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Title: Vegetarian
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087399/00324
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Title: Vegetarian
Series Title: Vegetarian
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Horticultural Sciences Department
Publication Date: May 1997
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Bibliographic ID: UF00087399
Volume ID: VID00324
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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S UNIVERSITY OF Cooperative Extension Service

i FLORIDA Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences


VEGETARIAN

J/ A Vegetable Crops Extension Publication
Horticultural &cinccs Department P.O. 110690 Gaineaville, F 32611 Telephone 904/392-2134


Vegetarian 97-April & May


May 16, 1997


CONTENTS


I. COMMERCIAL VEGETABLES

A. 1995-96 Vegetable Summary.

II. PESTICIDE UPDATE

A. Prefar Label Change.


B. Poast Label Change.



III. VEGETABLE GARDENING

A. Tomatoes: "Cage and Ring" Culture.


Note: Anyone is free to use the information in this newsletter. Whenever
possible, please give credit to the authors. The purpose of trade names in this
publication is solely for the purpose of providing information and does not
necessarily constitute a recommendation of the product.






The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational
information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
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I. COMMERCIAL VEGETABLES

A. 195-l9_6 Yegetable-Summary.

The value of vegetables in Florida for
the 1995-96 season was $1.48 billion
according to the Vegetable Summary, Florida
Agricultural Statistics. Tomatoes were still
the leader of the Florida vegetable shares of
total production value with 29.7% of the total.
Pepper followed second with 12.6%, followed
by potatoes with 8.5%, strawberries (7.6%),
sweet corn (6.2%), snapbeans (4.9%),
watermelon (3.4%), cucumbers (3.3%),
cabbage (2.0%), squash (1.8%), radish (1.4%),
and all others at 18.6%.

The acreage planted to vegetables was
369,200, down three percent from the 380,850
acres planted during the 1994-95 season.

The planted acreage and value of individual
vegetables during 1995-96 were:


Vegetables Planted
Acreage


snap beans


cabbage
carrots


sweet corn

cucumbers

eggplant
escarole

bell pepper

radish

squash
tomatoes

watermelon
potatoes


28,500

9,400
7,100

42,000

10,900
2,100

2,600

21,000

13,700

10,800
46,400
40,000

46,800


Total Value


Total Value
($1000)

73,178

29,691
12,768

91,284

48,369

10,926
5,590

185,672

20,021
27,297

440,119
49,980

126,165


other vegetables


Total


81,900


246,240


369,200 1,484,897


The "other vegetables" category
includes cantaloupes, cauliflower, celery,
tropical vegetables, greens (collard, turnip and
mustard), okra, onions, leeks, parsley,
southern peas and Chinese cabbage,

For individual data on specific
commodities, a copy of the Florida
Agricultural Statistics Vegetable Summary
may be obtained from the Florida Agricultural
Statistics Service, 1222 Woodward Street,
Orlando, Florida 32803. (407) 648-6020.

( Stall, Vegetarian 97-April & May)


II. PESTICIDE UPDATE

A. Prefar LabeLChange.

Gowan has changed Prefar (bensulide)
to a 6-E formulation and have added to the
label.
In addition to the cole crops, cabbage,
broccoli, brussels sprouts and cauliflower,
there is a supplemental label for Chinese
broccoli, broccoli raab rapinii), cavalo
broccoli, collards, Chinese cabbage (bok choy,
napa), Chinese mustard (gai choy), all Chinese
brassica crops (including both tight and loose
headed varieties), kale, kohlrabi, mizuna,
mustard greens, rape greens.

The leafy vegetable subgroup also is
labeled including: arugula (roquette), cardoon,
celery, Chinese celery (transplant only),
chervil, cress (garden, upland), dandelion,
endive, Florence fennel, parsley, radicchio and
lettuce (leaf and head).

(Stall, Vegetarian 97-April & May)


strawberries 6,000


112,632











B. PoastLLabelChange.

Poast (sethoxydim) has had several
label changes (additions) that should be noted.
Poast is now labeled for all the leafy vegetable
group. This includes endive as well as lettuce
(head and leaf) and spinach. I have a
supplemental label that also includes cilantro.
It should be pointed out that mint is already on
the label. The cucurbit subgroup is labeled.
This also includes all cucurbit crops in that
group including chayote.

(Stall, Vegetarian 97- April & May)


C. MatrixonPotatoes.

In the newest Dupont label book you
will find a label for Matrix (rimsulfuron) for
use on potatoes. At the present time there is
NOT a label for the use of Matrix in Florida.
We have had trials out with Matrix for several
years in Florida, primarily in the Hastings
area, but also in Collier Co. In our tests the
material is safe and effective. When a label is
obtained for use in Florida, I hope to get the
information to you immediately.

(Stall, Vegetarian 97- April & May)


III. VEGETABLE GARDENING

A. Tomatoes: "Cage anmLRing"
culture.

This article is a reminder of two
popular methods of growing tomatoes in the
Florida home garden. Both methods employ
the use of wire in the shape of a circle.

Caging This technique calls for the
placement of a wire cage around each
individual tomato plants.


By caging his tomatoes, a gardener can
grow an indeterminate, staking variety, such
as Better Boy, without having to stake and
periodically tie the plant. Likewise, suckering
could be reduced to a minimum, if so desired.
Easy plant support is the main advantage.

Various cages are sold already
constructed for this purpose. However, the
gardener may wish to construct his own. One
common method of construction calls for the
use of concrete reinforcing mesh wire. Holes
(mesh) must be large enough to insert the
hand to pick the fruit. Six-inch squares are
suggested.

Cages are cylindrical in shape, 3 V2 to
5 feet tall, and 18 to 24 inches in diameter.
Unrolled, about 5 feet of mesh wire are
needed to make one cage. Snip off, the
horizontal bottom rung so that the vertical
wires can be pushed into the soil to a depth of
6 inches for anchoring purposes.

Plant the tomato plants about 3 feet
apart in rows. Leave 4 to 5 feet between row
centers.

Place the cage over the plant while the
plant is small. The plant grows up through the
cage, with some leaves and stems sticking
through the wire, helping to support the plant.
No tying is necessary.

Pruning may still be performed
through the mesh if desired. However, it is
suggested that gardeners try caging plants
without suckering them.

Ring culture Unlike the method
described under "caging", "ring culture" calls
for the tomato plants to be grown on the

outside of the wire cage. Here are the
instructions.











The following supplies are needed:

1. A piece of wire fence five feet
high and 15 feet long.

2. At least two pounds of all-
purpose garden fertilizer (8-8-
8).

3. Two wheelbarrow loads of
good soil.

4. Abundant organic compost.

Choose a sunny location in the garden
or near the house. Break up the soil to a depth
of a few inches. Place the circle of wire in the
center of the prepared ground. Put in a layer
of organic amendment like compost six inches
deep in the bottom of the wire ring. Add a 3-4
inch layer of soil, then another 6 inch layer of
compost and a second layer of soil. Add a


pound of fertilizer, (about two heaping
handfuls) or a gallon of rotted manure. Make
the top of the pile somewhat dish-shaped so it
will hold water. Wait a week. Plant. Set
three or four plants equally spaced around the
outside of the wire, and fertilize them very
lightly to get them started.

As the young plants grow, they will
develop roots in the compost and soil, and
after that growth becomes very rapid. Tie the
plants to the wire as they grow. Water twice
weekly over the compost and around the base
of plants. Watch for insects and disease.

When production becomes heavy, put
3-5 pounds of fertilizer on top of the compost
and soil and water it in.

(Stephens, Vegetarian 97- April & May)


Prepared by Extension Vegetable Crops Specialists


Dr. D. J. Cantliffe
Chairman


Dr. S. M. Olson
Professor


Mr. J. M. Stephens
Professor


Dr. G. J. Hochmuth
Professor


Dr. S. A. Sargent
Assoc. Professor


Dr. C. S. Vavrina
Assoc. Professor


Dr. D. N. Maynard
Professor


Dr. W. M. Stall
Professor.. Edior


Dr. J. M. White
Assoc. Professor




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