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Title: Vegetarian
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087399/00291
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Title: Vegetarian
Series Title: Vegetarian
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Horticultural Sciences Department
Publication Date: August 1993
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Bibliographic ID: UF00087399
Volume ID: VID00291
Source Institution: University of Florida
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U


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


\


VEGETARIAN
A Vegetable Crops Extension Publication

Horticultural Sciences Department P.O. 110690 Gainesville, FL 32611 Telephone 392-2134


Vegetarian 93-8


August 16, 1993


Contents


I. NOTES OF INTEREST


A. Vegetable Crops Calendar.

II. COMMERCIAL VEGETABLES
A. Drip-Irrigated Vegetables in Florida.
B. Seedless Watermelon Variety Trial, Spring 1993.

III. VEGETABLE GARDENING
I A. Mango melon (Cucumis melo L. Chito Group).





Note: Anyone is free to use the information in this newsletter.
Whenever possible, please give credit to the authors. The purpose
of trade names in this publication is solely for the purpose of
providing information and does not necessarily constitute a
recommendation of the product.






The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational
information and other services only to individuals and Institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex. age, handicap or national origin.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS, STATE OF FLORIDA, IFAS, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA,
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING.


I


FLORIDA
COOPERATIVE
EXTENSION SERVICE


__ -- ---









i. NOTES OF INTEREST

A. Vegetable Crops Calendar.

August 24-25, 1993. Florida
Strawberry Jam 11 Agritech Session.
Arthur Boring Building, Florida
Strawberry Festival Fairgrounds, Plant
City, FL. (Contact Tim Crocker).

September 8, 1993. 1993 Tomato
Institute, Ritz Carlton, Naples. (Contact
C. Vavrina).


II. COMMERCIAL VEGETABLES

A. Drip-Irrigated Vegetables in
Florida.

Our recent survey of drip irrigated
vegetable acreage showed approximately
42,000 acres of vegetables grown yearly
with drip irrigation. There were 13
vegetables, one herb crop, and a mixed
vegetable group mentioned as crops grown
with drip irrigation. The breakdown by
crop was as follows. About one half of the
acreage was tomato.


CROP


ACRES


Tomato
Strawberry
Pepper
Watermelon
Cucumber
Squash
Eggplant
Cauliflower
Muskmelon
Celery
Beans
Mixed
Onions
Cabbage
Herbs


20,000
5,600
5,180
3,460
2,910
2,090
700
400
230
20
15
15
10
5
4


(Hochmuth, Vegetarian 93-08)


B. Seedless Watermelon Variety
Trial, Spring 1993.

The concept of seedless
watermelons was described first in the
U.S. literature in 1951 based on
experimentation that began in Japan in
1939. Seed for planting seedless
watermelons results from a cross between
a selected tetraploid female parent,
developed by treating diploid lines with
colchicine, and a selected diploid (normal)
male parent. The resulting triploid is
sterile and does not produce viable seed.
However, small, white rudimentary seeds
develop which are eaten along with the
flesh just as immature seeds are eaten in
cucumber.

Specialty vegetables are in high
demand and seedless watermelons offer an
attractive alternative for discriminating
consumers and the food service industry.
Seedless watermelons are being actively
promoted by marketing organizations and
seed companies to stimulate demand. At
the same time, new varieties are being
developed that are superior to those
previously available.

Observational plots of seven plants
of each entry were established on March
24. Watermelons were harvested on 28
May, 8 June, 17 June and 24 June.
Marketable (U.S. No. 1 or better)
watermelons according to U.S. grades were
separated from culls and counted and
weighed individually. Soluble solids were
determined with a hand-held refractometer
on at least four fruit from each entry.

Early harvest, represented by the
first two of four harvests, ranged from 0
for CLF 2042, CLF 2043, and XPH 6202 to
542 cwt/acre for W2005. 'Crimson Jewel',
'Ssupersweet 5244', 'Tiffany', W0067, and
XPH 6209 had early yields exceeding 400
cwt/acre. Average fruit weight of early
harvested watermelons ranged from 9.0 lb
for 'Scarlet Trio' to 19.4 lb for 'Tri-X-313'.









Soluble solids of fruit from the early
harvest ranged from 11% for W2005 to
14.1% for ASM 5077A and XPH 6211.

Total yield varied from 500 cwt/acre
for CLF 1027 to 1161 cwt/acre for CLF
2014. Other entries producing total yields
exceeding 900 cwt/acre were CLF 2042,
'Genesis', 'Ssupersweet 2532',
'Ssupersweet 5244', and XPH 6209. Total
yields far exceeded the state average yield
of 190 cwt/acre for the 1987-88 to 1991-92
seasons. Average fruit weight ranged from
9.5 lb for W2006 to 19.9 lb for XPH 6202.
Six other entries had average fruit weights
greater than 17 lb.


Soluble solids varied between 11.3% for
W2006 to 14.4% ASM 5077A. Sixteen
other entries had 13% or greater soluble
solids. Accordingly, soluble solids in all
entries far exceeded the 10% specified for
optional use in the U.S. watermelon grade
standards for very good internal quality.

Based on results of this and
previous trials, varieties, in alphabetical
order, that appear to have considerable
potential for commercial production in
Florida include 'Crimson Trio', 'Genesis',
'King of Hearts', 'Millionaire', 'Nova',
'Ssupersweet 2532', 'Ssupersweet 5032',
'Ssupersweet 5244', 'Tiffany', and 'Tri-X-
313'.








EARLY AND TOTAL YIELDS, AVERAGE FRUIT WEIGHT AND SOLUBLE SOLIDS OF SEEDLESS WATERMELONS. GULF COAST RESEARCH
AND EDUCATION CENTER. SPRING 1993.


Early HarvestI Total Harvest
Weight Avg. fruit Soluble Weight Avg. fruit Soluble
Entry Seed Source (cwt/A)z wt (lb) solids (%) (cwt/A) wt (ib) solids (%)


CLF 2014
Ssupersweet 5244
XPH 6209
Genesis
CLF 2042
Ssupersweet 2532
Scarlet Trio
ASM 7060
XPH 6202
Millionaire
CLF 2004
W0069
HMX 7928
RXW 701
Nova
Tiffany
Tri-X-313
XPH 6205
CLF 1025
W0067
Crimson Jewel
King of Hearts
CLF 2041
CLF 1003
Tycoon
CLF 1034
ASM 8907
ASM 5077A
W0068
Crimson Trio
W2005


CFREC- Leesburg
Abbott & Cobb
Asgrow
Shamrock
CFREC-Leesburg
Abbott & Cobb
Rogers NK
American Sunmelon
Asgrow
Harris Moran
CFREC-Leesburg
Pioneer
Harris Moran
Rogers NK
Sakata
Asgrow
American Sunmelon
Asgrow
CFREC-Leesburg
Pioneer
Sakata
Petoseed
CFREC-Leesburg
CFREC-Leesburg
Harris Moran
CFREC-Leesburg
American Sunmelon
American Sunmelon
Pioneer
Rogers NK
Pioneer


229
483
433
291
0
346
21
153
0
174
185
353
276
216
267
444
90
285
196
500
449
187
393
142
195
385
249
253
283
111
542


11.0
15.0
18.8
14.0

15.0
9.0
11.1

15.1
11.4
13.9
12.0
18.7
10.5
12.8
19.4
13.7
14.2
11.4
15.0
13.5
15.5
15.4
12.1
11.9
15.4
13.7
12.3
12.0
12.4


12.4
13.0
13.3
12.6

12.4
12.2
13.4

12.9
12.6
12.4
13.4
13.2
12.0
12.5
13.1
13.0
11.7
13.0
12.2
12.6
12.9
12.5
11.9
12.1
13.5
14.1
12.2
11.8
11.0


1161
1086
996
985
978
924
895
880
871
849
845
831
825
814
805
797
795
782
779
778
764
760
758
747
736
725
722
716
715
693
667


14.0
17.4
17.3
15.2
17.7
16.7
16.2
9.8
19.9
16.0
14.1
15.0
13.2
18.6
12.5
12.8
15.7
15.4
15.4
12.0
15.1
15.7
16.4
14.7
13.9
12.1
14.9
13.5
12.4
17.7
11.6


12.8
12.8
13.0
12.8
12.0
12.9
13.4
12.6
12.3
13.3
13.4
12.3
13.3
13.4
12.7
13.1
12.9
12.8
12.8
13.1
12.6
13.1
13.1
13.3
12.2
12.7
13.2
14.4
12.4
12.5
10.6








Table continued


EARLY AND TOTAL YIELDS, AVERAGE FRUIT WEIGHT AND SOLUBLE SOLIDS OF SEEDLESS WATERMELONS. GULF COAST RESEARCH
AND EDUCATION CENTER. SPRING 1993.


Early Harvestl Total Harvest
Weight Avg. fruit Soluble Weight Avg. fruit Soluble
Entry Seed Source (cwt/A)z wt (ib) solids (%) (cwt/A) wt (ib) solids (%)

XPH 6211 Asgrow 80 17.4 14.1 643 15.5 13.8
Ssupersweet 5032 Abbott & Cobb 362 14.3 12.4 637 14.5 12.4
CLF 2043 CFREC-Leesburg 0 624 19.3 12.6
Honeyheart Petoseed 334 11.1 12.7 604 11.9 13.2
Queen of Hearts Petoseed 103 15.0 13.4 595 14.3 13.1
W2006 Pioneer 371 9.4 11.8 590 9.5 11.3
Revelation Shamrock 179 11.1 13.1 575 13.1 13.4
CLF 1027 CFREC-Leesburg 222 10.7 12.6 500 14.5 12.9


1Early harvest based on first two of four harvests.
2Acre 4840 lbf.
(Maynard, Vegetarian 93-08)





-5-


III. VEGETABLE GARDENING

A. Mango melon (Cucumis melo L.
Chito Group).

Over the years one of the most
frequently sent in vegetable oddities has
been the mango melon. I received two this
week, one from Macclenny and one from
Kissimmee.

This member of the Cucurbitaceae
family is a close relative of the muskmelon,
which it resembles. Mango melon is just
one of many common names. The
Kissimmee specimen was called a "smell
melon" in North Florida, and a
"Plumgranny's" in the Tennessee foothills
of the Smokey Mountains. Other common
names are: garden lemon, orange melon,
melon apple, vine peach, and vegetable
orange.

The small, round fruits resemble
miniature honey dew melons except for
their color, which ranges from bright
yellow to pale green with subtle green
stripes running lengthwise. The smallest
form I've seen is about the size of the
kumquat (1"-1 1/2" diameter), and closely
resembles the lemon cucumber, which is
larger, usually 3 x 2 1/2 inches. The
largest is about 3" diameter (round as a
tennis ball).

The fruit is characterized by the
presence of a smooth stem scar where the
fruit slips from the vine. On the reverse
end where the blossom detaches, a small
smooth to irregular-shaped scar may be
seen.


The interior flesh is white or
yellowish white, similar in texture to that
of the cucumber. The central cavity (3 or
4 cells) is filled with clear, gelatinous
mucus surrounding 100+ small muskmelon
- like seeds (1/8-1/4" long). The pleasant
aroma resembles that of the honey-dew
melon or a mango. Notice that one of the
common names is the "smell melon". The
plant is vining. The female flowers (pale
yellow) and the small fruits are borne
along and near the ends of fruiting-
branches that arise at the basal
intersection of leaf-stems and main stem.
This fruit forms in a close cluster including
a tendril and small leaf. All stems are
vining, slender and quite hairy. Tiny male
flowers arise at this same leaf-base region,
close to the main stem, along with 3" long
curly tendrils. Bees are probably the mode
of pollination. The leaves are shaped like
those of muskmelon, being more-rounded
than pointed. The vigorous spreading
vines may be staked or trellised, and are
quite easy to grow. Plants are started
from seeds. While several seed companies
advertise seeds for sale (Burgess,
Dominion, Hollar, Nichols, Seeds Blum,
Shumway), gardeners often are surprised
to find the plant coming up in their garden
from seeds mixed with other cucurbits.

Fruits are ready to harvest 80-90
days after seeding, as soon as the vine
slips easily from the fruit scar. Although
not poisonous, the fruits are not eaten
fresh, but are preserved, pickled, or cooked
immature whole or with seed removed
from the mature fruit.


(Stephens, Vegetarian 93-08)





-6-


Prepared by Extension Vegetable Crops Specialists


Dr. D.J. Cantliffe
Chairman



Dr. S.M. Olson
Assoc. Professor



Mr. J. M. Stephens
Professor


Dr. G.J. Hochmuth
Professor



Dr. S.A. Sargent
Assoc. Professor



Dr. C. S. Vavrina
Asst. Professor


Dr. D.N. Maynard
Professor



Dr. W.M. Stall
Professor & Editor



Dr. J. M. White
Assoc. Professor




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