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Title: Vegetarian
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Title: Vegetarian
Series Title: Vegetarian
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Horticultural Sciences Department
Publication Date: May 1992
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Bibliographic ID: UF00087399
Volume ID: VID00276
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


FLORIDA
COOPERATIVE
EXTENSION SERVICE


VEGETARIAN

A Vegetable Crops Extension Publication

Vegetable Crops Department 1253 Fifield Hall Cainesville,F 32611 Telephone 392-2134


Vegetarian 92-5


May 18, 1992


, .. ; ) Contents

I. NOTES OF INTEREST

A. Vegetable Crops Calendar.


II. COMMERCIAL VEGETABLES

A. Florida Vegetable Transplant Survey 1989-1990.

III. PESTICIDE UPDATE

A. Status of Herbicide Tolerance Establishment
through IR-4.

IV. VEGETABLE GARDENING

A. 4H Horticulture ID: Vegetables Slide Set.






Note: Anyone is free to use the information in this newsletter.
Whenever possible, please give credit to the authors.
The purpose of trade names in this publication is solely
for the purpose of providing information and does not
necessarily constitute a recommendation of the product.







The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational
information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS, STATE OF FLORIDA, IFAS, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA,


L UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA A


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I. NOTES OF INTEREST

A. Vegetable Crops Calendar.

May 28, 1992. Organic Gardening
Research and Education Park Open
House and Tour Day. 1:00 4:00 PM.
Fifield Hall, UF, Gainesville (contact Jim
Stephens).


I. COMMERCIAL VEGETABLES

A. Florida Vegetable Transplant
Survey 1989-1990.

In the spring of 1990, Florida's
forty-sevenvegetable transplant production
houses were surveyed to assess various
aspects of the industry. Thirty-four
production houses responded to the
detailed survey developed and distributed
by Charles S. Vavrina, Extension Vegetable
Horticulturist, and William R. Summerhill,
Evaluation Specialist, Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.
Over 1.15 billion vegetable
transplants (Table 1) were grown in Florida
during the 1989-1990 season (July-May).
Nine companies produced greater than
92% of the transplants (>1,019,427,000):
Classie Plants, CollierGro, Johnny Johnson
Greenhouses, LaBelle Plant World, Plants
of Ruskin, Redi-Plants, Speedling, Inc. (2),
and The Plant Farm. Of the transplants
produced by these nine companies, 46%
were tomatoes, 29% pepper, 10% cabbage
and 6% were tobacco. The 25 smaller
companies responding to the survey
estimated a total production of 133,531,600
transplants: 40% in tomatoes, 22% in
celery, 18% in pepper, and 14% in cabbage.
The remaining production of all producers
included: broccoli, cantaloupe, cauliflower,
celery, collards, eggplant, lettuce, onion,
squash, and watermelon.
Tomato, pepper and cabbage
transplants represent the greatest volume
(>83%) of plants marketed by both large
and small producers in Florida.


Additionally, these crops were grown by
more producers in either category (large or
small) than other crops.
The crops in Table 1 are ranked
according to transplant volume produced
by the major producers (note the similarity
in total volume statistics). Smaller
producers market more collards, onions,
eggplant, and watermelon proportionally
than do the major producers.
Most transplant operations also
produced some "non-vegetable transplants"
including: tobacco, ornamentals, annual
plugs, foliage, citrus liners, and pine trees.
Tobacco is the fourth largest volume grown
transplant in Florida, but only 3 major
houses and 1 minor house produce it.
Various factors make it difficult to
estimate a dollar value for this industry
including: bare root vs. containerized
production, ebb and flow vs. overhead
irrigated production, containerized cell size
differences, cost per unit, etc... The greater
volume of Florida transplants are
containerized so based on a figure of $26.00
per thousand, Florida's vegetable
transplant industry is worth about $30
million dollars.





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Table I: 1990 Census of Vegetable Transplant Volume.


Type


Tomato
Pepper
nIlk'kn a


Tobacco
Celery
t.'r +- lI


Major Producers
466,105,000 (n=9)*
299,270.000 (n=9)
99,036.000 (n=8)
57.950.000 (n=3)
25,034.000 (n=3)
22,318,000 (n=7)


Minor Producers
53,333,800 (n=15)
24.499,000 (n=13)
18.764.800 (n=ll)
500.000 (n=l)
30.000 (n=l)
807,100 (n=7)


Total
519.438,800
323.769,000
117.800,800
58.450.000
55,034,000
23,125,100
1I 1 I /:j. ftrt


Broccoli 16.896,000 (n=6) Z 4.,bu (Ln=81) 11.LJU.
Onion 9,957.000 (n=6) 1,387.200 (n=6) 11,344.200
Lettuce 6,127.000 (n=4) 63.600 (n=6) 6,190.600
Eggplant 5,129,000 (n=6) 1,368,900 (n=9) 6,497,900
Cauliflower 4,295.000 (n=3) 100.000 (n=l) 4,395,000
Cantaloupe 3,727.000 (n=5) 9,600 (n=3) 3,736,600
Collard 2,173,000 (n=4) 2,237,900 (n=9) 4,410,900
Other 1,156.000 (n=8) 180.000 (n=2) 1,336,000
Squash 254,000 (n=2) 45,100 (n=6) 299,100
Total 1,019,427,000 133,531,600 1,152,958,600


*n = the


number of respondents


(Vavrina, Vegetarian, 92-05)

III. PESTICIDE UPDATE

A. Status of Herbicide
Tolerance Establishment throughIR-4.


Charles Meister, IR-4 Southern
Region Coordinator, presented an update
on the tolerances for herbicide uses
secured by the IR-4 project during the past
three years to the IFAS Weed Workers in
March of this year. Labels for all of the
tolerances are not yet established but
several are and others are pending. The
tolerances secured are:

Clomozone/bell and non-bell pepper.

DCPA/all vegetables in the Brassica leafy
vegetable group.

Fluazifop/endive (escarole), macadamia
nut.

Glyphosate/asparagus, beet, Brassica leafy
vegetable group, breadfruit, entire bulb
vegetable group (onions, garlic etc) canistel,
carrot, cherimoya, chicory, cocoa bean,
date, genip, horseradish, jaboticaba,


jackfruit, longan, lychee, mamay sapote,
parsnip, passion fruit, persimmon, potato,
radish, rutabaga, salsify, sapodilla, sopote
(black and white), soursop, sugar beet,
sweet potato, tamarind, turnip, yam.

Metolachlor/cabbage, Chinese cabbage
(tight heading varieties) cubanelle pepper,
bell pepper.

Linuron/parsley.

Norflurazon/asparagus, avocado.

Oxyfluorfen/feijoa, horseradish, papaya,
persimmon, taro.

Pendimethalin/garlic, lupin.

Prometryn/dill.

Sethoxydim/rhubarb, sweet potato.


r.gi


a erme on




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Sodium Chlorate/dry beans group,
southern pea.

2,4-D/raspberry.

Also the IR-4 Herbicide food use
projects for 1992 in Florida and the
Southern Region were listed. These
include:

Clomazone/watermelon.

DCPA/dill, parsley.

Diuron/blueberry.

Glyphosate/prickly pear cactus.

Linuron/arracacha, cassava, tanier, yam.

Metolachlor/blackberry, bok choy, Chinese
broccoli, collard, Chinese mustard, pigeon
pea, watermelon.

Napropamide/chives, daikon, dill, leek,
marjoram, mint, Chinese mustard,
rosemary, summer savory, sweet potato,
tarragon.

Oxyfluorfen/cabbage, calabaza, bell pepper.

Paraquat/calabaza, collard, eggplant,
endive, head lettuce, okra, onion (green),
perennial peanut, pigeon pea, summer
squash, turnip greens, watermelon.


Sethoxydim/cress (upland), daikon,
marjoram, okra, rosemary, sage, tarragon.

Thiobencarb/broccoli, cabbage, carrot.

Trifluralin/dill.

Many of these protocols are for
reregistration, but a number are to expand
tolerances to very minor crops. If you have
questions on the status of IR-4 projects, or
if a herbicide is in the process of tolerance
establishment with the IR-4 project, call
Charles Meister, (904/392-1978)

(Stall, Vegetarian 92-05)


IV. VEGETABLE GARDENING

A. 4H Horticulture ID:
Vegetables Slide Set.

The following slide set (128
Slides) will be available soon for you agents
to use for training your 4H teams on
vegetable identification. Sets will be
available for purchase along with similar
sets on fruits and ornamentals. Use them
for any clientele, such as Master Gardeners
and general groups. We'll let you know the
price and how to order as soon as slides are
back from duplicating. A streamlined
version (one slide per each vegetable) will
be on CD ROM-Disk 5.


Pronamide/dandelion.

Quizalofop/pineapple.









Artichoke, globe
Slide 1. Plant, buds
Slide 2. Plant, buds
Slide 3. Bud-cut open

Artichoke, Jerusalem
Slide 4. Tubers
Slide 5. Tuber, leaves

Asparagus
Slide 6. Fern, berries
Slide 7. Spears
Slide 8. Seeds

Bean, snap
Slide 9. Leaves, fruit,
flowers
Slide 10. Fruit pods, seeds
Slide 11. Purple pods

Beans, lima
Slide 12. Plant, leaves,
pods, flowers
Slide 13. Seeds
Slide 14. Pods, seeds

Beet
Slide 15. Plant, root,
leaves
Slide 16. Seeds
Slide 17. Leaf


Broccoli
Slide 18.
Slide 19.
Slide 20.


Flower head
Plant, heads
Seeds


Brussels sprouts
Slide 21. Stalk, leaves,
bud


Slide 22.
Slide 23.


Buds
Stalk, buds


Cabbage
Slide 24. Seedlings
(types)
Slide 25. Plant-savoy, reg.
Slide 26. Head (red)


Carrot
Slide 27.
Slide 28.
Slide 29.


Root, leaves
Root types
Seeds


Cauliflower
Slide 30. Head (green)
Slide 31. Head (purple)
Slide 32. Head (tied)


Celery
Slide 33.
Slide 34.
Slide 35.


Stalk
Seeds
Transplants


Chard, Swiss
Slide 36. Plant (green)
Slide 37. Leaf (red)
Slide 38. Root, leaves


Chavote
Slide 39.
Slide 40.


Fruit
Plant (vine)


Chinese cabbage
Slide 41. Head (round)
Slide 42. Plant
(Bok Choy)
Slide 43. Plant (Michihili)

Chives
Slide 44. Leaves
Slide 45. Leaves, flower
buds
Slide 46. Leaves, Flowers


Collard
Slide 47.
Slide 48.
Slide 49.


Plant
Plant
Leaves


Cucumber
Slide 50. Leaves, fruit
flower
Slide 51. Seeds
Slide 52. Fruit types


Egplant
Slide 53. Plant, fruit,
(black)
Slide 54. Seeds
Slide 55. Plant, fruit
(white)

Endive
Slide 56. Plant
Slide 57. Plants (Endive/
Escarole)
Slide 58. Escarole


Garlic
Slide 59.
Slide 60.
Slide 61.

Kale
Slide 62.
Slide 63.
Slide 64.

Kohlrabi
Slide 65.
Slide 66.

Leek
Slide 67.
Slide 68.

Lettuce
Slide 69.
Slide 70.
Slide 71.


Cloves
Tops
Plants


Plant
Flowering type
Seeds


Plant
Plant


Plant
Seeds


Head
Seed
Plant types


Muskmelon
Slide 72. Leaves, flowers
stem
Slide 73. Melon
(cut open)
Slide 74. Seeds

Mustard
Slide 75. Plant (broadleaf)
Slide 76. Broadleaf/curly
Slide 77. Leaves (curly)





-5-


Okra
Slide 78. Leaves, pods,
flowers
Slide 79. Seedlings
Slide 80. Seeds


Onion
Slide 81.
Slide 82.
Slide 83.


Bulbs, tops
Plant
Seeds


Parsley
Slide 84. Plant (broadleaf)
Slide 85. Root type
Slide 86. Curly
(on tomatoes)


Parsnip
Slide 87,
Slide 88.
Slide 89.


Leaves, plant
Root
Seeds


Pea, English
Slide 90. Pods, peas
Slide 91. Plant

Pea, Southern
Slide 92. Plant, pods
Slide 93. Seeds
Slide 94. Pods (Judging)

Pepper
Slide 95. Bell plant, pods
Slide 96. Banana plant,
pods
Slide 97. Seeds

Potato
Slide 98. Tubers
Slide 99. Leaves
Slide 100. Stem tubers

Potato, sweet
Slide 101. Plant top
Slide 102. Roots
Slide 103. Boniata root


Radish
Slide 104.

Slide 105.
Slide 106.

Rutabaga
Slide 107.
Slide 108.


Plant, roots
(summer)
Root (winter)
Root (black)


Plant, root
Plant (others)


Spinach
Slide 109. Leaves (curly)
Slide 110. Seeds
Slide 111. Leaves
(smooth)

Squash, Butternut
Slide 112. Fruits
Slide 113. Seed

Squash, Zucchini
Slide 114. Plant, fruits
Slide 115. Seeds
Slide 116. Fruits (yellow)

Sweet Corn
Slide 117. Plant, ears
Slide 118. Seeds
Slide 119. Cob, kernels

Tomato
Slide 120. Plant with
fruits
Slide 121. Fruit
(paste type)
Slide 121. Seeds

Turnip
Slide 123. Leaves
Slide 124. Plant, root
Slide 125. Root, tops

Watermelon
Slide 126. Leaves, melon
(cut)
Slide 127. Fruits
(Judging)
Slide 128. Seeds

(Stephens, Vegetarian 92-05)





-6-



Prepared by Extension Vegetable Crops Specialists


Dr. D.J. Cantliffe
Chairman


Dr. S.M. Olson
Assoc. Professor


Mr. J.M. Stephens
Professor


Dr. G.J. Hochmuth
Assoc. Professor


Dr. S.A. Sargent
Asst. Professor


Dr. C. S. Vavrina
Asst. Professor


Dr. D.N. Maynard
Professor


Dr. W.M. Stall
Professor & Editor


Dr. J.M. White
Assoc. Professor




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