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Title: Vegetarian
Series Title: Vegetarian
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Horticultural Sciences Department
Publication Date: November 1995
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Bibliographic ID: UF00087399
Volume ID: VID00307
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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VEGETARIAN

A Vegetable Crops Extension Publication
Horticultural Scienccs Department P.O. 110690 Gainesvillc, FL 32611 Telephone 904/392-2134


Vegetarian 95-11


November 21, 1995


Contents


L NOTES OF INTEREST

A. Vegetable Crops Calendar

HI. PESTICIDE UPDATE

A. EPA Announces Revised Pesticide Tolerance Crop
Grouping Regulations.

III. COMMERCIAL VEGETABLES


B. Compost Symposium.

IV. VEGETABLE GARDENING

[ A. Herbs for Fall/Winter Planting in the Garden.


Note: Anyone is free to use the information in this newsletter.
Whenever possible, please give credit to the authors. The purpose of
trade names in this publication is solely for the purpose of providing
information and does not necessarily constitute a recommendation of
the product.







The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity- Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational
information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
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/ UNIVERSITY OF Cooperative Extension Service

S.FLORIDA Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences









I. NOTES OF INTEREST

A. Vegetable Crops Calendar.

January 17, 1996. Compost
Symposium 9:00 AM 3:00 PM.
Southwest Fla. REC, State Rd. 29 N,
Immokalee, FL. Contact Charlie Vavrina.

March 7-14, 1996. Florida
Postharvest Horticulture Institute and
Industry Tour. Contact Steve Sargent,
Coordinator.

1L PESTICIDE UPDATE

A. EPA Announces Revised
Pesticide Tolerance Crop Grouping
Regulations.

On Wednesday, 17 May 95, the
Federal Register announced EPA's approval
of revised pesticide tolerance crop-grouping
regulations. The new regulations will create
new crop subgroups, expand existing crop
groups by adding new commodities, and
revise the representative crops in some
groups.
The idea of using crop groupings to
establish a group tolerance is not a new one.
IR-4 has worked closely with FDA in the
late 1960's and with EPA since the early
1970's to develop crop grouping regulations
that would promote a safe, scientifically
sound, and more cost-effective avenue for
establishing minor crop tolerances. "These
latest regulations are a victory for minor
crop growers," said Richard Guest, National
Director of the IR-4 Project.
Crop groupings allow for maximum
pesticide residues to be based on
representative crops within a group of crops
that are very botanically and culturally
similar. This eliminates much costly and
redundant research. "Increasing reliance


upon crop grouping for setting tolerances
will help to increase the availability of pest
control agents, including IPM materials, for
minor or specialty crop uses," explains
George Markle, IR-4 Associate Director.
The latest revision approvals create
smaller subgroupings that can be supported
by residue data from fewer representative
crops. Since the residue data can be
obtained from fewer but more representative
research studies, this new alternative will
reduce the cost of developing residue data to
support the registration and reregistration of
many minor uses while continuing to provide
the consumer with safe and nutritious
domestically grown commodities.
IR-4 played a major role in several of
the specific revisions to crop groups,
especially the subgroups. Examples of these
changes include:

Crop Group 1: Root and Tuber Vegetables
Oriental radish replaces Japanese
radish. Japanese radish is now part
of the expanded Oriental radish
definition.
Chayote root has been added to the
root and tuber vegetables group and
to subgroups 1-C and 1-D.
Crop Group 3: Bulb Vegetables
Residue data only required for
green and dry bulb onions.
Crop Group 4: Leafy Vegetables (except
Brassica Vegetables)
Cardoon and Chinese celery have
been added to crop group 4 and
subgroup 4-B, leaf petioles.
Florence fennel has been expanded
to include the name finocchio.
Crop Group 5: Brassica (Cole) Leafy
Vegetables
Mizuna and mustard spinach have
been added to the crop group and to
subgroup 5-B, leafy Brassica greens
subgroup.









Crop Group 13: Berries
The bushberry subgroup includes
woody shrubs and bushes that
produce fruit in clusters, including
the blueberry.
Blackberries are included in
subgroup 13-A with other
caneberries.
Youngberry has been added to
blackberry since it is a blackberry-
raspberry hybrid similar to
boysenberry and marionberry, which
are included with blackberry.



OUTLINE OF LATEST EPA CROP GROUPS
40 CFR 180.41

1. Root & Tuber Vegetables [Carrot, Potato, Radish, & Sugar Beet]
A. Root Vegetables [Carrot, Radish, & Sugar Beet]
B. Root Vegetables (Except Sugar Beet) [Carrot, & Radish]
C. Tuberous and Corm Vegetables [Potato]
D. Tuberous and Corm Vegetables (Except Potato) [Sweet Potato]
2. Leaves of Root and Tuber Vegetables [Turnip & Garden Beet 'or' Sugar Beet]
3. Bulb Vegetables (Allium spp) [Green Onion, & Dry Bulb Onion]
4. Leafy Vegetables (Except Brassica Vegetables) [Celery, Head Lettuce, Leaf Lettuce, &
Spinach]
A. Leafy greens [Head lettuce, Leaf Lettuce, & Spinach]
B. Leaf Petioles [Celery]
5. Brassica (Cole) Leafy Vegetables [Broccoli 'or' Cauliflower, Cabbage, & Mustard Greens]
A. Head and stem Brassica [Broccoli 'or' Cauliflower, & Cabbage]
B. Leafy Brassica greens [Mustard Greens]
6. Legume Vegetables (Succulent or Dried) [Bean (Succulent & Dried), Pea (Succulent &
Dried), & Soybean]
A. Edible Podded legume vegetables [Edible-Podded Bean & Edible-Podded Pea]
B. Succulent shelled pea and bean [Succulent Shelled Bean & Garden Pea]
C. Dried shelled pea and bean [Dried Bean & Dried Pea]
7. Foliage of Legume Vegetables [Bean, Field Pea, & Soybean]
8. Fruiting Vegetables (Except Cucurbits) [Tomato, Bell Pepper, & Non-Bell Pepper]
9. Cucurbit Vegetables [Cucumber, Muskmelon, & Summer Squash]
A. Melon [Cantaloupe]
B. Squash/Cucumber [Cucumber, & Summer Squash]
10. Citrus Fruits [Sweet Orange, Lemon, & grapefruit]
11. Pome Fruits [Apple, & Pear]





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12. Stone Fruits [Sweet 'or' Tart Cherry, Peach, & Plum 'or' Fresh Prune]
13. Berries [Blackberry 'or' Raspberry, & Blueberry]
A. Caneberry [Blackberry 'or' Raspberry]
B. Bushberry [Highbush Blueberry]
14. Tree Nuts [Almond, & Pecan]
15. Cereal Grains [Sweet Corn, Field Corn, Rice, Sorghum, & Wheat]
16. Forage, Fodder and Straw of Cereal Grains [Corn, Wheat, & any other Cereal Grain Crop]
17. Grass Forage, Fodder, and Hay Group [Bermuda Grass, Blue Grass, & Brome Grass 'or'
Fescue]
18. Nongrass Animal Feeds (Forage, Fodder, Straw and Hay) [Alfalfa, & Clover]
19. Herbs and Spices [Fresh Basil, Dried Basil, Black Pepper, Chive, & Celery Seed 'or' Dill
Seed]
A. Herb [Fresh Basil, Dried Basil, & Chive]
B. Spice [Black Pepper, & Celery Seed 'or' Dill Seed]

[Representative Crop(s) for Groups or Subgroups]

Extracted from IR-4 newsletter 26:2
(Stall, Vegetarian 11-95)


III. COMMERCIAL VEGETABLES

A. Compost Symposium Program.


COMPOST SYMPOSIUM
January 17, 1996
9:00 AM 3:00 PM
Southwest Florida Research & Education Center
State Road 29 N, Immokalee FL

Morning Session
Moderator: Charlie Vavrina, Vegetable Horticulturist, SWFREC

9:00 What are composts? Tom Obreza, SWFREC

9:20 Suppression of plant diseases by composts Harry Hoitink, Plant Pathology, Ohio State
University.

9:50 Chemical composition of composts Don Graetz, UF, Gainesville.

10:10 Compost usage with woody ornamentals George Fitzpatrick, FLREC.




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10:30 Compost usage with bedding plants Kim Klock, FLREC.

10:50 MSW composts for biocontrol of Phytophthora root rot in citrus Jim Graham, Citrus
REC.

11:10 Compost usage in turf- John Cisar, FLREC.

Lunch Sponsored by Bedminister Bioconversion Corp.

Afternoon Session
Moderator: Tom Obreza, Soil Science, SWFREC

1:00 Compost usage in the vegetable transplant industry Charlie Vavrina, SWFREC.

1:20 Composts for weed control in vegetable crops Monica Ozores-Hampton,
Grad. Student UF.

1:40 Composts in vegetable production Peter Stoffella, IRREC.

2:00 Heavy metal accumulation in vegetables grown in compost Herb Bryan, TREC.

2:20 Effectiveness of compost in drip irrigated vegetables Craig Stanley, GCREC.

2:40 Discussion.

3:00 Adjourn
(Vavrina, Vegetarian 11-95)



R.S.V.P. Compost Symposium

Name

Address

Affiliation

Will you attend the lunch? Yes No

(Please respond by January 10, 1996 to C. Vavrina, SW Fla REC, Immokalee)









IV. VEGETABLE GARDENING

A. Herbs for Fall/Winter
Planting in the Garden.

While Spring is the favorite time of
the year to start herbs in Florida, there are
many that can be propagated in the fall and
early winter months. One of our best
growers of herbs and authority on this group
of plants is Barbara Daniels of Duval
County. Barbara works with the
Jacksonville Urban Gardening program
where herbs are grown in demonstration
gardens and in several of the city-wide
community gardens.

According to Barbara, "There is
plenty of time in November for planting
herbs. Due to the possibility of heavy rains,
it is always a good idea to build rows or
mounds for your herbs just as you would do
for your vegetable garden. You can direct
seed dill, cilantro, arugula, borage, burnet,
chervil, chives, fennel, parsley, sage,
marjoram, and thyme. Some of the very tiny
seeds like marjoram and thyme are best
started in 2-inch pots and then transplanted.
Remember, it is important to space herbs


correctly, so be light-handed when planting
seeds directly into the garden, and thin the
seedlings to proper stand. Garlic is another
herb that can be planted now. Buy the bulbs
and break them apart into segments called
cloves. Place each clove on its side about 4
inches apart in a well prepared soil. Garlic
will be ready for harvest in May."
Barbara wishes to pass on a recipe
for insect spraying which she obtained from
the USDA, as follows:

1 tblspoon dishwashing detergent
1 cup oil (peanut, vegetable, sunflower, etc)

From this cup of concentrate, mix 2 tsps to 1
cup of water and use as needed.

The following table was prepared by J. M.
Stephens for general herb growing.


TABLE 1. HERB PROPAGATION INFORMATION FOR THE FLORIDA GARDEN.

Growth Part

Herb Cycle Propagation Spacing Used Harvest


Anise

Basil

Borage

Caraway


annual

annual

annual

biennial


seed

seed

seed

seed


seed

leaves

flowers

seed


when ripe

as needed

as needed

slightly
unripe





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Cardamom


Catnip

Chervil

Chives

Comfrey

Coriander

Costmary

Cumin

Dill

Fennel


Garlic

Ginger

Ginseng

Horehound

Lemon balm

Lovage

Marjoram

Mint

Oregano

Parsley

Rosemary

Sage

Savory

Tarragon


Thyme


perennial


perennial

annual

perennial

perennial

annual

perennial

annual

annual

perennial


perennial

perennial

perennial

perennial

perennial

perennial

perennial

perennial

perennial

biennial

perennial

perennial

annual

perennial

perennial


division


seed/cuttings

seed

seed/division

root cuttings

seed

seed/division

seed

seed

seed


cloves

root division

seed/seedlings

seed/cuttings

seed/cuttings

seed/plants

seed/cuttings

cuttings/division

division

seed

seed/cuttings

seed/cuttings

seed

cuttings/division


18"


12"

12"

8"

18"

12"

12"
1"

12"

12"


6"

24"

12"

12"

12"

12"

12"

12"

24"

12"

24"

18"

12"

12"


seed/cuttings


seed


leaves

leaves

leaves

leaves

seed

leaves

seed

seedheads

seed
leaves

bulb

rhizome

root

leaves

leaves

leaves

leaves

leaves

leaves

leaves

leaves

leaves

leaves

leaves


leaves/cuttings


slightly
unripe

as needed

as needed

as needed

as needed

when ripe

as needed

when ripe

as needed

when ripe
as needed

when mature

when mature

when mature

before bloom

as needed

as needed

as needed

as needed

dry leaves

as needed

as needed

as needed

as needed

as needed


as needed


(Stephens, Vegetarian 11-95)





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Prepared by Extension Vegetable Crops Specialists


Dr. D. J. Cantliffe
Chairman


Dr. S. M. Olson
Assoc. Professor


Mr. J. M. Stephens
Professor & Editor

^^^^^^^,^


Dr. G. J. Hochmuth
Professor


Dr. S. A. Sargent
Assoc. Professor


Dr. C. S. Vavrina
Assoc. Professor


Dr. D. N. Maynard
Professor


Dr. W. M. Stall
Professor


Dr. J. M. White
Assoc. Professor




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