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Title: Vegetarian
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087399/00226
 Material Information
Title: Vegetarian
Series Title: Vegetarian
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Horticultural Sciences Department
Publication Date: November 1986
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087399
Volume ID: VID00226
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Full Text



INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


FLORIDA
COOPERATIVE
EXTENSION SERVICE


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VEGETARIAN

A Vegetable Crops Extension Publication


\getable Crops Department 1255 IISPP Gainesvdle. FL 32611


Vegetarian 86-07


Telephont 392-2134


November 17, 1986


Contents


I. NOTES OF INTEREST


A. Vegetable Crops Calendar

II. PESTICIDE UPDATE

A. Suspension of Dinoseb

III. Commercial Vegetables

A. Strawberry field day program

B. Leek postharvest handling


IV. VEGETABLE GARDENING

A. FSHS Notes on vegetable varieties

B. Florida 4-H horticulture teams excell in national
contests






The use of trade names in this publication is solely for
the purpose of providing information and does not
necessarily constitute a recommendation of the product.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research.
educationaL information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, or national origin.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS, STATE OF FLORIDA, IFAS, UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA. U. S, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING


mooognmom I


















I. NOTES OF INTEREST

A. Vegetable crops calendar

January 12-14. Southern Weed
Science Society, Orlando Hyatt,
Orlando, Florida. (Contact: Bill
Stall).

February 11, 1987. Strawberry Field
Day. AREC Dover. (Contact: E. E.
Albregts).

February 17-18, 1981. Sixth Annual
IFAS Seedsmen Seminar. University
Center Hotel, Gainesville, FL.
(Contact: D. J. Cantliffe).

June 22-26, 1987. State 4-H
Horticultural Institute, Camp Ocala.
(Contact: Bob Black).

II. PESTICIDE UPDATE

A. Suspension of Dinoseb

The Environmental Protection
Agency has notified the Florida
Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services of an immediate
suspension order on the
distribution, sale and use of all
pesticide products containing
Dinoseb, a contact herbicide used to
control broadleaf weeds. The
suspension follows the warning
statement found in last month's
"Vegetarian".
Trade names of Dinoseb products
include: Dinitro, DNBP, Dynamyte,
General Weed Killer, Premerge,
Sinox, Basanite, Caldon, Chemox,
Chemsect, HelFire, Kilaseb,
Nitrapone, and Gebutox.
Please remove or identify the
suspension of these products in all
vegetable recommendations.
(Stall, Veg. 86-11)

III. COMMERCIAL VEGETABLES

A. Strawberry field day program


Date: February 11, 1987
Place: AREC Dover, Florida
Contact: Dr. E. E. Albregts
Moderator: Rick Mitchell
1:30 P.M. Dr. W. E.
Waters Welcome and Introduction;
Dr. J. M. Davidson, Dean of Research
- Overview of IFAS Research; Mrs.
A. J. Overman Nematode Research;
Dr. J. F. Price Insect Management;
Dr. J. P. Gilreath Weed Control;
Dr. C. D. Stanley Water
Requirements; Dr. G. A. Clark -
Recycling Irrigation Water; Dr. C.
M. Howard Varieties and Diseases;
Dr. E. E. Albregts Nutrition and
Culture.
4:00 P.M. Tour of research
plots.
(Stephens Veg. 86-11).

B. Leek postharvest
handling

Eotany & use Leek is a
distinctive species of onion.
However, leek differs from onion in
having flat leaves instead of
tubular and relatively little bulb
development. Plants are grown from
seed which are generally started in
beds or flats for later planting to
the field. Plants are usually
blanched with soil or mulches to
produce the maximum amount of white
basal tissue.
The thick leaf bases or
slightly developed bulb, which
appear to be similar to 'green
onions', are eaten as a cooked
vegetable. The green leaves are
also eaten and have a pungent odor
and acrid taste; they are used in
flavoring in cookery and salads.

Production There is no actual
data on production, but estimates
are that about 20 million pounds are
produced annually. Leek grows best
in a cool to moderate climate.
Although California, New Jersey,
Michigan and Virginia are the
traditional growing areas, leeks are
also produced in several states. In












Florida they are available in
Goulds, Tampa, and Zellwood. Leeks
are adapted to a wide growing area
because they neither form bulbs nor
enter a rest period, as does the
common onion. Leek also has greater
cold resistance than the onion.

Marketing seasons Leeks are
available in the market throughout
the year, with peak supplies
September through November and again
in the spring. Production of leek
in Florida could possibly extend
from November through May.

Harvest maturity Leeks do not
bulb but continue growth and can be
harvested over a long period of
time. Leeks of good quality have
green, fresh tops and medium-sized
necks which are well blanched for at
least two or three inches from the
root and which are young, crisp and
tender. Yellowed, wilted or
otherwise damaged tops aay indicate
old age and flabby, tough and
fibrous necks.

Preparation for market There
are no U. S. Grade Standards for
leek. Appearance is the major
criterion of acceptability. Leeks
are normally washed to remove all
soil, damaged leaves are removed but
roots and tops may not be trimmed.
Generally, leeks are bunched in
3's, depending on size. Although
there are no size restrictions, most
attractive packs contain leeks of
uniform size. One or more ties are
used to secure the bunch for
appearance, ease of handling and
protection from damage. Alternate
stacking within the crate reduces
the incidence of damage and more
efficiently utilizes the cube of the
container.

Shipping container Leeks are
shipped by the grower in a wide
variety of containers, as there is
not a standard pack. One carton
contains 10 film-bags of leek at


about 1 lb. each. A 4/5 bushel
crate is also used packed with 12
bunches and having a net weight of
20 pounds. Other crates are packed
with 18 or 24 bunches with a net
weight ranging to 30 pounds.
Wire-bound crates are frequently
used, with and without plastic
liners.

Commodity requirements/display-
Leeks are perishable, like "green
onions", and therefore should be
properly refrigerated. Optimum
storage temperature is 32" F with
90-95% R. H. Shelf-life of leek in
a polyethylene-lined crate at 32 F
is about 6 weeks, at 40' F they
remain salable for 3 weeks and at
50' F their shelf-life is reduced to
a maximum of 2 weeks. Leeks in a
unlined crate have a shelf-life of
only about 1/2 as long as those in a
poly-lined crate.
At the retail level leeks are
generally trimmed from 12 to 18
inches and may be displayed with or
without roots. Displays range from
bunched (3's) trimmed to 12 inches
with roots, to a single leek trimmed
to 18 inches without roots and
enclosed in an overwrap tray.
Displays should always be
refrigerated.

Nutritional content leeks
contain about 45 calories per 100
gram serving and are also a good
source of calcium, phosphorus, iron,
vitamin a and ascorbic acid.

III. VEGETABLE GARDENING

A. FSHS notes on vegetables
varieties

Several papers presented during
the October, 1986 meeting of The
Florida State Horticultural Society
(FSHS) made reference to the
performance of certain vegetable
varieties. Such information is
always useful when working with home
gardeners, so I am passing on some













of the more pertinent points for
those of you who did not get down to
Miami Beach.

Artichokes, globe Don Maynard
presented information to show that
the globe artichoke will not likely
be a commercial crop in Florida.
Some of the problems encountered at
Bradenton included root rot, low
productivity, and an excessively
long time to produce the edible
portion. Home garderners might be
encouraged to know that some edible
artichokes were produced in his
trials.

Boniato Carl Campbell displayed
some of the leading varieties of the
type of sweet potato known as
boniato. The three shown were:
'Campeon' roots long,
slender, light red to
pinkish-yellow. Leaves entire (few
notches in the edges of the leaf).
'Picadito'-roots smooth, red.
Leaves deeply notched (5-lobes).
'Verde'-roots large,
irregular-shape, medium red. Leaves
shallow-notched*

Cabbage Terri Howe tested 24
hybrid and 4 open pollinated cabbage
varieties in west-central Florida
trials. Three of the best varieties
were 'Bravo', 'Rio Verde', and
'Gourmet'.

Calabaza Not all varieties of this
cuban squash are round and typically
pumpkin shaped. Varieties shown
were results of crosses with
long-necked cylindrical shaped
varieties.

Cassava Henry Ozaki discussed a
common problem which occurs on most
cassava varieties. The roots of
varieties 'Mon', 'HMC', 'CMC', and
'M-C' all develop darkened vascular
bundles caused by pythium.

Leek According to Don Maynard,
leek is a promising crop for Florida


growers.
'Electra'
Richard'
'Verina'.


Varieties for trial are
(short shank) 'King
(long shank), 'Tivi', and


Radicchio This red Italian type of
chicory, whose small cabbage-like
heads are deep red with white
mid-ribs, has potential for Florida
growers and gardeners. Best
production potential was found by
Don Maynard for the varieties
'Augusto' and 'Guilo'.

Snow Pea In order for a snow pea
variety to perform well in Florida,
it must have good resistance to
powdery mildew. "Oregon Sugar Pod'
and 'Oregon Sugar Pod II' looked
good in Don Maynard's trials.

Strawberry Earl Albregts
demonstrated that yields of both
'Dover' and the later maturing
'Tufts' are depressed by foliar
fertilizers when initial soil
fertility is adequate.

Tomato Pat Crill observed that the
use of hybrid tomato varieties is
relatively new in Florida, but today
all commercial acreage is planted to
hybrids. He noted that the first
hybrid tomato developed was
'Fordhook' in 1945, followed by the
popular 'Big Boy' in 1949. The
first IFAS hybrid was 'Floramerica'
in 1974. Since 1974, yields have
risen 38 percent, due at least in
part to the use of hybrid varieties
such as 'Duke' and 'FTE 12'.

Watermelon Phyliss Gilreath
reported on ice-box watermelon
trials in southwest Florida.
Potential for good yields is
promising, with the following
varieties suggested for trial:
'Mickylee' small round gray
5-10 lb. (IFAS); 'Minilee' -
smaller, with thinner rind, 5-10 lb.
(IFAS); 'Baby Fun round, striped












(like 'Crimson Sweet'), larger than
most ice box melons at 10-15 lb.;
'Sugar Baby' old standard dark
green, round variety, with
relatively poor internal quality.


Since many of the above points may
have been taken out of context to a
certain degree, the reader is
referred to the complete reports by
the authors in the forthcoming June
1987 proceedings of the FSHS
meeting.
(Stephens Veg. 86-11)

B. Florida 4-H horticultural
teams excell in national contests

Last month, Florida was
represented well at the National
Junior Horticultural Association
annual convention in Raleigh, N. C.
The Florida champion horticulture
judging and identification team from
Marion County placed 4th in the


nation. The team, coached by
Extension 4-H Agent Bob Renner, was
composed of Dana McCroskey, Theresia
Knowles, Paula Marzella, and Chad
Johnston. Dana placed 2nd in the
the nation, and Theresia placed 5th
high in the nation.
In the Horticultural
Demonstrations, Florida was
represented by state champions
Marcia Cooksey and Amy Smith,
coached by Extension 4-H Agent
Cynthia Goodman. The team received
a blue ribbon award in the
Production Division for their
demonstration on African Violets.
We want to congratulate both
these teams and their coaches, and
thank the sponsors Florida Fruit
and Vegetable Association, Florida
Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services, and the Florida
4-H Foundations.
(Stephens Veg. 86-11)





















Prepared by Extension Vegetable Crops Specialists


Kathleen Delate
Visiting Ext. Agent I

Dr. S. M. Olson
Associate Professor


Dr. D. J. Cantliffe
Chairman

Dr. G. J. Hochmuth
Assistant Professor

Dr. W. M. Stall
Professor

Dr. D. N. Maynard
Professor


J. M. Stephens
Professor


Dr. D. D. Gull
Associate Professor




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