Title: Vegetarian
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087399/00410
 Material Information
Title: Vegetarian
Series Title: Vegetarian
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: March 1964
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087399
Volume ID: VID00410
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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STATE OF FLORIDA


COL EGE Or AGRICULTURE,
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, AND
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF
AGRICULTURE. COOPERATING


Vegetable Crop Specialists

VEGETARIAN


AGRICULTURAL EXTEN SON Srnv :E
COUNTY AGENT AND
HOME DEMONSTRATION WDRK
GAINESVILLE rLORIDA


March, 1964


TO: COUNTY AGENTS, ASSOCIATES AND ASSISTANTS

NO. 63


IN THIS ISSUE


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
a.
b.
c.


Seed Catalogs
Tomato and Potato Late Blight Forecasting
Asphaltic Mulches
Blotchy Ripening of Tomatoes
New Variety Releases
Celery Pinkrot and Lettuce Drop
Brief Notes from Here and There
Watermelon Diseases
Spacing in Sweet Corn
Students Needed in Agriculture


1. Seed Catalogs

At one of the Agents' Training Schools last fall, a few
agents requested that we supply you with a list of names and ad-
dresses of seed companies frma which they could obtain descriptive
and price catalogs. These catalogs are handy references and should
be made a regular part of the library of all agents working in
vegetable production.
The partial list of companies included below can supply you
with information on description of varieties, source of seed of regu-
lar crops and hard to find specialty crops, supplies, chemicals, etc.
We have listed eighteen companies and where possible, have indicated
the crops or items in which they specialize. Write these companies
for their descriptive catalogs preferably or their price catalogs if
the former is not available.


COMMERCIAL VEGETABLES


Abbott and Cobb
4744-46 Frankford Avenue
Frankford, Philadelphia 24, Pa.


Asgrow Seed Company
.Tew Haven 2, Connecticut


Ie






-2-


W. Atlee Burpee Company H. G. Hastings and Company
Box 6929 Atlanta, Georgia
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Southern Varieties)

D. V. Burrell Seed Growers Company Reuter's Seed Company
Rocky Ford, Colorado 320 North Carrollton Avenue
(Cantaloupes and Watermelons) New Orleans 19, Louisiana
(Southern Varieties)
Corneli Seed Company
St. Louis 2, Missouri Robson Quality Seeds, Inc.
Hall, New York
Willhite Melon Seed Farms
Poolville, Texas Seed Research Specialists, Inc.
(Watermelons) P. O. Box 3091
Modesto, California
Ferry-Morse Seed Company (Vine Crops)
Mountain View, California
Rogers Brothers Company
Joseph Harris Company, Inc. Box 2188
Moreton Farm Idaho Falls, Idaho
Rochester 11, New York (Sweet Corn, Beans and Green Peas)

Kilgore Seed Company SPECIALTY ITfMS
Plant City, Florida
(Florida Varieties) Gleckers Seedmen
Metamora, Ohio
Northrup, King and Company (Tomatoes and Others)
Minneapolis, Minnesota
STRAWBERRY PLANTS

W. F. Allen Company
Salisbury, Maryland

2.) Tomato and Potato Late Blight Forecasting

The U. S. Department of Agriculture and a number of state
Experiment stations have investigated the possibility of developing
a forecasting service for potato and tomato late blight. Conditions
conducive to late blight development have been worked out and were
tried on an area basis in one location in Florida last year.
Even though area-wide forecasting services are not available
in the potato and tomato growing areas of Florida, growers should be
made aware of the environmental conditions leading to late blight
development. This type of information could be used by the grower to
adjust his spray schedule with a better degree of judgement than other-
wise.
Conditions favorable to late blight developments are:(l) a total


*This list is not intended to be exclusive and no discrimina-
tion or endorsement is implied.







-3-


rainfall of 1.00 inches or greater over ten consecutive days plus,
(2) seven consecutive days of temperature when the maximum ranges
between 500 and 770F. High relative humidity and heavy dews contri-
bute to the moisture requirement. A temperature maximum of 850F. on
any day breaks the "seven consecutive day" requirements which means
late blight is not apt to develop immediately. A break, therefore, in
either temperature or moisture requirements breaks the cycle and cal-
culations should be started again.

3. Asphaltic Mulches
Several stations in Florida have tested asphalt-like petroleum
mulches on a number of vegetables for the past two years. Preliminary
results appear quite promising. Scae of the benefits that have been
observed by the use of asphaltic mulch are: (1) longer retention for
more effective action of soil fumigants, (2) raising soil temperatures
when cold soils are a limiting factor, (3) reduction of wind and rain,
erosion and, (4) possibly increasing effectiveness of herbicides.
Asphaltic mulch requires special equipment for application. Field
tests are being conducted in several. counties in the state. The mat-
erial has label clearance for use commercially on beans and cucurbits.
Asphaltic mulch is still in the developmental stage but should be
watched as it offers same good possibilities in Florida.

4. )Blotchy Ripening of Tomatoes

Are blotchy ripening, graywall and white tissue in tomatoes the
same? Yes, says Dr. Phil Minges, Extension Vegetable Specialist from
Cornell University. He has just completed a survey of Mexican and
Florida tomato growing areas and is also familiar with California and
New York state deals. He reports that the problem is found in all of
these areas.
He has some evidence which indicates that all of the conditions
mentioned above are just different manifestations of the same dis-
order which is probably physiological in nature. He has been able to
reproduce this complex of disorders under greenhouse conditions in
nutrient culture studies.
If Dr. Minges' contention is correct, a long step forward in
the ultimate solution of the problem has been taken. His ideas on
blotchy ripening have yet to be proven. Nevertheless, they will sti-
mulate some thinking and possibly some additional research.

5. New Variety Releases

The Florida Agricultural Experiment Station is releasing two
southern pea varieties in the near future. Look for the release









circular due out within a month or so. Floricream is a crowder type,
cream southern pea with resistance to wilt. 'It is a good yielder and
can be used for fresh market, freezing and canning.
Snapea is a new type of southern pea. It was developed primarily
for use in the snap stage. This variety should be in demand by pro-
cessors who process snapped and shelled peas together.
Seed of these varieties will be increased and if everything goes
well, they should be available for commercial plantings in the fall of
1964.

6. Celery Pinkrot and Lettuce Drop

Circular 193C lists a recommendation for control of lettuce
drops with weekly spraying of 2 pounds of ferbam plus 2 pounds of
hydrated lime. Recent work indicates that this is also the best control
available for celery pinkrot. Both of these diseases are caused by the
fungus, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Sclerotiniose disease is another name
for the disease which may attack crucifers and other vegetable crops as
well.

7. Brief Notes from Here and There

a. Watermelon Diseases
Watermelon mosaic and bacterial spot have shown again in
south Florida. Be on the lqkout for these diseases. Suggestion for
checking bacterial spot is the use of basic copper. No control is avail-
able for watermelon mosaic.

Spacing in Sweet Corn
Considerable research in progress now and in the past on
organic soils shows that spacing sweet corn too closely results in re-
duction in ear size and ultimately higher grade out. Rows 28 to 32
inches apart and spacing of 8 inches between plants is recommended for
the best growing conditions.

c. Students Needed in Agriculture
Although our enrollment in the College of Agriculture is on
the increase, more students are needed. Students showing a preference
for Agriculture when making application for entrance to the University
of Florida stand an excellent chance of being admitted. The College of
Agriculture has a quota for more students than it presently has re-
gistered.

Sincerely,

James Montelaro F ,s' F. S. amison, Head
Associate Vegetable Crops/ /4 Vegetable Crops Department
Specialist Mason E. Marvel
Associate Vegetable Crops
Specialist




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