Title: Vegetarian
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087399/00417
 Material Information
Title: Vegetarian
Series Title: Vegetarian
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: July 1958
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Bibliographic ID: UF00087399
Volume ID: VID00417
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
STATE OF FLORIDA
COLLaEG Or AGRICULTURr. AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
UNIVERSITY or FLORIDA. AND Vegetable Crop Specialists COUNT AGENT AND
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF HOME DEMONSTRATION WORK
AGRICULTURE. COOPERATING y G T A R I A N GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA



July 2, 1958



Gentlemen:

Several things of interest have occurred or will be coming up that are
worth reporting.

Short Course for Florida Seedsmen and Garden Supply Dealers. The
final program has been set and there are many interesting subjects that
will be covered. We invite all of you to attend and request that you
contact other people who would be interested.

The program begins Wednesday, July 9, 1958 at 1:00 P.M. in McCarty
Hall Auditorium, University of Florida, Gainesville, and will run through
Friday morning July Uth.

Subjects to be covered include plant breeding, new varieties, pest
control, storage and handling of seed, plant growers responsibilities,
merchandising garden supplies, how to prepare specimens for identification,
movies of interest, garden soil management, fertilizers, hydroponics, seed
laws, certification programs, foundation seed association purpose and other
related subjects. Each of these subjects will be presented by experts in
their field, so come and learn with us.

NEW PUBLICATIONS:
Two USDA Publications have just been revised and are available from
the Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C.

Suggested Guide for Chemical Control of Weeds
ARS 22-46

Insects & Diseases of Vegetables in the Home Garden
Home & Garden Bulletin No. 46

Now that the vegetable field days are over at the various branch
stations there are some interesting things to report.

POTATO FIELD LABORATORY, HASTINGS, FLORIDA Field day held April
8th with a very good crowd and plenty to hear and see. It was stated by
Dr. Eddins that the condition known as "Corky Ring Spot" of potato tubers
is now known to be caused by a virus. This means that control measures
can now be more easily worked out with the cause known.

Dr. Myhre discussed his work on cover crops following potatoes and
indicated several of our common weeds might be very good ones, particularly
crab grass and cockle burs. No final results or recommendations on this
work as yet.






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Dr. McCubbin discussed several aspects of cabbage and potato production.
The use of DNBP for weed control in potatoes looked very good, recommended
three pounds of DNBP per acre pre-emergence.

A report on Dr. Norris' work on insect control was given with particular
emphasis on research toward practical control of the very troublesome species
of wire worm found in the Hastings area. Progress is being made in this work
and a practical control will no doubt be found soon.

PLANTATION FIELD LABORATORY, FT. LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA The field day
was held on April 17th with several interesting things to report. First,
continued cold weather, heavy rains and hail had harassed research workers
most of the winter and spring but in spite of this all was not lost.

Dr. Ozaki had some very good fertility plots on peppers etc. It appeared
at the time that the more frequent and continuing side dressings of nitrogen
and potash would be the best treatments. No final results were available at
the time.

Dr. Boyd had some very interesting soy beans in his variety trials.

Dr. Moore had some results to report on the application of dry organic
matter to soil for aid in controlling damping off of beans. His work
indicated dry material was better than freshly turned green manure. The
recommendation was if green manures are grown, cut them and allow them to
dry on the surface before turning under and allow at least a month to six
weeks before planting.

INDIAN RIVER FIELD LABORATORY, FT. PIERCE, FLORIDA The field day
was held Wednesday, May 7th with good attendance. They also had suffered
from weather.

Mr. Hayslip discussed his rotation studies for tomatoes and has
devised a system which looks very promising for going from tomatoes into
Pangola grass and clover then to pasture with a minimum of time lost
and then going from Pangola to tomatoes or cucumbers with efficiency.

We also saw the new tomato variety "Indian River" which is resistant
to Gray Wall, a physiological condition, plus resistance to other diseases.
It appears to be adapted to ground culture as a mature green or staked, harvested
as a vine ripe. Limited seed should be available for winter and spring of 1959.

Dr. Stall reported on his work on disease control in tomatoes with only
slight changes recommended from practices used in the past. Any definite
changes will be reported at a later date.

EVERGLADES EXPERIMENT STATION, BELLE 6LADE, FLORIDA Tuesday, May
13th was the day here with many good reports and much to see in the field.

Mr. Wolfe showed us his celery breeding lines and the variety recently
named 'Emerald"' which looks very promising as a spring variety.






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Dr. Van Nostrand has an interesting experiment on the prediction of when
Helminthosporium blight of corn will occur by correlating temperatures,
rainfall and humidity with spore counts in the field. This should aid in
taking a lot of the guess work out of scheduling sprays for control of
this disease plus saving of money to the grower.

Dr. Burdine discussed his work on vegetable varieties and reported on
several white seeded sweet corn varieties which are worth trying plus
several yellow varieties which are promising. Look for more on these in
a later report.

Dr. Harris re-emphasized the necessity for extreme caution in the
handling of pesticides and the necessity for physical examinations for
workers who are in contact with organic phosphate insecticides.

Dr. Orsenigo discussed weed control and showed his plots at the
station whore he is screening many herbicides on several crops. Some
of the suggested chemicals for weed control are being published in an
Extension Circular soon.

Dr. Simons discussed his research on the use of border crops around
pepper fields to help in the control of virus diseases of peppers. His
research indicates that a 50 foot planting of a non-susceptible crop
around fields tends to trap or prevent the movement of insects from the
field edges into the pepper fields.

In our next Vegetarian we will discuss some of the highlights of
the work going on at the other stations including, the Main Station,
Gulf Coast Station, Central Florida Station Subtropical Station and North
Florida Station.

Sincerely,




Mason E. Marvel
Assistant Vegetable
Crop Specialist


MEM:bb




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