Title: Vegetarian
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087399/00028
 Material Information
Title: Vegetarian
Series Title: Vegetarian
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: October 1957
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087399
Volume ID: VID00028
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
STATE OF FLORIDA
COLLEGE or AGRICULTURE. AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
UNI.vYRsIT or PFLaRID, AND Vegetable Crop Spiccialis v CO^U" AGENT A wI
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF HoME DEONSTRA. ON WORK
A.RiCuLURE. COOPERATIN V E G E T A R I A N G'mNESVILLE. LORI



October 30, 1957
Several new vegetable varieties are being recommended for the year some for
trial only and others as replacements for formerly used varieties. Several formerly
used varieties have been dropped. Check this against Circular 153, December, 1956.

Cantaloupe Georgia 47 Mildew Resistant
Celery Utah 52-70
Sweet Corn Several new varieties are promising Floragold, Sixty Pak, R-8,
lobelle and Sweetangold, all yellow varieties, all have some resistance
to Ealminthosporium turcicum.
Three varieties have been dropped, F-M Cross, Golden Hybrid, and
Erie.
Cucumber Stono has been added for trial.
Onion Texas Grano 502 replaces Texas Early Grano. Eclipse and White Granex
are white hybrids recommended.
Southern Peas To minimize confusion, the types have been listed together with
some additions.
Blackeye Type
1. California No. 5
2. Calva No. 3
3. Ramshorn
Cream Type
1. Bush Conch
2. Running Conch (White Acre)
3. Texas Cream (Several Strains)
4, Cabbage Pea
Crowders
1. Dixielee
2. Brown Crowder (Alabama Crowder)
3. Calhoun Crowder
4. Mississippi Crowder
Pepper-- Allbig replaces Illinois F
Spinach New F1 hybrids look promising Early Hybrid No. 7 and 7E. Smooth
leaved, for fall and winter planting. Bolts easily.
Tomatoes Several changes Grothen's Globe (Wilt Resistant) replaces Grothen's
Globe. Homestead No. 2 and 24 replace Homestead. Manasota dropped.
Watermelons Garrisonian, a new Garrison type, anthracnose resistant.

Notes Picked up at FFVA Convention

Some very interesting statements made by members on a panel discussion from
areas which compete with Florida.

The panel member from Texas made these statements:

'"Good vegetables serve as a calling card to the housewife poor vegetables will
get no return invitation."


"Pink tomato production is only in experimental stage in Texas."





'Having no State-Federal Inspection Service in Texas makes customers for
other areas.To (On tomatoes and cabbage this means Florida)

'Cauliflower plantings are very low because of low prices for freezing in
1956-57."

The member from Cuba, a native of Cuba, said: "Any increase in acreage of
vegetables in Cuba will come from U. S. farmers going to Cuba."

The member of the panel who spoke for Mexican growers stated that tomato
plantings in Mexico were off because of bad weather.

The representative from Louisiana talked primarily on sweet potato production
in Louisiana. He made a statement I am sure we all can't agree with %'You cannot
grow sweet potatoes in Florida.'. Of course, he meant to say his experience in
Florida, which was not a true indication of what can be done. I strongly feel that
off-season sweet potatoes could become a major crop in Florida.

He also said that Louisiana growers were getting on the average of about $3.00
a bushel for sweet potatoes and.it was costing them $3.00 a bushel to produce them.

The president of the Vegetable Growers Association of America who is a large
greenhouse tomato grower in Ohio discussed the winter tomato industry from the
greenhouse producers' viewpoint. He stated that one acre of greenhouse would produce
the equivalent of seven acres outside, ten to eighteen thousand eight-pound baskets
per acre average with 80 to 90 percent U. S. No. 1 tomatoes. Don't start figuring
how much money they make their fuel bill alone for an acre will exceed '2,000.
This is of interest from a production standpoint in that it is obvious the tomato
has the inherent capacity to produce at least seven times what we are making it
produce outside.

Some most interesting statements were made by the panel member from California.
He is a shipper and grower and has a very close working relationship with the growers
he represents.

Celery, which California ships from December through July and is a very competi-
tive vegetable for our growers, is a major crop in California. Celery acreage for
this winter is unchanged from last year and the condition of the crop is good.

The California growers are changing from their present variety, Utah 1OB
(which brings a premium on eastern markets) to Tall Utah 52-70 because in sample
shipments this past season 52-70 brought $1.00 a crate more than their present
variety. This will be for midwinter and spring harvest only.

Another interesting statement was that potatoes shipped in 50-pound cartons,
which increased their unit cost 40 cents over 50 pound bags, earned the difference
on eastern markets because of better acceptance and lower losses in shipment.
Thirty pound and fifty pound units sold better than 100 pound units.

Mr. George Wedgeworth was the panel.member from Florida and he used his time to
ask questions of the other panel members. Some of the answers I have quoted above.

Sincerely,

5N-asw.. )nw^-ef
Mason E. Marvel
Assistant Vegetable
Crop Specialist
MEM:bb
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