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Title: Vegetarian
Series Title: Vegetarian
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Horticultural Sciences Department
Publication Date: February 1995
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Bibliographic ID: UF00087399
Volume ID: VID00298
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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SUNIVERSITY OF Cooperative Extension Service

SFLORIDA Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences



VEGETARIAN


A Vegetable Crops Extension Publication
Horticultural Sciences Department P.O. 110690 Gainesville, FL 32611 Telephone 904/392-2134


Vegetarian 95-2


February 15, 1995


Contents

I. NOTES OF INTEREST

A. Vegetable Crops Calendar.

IL. COMMERCIAL VEGETABLES

A. Standard Watermelon Variety Evaluation Spring 1994.

III. VEGETABLE GARDENING

A. Minigardening

IV. 1990-1994 VEGETARIAN INDEX







Note: Anyone is free to use the information in this newsletter.
Whenever possible, please give credit to the authors. The purpose of
trade names in this publication is solely for the purpose of providing
information and does not necessarily constitute a recommendation of
the product.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational
information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.












I. NOTES OF INTEREST

A. Vegetable Crops Calendar.

March 2, 3, 1995. 1995 Florida
Postharvest Horticulture Institute. Holiday Inn
West, Gainesville. (Contact S.A. Sargent, 904-392-
2134 ext. 215).

March 6-9, 1995. Harvest and Postharvest
Handling of Horticultural Crops. Industry Tour.
(contact S.A. Sargent, 904-392-2134 ext. 215).

March 9, 10, 1995. Florida Weed Science
Society Annual Meeting. St. Augustine. (Contact
W. M. Stall)

May 25, 1995. Organic Gardening Field
Day, 10:00 am 12 noon. Organic Park, Fifield
Park, UF. (Contact J. M. Stephens)


II. COMMERCIAL VEGETABLES

A. Standard Watermelon Variety
Evaluation Spring 1994.

Standard watermelons weigh from 18 to 35
lbs and represent most of the commercial crop
grown in Florida. Icebox watermelons weigh 6 to
12 lbs each and are grown on a small acreage.
Seedless watermelons, weighing 12 to 18 Ibs, also
are grown in Florida on a limited scale. Florida
produced 8.3 million cwt of watermelons of all types
from 37,000 harvested acres in 1992-93 which
provided an average yield of 225 cwt/acre. The
average price was $8.00/cwt providing a crop value
exceeding $66 million which accounted for 3.9% of
the gross returns to the state's vegetable growers.
Until recently, the Florida crop was about
equally divided among open pollinated and hybrid
varieties of Crimson Sweet, Charleston Gray, and
Jubilee types. A noticeable decline in Charleston
Gray and Jubilee production has been replaced
largely by increases in production of Allsweet and
blocky Crimson Sweet types.


The purpose of this trial was to evaluate
some of the recently introduced commercial and
experimental hybrids of the Crimson Sweet and
Allsweet types.
The EauGallie fine sand was prepared in
early February by incorporation of 0-1.2-0 lb N-
P205-KO per 100 linear bed feet (lbf). Beds were
formed and fumigated with methyl
bromide:chloropicrin, 67:33 at 2.3 lb/100 lbf.
Banded fertilizer was applied in shallow grooves on
the bed shoulders at 2.7-0-3.8 lb N-P2Os-K20/100
Ibf after the beds were pressed and before
application of the black polyethylene mulch. The
total fertilizer applied was equivalent to 130-60-182
lb N-P20O-KO2/acre. The final beds were 32 in.
wide and 8 in. high and were spaced on 9 ft centers,
with four beds between seepage irrigation/drainage
ditches which were on 41 ft centers. The standard
watermelons were planted in rows adjacent to the
ditches and also served as pollenizers for seedless
watermelons that were being evaluated in the two
center beds of each land.
The watermelons were direct-seeded on 15
February in holes punched in the polyethylene mulch
at 3 ft in-row spacing Harvests were made on 16
May, 26 May and 9 June. Marketable fruit (U.S.
No. 1 or better) according to U.S. Standards for
Grades were separated from culls and counted and
weighed individually.
Early yields (first harvest) varied from 90
cwt/acre for Regency' to 336 cwt/acre for 'Sangria'.
Average fruit weight ranged from 17.6 lb for XPH
6190 to 29.1 lb for 'Summer Flavor 520'. Soluble
solids varied from 11.8% for'Starbrite' to 14.1% for
'Sultan'. Soluble solids for early harvested fruit of
all entries exceeded the 10% specified for optional
use to designate very good internal quality in the
U.S. Standards for Grades of Watermelons. The
proportion of sampled fruit with hollowheart varied
from 0 for ASM 6564, 'Starbrite', 'Fiesta', and
'Sangria' to 100% for 'Royal Star'. The severity
(average width of fruit cracks) of hollowheart
ranged from 0 to 3.3 in. for the aforementioned
entries.
Total yields in the replicated trial ranged
from 390 cwt/acre for 'Regency' to 551 cwt/acre for
ASM 6564 but there were no statistical differences







among the entries. Average fruit weight varied from
17.6 lb for XPH 6190 to 25.2 lb for 'Starbrite'.
Soluble solids of fruit over the season were
uniformly high ranging from 11.2% for RXW 105
to 13.0% for 'Sultan'. The incidence and severity of
hollowheart was less for the total harvest than for
the early harvest. Nonetheless, 51% of the 'Royal
Star' fruit that were sampled had hollowheart and
the average crack width was 1.5 in.
Watermelon yields were similar to those
obtained at this location in 1991 and 1992 but not
as high as those obtained in 1993. Based on results
of this and previous trials, the following Allsweet
type and blocky Crimson Sweet type varieties are
expected to perform well in Florida: 'Fiesta', 'Royal
Sweet', 'Sangria' and 'Starbrite'.

(Maynard, Vegetarian 95-02)

III. VEGETABLE GARDENING

A. Minigardening

One gardening variation that seems to have
caught on with even the most novice gardener is
referred to as "minigardening". It involves growing
vegetables in some sort of container, utilizing either
garden soil or a prepared mixture called a soil
substitute. It can also mean gardening on a small
plot.
Minigardening is practical for those who do
not have sufficient yard space for an outdoor garden.
Even persons living in apartments and
condominiums can grow at least a few vegetables by
planting a minigarden. On problem soils, such as
the hard, calcareous flatwoods of Dade County and
the porous, excessively drained soils found in a
number of counties, the entire outdoor garden might


be constructed above ground. Areas suitable are
along fences and in fence covers, in and around
flower beds, on patios, porches, and balconies, and
even on rooftops. Such small-scale container
culture can be both practical and ornamental if
properly and imaginatively done.
A wide assortment of containers might be
used, ranging from hanging baskets and flower pots
to tubs, bean hampers, and refuse cans. Most any
container is suitable as long as it is sufficiently
durable and large enough to hold the fully-grown
plant or plants. In this respect, gardeners are limited
only by their imagination. An old bathtub might
yield the prize tomatoes of the neighborhood, while
an old plastic beach ball cut in half could become an
excellent herb container.
A "grow-box" is a raised bed enclosed on
all four sides by a wooden frame. A typical size is
4'x8' and 5'x10'. The wooden frame should be
constructed of 2x6 inch (or wider) rot-resistant
lumber. Pressure treated and creosoted timbers may
be used with no ill effects from the wood
preservative. Cedar wood is an excellent choice.
An abandoned cypress-wood skiff was utilized as a
grow-box by one gardener that I knew. Even
fiberglass models would make excellent grow-
boxes.
Obviously, the larger kinds of vegetables
require more space and larger containers. For
example, miniature tomatoes such as 'Micro-Tom',
'Tiny Tim', 'Floragold Basket', 'Florida Basket',
'Florida Petite', and "Basket King', herbs and
strawberries, can be grown in hanging baskets,
while 'Better Boy' and 'Patio' need 5 gallon buckets.

(Stephens, Vegetarian 95-02)


Prepared by Extension Vegetable Crops Specialists


Dr. D. J. Cantliffe
Chairman


Dr. S. M. Olson
Assoc. Professor


Mr. J. M. Stephens
Professor


Dr. G. J. Hochmuth
Profes r or


Dr. S. Sargent
Assoc. Professor


Dr. C. S. Vavrina
Asst. Professor


Dr. D. N. Maynard
Professor


Dr. W. M. Stall
Professor


Dr. J. M. White
Assoc. Professor




-3-

1990-1994
VEGETARIAN INDEX


ASPARAGUS


BROCCOLI


Variety Trial .....................................91-5:34


Variety Selection ................................ 90-6:2-3
Variety Trial..........................91-1:1-6, 91-10:2-3


Chinese Cabbage Production...........
Chinese Cabbage -Central Fla........
Pepper Spot (Gomash5) ................
Tipburn and Internal Rot.............


Mango Melon ..........................
Muskmelon EPA Definition.............
Variety Trial ........................


.......... 91-5:2-3
............. 91-2:3
............ 93-3:1-2
........... 93-6:1-2


.............. 93-8:5
.......... 91-3:2-3
............ 91-8:2-3


Florida Production...................
HUA Project Carrot Study..............
Soil Moisture .........................
Update on Yields and P Fertilization..


... .91-9:2-3
.... 93-5:1-2
....92-4:2-3
......94-7:4


Yield and Stalk Size............................94-12:1-2


CERTIFICATION
Professional Standards...............


CHLORINE


............93-2:4


Effects of Chlorine on Plants......................91-3:2


CONFERENCES


FACTS .......................
Micro-Irrigation............
Nat'l Pepper Conference.....


...93-12:5-6
...... 92-4:1
...... 90-3:3


Nat'l Jr. Hort. Assoc............................ 91-9:6-7
Post Harvest............................91-4:5-6, 90-9:3-4
Seed Seminar............................90-1:2-3, 94-1:1-2
Specialty Vegetable.............................. 91-10:3-4
Stand Establishment..90-4:6, 91-11:3, 92-2:3-4, 92-10:1-2
Strawberry ......................................91-1:5-6
Suwanee Valley.........................90-12:2-3, 91-12:1


(See watermelon, pumpkin, squash, etc.)
Pollinators..................................
Variety Trials ..............................


Potassium Response ..........................


Alternatives to Chemical Pest Control ......
Ants ........................................
Healthy Plant Resistance....................


Blossom-end Rot .................... .............
Drip Application Frequency....................
Fertilizer Demonstration......................
IFAS Recommendation Process ....................
Lb /A ..........................................
Management Pointers.............................
Nitrogen BMP Bill ..............................
Nitrogen Fertilizers ...........................
Organic Matter .................................
Organic Soil Amendments for Cucumber Culture...
Overfertilization W/Potassium.................


..... 90-5:3-5
....90-10:3-4


.....92-1:2-3


.....93-5:2-4
.....91-7:6-7
....94-12:3-4


..90-8:3-5
..91-6:2-4
....92-4:3
... 92-9:4
....91-9:2
....94-9:2
..94-7:3-4
..92-3:1-2
.91-11:2-3
....94-4:3
..94-9:2-3


CABBAGE


CANTALOUPE


CARROT





CELERY


CUCURBIT



EGGPLANT


ENTOMOLOGY




FERTILIZERS











4-H


-4-
Principles .........................
Rate Reductions.....................
Recommendations....................
Reduced Fertilizer Demonstration...
Seepage Irrigation Band Placement..


Bottled Vegetables- Project........
Congress............................
ELM Proposals.......................
Horticulture Contest Results.......
Marion County National Winners.....
Vegetable Slide Set................
Water Management Project...........
Water Shortage Aid..................


FUNGICIDES



GARDEN



















GARLIC


GREENHOUSE


HYDROLOGY


INSTITUTES






IRRIGATION




MUSHROOMS


NEMATICIDES



ONIONS


.90-4:2-3
.91-7:2-3
. .90-6:2
. .92-6:3
.91-4:4-5


..............93-9:4-6
.............. 92-8:5-7
..............91-2:5-6
....90-8:5-6, 94-8:2-4
............. 90-12:6-7
..............92-5:3-5
.............90-11:3-4
.............91-4:9-10


Bravo 720 on Watermelons.................91-3:7, 91-9:4-5
EBDC Use ..........................................92-4:5-6


1991 Record Size .................. ................92-3:3-4
1992 Record Size..................................93-1:3-5
1993 Record Size .................................93-7:3-4
1994 Record Size................................ 94-11:4-5
Big Vegetable Contests Scoring Tables............. 94-2:1-2
Educational Gardens..............................90-9:5-7
Fifield Hall Organic Gardens.....................90-4:6-7
FSHS- Garden and Landscape Section.................94-5:4
Gardening Guide Rev..............................91-12:6-7
Gardening Survey- Palm Beach County............. 94-10:4-5
Growing Tomatoes the Japanese Ring Method........ 94-3:2-4
Largest Vegetables in '90.............. 90-2:5-6, 90-7:5-7
Largest Vegetables in '91........................91-6:4-5
Largest Vegetable Varieties......................92-7:4-5
Organic Gardening Research and Education Park...93-06:2-4
Varieties........................................ 94-1:2-3
Vegetable Gardening Guide Rev....................90-3:5-6


Production Potential............................. 90-10:2-3

VEGETABLES
Florida Meeting.................................90-12:3-5


Lake Apopka Unit Project..........................92-12:4


Post-Harvest .......................................... ........92-10:2
Sweet Corn.........................................91-12:1
Tomato.............91-8:4-5, 91-9:3-4, 93-7:2-3, 94-6:6-7
Vine Crops.......................................92-11:1-2
Watermelon.......................................... 91-1:4-5


Drip Irrigation Survey- Vegetables.................93-7:1
Drip Irrigation Survey- Continued.................. 93-9:1
Micro-Irrigated Vegetable Beds ...................90-1:6-7


Fresh Florida Varieties........................... 94-9:3-5


Clandosan ....................................... 90-10:5-7
Vapam................................ 91- 1:7-8, 92-10:5-7


Prowl Supplemental Labeling......................93-10:4
Day Length Effects ................................ 90-12:6
Storage Quality................................. 91-11:5-6


ORGANIC FARMING
Cucumbers and Muskmelons........................93-11:6-7
Economics............................................. 91-3




-5-
Florida Council on Certification..................90-12:7
Nitrogen Fertilizers .............................92-3:1-2
Organically Grown ................................92-4:3-5
Organic Gardening Research and Education Park.....93-6:2-4
Support Industries................................90-7:4-5
Survey Results .................................... 94-10:4


Maturity Yields ..............
Pepper Carton................
Petiole Sap Testing..........
Scotch Bonnet Variety........
Transplant Depth.............


..90-7:3-4
....92-9:5
..93-2:1-2
..92-9:4-5
.92-11:2-3


PLANT & SOIL ANALYSIS
Changes to Form......................
Interpretation......................
Tissue Testing......................
Testing Plant Sap....................


PLASTICS


....... 91-3:2
....... 91-9:2
..... .91-3:3-4
....91-12:4-6


Fall Temperatures Under Plastic..................94-7:1-2
Plastics Disposal ...............................94-11:1-2


POST HARVEST
Cold Storage Air Quality...............
Pepper Carton.........................
Ripening Tomato Simulations..........
Effective Sanitation of Packing Lines.
Tomato Packing Line Improvements.......
Wax Labeling Requirements.............


Disease Situation for 1993-94..........
Fertilizer Demonstration.............


Calabaza Production....................
Fall Production .........................
Florida Varieties......................


Carton Standards.................
Carton Standardizing Promotion...
Carton Standards for Peppers.....
Handling and Shipping...........
Ripening Tomato Simulations......
Vegetables.......................


..90-5:6, 90-6:4-6
........... 92-9:5
..........90-1:7-8
.........94-11:2-3
.........91-10:4-5
......... 93-4:1-2


.........93-11:4-6
........... 92-4:3


......... 91-3:4-5
............ 90-5 :5
..........94-5:2-3


................92-8:1-2
.............. 93-2:4-5
.................. 92-9 :5
.............. 92-1:4-5
................ 90-1:7-8
.............. 91-7:4-5


SNAPBEANS


SOAPS


N Fertilization...................................92-8:2-3


Detergent Toxicity................................92-9:1-3
Foliar Detergent Sprays..........................92-2:1-2


SOIL AMENDMENTS
Banding Organic Soil Amendments and Fertilizers..94-4:3-4
Compost Trial ......................................91-5:5
Oak Leaves as an Amendment......................92-9:6-7
Organic Amendments...............................92-1:5-7
Effects of Organic Soil Amendments on Collards...93-4:5-6
Yard Waste Compost.....................93-12:7, 92-11:5-7

SOIL TEMPERATURES
Fall Temperatures Under Plastic..................94-7:1-2


SOIL TESTS


ESTL Changes ........................................... 90-3:2

SOUTHERN PEAS
Organic Amendments...............................92-1:5-7


SPINACH


QA-, .1 1iA. _i ._) A


PEPPERS


POTATO



PUMPKIN


SHIPPING


. . . .
...........o
...........
...........
...........


Vari aty- T-rial




-6-
SQUASH
Summer Squash Defined ........................... 91-10:6
Summer Squash Evaluation..........................93-9:1-2
Winter Squash Amendment........................... 91-11:6

STATE FAIR 1993.................. .............. ............ 92-12:6-7


STRAWBERRY


Leaf and Petiole Sap Analysis.........93-10:1-2, 94-6:4-5
N and K Sap Testing................................ 93-1:1
Atmospheric Treatments for Shipping..............90-3:4-5


SWEET CORN


Best Variety................ .........
Herbicide vs. Cultivar...............
HUA Project Sweet Corn Study.........
Inflorescence Abnormalities..........


..............92-2:4
............91-9:5-6
.............. 93-5:2
............ 92-6:3-4


SWEET POTATO
Weevil Varietal Resistance.......................92-2:4-6


Catfacing in Tomatoes and Gibberellic Acid...
Cherry Tomato Wholesale Prices...............
Copper Toxicity...............................
Florida Varieties ............................
Geminivirus Subcommittee.... 90-3:2-3, 90-5:2-
Geminivirus Subcommittee.....................
Geminivirus Tomato Yield.....................
Geminivirus and Whiteflies...................
Gray Wall In Florida: Factors and Control....
Gray Wall Revisited ..........................
Growing By The Mound Method..................
Reduced Fertilizer Demonstration.............
Seasonal Production...........................
Size Revision.................................
Thrips and Virus Control......................
Tomatillo ....................................
Tomato Leaf Roll...... ........................
Tomato Packinghouse Improvements............
Tomato Transplant Age Studies................
Transplant Depth Evaluation .................
Varieties...............................92-1:1


... 94-3:1-2
.... 93-1:2-3
....90-9:4-5
... 94-6:1-4
3, 90-12:5-6
...91-11:4-5
....90-1:4-5
......90-1:6
... 93-2:2-3
....93-4:2-3
....93-3:2-3
...... 92-6:3
... .92-1:1-2
..... 91-9:1
....90-4:4-5
....92-7:1-2
....90-5:7-8
...91-10:4-5
......91-4:6
...94-10:1-2
-2, 94-6:1-2


TRANSPLANTS


1991 Survey................ ...........
Age Studies ............................
Controlling Height.....................
Depth Impact on Tomato Yield............
Greenhouse Industry-Fla.................
Growers Association.....................
Handling and Shipping..................
Planting Depths of Bell Peppers.........
Plug pH................................
Survey .................................
Transplant Houses 1989-90...............
Virus Detection ........................
Watermelon Production..................


...91-2:3-4
.....91-4:6
.....90-8:5
..94-10:1-2
.....90-2:2
...94-4:3-4
...92-1:4-5
..92-11:2-3
..90-10:4-5
...92-5:1-2
...92-6:1-2
..91-7:5-6
...90-2:2-4


MISCELLANY
Detergent Toxicity...........
Foliar Detergent Sprays......
Freeze Covers.................
Herbs.........................
Herb Directory................
Minor Vegetable Manual.......
Miscellaneous ................
Petiole Sap Test Guidelines..
Plant Sap Testing............
Season Timing................
Sustainable Agriculture......
SW Fl Veg. Research Ext. Adv.
1991-92 Value of Florida Veget
Variety Demonstrations.......
Yields in Florida............


. . . . . .


........ 93-12:1-3
. . .. . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .



Board Priorities.
tables.............
. . . . . .
. . . . . .


..92-9:1-3
..92-2:1-2
..90-1:3-4
, 91-1:7-8
.93-10:4-6
. .90-10:5
..90-6:6-7
.93-12:2-3
.91-12:4-6
..90-3:3-4
..91-1:2-4
....94-5:1
..93-9:3-4
..90-9:2-3
.92-10!2-4


TOMATOES


VEGETABLE-




-7-


WATERMELONS


Bee Attractants ................. ................. 92-4:1-2
N Fertilization...................... ............. 93-4:3-4
Icebox Varieties............... ...................90-11:3
Planting Depth Trials. .......................... 93-12:3-4
Standard and Icebox Variety Evaluations.........92-12:2-3
Seedless Variety Trials....93-8:1-4, 92-11:3-5, 91-12:3-4
Transplant Production........ ...................90-2:2-4
Variety Trial .........................91-8:3-4, 93-10:2-3

WEED CONTROL
Alachlor Withdrawal............................... 90-11:2
Bolero 8C............................. ............. ............. 90-2:5
Bolero 8C on Celery, Lettuce, Endive, Escarole.....91-3:6
Bravo 720 on Watermelons.................91-3:7, 91-9:4-5
Cobra Usage on Tomato and Pepper Row
Middles ............................92-12:5, 94-10:3
Command 4 EC for Peppers........................ 92-3:2-3
Diquat Labeling Needs for Local Use on Tomatoes,
Eggplant and Green Peppers...................94-8:1
Diquat on Tomatoes and Peppers..........90-11:2-3, 91-11:7
Dual on Cabbage.............................................. 91-3:6
Dual on Pepper Row Middles.....................94-12:2-3
Dual 8E on Sweet Corn.............................. 93-4:5
Enquik on Strawberries.............................90-9:5
Gramoxone Extra on Cabbage....................... 92-12:5
Gramoxone on Dry Beans .............................90-7:5
Gramoxone Extra on Eggplant........................94-3:2
ID Publication.................................. 90-11:4-5
IR-4 Meeting ............... .....................92-9:5-6
IR-4 Tolerances...... ............ ............ ...92-5:2-3
Last Year's Applications...........................90-5:7
Lorox DF on Parsley..................... ........... 91-2:5
Off Season ........................................... 92-7:2
Paraquat on Melons and Lettuce.....................91-4:8
Poast on Sweet Corn................................ 91-5:4
Poast on Bulb Vegetables............................91-1:7
Poast on Legumes.......................... ........ .. 90-5:7
Pursuit on Legumes............................. .... 91-4:7
Record-keeping..................... ............... 90-5:7
Roundup Labeling................................92-12:5-6
Sulfonyl-Urea on Sweet Corn......................91-9:5-6
Tank Mixing Herbicides ...........................90-2:4-5
Triazine Compounds Carcinogenic.................... 94-12:3
Weed ID................. ......................... 90-11:4-5


(Vavrina, Vegetarian 95-2)




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