• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Table of Contents
 Main






Title: Vegetarian
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087399/00327
 Material Information
Title: Vegetarian
Series Title: Vegetarian
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Horticultural Sciences Department
Publication Date: August 1997
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087399
Volume ID: VID00327
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

Vegetarian%201997%20Issue%2097-8 ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
Full Text


S UNIVERSITY OF Cooperative Extension Service
-,.FLORIDA -------
FLORIDA Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences


VEGETARIAN

(A Vegetable Crops Extension Publication
i lorticultural &iencea Dcpartment P.O. 110690 U Gainesville, F 32611 Telephone 904/392-2154


Vegetarian


August 25, 1997


CONTENTS


I. NOTES OF INTEREST

A. Vegetable Crops Calendar.

II. COMMERCIAL VEGETABLES

A. Tomato Varieties for Commercial Production in Florida.

B. Carrot Quality Responses to N and K.

III. VEGETABLE GARDENING

A. Horticultural Events at 4H Congress.



Note: Anyone is free to use the information in this newsletter.
Whenever possible, please give credit to the authors. The purpose of
trade names in this publication is solely for the purpose of providing
information and does not necessarily constitute a recommendation of
the product.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity- Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational
information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.











I. NOTES OF INTEREST

A. Vegetable Crops Calendar.

September 3, 1997. Florida Tomato
Institute, Naples. Contact Charles Vavrina,
SFREC, Immokalee.

September 30 and October 1, 1997.
1997 Florida Agricultural Conference and
Trade Show, Lakeland Civic Center. Contact
George Hochmuth, Horticultural Sciences
Dept., UF, Gainesville.


I. COMMERCIAL VEGETABLES

A. Tomato Varieties for
Commercial Production in Florida.

Variety selection, often made several
months before planting, is one of the most
important management decisions made by the
grower. Failure to select the most suitable
variety or varieties may lead to loss of yield or
market acceptability.

The following characteristics should be
considered in selection of tomato varieties for
use in Florida:

*Yield The variety selected
should have the potential to
produce crops at least
equivalent to varieties already
grown. The average yield in
Florida is currently about 1300
25-pound cartons per acre.
The potential yield of varieties
in use should be much higher
than average.


*Disease Resistance Varieties
selected for use in Florida must
have resistance to Fusarium
wilt, race 1 and race 2;
Verticillium wilt (race 1); gray
leaf spot; and some tolerance
to bacterial soft rot. Available
resistance to other diseases
may be important in certain
situations.

*Horticultural Quality Plant
habit, stem type and fruit size,
shape, color, smoothness and
resistance to defects should all
be considered in variety
selection.

*Adaptability Successful
tomato varieties must perform
well under the range of
environmental conditions
usually encountered in the
district or on the individual
farm.

*Market Acceptability The
tomato produced must have
characteristics acceptable to
the packer, shipper,
wholesaler, retailer and
consumer. Included among
these qualities are pack out,
fruit shape, ripening ability,
firmness and flavor.

Current Variety Situation

Many tomato varieties are grown
commercially in Florida, but only a few
represent most of the acreages.











'Agriset 761' was grown on 35% of the
acreage in Florida in the 1996-97 season -
down somewhat from the 41% planted the
previous season. 'Agriset 761' was grown on
49% of the acreage in southwest Florida, 24%
of the acreage in west central Florida, and was
the predominant variety in north Florida.

'Solar Set' had over 12% of the state
acreage, about the same as in 1995-96. It was
the most popular variety in Dade County, and
had significant acreage on the East Coast, in
Palmetto-Ruskin, and in north Florida.

All BHN varieties combined accounted
for about 12% of the state's acreage which
was almost double what was planted in 1995-
96. About 20% of the southwest Florida crop
was planted with BHN material.

'Sunbeam' and 'Solimar' each had about
10% of the state acreage. 'Sunny' was the most
widely planted variety in Florida for many
years, but only accounted for about 3% of the
acreage in 1996-97.

'Florasette' was grown on about 4% of
the acreage, and 'Bonita', Mlerced', 'Cobia', and
'Olympic' were grown on 1 or 2% of the
Florida tomato acreage. Several other
varieties and experimental lines were grown on
less than 1% of the state acreage.


Varieties for Commercial Production

The varieties listed have performed
well in University of Florida trials conducted in
various locations.

Agriset 761. An early midseason,
determinate, jointed hybrid. Fruit are deep
globe and green shouldered. Resistant:


Verticillium wilt (race 1), Fusarium wilt (race
I and 2), Alternaria stem canker, gray leaf
spot.

Bonita. A midseason, jointless hybrid. Fruit
are globe-shaped and green-shouldered.
Resistant: Verticillium wilt (race 1), Fusarium
wilt (race 1 and 2), gray leaf spot.

Equinox. A determinate, jointed, heat-
tolerant hybrid that also performs well in the
spring. Fruit are flattened globe-shaped with
light-green shoulders. Resistant: Verticillium
wilt (race 1), Fusarium wilt (race 1 and 2), and
gray leaf spot.

Merced. Early, deep-globe shaped, green-
shouldered fruit are produced on determinate
vines. Jointed hybrid. Resistant: Verticillium
wilt (race 1), Fusarium wilt (race 1 and 2),
gray leaf spot, tobacco mosaic virus.

Olympic. A mid-season determinate, jointed
hybrid. Fruit are deep oblate with green
shoulders. Resistant: Verticillium wilt (race
1), Fusarium wilt (race 1 and 2), Alternaria
stem canker, and gray leaf spot.

Solar Set. An early, green-shouldered, large-
fruited, jointed hybrid. Determinate. Fruit set
under high temperatures (92F day/72" night)
is superior to most other commercial cultivars.
Resistant: Fusarium wilt (race I and 2),
Verticillium wilt (race 1) and gray leaf spot.

Solimar. A mid-season, jointed, hybrid
producing globe-shaped, green shouldered
fruit. Resistant: Verticillium wilt (race 1),
Fusarium wilt (race 1 and 2), Alternaria stem
canker, gray leaf spot.

Sunbeam. Early mid-season, deep-globe
shaped, jointed, uniform green fruit are











produced on determinate vines. Resistant:
Verticillium wilt (race 1), Fusarium wilt (race
I and race 2), gray leaf spot, Alternaria stem
canker.

Sunny. A midseason, jointed, determinate,
hybrid. Fruit are large, flat-globular in shape,
and are green-shouldered. Resistant:
Verticillium wilt (race 1), Fusarium wilt (race
1 and 2), Alternaria stem canker, gray leaf
spot.
(Maynard, Vegetarian 97-08)


B. Carrot Quality Responses to N
and K.

This article is a followup article to two
previous Vegetarian articles reporting on some
research conducted on N and K fertilization of
sandland carrots. One of the variables
evaluated was carrot quality, e.g. carotene and
sugar concentrations. In this research three
successive plantings of carrots ('Scarlet
Nantes' and 'Choctaw') were made in the
winter of 1994-95. N and K20 fertilization
treatments of 0 to 200 lb/acre in 50-lb
increments were used in the study. Marketable
yield responded to 150 lb N per acre, the
recommended rate, and to about 50 lb K20 per
acre, less than the soil test predicted amount.


Carrot roots were analyzed for total
alcohol-soluble sugars and for total carotenoid
concentrations. For sugars, cultivar interacted
with N rate (Table 1). Sugar concentration in
'Nantes' was not affected by N fertilization
while there was a quadratic response in sugar
concentration to N fertilization in 'Choctaw.'
The response to N leveled off after 50 lb N per
acre although more N was needed for best
yields.

Carotene concentration responded
quadratically to N fertilization with the
maximum carotene concentration of 55 ug/gfw
with 140 Ib N per acre (data not shown).
Potassium fertilization had no effect on sugar
or carotene concentrations in carrot roots.

The results of these studies showed
that carrot quality responses to N and K
fertilization were of the same magnitude as
responses in yield. No more fertilization (less
in most cases) was needed to maximize quality
than was required for maximum yields.


Table 1. Response of carrot sugar concentrations to N fertilization on
sandy soils. Gainesville. FL, 1995-96.
N rate (lb/acre)

Cultivar 0 50 100 150 200 Signif.
Total sugars (mg/g fresh wt)

Nantes 32 30 36 35 34 NS

Choctaw 36 44 44 42 43 L**Q*


(Hochmuth, Vegetarian 97-08)












1II. VEGETABLE GARDENING

A. Horticultural Events at Florida 4H Congress.

Horticulture specialists Jim Stephens, JeffWilliamson, and Bob Black engineered three major
plant related events during the July 28-31 4-H Congress.

1. "Plant Connections" demonstrations. 4-H individuals at teams demonstrated a variety of
horticultural production techniques in competition for awards. The results follow.

INDIVIDUAL DIVISION


Name
Tera Mills
Graham Hadley
Jamie Yates
Sarah Thomas
Abbey Shaffer
Elliot Monroe


County
Pasco
Palm Beach
Osceola
Citrus
St. Lucie
Gadsden


Title
Hydroponic gardening
Echinacia anyone?
Citrus tree
Perennial peanuts
Butterfly gardens
Repotting Plants


TEAM DIVISION and OVERALL WINNER


Krista Renner and
Amy Upton


Marion


Cacti grafting


Awards: 1st, 2nd, 3rd place plaques/trophies*. Top demonstration will represent Florida at the
NJHA Convention, Williamsburg, Va, in October.

2. State Hort ID/Judging Contest this event consisted of four divisions: vegetables, fruits and
nuts, ornamentals, and flowers/foliage. Highest possible individual score was 900 (700 for
ID and 200 for judging).

RESULTS


Name
Brooke Adams
Derick Taylor
Cristine Schafer
Gary Hodges*
Pebbles Fulford*
Sara Jo Lorenz
Breana Mock
Eliane Vivoni


County
Marion
Marion
Marion
Duval
Marion
Marion
Duval
Duval


Total Score
801
790
753
745
736
718
695
614


Placing
1
2
3
4
5
6


P1 acing
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8











Placing
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24

*Extras


Name
James Downey*
Jason Graves*
Cheryl Anderson
Patrick Haley
Christy Biggy
Lynn Moss
Alayne Clarke*
Taylor Boydston
Trey Akin*
Ray Dutcher
Holly Batten*
Andy Massey
Roman Vizvary
Ben Colbert*
Lory Duke
Ben Starter


County
Duval
Duval
Duval
Sarasota
Sarasota
Hendry
Duval
Duval
Mlarioii
Hendry
Marion
Hendry
Sarasota
Hendry
Sarasota
Hendry


Marion County team of Adams, Taylor, Schafer, and Lorenz won the team trip to NJHA in
October. Coach is Bob Renner, 4H Agent (score 2344). Second place team was Duval (1859) and
third was Sarasota (1443). Thus there were only four counties at the competition.

3. Horticultural Leadership Track Two days of intensive hands-on classes were provided 40
4H students. Classes covered such topics as hydroponics, palming orchids, lake watch, and
ornamental wreath making.

(Stephens, Vegetarian 97-08)


Prepared by Extension Vegetable Crops Specialists


Dr. D. J, Cantliffe
Chairman


Dr. S. M. Olson
Professor


Mr. J. M. Stephens
Professor


Dr. G. J. Hochmuth
Professor


Dr. S. A. Sargent
Assoc. Professor Editor


Dr. C. S. Vavrina
Assoc. Professor


Dr. D. N. Maynard
Professor


Dr. W. M. Stall
Professor


Dr. J. M. White
Assoc. Professor


Total Score
604
590
550
532
526
506
475
466
443
401
396
393
384
367
297
258




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs