5451 and XIT-101 to 88% in 'Summer Gold'.

Diploid watermelon variety evaluations have been conducted at this location each spring season since 1991. The highest yields ranged
from 439 cwt/acre in 1996 to 1026 cwt/acre in 1993. In spring 2000, the highest yield was 958 cwt/acre which was considerably greater than
the 9-year average yield of 738 cwt/acre.

Based on this and previous trials, the following Allsweet and blocky Crimson Sweet type varieties are expected to perform well in Florida:
'Celebration', 'Fiesta', 'Mardi Gras', 'Pirata', 'Regency', 'Royal Flush', 'Royal Star', 'Royal Sweet', 'Sentinel', 'Starbrite', 'Stars-N-Stripes'
and Summer Flavor 800 and 900 series. Other varieties may perform equally well on some farms.

Readers needing additional information should request GCREC Research Report BRA 2000-5 from the author.


Table 1. Early and total yields average fruit weight, fruit per plant, percentage of cull fruit, soluble solids and the incidence and severity of hollowheart of
diploid watermelons. Gulf Coast Research and Education Center, Bradenton. Spring 2000.


Entry


Source


Early Harvest


Weight
(cwt/A)1


Avg fruit
wt (Ib)


XWD 7201 Sakata 151c-i4 24.8 bc


Big Stripe Willhite 10 hi 24.3 bc

XWD 7302 Sakata 149 c-i 22.9 b

RWM 8102 Novartis 264 a-d 21.9 bc


Total Harvest


Weight
(cwt/A)1


958 a


907 ab

877 a-c

846 a-d


Avg fruit Fruit
wt (Ib) per
plant


25.5 a-c 2.3 ab

25.9 ab 2.2 a-c

23.3 c-i 2.4 a

23.4 b-h 2.4 a


Cull
(%)3


7 bc


9 a-c

10 a-c

6 bc


Soluble
solids
(%)

12.7 b-g


12.4 d-g

13.0 b-g

12.8 b-g


Hollowheart



(%) (in.)2


44 ab 0.7a


50ab 0.7 a

29b 0.4a

38b 0.5 a
II


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WX-22


Southwestern
Seed


27 g-i


33.6 a


Sumer l Abbott & Cobb 333 ab 24.7 bc
Flavor 820


Royal Star Petoseed 15 g-i 18.9 c


ACX 5451 Abbott & Cobb 284 a-d 24.4 bc

WX-15 Willhite 167 c-h 25.0 bc


Delta Petoseed 296 a-c 22.4 bc


W5045 Sunseeds 204 a-f 21.4 bc

WX-8 Willhite 335 ab 22.3 bc

Pinata -
eed Willhite 146 c-i 22.6 bc
large seed


Royal Petoseed NH5 NH



WX-30 Southwestern
WX-30 uthwestern 50 f-i 4 25.0 bc
Seed


RWM 8093 Novartis 223 a-e 21.2 bc


Legacy Willhite 77 e-i 23.4 bc

XWD 7303 Sakata 241 a-d 20.4 bc

Summer
Summer Abbott & Cobb 197 a-f 21.1 bc
Flavor 800


Piatasd Willhite 128 d-i 25.0 b
small seed


Sentinel Petoseed 206 a-f 23.0 bc


Sangria Novartis 193 a-f 19.4 bc


XIT 101 Sugar Creek 171 b-g 22.2 bc


Margarita Seed 289 a-d 21.8 bc


ACX 5411 Abbott & Cobb 262 a-d 20.1 bc


Celebration Novartis 341 a 20.5 bc


Mardi Gras Novartis 271 a-d 21.7 bc


Novartis


311 a-c


18.9 bc


828 a-e 27.0 a 1.9 a-d 8 a-c 12.7 b-g 60 ab 1.3 a



812 a-f 24.9 a-e 2.0 a-d 12 a-c 12.9 b-g 25 b 0.2 a


755 a-g 26.4 a 1.8 a-d 12 a-c 13.3 a-e 20 b 0.3 a


747 a-g 26.0 ab 1.8 a-d 9 a-c 13.0 b-g 19b 0.7 a


727 b-g 26.4 a 1.7 b-d 14 a-c 12.8 b-g 63 ab 1.1 a


724 b-g 22.9 c-i 2.0 a-d 14 a-c 13.8 ab 44 ab 1.0 a


720 b-g 23.8 b-g 2.0 a-d 15 a-c 13.2 a-f 38 b 0.6 a

720 b-g 23.6 b-g 1.9 a-d 4 c 13.4 a-d 69 ab 1.0 a


718 b-g 22.7 d-i 2.1 a-d 14 a-c 12.2 e-g 64 ab 1.0 a



717 b-g 25.0 a-d 1.8 a-d 8 a-c 13.4 a-d 38 b 0.7 a


704 b-g 24.6 a-f 1.8 a-d 12 a-c 12.4 d-g 60 ab 0.5 a


687 b-g 21.3 g-i 2.0 a-d 9a-c 12.4 d-g 44 ab 0.4 a


673 c-g 25.2 a-d 1.8 a-d 18 ab 12.7 b-g 58 ab 1.3 a


672 c-g 20.6 ij 2.0 a-d 13 a-c 13.7 a-c 50 ab 0.8 a


670 c-g 22.7 d-i 1.8 a-d 13 a-c 13.1 a-g 36 b 0.6 a



667 c-g 23.0 c-i 1.9 a-d 13 a-c 12.9 b-g 69 ab 1.2 a


666 c-g 22.9 d-i 1.8 a-d 12 a-c 14.2 a 38 b 0.7 a


658 c-g 20.8 h-j 2.0 a-d 14 a-c 13.4 a-d 38 b 0.3 a

657 c-g 21.2 g-j 2.0 a-d 19 a 12.9 b-g 19 b 04 a


650 c-g 22.7 d-i 1.8 a-d 9 a-c 12.8 b-g 56 ab 1.2 a


647 c-g 22.3 e-i 1.8 a-d 13 a-c 12.8 b-g 44 ab 0.2 a

637 d-g 21.6 g-i 2.0 a-d 15 a-c 12.3 d-g 44 ab 0.6a


636 d-g 22.3 e-i 1.8 a-d 15 a-c 13.2 a-f 44 ab 0.9 a


635 d-g 19.6j 2.1 a-d 12 a-c 12.7 c-g 38 b 0. a


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627 d-g 25.9 ab 1.5d


620 d-g 21.6 g-j 1.8 a-d

617 d-g 23.2 c-i 1.7cd

609 e-g 20.8 h-j 1.8 a-d

584 fg 22.2f-j 1.7cd

557 g 22.7 d-i 1.7 b-d


18 ab 12.1g


12a-c 13.0 b-g

14a-c 12.2fg

8 a-c 12.8 b-g

12a-c 13.2 a-g

15 a-c 12.3 d-g


88 a 0.8 a


38 b 0.3 a

63 ab 1.3 a

56 ab 0.6 a

50 ab 1.0 a

38 b 0.5 a


1 Acre=4840 Ibf.
2 Average flesh separation of those fruit sampled.
3 By weight.
4 Mean separation in column's by Duncan's multiple range test, 5% level.
5 No harvest.


(Maynard, Vegetarian 00-11)


GCREC Triploid Watermelon Cultigen Evaluation, Spring 2000


The concept of triploid (seedless) watermelons was described first in the U.S. literature by Kihara (1951) based on experimentation that
began in 1939 in Japan. Seed for planting seedless watermelons results from a cross between a tetraploid female parent, developed by
treating diploid lines with colchicine or by other means, and a diploid (normal) male parent. The resulting triploid plants are sterile and do not
produce viable seed. However, small, white rudimentary seeds develop which are eaten along with the flesh just as immature seeds are
eaten in cucumber.

Fruit enlargement in seeded fruit, including watermelon, is enhanced by growth-promoting hormones produced by the developing seed.
Growth hormones are lacking in seedless watermelons so those agents must be provided by pollen. Since flowers on triploid plants lack
sufficient viable pollen to induce normal fruit set, diploid seeded watermelons are interplanted with triploids to serve as pollenizers. An
adequate bee population is necessary to insure that sufficient transfer of pollen occurs. Seedless fruit (from triploid plants) tend to be
triangular shaped without sufficient pollination.

Although the procedure for production of seedless watermelons has been known for almost 50 years and commercial varieties have been
available for over 20 years, the interest in and acreage of seedless watermelons has remained small in Florida until recently. Erratic
performance, poor seed germination, high seed costs, and inadequate varieties resulted in the lack of interest in seedless watermelon
production in the past, but most of these deterents have now been overcome. It is estimated that seedless watermelon production now
represents about 30 to 35% of the total production in Florida.

The objective of this trial was to evaluate the performance of triploid watermelon cultigens under west-central Florida conditions.

Seeds of 50 triploid watermelon varieties or experimental lines were planted in a peat-lite growing mix in planter flats (1 1/4 x 1 1/4 x 2 1/4
in. cells) on 27 January. The watermelon transplants were grown by a commercial plant grower.

The EauGallie fine sand was prepared in early February when beds were formed and fumigated with methylbromide:chloropicrin. Banded
fertilizer was applied in shallow grooves on the bed shoulders after the beds were pressed and before the black polyethylene mulch was
applied. The total fertilizer applied was equivalent to 148-40-206 Ib N-P205-K20/A. The final beds were 32-in. wide and 8 in. high, and were
spaced on 9-ft centers with four beds between seepage irrigation/ drainage ditches which were on 41-ft centers.

The transplants were set in holes punched in the polyethylene at 3-ft in-row spacing on 29 February. The replicated plots were 27 ft long


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and had nine plants each and were repeated three times in a randomized, complete block design. Diploid watermelons that were being
evaluated were direct seeded in beds on each side of two triploid watermelon beds on 22 February to serve as diploid pollenizers. Plant
stands recorded just before vines grew together showed no significant differences among plots. Weed control in row middles was by
cultivation and applications of paraquat. Pesticides were applied as needed for control of silverleaf whitefly endosulfann and imidacloprid),
gummy stem blight (chlorothalonil and azoxystrobin), and lepidopterous larvae (Bacillus thuringiensis, spinosad, and methomyl).

Watermelons were harvested on 15-25 May and 30 May 15 June. Marketable (U.S. No. 1 or better) fruit according to U.S. Standards for
Grades of Watermelons were separated from culls and counted and weighed individually. Fruit 10 Ibs and larger were assumed to be
marketable. Tetraploid fruit, where they occurred, were not included in the marketable category because they are not seedless. At least six
fruit from each entry at each harvest were used to determine soluble solids (a measure of sweetness) with a digital, hand-held
refractometer, polar and equatorial dimensions, rind thickness, flesh color, and the incidence and severity of hollowheart were noted. Cell
separations, however slight, were noted as hollowheart, even though the fruit might be commercially acceptable.

Early yield, as represented by the first of two harvests, varied from 33 cwt/acre for Liliput (Hazera SW-1) to 219 cwt/acre for DPSX 4586
(Table 1). Other entries, except Liliput, had yields similar to those of DPSX 4586. Average fruit weights at the first harvest ranged from 9.9
Ibs for Hazera 6009 (a minimelon) to 21.5 Ibs for 'Tribute'.

Total yields ranged from 398 cwt/acre for 'Liliput' to 1056 cwt/acre for 'Sunday Special' (EMR-507). Only seven other entries produced
yields significantly similar to those of 'Sunday Special'. Average fruit weight for the entire season varied from 10.0 Ibs for 'Liliput' to 21.4 Ibs
for W5052. The number of fruit per plant ranged from 1.8 for 'Revolution' to 4.0 for 'Sunday Special'. Soluble solids concentrations varied
from 12.7% for RWM 8089 to 14.8% for EX 4590249. Accordingly, soluble solids in all entries far exceeded the 10% specified for optional
use in the U.S. Standards for Grades of Watermelons to describe very good internal quality. The incidence of hollowheart in the fruit
sampled ranged from 0 in 'Tri-X-Shadow' to 88% in W5052.

Seedless watermelon variety trials have been conducted at this location each spring season since 1988. The highest yields ranged from
507 cwt/A in 1996 to 1186 cwt/A in 1999. In spring 2000, 1056 cwt/acre was the highest yield which greatly exceeded the 821 cwt/A
average high yield during the entire period.

Based on results of this and previous trials, triploid hybrids, in alphabetical order, that should perform well in Florida include 'Constitution',
'Freedom', 'Genesis', 'King of Hearts', 'Millionaire', 'Revere', 'Summersweet 5244', 'Summersweet 5544', 'Tri-X-313' and 'Tri-X-Carousel',
'Tri-X-Palomar', and 'Tri-X-Shadow'. 'Triton', a yellow-flesh variety should be evaluated for that niche market. Other varieties may perform
well on individual farms.

Readers needing additional information should request GCREC Research report BRA 2000-4 from the author.


Table 1. Early and total yields, average fruit weight, fruit per plant, percentage of cull fruit, soluble solids and the incidence and severity of hollowheart of
triploid watermelons. Gulf Coast Research and Education Center, Bradenton. Spring 2000.

Early Harvest Total Harvest

Entry Source Av Fruit Soluble Hollowheart
Weight Avg Weight Avg Fruit Cull
Weight Fruit Wt Weight Avg Fruit per Cull Solids
(cwt/A) (b) (cwt/A) Wt (b) Plant (%)3 (%) (in.)2


Sunday
Special Hazera 182 ab4 16.3 b-i
(EMR-507)

XWT 8706 Sakata 117ab 17.8b-e


Sugar Time uga168ab 15.9 b-i


Sugar Shack SC 13 ab 15.6 b-i


1056 a 16.4 e-m 4.0 a 10 b-d 14.5 ab 25 cd 0.4 b-d


938 ab 20.0 a-c 2.9 b-f 8 cd 12.8 de 20 cd 0.2 b-d


915 a-c 17.2 d-k 3.9 ab 9 b-d 13.6 a-e 33 a-d 0.6 b-d


911 a-c 18.8 b-e 3.1 a-d 7d 13.6 a-e 50 a-d 0.8 b-d


Page 9








http://peaches/hochmuth/vegetarian.htm


Slice n' Serve
830


Colorado
Seeds


149 ab


15.2 c-i


DPSX 4572 d. palmer 127 ab 17.4 b-f


Hazera 103 Hazera 99 ab 17.3 b-g


WX55 Willhite 111ab 16.8b-h


Summer Abbott & 132 a 17.
Sweet 5244 Cobb


Disko I
(EsM-32) Hazera 192 ab 15.6 b-i
(EMR-32)


XWT 8707 Sakata 139 ab 16.5 b-h


Tri-X-Palomar Novartis 82 ab 15.7 b-i


Asgrow I
-9 -FL Asgrow 103 ab 14.2 e-j


Emerald Hazera 131 ab 16.9 b-h


HMX 8915


Harris
Moran


210 a


16.3 b-i


Millionaire arris 84 ab4 16.1 b-i
Moran


JudoR-41) Hazera 180 ab 13.6 g-j
(EMR-41)


Tri-X-Shadow Novartis 74 ab 15.5 c-i


DPSX 4573 d. palmer 144 ab 16.1 b-i


Tribute Petoseed 64 ab 21.5 a


Tri-X-Sunrise Novartis 154 ab 16.2 b-i


DPSX 4571 d. palmer 170 ab 16.2 b-i


SWT 8705 Sakata 144 ab 17.1 b-g

Harris ir
HMX 8914 Ha150 ab 15.5 c-i
Moran


Colorado
Premiere oSe 188ab 16.1 b-i
Seeds


Tri-X-313 Novartis 46 b 19.3 ab


906 a-c


836 a-d


818 a-e


808 a-f


794 b-g



790 b-g


787 b-g


783 b-g


781 b-g


768 b-h


768 b-h



750 b-h



740 b-h


739 b-h


724 b-h


719 b-h


712 b-h


709 b-h


698 b-i


696 b-i



686 b-j


684 b-j


16.7 e-l


20.4 ab


19.6 a-d


17.6 c-j


3.4 a-c


2.5 c-f


2.6 c-f


2.9 c-f


18.0 c-g 2.7 c-f


16.5 e-l


16.5 e-l


16.6 e-l


16.7 e-l


17.4 d-k


2.9 b-f


3.0 b-e


2.9 b-f


2.9 b-f


2.7 c-f


17.3 d-k 2.8 c-f


17.0 d-l



16.0 f-m


17.5 d-k


17.8 c-h


17.7 c-i


17.0 e-l


17.2 d-k


17.0 e-l


16.8 e-l



17.3 d-k


17.8 c-g


2.8 c-f



2.9 c-f


2.6 c-f


2.6 c-f


2.6 c-f


2.6 c-f


2.7 c-f


2.6 c-f


2.6 c-f



2.4 c-f


2.4 c-f


8 cd


8 cd


10 b-d


9 b-d


9 b-d


13.6 a-e


14.0 a-e


14.5 ab


14.0 a-e


14.1 a-e 50 a-d 1.1 b-d


10b-d 13.7 a-e


12 b-d 14.2 a-d


17b-d 13.9a-e


10b-d 13.9 a-e


9b-d 13.6a-e


17 b-d 14.1 a-e



13b-d 14.4ab



14 b-d 13.7 a-e


14 b-d 13.8 a-e


9b-d 14.1 a-d


18 b-d 13.7 a-e


8cd 13.6 a-e


10b-d 13.9 a-e


10 b-d 14.2 a-c


10 b-d 14.3 ab



9cd 13.9 a-e


11 b-d 13.9 a-e


Page 10


25 cd


17 cd


60 a-c


17 cd


0.8 b-d


0.3 b-d


1.2 b-d


0.6 b-d


58 a-c


40 a-d


25 cd


42 a-d


33 a-d


42 a-d



50 a-d



58 a-c


Od


20 cd


20 cd


58 a-c


25 cd


42 a-d


42 a-d



33 a-d


38 a-d


1.2 b-d


0.4 b-d


0.5 b-d


1.1 b-d


0.9 b-d


1.3 b-d



0.7 b-d



0.7 b-d


0.0 d


0.1 cd


1.0 b-d


0.8 b-d


0.6 b-d


1.0 b-d


0.6 b-d



0.6 b-d


0.7 b-d


I I I








http://peaches/hochmuth/vegetarian.htm


Tri-X-Carousel


Novartis


95 ab


17.8 b-e


XWT 7703 Sakata 104 ab 15.9 b-i


EX 4590249 Asgrow 98 ab 15.2 c-i


Freedom Sunseeds 178 ab 17.4b-f


Fandango Shamrock 144 ab4 15.4 c-i


Trident Petoseed 136 ab 14.4 d-i


Genesis Shamrock 131 ab 15.1 c-i


Harris [ iF
Millennium Mora 217a 13.9f-j


W5052 Sunseeds 66 ab 18.4 a-c


Boston Sunseeds 106 ab 14.5 d-i


Colorado [ 1 F
SSX 4850 Sd 176 ab 14.7 c-i
Seeds


Constitution Sunseeds 187 ab 14.7 d-i


Summer Abbott & 80 ab b
Sweet 5544 Cobb


RWM 8096 Novartis 120 ab 18.0b-d


DPSX 4586 d. palmer 219a 13.8 f-j


Colorado ir
SSX 835 Colorado 106 ab 14.7 d-i
Seeds


Hazera 6009 Hazera 137 ab 9.9 k


Gem Dandy Willhite 140 ab 14.9 c-i


SCS-91E3 Sugar 99 ab 12.7 i-k
Creek


Revolution Sunseeds 129 ab4 17.4b-f


SWT 6703 Sakata 107 ab 14.6 d-i


RWM 8089


Novartis


103 ab


13.4 h-j


683 b-j


678 b-j


671 b-k


671 b-k


663 b-k


651 c-k


650 c-k


639 c-k


638 c-k


622 d-k


606 d-k


595 d-k


589 d-k


581 d-k


565 d-k


552 e-k


548 e-k


533 f-k


528 g-k


523 g-k


496 h-k


425 i-k


18.4 b-f


17.4 d-k


15.5 g-m


17.6 c-j


17.4 d-k


16.4 e-l


15.7 g-m


14.5 Im


21.4 a






15.5 g-m


16.0 f-m


16.7 e-l


16.7 e-l


14.8 k-m


15.1 h-m


10.6 n


16.7 e-l


14.5 Im


17.9 c-g


16.2 e-m


2.5 c-f


2.4 c-f


2.9 b-f


2.4 c-f


2.5 c-f


2.4 c-f


2.6 c-f


2.7 c-f


1.9 ef


2.5 c-f


2.4 c-f


2.3 c-f


2.2 d-f


2.1 d-f


2.3 c-f


2.3 c-f


3.3 a-c


2.0 ef


2.3 c-f


1.8 f


1.9 ef


13.8m 1.9ef


11 b-d


19 b-d


21 b-d


9 cd


11 b-d


9 b-d


16 b-d


22 a-d


18 b-d


13 b-d


23 a-c


14 b-d


19 b-d


11 b-d


21 a-d


11 b-d


20 b-d


11 b-d


16 b-d


16 b-d


17 b-d


36 a


14.3 ab


13.6 a-e


14.8 a

13. a-

13.4 a-e

14.0 a-

13.6 a-e


14.6 abe


13.8 a-e


14.4 ab




13.9 a-e


14.1 a-e




13.2 b-e


13.2 b-e

12.8 d


14.0 a-e


14.2 a-c


14.0 a-e


13.6 a-e


30 b-d


33 a-d


33 a-d


42 a-d


33 a-d


33 a-d


25 cd


40 a-d


88 a


50 a-d


33 a-d


83 ab


33 a-d


50 a-d


33 a-d


33 a-d


30 b-d


50 a-d


25 cd


67 a-c


42 a-d


0.8 b-d


1.2 b-d


0.9 b-d


0.6 b-d


0.9 b-d


0.3 b-d


0.5 b-d


1.2 b-d


2.9 a


0.9 b-d


0.7 b-d


1.8 ab


0.9 b-d


0.9 b-d


0.5 b-d


0.4 b-d


0.7 b-d


1.7 a-c


0.3 b-d


1.0 b-d


1.0 b-d


12.7 e 50a-d 0.7 b-d


Page 11







http://peaches/hochmuth/vegetarian.htm


Triton Petoseed 136 ab 16.0 b-i


417j


Liliput (SW-1) Hazera 33 b 11.Ojk 398


1 Acre=4840 Ibf.
2 Average flesh separation of all fruit sampled.
3 By weight.
4 Mean separation in columns by Duncan's multiple range test, 5% level.


(Maynard, Vegetarian 00-11)


jk 15.0 j-m 2.0 d-f 25ab 12.9 c-e 25cd 1.1 b-d

k 10.0 n 2.5 c-f 23 a- 13.5 a-e 30 b-d 0.5 b-d


Effect of Blue Mulch on Melon Production


There has been a lot of interest lately on use of different colored mulches for vegetable production. One example is use of red mulch for
tomato production. In Florida, researchers has not found any positive effects of using the red mulch but northeastern production areas of
the USA have found positive results. But even where positive results have been found they are not consistent from year to year. This may
be due to production or climate differences. There has been some evidence that using a blue mulch may be of benefit for melon production.
The results here are from a preliminary report of a first year trial using blue mulch for watermelon and cantaloupe production.

The study was conducted at the North Florida REC, Quincy during the spring of 2000. Total fertilizer applied was 195-60-195 Ibs/a of
N-P205-K20. As mulch was applied, 350 Ibs/a of methyl bromide/chloropicrin (67/33) was injected into the bed. Bed width was 36 inches
and irrigation was done with single drip line located 6 inches from center of bed. Watermelon cultivar used was 'Starbrite' and cantaloupe
cultivar was 'Athena'. In row spacing was 3 feet for watermelon and 2 feet for cantaloupe. Between row spacing was 8 feet to help separate
plots. Transplants was on March 28, 2000, a little later than desired due to late arrival of blue mulch (North American Films blue).
Harvesting started on June 2 for cantaloupes and ended on June 26 (8 harvests). Harvesting started on June 8 for watermelons and ended
on June 26 (4 harvests). Data collected included yield, average fruit weight and percent soluble solids.

With watermelons, early yields were higher but not significant (P < 0.10) on blue mulch compared to black mulch ( Table 1). Late yields on
the two mulches were almost identical. Total yields were higher with blue but not significant (P < 0.07). There were no effects of mulch on
fruit weight or percent soluble solids.

For cantaloupes, mulch color had no effect on any of the parameters measured (Table 2). However, yields on the blue mulch were again
higher.

As I mentioned, this is a single year trial and planting date was later than I would have liked it. Also, spring of 2000 was very dry and warm
at NFREC, Quincy. Results are encouraging enough to try again in spring of 2001.


Table 1. Effect of mulch color on yield, fruit weight and percent soluble solids of 'Starbrite' watermelon.
NFREC, Quincy. Spring, 2000.

Mulch Yield (cwt/a) Fruit weight (Ibs) SS


Early Latey Total Early Late Seasonal (%)

Black 207 249 456 20.3 19.1 19.6 12.4

Blue 298 246 544 20.1 19.1 19.6 12.2

Signif. NS(0.10) NS NS(0.07) NS NS NS NS


Page 12







http://peaches/hochmuth/vegetarian.htm


z Early consists of first 2 harvests.
Y Late consists of last 2 harvests.


(Olson, Vegetarian 00-11)


Evaluation of Cultivars for Pumpkin Production in North Florida


A project has been undertaken to identify pumpkin varieties that are suitable for production in North Florida. Two similar variety trials were
conducted at the North Florida Research and Education Center Suwannee Valley (NFREC-SV) in Live Oak, and the Hastings Research
and Extension Center (HREC) in Hastings. Both centers are located in regions of the state where research efforts on finding alternative
crops to supplement current crops are underway.

The NFREC has been involved recently in research to develop crop production systems to supplement the regions' declining tobacco
production. The Hastings REC has approximately 40,000 acres dedicated to horticultural crop production of which 23,000 were planted in
Irish potato last year. Both production areas are within a two-hour drive of the large population of the Jacksonville and Tampa/St. Pete
areas.

Pumpkins may be a good fit for both agricultural production areas for several reasons. First, the majority of pumpkins sold in Florida is
imported from Northern states. This increases product cost because of the added expense in trucking the pumpkins into state. Secondly,
time in transport decreases shelf life of the product once it arrives. Development of local production areas would reduce shipping costs and
allow local markets to obtain product that could have been harvested just hours earlier.

Selecting a desirable variety is the first marketing decision a pumpkin grower makes. Important attributes of pumpkin varieties are yield,
fruit size and color, size and color of the stem, and disease resistance/tolerance. The objective of this research was to evaluate new
pumpkin varieties for production in North Florida.

At NFREC-SV, pumpkins were grown with white-on-black plastic and drip irrigation. Pumpkins were direct seeded on July 28 (3 seeds per
hill, thinned to 1 plant per hill) at a within-row spacing of 3-feet onto 30-foot long plots. Center-to-center distance between beds was 7.5
feet, which created a plant population of approximately 2,000 plants/acre (22sq-ft/plant). Fertilization consisted of a preplant application of


Page 13


Table 2. Effect of mulch color on yield fruit weight and percent soluble solids of 'Athene' cantaloupes.
NFREC, Quincy. Spring, 2000.


Z Early consists of first 3 harvests.
Y Late consists of last 5 harvests.







http://peaches/hochmuth/vegetarian.htm


500 Ibs./acre of 13-4-13, and weekly injections of N and K through the drip tube to provide a total of 150 Ibs of N and K 20. Thiodan and
Bravo fungicides were sprayed on Aug. 4, 11, 18,25, Sept. 1, 8, 15 and 20, and Admire systemic insecticide was injected through the drip
tape on Aug. 7 and Sept. 1. Plots were harvested on Sept. 28.

At HREC, pumpkins were direct seeded on July 31, 2000 on raised beds without plastic mulch. Pumpkins were planted three seeds to hill
and thinned to two plants per hill at in-row spacing of 10 ft. Center to center distance between beds was 80 inches. Plant population was
approximately 1300 plants/acre. The crop was irrigated with seepage irrigation during the season. The pumpkin ground was not fumigated
prior to planting, but Vydate was applied preplant and after crop emergence for nematode control. Provado was applied after crop
emergence for whitefly control. Bravo was used on regular schedule during the season for fungal control. The crop was fertilized with 100
Ib/acre N (14-2-12) pre-plant and side-dressed three weeks after planting at a rate of 75 Ib/acre N. Pumpkins were harvested on October 19.

The pest control program used at NFREC-SV kept foliar diseases under control, and the incidence of virus was small. Pest control
programs for pumpkins are important as only a few commercial varieties ('Touch-of-Autumn', 'Howdee Doodee', and 'Gold Bullion') have
reported resistance to powdery mildew. At HREC, approximately six weeks after planting, developing vines were severely damaged by the
60-mph winds associated with a thunderstorm. This delayed fruit set and reduced yields. Despite weather conditions, days-to-harvest were
62 at NFREC-SV and 81 at HREC. Based on commercial literature, days-to-maturity of selected varieties ranged between 85 and 120 days.
Actual days to maturity are important to schedule pumpkin planting and harvest.

'Pik-A-Pie' (desktop group), 'EX-4622837', 'SVR-4623437', and 'Gold Standard' (small/medium jack-o-lantern group), 'Jack-Be-Quick'
(miniature), and 'Casper' (white, specialty) performed well at both locations. For each variety, retail value was estimated using $0.29/lb for
Small/Medium j-o-l and specialty, $0.49/lb for Desktop, and $0.69/fruit for miniature. These values were based on a price survey of stores
several stores from the Gainsville area. Estimated retail values (/acre) at NFREC-SV ranged between $5,038 ('PSR-93590-69' and $1,492
('baby Bear') for the desktop varieties, between $6,875 ('EX-4622837') and $394 ('EX-4643439') for the small/medium jack-o-lantern
varieties, and between $5,671 ('Casper') and $624 ('Valenciano') for the specialty varieties. The highest estimated retail value was $10,101
for Jack-be-Quick'.

Varieties differed not only in yield and skin color, but also in stem length and fruit shape ( Table 1 and Table 2). Stem length is an important
component of the pumpkin esthetic value: the longer the stem, the more desirable the pumpkin. Most varieties had stem length above 2
inches. Fruit shape (expressed as the height-to-diameter ratio) ranged between 0.57 for 'Jack-Be-Quick' to 1.36 for 'PSR-93590-39'. Fruits
with a 1.0 to 1.2 ratio appear 'tall', those with a ratio between 0.9 and 1.0 appear 'round', while those with a ratio between 0.8 and 0.5
appear 'flat'. No ratio is more desirable than another one. Yet, it is important to select varieties with different fruit shape in order to attract a
wider range of consumers.

In conclusion, several varieties performed well under the Fall conditions of North Florida. Because of the many fruit size, shape, and color,
pumpkin growers should consider planting several varieties. Production was lower at the HREC compared to the NFREC-SV. These
differences were due not only to severe early season wind damage at HREC, but also to differences in production system (bareground and
seepage irrigation at HREC, and plastic and drip irrigation at NFREC-SV). Data from this project will be used to demonstrate to growers in
North Florida the value that proper ground preparation, the use of mulch, and fertigation can bring to "alternative" crop production.


Table 1. Fruit Production and Shape and Stem Length of Selected Pumpkin Varieties at NFREC-SV.


Seed Total Stem Fruit Fruit Height:
Variety Source1 Mkt. Wt. Length2 Height Diam. Diameter
(Ib) (in) (in) (in) Ratio3

Desktop

PSR-93590-69 Petoseed 10,282 4.1 6 7 0.82

Baby Bear Rupp Seeds 3,046 2.8 4 5 0.78

Pik-A-Pie Rupp Seeds 9,661 2.1 6 6 0.98

Oz Harris Seeds 7,107 2.0 5 6 0.96


Page 14







http://peaches/hochmuth/vegetarian.htm


Peek-A-Boo


Rupp Seeds


6,260


Lil Ironsides Harris Seeds 8,627 1.6 4

Touch-Of-Autumn Rupp Seeds 8,588 1.6 5

C.R. 4 4,865


PSR-93590-44


inafll l.editumn Jack-o-Lantern


Petoseed


9,875


Gold Fever Rupp Seeds 19,122 3.9 9 9

Howdee Doodee Rupp Seeds 16,015 3.8 9 10

EX-4622827 Asgrow 20,506 3.1 10 11

PSR-93590-39 Petoseed 13,386 2.6 12

Merlin Harris Seeds 13,890 2.5 10 9

PSR-93590_59 Petoseed 4,384 2.5 7 6

SVR-4623437 Asgrow 16,878 2.5 12 11

EX-4622837 Asgrow 23,707 2.4 11 10

Mystic Harris Seeds 8,898 2.4 6

Phantom Petoseed 11,650 2.4 11 10

Gold Bullion Rupp Seeds 15,971 2.3 8 10

Gold Standard Rupp Seeds 16,970 2.3 8

PX-93590-19 Petoseed 23,067 2.3 12 10

Var. #510 A&C 9,598 2.1 11 10

XPH-1853 Asgrow 18,818 1.9 7 8

EX-4643439 (F1) Asgrow 1,358

C.R. 10,549


Miniature


Jack Be Quick


Rupp Seeds


3,725


1.3


Page 15


0.89

0.87

0.94


1.01

0.95

0.89

0.91

1.36

1.07

1.10

1.10

1.03

0.93

1.06

0.88

0.92

1.22

1.07

0.83


0.57
II







http://peaches/hochmuth/vegetarian.htm


Wee B Little

C.R.


Specialty


1 Seeds may be ordered from other sources.
2 Harvesters were instructed to cut as-long-as-possible a stem.
3 Fruits with a 1.0 to 1.2 ratio appear 'tall'; fruits with a 0.9 to 1.0 ratio appear 'blocky'; and, fruits with a
0.8 to 0.5 ratio appear 'flat'.
4 CR = Critical Range. Represents the smallest difference to be observed between two means to be
able to conclude with a 95% confidence that the difference between these two means is real, and not
due to plot size and sampling.


Page 16







http://peaches/hochmuth/vegetarian.htm


Kelly 1,032cd


1.7 c 4.1 bc


4.4 a-c


Small/Medium Jack-o-Lantern


EX-4622827 Asgrow 1,272 b-d 1.8ab

SVR-4623437 Asgrow 1,983b 1.5 bc

EX-4622837 Asgrow 3,154 a 2.1 ab

Mystic Harris Seeds 1,132 cd 2.2 a

Phantom Petoseed 1,246 b-d 1.7ab

Gold Standard Rupp Seeds 2,020 b 1.8 ab

Var. #510 A&C 552d 1.4 bc

XPH-1853 Asgrow 1,784 b 1.9ab

Jackpot Harris 709 d 0.9 c

Miniature

JackBe Quick Rupp Seeds 874 a 0.7 ns5

Wee B Little Johnny 42 b 0.5

Jack-Be-Little Johnny 843 a 0.9

Specialty


Jarrhadale (blue) Johnny 1,723 b 1.5 ns

Golden Delicious Rupp Seeds
Rupp Seeds 2,164 b 1.4
(red)

Valenciano (white) Johnny 341 d 0.8

Lumina (white) Rupp Seeds 885 cd 1.1

Casper (white) Rupp Seeds 3,520 a 1.0


Rupp Seeds


1,401 b-d


1.8


6.3 a-d 6.6 ab

7.4 ab 6.3 a-c

7.8 a 7.2 a

5.0 d 5.4 bc

5.9 b-d 5.8 a-c

5.4 cd 6.0 a-c

4.8 d 5.1 c

5.3 cd 6.2 a-c

6.8 a-c 7.0 a


1.7 b

2.5 a

1.9b


4.1 c


7.0 a


3.5 c

5.3 b

5.6 b

5.2 b


2.8 ns

2.3

4.5 a




5.6 ns


5.1


5.0

5.4

5.2

6.9


1Seeds may be ordered from other sources.
2Harvesters were instructed to cut a handle that was "as-long-as-possible".
3Fruit with a 1.0 to 1.2 ratio appear 'tall'; fruit with a 0.9 to 1.0 ratio appear 'blocky'; and fruit with a 0.8 to
0.5 ratio appear 'flat'.
4Comparisons of means within column and variety type using Waller-Duncan, p < 0.05. Means followed
by different letters are significantly different.


Page 17


Sugar Pie


0.94




0.95

1.17

1.08

0.94

1.02

0.91

0.95

0.85

0.96




0.61

1.11

0.65




0.72


1.37


0.71

0.97

1.08

0.74


Fairytale







http://peaches/hochmuth/vegetarian.htm


5No significant difference between treatment means.


(Simonne, Hutchinson, Tilton, B. Hochmuth, Vegetarian 00-11)



*1 1 -
Ii,. I .. ",.

: l ;


Extension Vegetable Crops Specialists


Daniel J. Cantliffe
Professor and Chairman, Horticultural Sciences Department
Timothy E. Crocker
Professor, deciduous fruits and nuts, strawberry
John Duval
Assistant Professor, strawberry
Chad Hutchinson
Assistant Professor, vegetable production
Elizabeth M. Lamb
Assistant Professor, production
Yuncong Li
Assistant Professor, soils
Donald N. Maynard
Professor, varieties

Stephen M. Olson
Professor, small farms


Mark A. Ritenour
Assistant Professor, postharvest
Ronald W. Rice
Assistant Professor, nutrition
Steven A. Sargent
Professor, postharvest
Eric Simonne
Assistant Professor and Editor, vegetable nutrition
William M. Stall
Professor, weed control
James M. Stephens
Professor, vegetable gardening
Charles S. Vavrina
Associate Professor, transplants
James M. White
Associate Professor, organic farming


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