Title: Vegetarian
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 Material Information
Title: Vegetarian
Series Title: Vegetarian
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: July 1963
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087399
Volume ID: VID00045
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
STATE OF FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, AND VegetablIe Crop Specialists COUNTY AGENT AND
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF HOME DEMONSTRATION WORK
AGRICULTURE. COOPERATING V E G E T A R I N GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
VEGETARIAN



July C, 1963


NO; 60

TO: COU7iTY AGENTS


EXTENSION VEGETABLE ADVISORY COIMITTEE MEETING

The State Vegetable Extension Program highlighted the discussion
at the recent Gainesville meeting of the Extension Vegetable Advisory
Committee. In other discussions, agents expressed a need for frequent
informational newsletters from the specialists and for state-wide area
vegetable training sessions. Plans are underway for both these items.
Long and short-range planning, training-program planning and vegetable
program evaluation were established as being the role of the Extension
Vegetable Advisory Committee.


NEW STRAWBERRY VARIETIES

Three new strawberry varieties are looking good in trials in Florida.
Dr. Locascio has reported on them in the Sunshine State Report. They
are Torrey and Fresno, developed in California and Dabreak, developed
in Louisiana. At this time, there are no comreroial quantities of plants
available. A limited supply should be available by January, 1964 from
the nurseries in the area where the varieties were developed.

VERTICILLIUM WILT OF STRAWBERRIES

This disease has not been recognized as being serious on strawber-
ries in Florida until recently. This has been observed primarily in
the south Dade County area. Dr. Strobel at the Subtropical Experiment
Station has definitely established that the same verticillium that is
attacking tomatoes, okra and eggplant in Dade County is causing serious
damage on Florida 90 strawberries. He has several strawberry varieties
at the station which show some resistance to the disease; however, none
are superior to Florida 90 in horticultural characters.

WARNING Strawberry plants should not be removed from south Florida
to other areas of the state.


NEMATODE CONTROL


The broad band applicators used by Dr. Rhodes at the Central Florida








Experiment Station for application of nematocides both in sand and peat
soils appear to be much more effective than the old methods of applica-
tion. For more detailed information see Volume 75, page 125-129 of the
Florida State Horticultural Society Proceedings.


ONION PRODUCTION

Research workers in Florida are always gathering information which
makes commercial onion production more nearly possible. Tests at Braden-
ton and Belle Glade, Ft. Pierce and Gainesville have brought out these
findings.

The varieties Texas Grano 501, Yellow Granex and Bermex 5 are the
best yellows and Early Crystal 281, White Grano and Eclipse (L303) are
the best white varieties. Tropicana Red, a hybrid F1, is an outstanding
red variety for yield, disease resistance and keeping qualities.

Bulbing onions, spaced 2 inches apart, produced more number 1 bulbs
of uniform size than if spaced 4 inches apart on sany soils.

Onions grown on sandy soils are usually brighter, have better skin
condition and cure and keep better than those grown on organic soils.

Trials at Ft. Pierce and Belle Glade indicate that with the varie-
ties listed above that yields increased from the first seeding date
(Sept. 16 to Oct. 15). Seeding then progressively decreased in yield
as seeding dates were delayed through October into December.


COMPATIBILITY OF CHEMICALS INT THE SPRAY T.: K AND PLANT IIJJIPY

Several instances of peculiar plant injury are observed every year
and are not always diamnoFed correctly because of the many combinations
of chemicals, crops and environment which are involved. Workers in
Florida and elsewhere have worked on this problem for a number of years,
however, only recently have we had so many different chemicals which
could be sprayed on. Now commercial growers may be applying two or more
funjicidc3, two or more insecticides, each with its own combination of
spreaders, stickers, emulsifiers, and diluents.

In addition to these he puts fertilizers which may contain up to
ten or more chemicals. There is no way of knowing what chemical reac-
tions are taking place in the tank.

Studies begun in 1961 at the Watermelon and Grape Lab by Dr. Schenck
and Dr. Adlerz using 72 combinations of insectides, fungicides and foliar
fertilizers on watermelons has shown: Disease control was best with zineb-
maneb or maneb alone. Mixtures containing Thiodan or Nugreen significantly
decreased disease control. Budworm control was best with guthion and
mixtures containing either zineb or mancb without fertilizers. Insect
control was reduced by mixtures contaiining either zineb or maneb without
fertilizers. This research is being continued as well as work of the
same nature which was begun at the Gulf Coast Station on tomatoes.








These results vividly show how unpredictable the results may be
where chemicals are combined in the spray tank.


A PLUG

Those of you who are not now members of the Florida State Horticul-
tural Society are missing the very best source of horticultural research
information available to you. If you cannot attend the society meetings,
you should belong to the Society to receive a copy of the Proceedings.
In 1962, thirty-two reports were presented in the Vegatcable Section co-
vering many subjects.


PUBLICATIONS

Four new publications are now available. Please remove all old
copies of these and discard them and replace with the following:


Ext. Circ. 193C -


Ext.
Ext.
Exp.


Circ.
Circ.
Circ.


196A -
102B -
S-139A


Co:mnercial Vegetable Insect and Disease Control
Guide.
Vegetable Weed Control Guide.
Pepper Production Guide
- Two New Cantaloupe Varieties for Florida Growers.


This is a reprint with the change of name of the one variety to Florida
#1.

Florida Agricultural Statistics Vojet_-tle Surnary 1962 issue is now
available from Florida Crop and Livestock Reporting Service, Orlando,
Florida.


Mason E. Marvel
Assoc. Vegetable Crops Specialist


i James Montelaro
As6e. 'Vegetable Crops Specialist


-/7J / .i

F. J. Janison
Vegetable Crops Specialist
and Head


MEI: gs




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