Title: Vegetarian
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 Material Information
Title: Vegetarian
Series Title: Vegetarian
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: April 29, 1959
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087399
Volume ID: VID00032
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
STATE OF FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, AaRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVIeC
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, ANO Vegetable Crop Specialists COUNTY AGENT AND
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT or HOME DEMONSTRATION WORK
AOnrCULTURE. COOPERATING VA GINESVILL FLORIDA
" ^" VEGETARIAN

University of Florida
Gainesville
April 29, 1959

Gentlemen:

It is Field Day time again. The first three were listed in our last
Vegetarian. The other four are being announced for the first time.

FIELD DAY ANNOUNCEMENTS

Everglades Experiment Station, Belle Glade, Florida
Thursday, May 7, 1959, at 9:00 A.M.

Central Florida Experiment Station, Sanford, Florida
Thursday, May 14, 1959, at 1:30 P. M.

Zellwood Experiment Station Friday, May 15, 1959
at 9:00 A.M.

Gulf Coast Experiment Station, Bradenton, Florida
Wednesday, May 13, 1959, at 10:00 A.M.

South Florida Fie3d Laboratory, Immokalee, Florida
Wednesday, May 20, 1959, at 10:00 A.M.

Vegetable Crops Department, Main Station, Gainesville, Florida
Thursday, May 28, 1959, at 9:00 A.M.
(Lunch will be served at Hort. Unit as usual)

Watermelon and Grape Investigation Laboratory, Leesburg, Florida
Wednesday, June 3, 1959, at 1:30 P.M.

The 1958-59 vegetable growing season is rapidly drawing to a close. As
expected the industry encountered problems in over-production, weather,
diseases, insects and many others during this season.

We selected four items for discussion in this letter. These are the
items that seem to crop up often in letters and questions to us.


ACREAGE COMPARISONS -

The table given below merits some study. Mr. Rosenberger has worked up
some interesting comparisons between "suggested acreage'' as given in the
Florida Outlook Information and "indicated plantings" as reported by the
USDA Crop Reporting Service. We won't try to interpret these figures for you.
BUT, you may be interested in making comparisons between indicated plantings
and market patterns.






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FLORIDA SUGGESTED 1/ACREAGE COMPARED TO INDICATED 2JPLANTINGS
FOR WINTER AND SPRING VEGETABLES


I WINTER


Crop

Lima Beans

Bush & Pole Beans

Cabbage

Cantaloupes

Cauliflower

Celery

Sweet Corn

Cucumbers

Eggplant

Endive & Escarole

All Lettuce

Pepper

New Potatoes

Squash

Strawberries

Tomatoes

Watermelons


1
Suggested
Plantings
in Acres

700

23,100

16,600



1,000

6,100

10,800

3,000

800

5,800

4,600

5,700

16,000

4,100

4,000

22,200


2
Indicated
Plantings
in Acres

500

16,800

18,000



550

8,000

7,500

800

800

6,700

3,200

6,000

12,500



1,600

16,000


3
% of
Suggested
Acreage

71

73

108



55

131

69

27

100

116

70

105

78



40

72


SPRING


1
Suggested
Plantings
in Acres

2,000

20,000



3,000



3,900
26,500

10,000

920





8,500

26,000

4,400



24,200

92,500


2
Indicated
Plantings
in Acres

1,400

12,000



1,800



5,000

31,000

8,500

1,100





7,600

25,300





14,800

75,000


~/ Florida Outlook Information, Vegetables
Service, University of Florida


1958-59, Agricultural Extension


2/ Crop Reporting Board, U.S.D.A.


3
% of
Suggestec
Acreage

70

60



60



128

117

85

120





89

97




61

81


L I








WAXING CUCUMBERS -

Have you ever seen a cucumber injured by over-waxing? Excessive wax on a
cucumber is disagreeable to the housewife, causes injury to the surface of the
cuke and is an unnecessary waste of material. Light waxing would be more
profitable all the way around. Dr. B. D. Thompson of our Department says that
maximum benefits can be obtained when wax emulsions are diluted with water to
contain about 7 solids.

Florida grows a good cuke. Let's not ruin it by over-waxing.


SEEDBED AND FIELD FUMIGATION -

In a recent newsletter, we discussed the use of SMDC (vapam and VPM soil
fumigant) for field fumigation. Our reports show that many growers were well
satisfied with SMDC. A few failures have been reported. We feel that some of
these failures can be attributed to method of application.

itylone is another material whi.h is now being sug.-sted for use on seedbed
and in-the-row treatment in the fieid.

Dr. J. F. Darby of the Central Florida Station suggests using 300 pounds
(855% WP) per acre for celery seedbeds. He emphasizes that this material should
be applied to a well-prepared seedbed in about one-third acre-inch of water. It
should be worked into the soil to a depth of about 3 inches.

Tir. D. S. Burgis obtained gocd results with mylone on seedbed when the 300
pound dosage was split into two ap? _--iatiirs. One-half was applied and rotatilled
to a six-inch depth. The other hal' of the material was rotatilled to a 1 to 2
inch depth, rolled and soaked with overhead irrigation. Mr. Burgis states that
maintaining soil moisture at a high level for seven days before treating is
necessary for best results with either mylone or SMDC.

In-the-row treatment with mylore may be tried on a small scale on approved
crops using one-fourth pound of actual mylone per 100 lineal feet of row.

CAUTION: The waiting period between application of mylone and seeding is generally
14 days. Under conditions of heavy rainfall, a longer waiting period or aeration
of the row may be necessary.


PEPPER VIRUS -

People attending the Vegetable Field Day at the Plantation Laboratory recently
were given some good information by Dr. Ozaki and Associates on varieties, fertil-
ization, fumigation, drainage and irrigation of vegetables. East Coast pepper
growers were especially interested in comments made by Dr. Simons on pepper virus
diseases. He discussed potato Y virus on peppers and how it has become established
in that area.






-4-


The virus, he pointed out, is carried over by the nightshade plant from
which it is transmitted by aphid to peppers. Since virus diseases cannot be
controlled by chemicals other measures must be taken. One of these is to
"kill-out" all nightshade growing during the summer months in the area around
proposed pepper plantings. Although this may not sound practical, it is one
of the few alternatives left to the pepper grower in that area.

Sincerely yours,


James Montelaro
Associate Vegetab:
Crop Specialist


JM:bb


r~-3F~C~'~~za




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