Title: Vegetarian
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 Material Information
Title: Vegetarian
Series Title: Vegetarian
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: July 1983
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Bibliographic ID: UF00087399
Volume ID: VID00186
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


FLORIDA
COOPERATIVE
EXTENSION SERVICE


VEGETARIAN

A Vegetable Crops Extension Publicatior

Vegetable Crops Department 1255 HIIPP Gainesville. FL 32611 Telephone 392-213


Vegetarian 83-07


". ." ^ "CONTENTS


I. NOTES OF INTEREST

A. Vegetable Crops Calendar

B. New Publications


II. PESTICIDE UPDATE

A. Chinese Cabbage


B. Update on IR-4 Requests for Pesticide Labels for
Vegetable Uses


III. HOME VEGETABLE GARDENING

A. Gardening on Small Florida Farms









The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research,
educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, or national origin.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS, STATE OF FLORIDA, IFAS, UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA, U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING


July 6, 1983


1







-2-


I. NOTES OF INTEREST

A. Vegetable Crops Calendar

The Twenty second Annual Florida Tomato Institute will be
held September 8, 1983 at the Sandpiper Bay Conference Center,
Port St. Lucie, Florida. The Institute will precede the Annual
Joint Tomato Committee/Exchange Conference at the same location
on September 9-10, 1983.

(Stall)

B. New Publications

Vegetable Field Day, Research Report BRA 1983-9 is available
from the Bradenton AREC, 5007 60th Street, East, Bradenton, FL
33508.
(Maynard)


II. PESTICIDE UPDATE

A. Chinese Cabbage

Bok choy as well as Napa is considered by EPA to be a type
of Chinese cabbage and as such is grouped with Chinese cabbage on
pesticide labels. There has been some controversy in the past on
the pesticide labeling on these two crops.

B. Update on IR-4 Requests for Pesticide Labels for Vegetable Uses

Dr. Charles Meister, Southern Region Coordinator (IR-4), in
a June 27th memorandum updated their progress toward labeling
pesticides for use in selected vegetables. In his comments from
the attached tables, Dr. Meister points out that:

(1) The EPA still requires more information on the toxicity of
the EBDC's from Dupont and Rohm and Haas before expanding
Manzate 200 and Dithane M-45 labels. IR-4 has placed a
temporary hold on all these projects.

(2) Although Ridomil has a food-use label for citrus, Ciba-Geigy
has not yet provided IR-4 with a written comment that they
are interested in labels for minor crops.

(3) The recent IR-4 requests for Fusilade and Poast labels have
received the go-ahead and IR-4 will be supporting field
trials and laboratory residue analysis for many of these
projects in 1984.








-3-


The following tables are selected commodities and pesticides
that have received the most grower interest and IR-4 support. If
there are any questions on IR-4 procedures or possible expansion
or clearance requests, contact Dr. Meister at the Pesticide
Research Laboratory, Gainesville.

STATUS* UPDATE ON IR-4 REQUESTS FOR
LABELS FOR SELECTED HERBICIDE/VEGETABLE USES

COMMODITY DEVRINOL DACTHAL DUAL FLUCHLORALIN FUSILADE PARAQUAT POAST

Beans I I 0 I 0
Beet tops X
Bok choy Included in Chinese Cabbage Label
Broccoli I L I 0 T 0
Cabbage I L I I 0 I 0

Cantaloupe I L 0 0
Carrot I 0 0 0
Cauliflower I L I I
Chinese
broccoli 0
Chinese
cabbage 0 0 I

Chinese
mustard
Chinese
radish 0 0
Collard L I I
Dandelion
Dill 0 0

Eggplant
Endive,
Escarole I
Leek
Lettuce X 0 L 0
Mustard
greens L 0 I 0 0

Parsley X
Pumpkin 0
Radish
Spinach I 0 0
Squash L 0

Strawberry L L I T 0
Turnip
greens L I 0 0
Watercress 0 0 X
Watermelon I L 0 0








-4-


STATUS* UPDATE ON IR-4 REQUESTS FOR
LABELS FOR SELECTED INSECTICIDE/VEGETABLE USES


AMBUSH


LANNATE


COMMODITY (POUNCE) DIAZINON (NUDRIN) MONITOR PHOSDRIN PYDRIN

Beet tops L L I
Bok choy Included in Chinese Cabbage Label
Cabbage L L L L L
Cantaloupe I L L
Carrot L L L

Cauliflower L L L L L
Chinese
broccoli 0 0 0 0
Chinese
cabbage I T L I I I
Chinese
mustard I I I
Chinese
radish 0 0 0 0 0

Collard I L L I L I
Dandelion L I
Dill 0 I. I
Eggplant I L L T
Endive,
Escarole 0 L I I I 0

Leek I I
Lettuce L L L L
Mustard
greens L I L I
Parsley L L I
Radish L L I

Spinach L I L I
Squash I L L L
Strawberry L L L I
Swiss
chard L L I
Turnip
greens L L I L I

Watercress I L(Hawaii) L I
Watermelon I L L L








-5-


STATUS* UPDATE ON IR-4 REQUESTS FOR
LABELS FOR SELECTED FUNGICIDE/VEGETABLE USES


MANZATE 200
COMMODITY BENLATE BRAVO (DITHANE M45) RIDOMIL ROVRAL TERRACLOR

Beet tops I X 0
Bok choy Included in Chinese Cabbage Label
Broccoli L L 0 I L
Cabbage L L 0 I
Carrot 0 L L I

Cauliflower I L 0 O I L
Chinese
broccoli 0 0
Chinese
cabbage I I 0 0 0
Chinese
mustard 0 0
Collard 0 0 I

Dandelion I
Dill 0 0
Eggplant 0 0 I
Endive,
Escarole I X 0 0
Leek L 0 0

Lettuce I X 0 I 0
Mustard
greens I X
Parsley I X 0
Radish X I 0 I
Spinach T X

Squash L L 0
Turnip
greens I X 0 I
Watercress I X I 0 0
Watermelon L L 0


*STATUS KEY

0-Request but no action; X-Manufacturer not interested; I-IR-4 work in
progress; T-tolerance granted; L-Label printed


(Stall)








-6-


III. HOME VEGETABLE GARDENING

A. Gardening on Small Florida Farms

Determining the economics of food gardening is increasing in
importance to us in Extension as we attempt to evaluate and quan-
tify our home horticulture programs. One such effort in this
direction was reported in the Proceedings of the Florida State
Horticultural Society, vol. 95, pgs. 264-268, 1982. It is sum-
marized here as a benefit to all our readers.

Using a National Science Foundation Grant, Christina Gladwin
and John Butler, FRED, IFAS, made a survey of vegetable gardening
activities on 104 family farms in Alachua, Baker, Gilchrist, and
Levy Counties. The survey, conducted in the spring and fall of
1981, asked them why they garden, how they garden, and how the
garden is helpful to them.

Results Data collected in the four North Florida counties
and summarized in Table 1 show that almost everyone who lives in
the country grows and preserves some portion of their own food.

Table 1. Number and percent of farm families who garden (n=104).


Alachua Baker Gilchrist Levy All
1980 1981 1981 1981 counties
Number of farmers who: n=21 n=30 n=25 n=28 number %

Have a spring-summer garden 17 23 23 26 89 86
Have a fall garden (n=74) 10 na 16 21 47 64
Have no spring garden this year 4 7 2 2 15 14
Raise own meat/hunt/fish 17 26 18 18 79 76
Average size of spring-
summer garden 1.0 a. 1.6 0.97 0.51 0.83
Average size of fall garden
(n=74) 0.24 a. na 0.02 0.24 0.16
Use of garden produce:
Can 8 23 17 24 72 69
Freeze 18 27 21 26 92 88
Give away/share 15 20 23 26 94 81
Average number of freezers
owned by family 1.0 1.6 1.6 1.7 1.48
Percent of consumed vegetables
raised in own garden 42 83 76 73 -- 69
Percent of meat from own
livestock and/or hunting
and fishing 41 75 64 38 -- 55








-7-


Of the 104 farms families contacted in the survey, all have had
gardens at some point in their lives and 86% had a garden in
1981. These gardens ranged from less than 0.1 acre in size to 5
acres, with 0.83 acres being the average of the main spring gar-
den (contrasted with the U.S. average of 0.014 acres). In addi-
tion, fall gardens are quite common and are usually about a quar-
ter to a half the size of the main spring garden. Some 6 percent
have a continuous year-round garden.

Two different types of gardens were identified: the standard
row garden and the bed garden. Of the farmers that had spring-
summer gardens, 98% had a standard row type garden with the vege-
tables planted in rows. The remaining 2% had a "bed" garden
where vegetables were planted on wide beds rather than the stan-
dard rows. This wide bed system is popular with their urban
neighbors.

Most gardens are near the farmhouses where they can be
watered and tended easily. Most contain between 7 and 30 vege-
tables, with the most frequently grown being: tomatoes, southern
peas, yellow squash, Irish potatoes, sweet potatoes, sweet corn,
okra, snap beans, lima beans, cucumbers, and peppers.

Garden produce is put to good use, with 69% of farm families
surveyed canning at least some of it, 88% freezing part of it,
and 81% giving some produce away. Freezing was more popular than
canning, with the average farm family in the survey group owning
1.48 freezers. The average North Florida farm family, according
to the survey, gets 69% of the vegetables they eat from their own
garden. In addition, 76% of the farmers surveyed raise their own
meat and/or hunt and/or fish, providing the average farm family
with 55% of the meat and fish consumed.

Why farmers garden? When asked why a garden was grown, 52%
of the respondents in the sample said that one of their main
goals was to save money. While no one felt that money was lost
in gardening, clearly the amount saved is closely tied to the
number of people using the food and to canning and freezing the
produce.

Sixty percent of the farmers felt that the high quality of
home-grown produce was the main advantage of having a garden.
Forty-one percent of those surveyed grew a garden for conven-
ience, satisfaction, and self-sufficiency. As one woman said,
"It's such a pleasure to sit down to a meal knowing that all the
vegetables on the table came from your own garden." Thirty per-
cent felt that having a garden was simply part of living on a
farm (role playing). Five percent felt a main reason for garden-
ing was exercise, and 4% thought they would do it because it was
fun.







-8-


Do farmers save money by gardening? This question was con-
sidered in the same survey. The findings will be disclosed and
discussed in next months newsletter.

(Stephens)















Prepared by Extension Vegetable Crops Specialists


D.N. Maynard
Chairman Ass

G.A. Marlowe
Professor Ass

W.M. Stall
Associate Professor Ass

A. McDonald
VEA-I Multi-County


S.P. Kovach
istant Professor

M. Sherman
istant Professor


J.M. Stephen
ociate Yrofej


Anyone is free to use the information in this newsletter.
possible, please give credit to the authors.


Whenever


The use of trade names in this publication is solely for the purpose
of providing information and does not necessarily constitute a recom-
mendation of the product.


Statement: "This public document was promulgated at a cost of $144.55 or
24 .4 per copy for the purpose of communicating current technical and
educational materials to extension, research and industry personnel.


NOTE:




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