Title: Vegetarian
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087399/00050
 Material Information
Title: Vegetarian
Series Title: Vegetarian
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: November 1965
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087399
Volume ID: VID00050
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
STATE OF FLORIDA


COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE.
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, AND
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF
AGRICULTURE, COOPERATING


Vegetable Crop Specialists

VEGETARIAN


AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
COUNTY AGENT ANO
HOME DEMONSTRATION WORK
GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA


November 8, 1965



TO: COUNTY AGENTS, ASSOCIATES AND ASSISTANTS

NO: 71


IN THIS ISSUE


Sweet Potato Variety Trials
Plants Susceptible to Watermelon Mosaic Virus
Dormancy of Potato Seed and Treatments
Short Subjects
(a) Kenaf
(b) County Agents Training
(c) New Publications
(d) New Varieties
(e) Fumigation & Organics in Fertilizer
(f) Zinc Deficiency in Tomatoes


1. Sweet Potato Variety Trials:

The sweet potato trials conducted by Dr. Victor F. Nettles at Gaines-
ville and Dr. Phil J. Westgate at Sanford showed some interesting results,
in 1964 and 1965.

At the Central Florida Experiment Station, Sanford, seed potatoes
were put in the plant bed February 17, 1964. Plants set in field April
10, 1964. Each variety was dug at two week intervals beginning on August
25 until November 4, 1964.


Sanford Sweet Potato Trial Results 1964


Harvest Date
For Highest Yield
Oct. 21
Oct. 7 or 21
Nov. 4
Nov. 4


Variety
N. C. 162
Centennial
Georgia Red
Porto Rico #1


Marketable Yield
50 Lb. Bu/Acre
562
456
389
361




-2-


Results Gainesville Sweet Potato Variety Trials 1965 Set In
Field March 31 and Harvested September 13. Bushels Per Acre.


I
Variety I
1. Unit 1 Porto Rico
2. Georgia Red
3. Centennial
4. Gem
5. Goldrush
6. NC 172
7. NC 210
8. Cuban (Alquizar)
9 Cnastal wTetl*


J. S.
lo. 1
190
231
259
406
267
225
222
220
qq


Marketable Marketable
U.S.1 & U.S.2 & Jumbos
288 376
309 360
342 417
460 678
317 353
304 334
300 309
292 516
1f5 156


Total
480
437
490
737
432
415
433
716
204


* Coastal Sweet planted April 22 and harvested September 14.


North Florida Experiment Station, Quincy, 1965 Sweet Potato
Trial Results. Planted April 23 and Harvested October 22.

Marketable Yield No. 1 Culls
Variety bu./A. bu./A. Lu.A.
Centennial 502 424 55
Gem 432 349 128
NC 212 338 290 58
Ga. Red 245 194 46
Red E. Sweet 242 217 171
Coastal Sweet 84 67 13


2. Plants Susceptible To Watermelon Mosaic Virus:

Recently we have released a mimeo concerning watermelon mosaic virus
and its control. Since this mimeo was sent out new information concerning
host range has appeared in Phytopathology, Volume 55, No. 8, August 1965.


Recovery of Untermelon Mosaic Virus Groups 1 and 2 From
Mechanically Inoculated Plants in Host-Range Testa
Isolates of Watermelon
Mosaic Virus
Group 1 Group 2
Hosts 1 2 5 7


Chenopodiaceae
Chenopodium album
C. amaranticolor
Dixie Market spinach
Compositae
Dwarf African marigold
Cucurbitaceae
Charleston Grey
watermelon
Prolific Straightneck
squash
PMR 45 muskmelon


- -b
- +i


* A

-i..


:-.
C: 1


Table continued


I








-3-


Isolates of Watermelon
Mosaic Virus
Group 1 Group 2
Hosts 1 2 5 7
Euphorbiaceae
Snow-on-the-Mountain + +
Leguminosae
Garder pea +
Sweet pea + +
Crimscn clover + +
Hubam clover +
Common vetch + +
Guar ++
Solanaceae
Nicotiana glutinosa -
Samsun tobacco -
a + indicates virus recovered.
b Recovered by aphids only.

3. Dormancy of Potato Seed and Treatments:

Every year at this time there is some question from growers of fall
and early winter potatoes whether they should treat with dormancy breaking
chemicals. Here is an excerpt from U.S.D.A. Agricultural Handbook No. 267.

Storage temperatures and humidities affect seed quality. High storage
temperatures encourage early sprouting, if sprouts occur and you are not
ready to plant removal of sprouts once does not hurt the seed. Repeated
desprouting does reduce the value of seed. Varieties differ in the number
of sproutings that can be removed before the tubers are unfit for seed.
A storage of 40F. or slightly lower is recommended for keeping seed
potatoes. Seed stored at 400F. or below should be warmed up at 600F. or
higher for 10 to 14 days before planting.

The true rest period occurs after harvest when the tuber buds will
not develop sprouts even though environmental conditions are favorable.
Dormancy is that stage when the sprouts will initiate growth when environ-
mental conditions are favorable. Freshly harvested potatoes are usually
in a pronounced state of rest. Varieties vary in the length of time they
will remain in the rest period or in a nonsprouting condition. When
potatoes must be planted soon after harvest it may be necessary to break
the rest period. We use two chemicals here in Florida. Recent research
by Dr. Guzman at the Everglades Experiment Station indicates that potassium
thiocyanate is slowly effective on some varieties and that gibberellic
acid concentrations of from 1.0 ppm to2. ppm are necessary depending on
time of application and variety. Follow instructions found in Extension
Circular 118A "Potato Production Guide.'





-4-


Time Required To Sprout Potatoes Stored At Various Temperatures.
Storage Temperature
Variety 70"F. 600F. 50F. 40'F.
Weeks Weeks Weeks Weeks
Coyuga 7 7 10 25
Chippewa 8 8 12 *36
Houma 8 8 12 27
Irish Cabblo 8 9 13 20
Katahdin 8 8 13 *40
Kennebec 9 9 19 *38
Pontiac 8 9 18 *35
Russet Burbark 8 10 13 27
Sebago 6 6 11 *41
Teton 8 8 20 *41
White Rose 8 12 15 27
1. Adapted from Uright, R. C. and Whiteman, T. M., 1949, "The
Comparative Length of Dormant Periods of 35 Varieties of
Potatoes at Different Storage Temperatures." American
Potato Journal 26: 330-335. No sprouting was visible at
end of this storage test.

3. Short Subjects

(a) Kenaf a plant of many uses in the world and a member of the
hibiscus family, along with cotton and okra, has a potential new use.
Dr. Killinger of the Agronomy Department at Gainesville has a number of
varieties and hybrids, of these several appear to be suitable for making
pole bean stakes and from our observation they should produce a higher
yield and better quality stake than Sesbania.

(b) County Agents Training

A one week training course in depth is being worked out to give
County Extension Workers interested in vegetable production some inten-
sified training in principles of nutrition, insect, disease, nematode and
weed control, plant breeding and varieties and economics of production and
marketing. The dates have already been set for the week of May 23-27,
1966. Keep this date open.

(c) Recent Publications You Should Have Copies Of.

1. U.S.D.A. Statistical Bulletin No. 362, "Conversion Factors
and Weights and Measures for Agricultural Commodities and
Their Products."

2. U.S.D.A. Agricultural Handbook No. 291, "Losses in Agriculture.'

3. U.S.D.A. Farmers Bulletin No. 2169, "How to Control Soil
Blowing." (Not a new one but worth having and reading again).

(d) New Varieties

The bush snap bean tested in several locations for a number of
years as B-3370 has been named Provider. It has been a high yielding good
quality bean for fresh market and withstands mechanical picking with a
minimum of damage.










(e) Organic fertilizer and soil fumigation do not go together. This
was re-emphasized in a paper given at the Soil and Crop Science Society
by Mrs. Overman. Her data on fumigation of strawberry land with most of
the soil fumigants showed decreased nitrification and yields of berries,
because of nitrate nitrogen deficiency.

(f) Zinc deficiency in tomatoes has been widespread in the sandy
soils of both the lower East and Teest oastss of Florida. More prevalent
on staked tomatoes than on the ground crop. Heavy leaching rains coupled
with less use of zineb fungicide has been responsible. A switch back to
zineb for a couple of sprays has helped in mild cases, but one application
of zinc sulphate at 4 lbs. per acre as a spray has been best. If you see
a peculiar yellowing of mature leaves between the veins,then a rusty
appearance on the under sides which die then you can suspect zinc
deficiency.

Sincerely,



F. S mison, Charan es Montelaro
Vegetable Crops Department Vegetable Crops Specialist

i7k r1. c C. lfctV'
Mason E. Marvel
Associate Vegetable Crops Specialist




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