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Title: Vegetarian
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087399/00221
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Title: Vegetarian
Series Title: Vegetarian
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Horticultural Sciences Department
Publication Date: June 1986
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Bibliographic ID: UF00087399
Volume ID: VID00221
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Full Text



INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


FLORIDA
COOPERATIVE
EXTENSION SERVICE


VEGETARIAN

A Vegetable Crops Extension Publication

V ~-l bki C'rop i ep rtin,.nl 12Y5 H&SPP* GaincviIllc, FL 32611 Tl -pIone 392-2134
I IL l I IIII I II IIIII]1 II


Vegetarian 86-06


June 17, 1986


Contents


I. NOTES OF INTEREST


A. Personnel Note

B. New Publications

C. Vegetable Crops Calendar

II. COMMERCIAL VEGETABLES

A. Miniature vegetables

B. Silver-Tip Weed Identified in Florida

III. HOME GARDENING

A. Urban Gardening Harvest Fair, 1986 Version


Note: Anyone is free to use the information in this
newsletter. Whenever possible, please give credit to th
authors.

The use of trade names in this publication is solely for
the purpose of providing information and does not
necessarily constitute a recommendation of the product.


The Irnsitutir of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research.
educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, or national origin.
COOPE-RATIVF EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS. STATE OF FLORIDA, IFAS, UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA. U S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING


I ~- __~


''''

~ jcl
I~














Little Mincu

Easter Egg
Little Finpers
Slim Jim
Classic
Purple Pickling
Ghost Buster


Lettuce


Muskmelon


Onion


Pumpkin


Tom Thumb
Miniature Summer Bibb

Minnesota Midget
Mini Cantaloupe

Barletta

Baby Pam
Little Lantern
Sweetie Pie
Jack-Be-Little
Little Sweetie Pie


5, 14, 18
15

5, 14
3

15

2
16
16
1, 3, 17
14


Little Gen (Hubbard)
Gourmet Globe (Green Summer)
Multipick (Yellow Summer)
Baby Blue (Hubbard)
Blackjack (Green Summer)
Supersette (Yellow Summer)
Arlesa (Green Summer)
Petite Sunburst (Scallop)


19
2, 17
6
7
5
6
15
15


Small-fruited pepper and tomato varieties, ice-box watermelon varieties, and
pickling cucumber varieties have not been included in this list since most seed
companies list these types.


1. Abbott & Cobb, Inc.
P.O. Box 307
Feasterville, PA 19047

2. Agway, Inc.
Seed Division
P.O. Box 4741
Syracuse, NY 13221

3. Burgess Seed & Plant Co.
905 Four Seasons Road
Bloomington, IL 61701

4. W. Atlee Burpee Co.
300 Park Ave.
Warminster, PA 18991


5. Gurney's Seed & Nursery Co.
2nd & Capitol
Yankton, SD 57079

6. Harris-Moran Seed Co.
3670 Buffalo Rd.
Rochester, NY 14624

7. Johnny's Selected Seeds
Albion, ME 04910

8. Liberty Seed Co.
P.O. Box 806
New Philadelphia, OH 44663


Cucumber

Eggplant


5

17, 18
6
3
6
14
6


Squash












must be definitely established. Be-
cause of the limited market, plant-
ings are usually small and need to
be scheduled more precisely than
traditional plantings to insure a
continuous product supply. Pesti-
cide application schedules also are
more demanding because there is such
a short time to harvest. Miniature
vegetables, especially those har-
vested in the immature stage, are
more perishable than other crops,


and require special postharvest han-
dling.
A review of the 1986 vegetable
seed catalogs crossing my desk indi-
cates that many seed companies offer
varieties claimed to be baby or
miniature. For the most part, these
varieties have not been evaluated in
Florida, so should only be planted
in trial blocks. Those varieties
listed will provide a starting place
for growers interested in miniature
vegetables.


Vegetable Variety Source


Triumph de Farcey
Slenderette
Vernandon

Little Ball
Baby Beet Spinel
Little Mini Ball
Gladiator

Salarite
Baby Red

Minicore
Parisian Rondo
Little Finger
Sucram
Baby Sweet Hybrid
Baby Finger
Baby Orange
Fincor
Planet
Vitasweet 500
Fancy Nantes
Amstel
Mini Express
Early French Frame
Glowing Ball
Lady Finger


Cauliflower

Indian Corn


7
5, 18
15


4, 15, 17, 19
10
14, 16
5

5
14

5, 7, 8, 16
2, 11
4, 9, 10, 12, 17
10, 14
16
16
16
16
15, 16
1
1
12
18
18
5
3


Snowball 16

Cutie Pops
Symphonie


Sweet Corn Baby Corn
Golden Midget
Miniature Hybrid


10
5, 12, 13, 14
12


Bean


Beet


Cabbage


Carrot














Little Mincu

Easter Egg
Little Fingers
Slim Jim
Classic
Purple Pickling
Ghost Buster


Lettuce


Muskmelon


Tom Thumb
Miniature Summer Bibb


Minnesota Midget
Mini Cantaloupe


Barletta


Onion


Pumpkin


Baby Pam
Little Lantern
Sweetie Pie
Jack-Be-Little
Little Sweetie Pie


5, 14, 18
15

5, 14
3

15

2
16
16
1, 3, 17
14


Little Gen (Hubbard)
Gourmet Globe (Green Summer)
Multipick (Yellow Summer)
Baby Blue (Hubbard)
Blackjack (Green Summer)
Supersette (Yellow Summer)
Arlesa (Green Summer)
Petite Sunburst (Scallop)


19
2, 17
6
7
5
6
15
15


Small-fruited pepper and tomato varieties, ice-box watermelon varieties, and
pickling cucumber varieties have not been included in this list since most seed
companies list these types.


1. Abbott & Cobb, Inc.
P.O. Box 307
Feasterville, PA 19047

2. Agway, Inc.
Seed Division
P.O. Box 4741
Syracuse, NY 13221

3. Burgess Seed & Plant Co.
905 Four Seasons Road
Bloomington, IL 61701

4. W. Atlee Burpee Co.
300 Park Ave.
Warminster, PA 18991


5. Gurney's Seed & Nursery Co.
2nd & Capitol
Yankton, SD 57079

6. Harris-Moran Seed Co.
3670 Buffalo Rd.
Rochester, NY 14624

7. Johnny's Selected Seeds
Albion, ME 04910

8. Liberty Seed Co.
P.O. Box 806
New Philadelphia, OH 44663


Cucumber

Eggplant


5

17, 18
6
3
6
14
6


Squash












9. Earl May Seed & Nursery Co.
Shenandoah, IA 51603

10. Nichol's Garden Nursery
1190 North Pacific Highway
Albany, OR 97321

11. J. E. Ohisens Enke
Roskildevei 325A
DK-2630 Taastrup
Denmark

12. Geo. W. Park Co., Inc.
Greenwood, SC 29646

13. Pinetree Garden Seeds
New Gloucester, ME 04260

14. Seeds Blum
Idaho City Stage
Boise, ID 83706

15. Shepherd's Garden Seeds
7389 West Zayante Rd.
Felton, CA 95018

16. Stokes Seeds,. Inc.
P.O. Box 548
Buffalo, NY 14240


17. Twilley Seed
P.O. Box 65
Tcevose, PA


Co., Inc.

19047


18. Vermont Bean Seed Co., Inc.
Garden Lane
Bomoseen, VT 05732

19. Vesey's Seeds Ltd.
P.O. Box 9000
Houlton, ME 04730

(Maynard, Veg 86-06)


B. Silvershieth Knotweed
Identified in Florida

Silvershieth Knotweed, Polygonum
argyrocoleon Steud. ex Kunze, is a
weed in the Buckwheat Family. It is
new to Florida and has just been
found in vegetable fields near
Zellwood in Orange County. This


weed is not at all common in the
United States being found in North
Carolina, Texas and California. It
has been found only once in North
Carolina and is seldom collected in
Texas, but has become a frequent
weed in California. It is native to
the Near and Middle East.
The name Polygonum comes from
the Greek words poly meaning many
and gpn meaning knee or joint.
This refers to the many joints of
the stem which are frequently swol-
len and bent resembling knees. The
species name argyrocoleon also comes
from two Greek words, argyr meaning
silvery and cole meaning a sheath.
This refers to the silvery sheaths
that are around the stem at each
joint. The common name also notes
the prominent silvery sheaths which
are close together and easily seen
at the tip of the branches.
Silvershieth Knotweed is an
annual which can be almost two feet
tall (0.5 meters). Late in the
season the tap roots become woody,
but as far as known it does not last
more than one season. The entire
plant is smooth. The blue-green
leaves are somewhat narrow and up to
two inches long (5 centimeters).
The leaves at the tip of the plant
are quite small. The flowers occur
in clusters of 1 to 5 at the joints
with the small leaves at the tips of
the branches. The flowers are
greenish-white and are very small.
They range from 1.5 to 2 millimeters
(about 1/16 inches) long. The fruit
is the same length as the flowers,
is three-sided and shiny.
This weed is usually found in
moist soils. Propagation seems to
be by seeds. To prevent the spread
of this weed, equipment should be
cleaned between fields. If you
think you have found other locations
for this pest please take an entire
plant specimen to your county agent
or other extension specialist. Be
on the lookout for Silvershieth













Knotweed and help stop its spread
now.

(David Hall Veg. 86-06)


II:. VEGETABLE GARDENING

A. Urban Gardening Harvest
Fair, 198b Version

Downtown city-folks in
Jacksonville had an opportunity to
rub elbows with and talk growing
vegetables with that city's urban
gardeners during the annual Harvest
Fair, Saturday, June 7. The oohss!"
and "aahs!" were loud and plentiful,
as the samplings of a bountiful
harvest were displayed on the tables
in the park at Five-Points.
As has been the case for almost
a decade now, the annual event sig-
nals the close of the spring
gardening season for the many hun-
dreds of participants in the "Gar-
dening Lots" project of the Duval
COuny Extension Service. It was a
day for fun, good fellowship, and
garden-talk for the program partic-
ipants, and a chance to show-off
braggin-size zucchinis, gleaming-
white turnips, and tantalizing
pEpers. Not only were the radishes
sparkling, but so were the eyes of
the exhibitors, glistening with
pride and the confident knowledge
that they could do it again.
For the gardeners, the highlight
of the day was the judging of their
exhibits and the rewarding blue,
red, and white ribbons. In addi-
tion, winning exhibitors received
merchandise awards donated by local
garden supply stores and other city
merchants happy to be a part of the
community endeavor. Other events of
the day which allowed gardeners to
display the results and products of
their gardens were: Largest vegeta-
ble contest, vegetable basket
arrangement, and canned vegetables.
Or.iv 6 large vegetables were entered
in the "largest" category. These


were: Cucumber (2 lb. 12 oz.),
Turnip (3 lb. 7 oz.), Cucumber (3 Ib
12 oz.), Zucchini (7 lb. i oz.),
Turnip (7 lb. 11 oz.), Zucchini
(8 lb. 10 oz).
The largest turnip was declared
the winner in the category based on
a point system which matches weight
with degree of difficulty. The big
zucchini came in second place, fol-
lowed by the big cucumber. Prizes
for the gardeners were: 1st place,
$25.00; 2nd place, $10.00; and 3rd
place, $5.00.
Several other events featuring
vegetables were part of the day's
festivities. Ladies who had peeled
perhaps a ton of potatoes in their
lifetime got a chance to show-off
their skills in the potato peeling
contest. The one who could produce
the longest continuous peel without
breaking it was declared the winner.
Contestants learned the first lesson
which was to select a large potato
for this event.
Children enjoyed the potato-
rolling contest, wherein they rolled
a potato with their nose down a
card-board runway. Also, they got a
chance to look at the vegetables
through the eyes of the judges by
competing in the vegetable judging
contest.
Additional fun events for the
youngsters were the three-legged
race and the animal petting zoo,
which included a pig, 2 geese, and
chickens.
The large crowd was feted to
some of the best boiled sweet corn
around, the 'Silver Queen' hot out
of the pot. They got their ques-
tions answered and plant problems
solved by the staff of friendly
Master Gardeners standing by their
diagnostic tables, and they had a
chance to see and purchase the
"fruits of labor" of many fine area
artists and craftsmen.
Local television cameras ground
away all day recording the gala
events and happenings of the day to
share with those who could not












attend. All in all, the 1986 Har-
vest Fair helped prove again that
vegetable gardens and the production
therefrom are a popular and vital
part of the Jacksonville scene and
many other urban settings elsewhere
around our state.

(Stephens Veg. 86-06)








Prepared by Extension Vegetable Crops Specialists


Dr. D. J. Cantliffe
Chairman

Dr. G. J. Hochmuth
Assistant Professor

Dr. W. M. Stall ;.C" IL
Professor / /1l) t

Dr. D. N. Maynard
Professor


Kathleen Delate
Visiting Ext. Agent I

Dr. S. M. Olson
Assistant Professor

J. M. Stephens
Associate Professor

Dr. D. D. Gull
Associate Professor




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