Title: Vegetarian
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087399/00025
 Material Information
Title: Vegetarian
Series Title: Vegetarian
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: March 1956
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087399
Volume ID: VID00025
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
STATE OF FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION BERV3CE
UNIVERSITY OP FLORIDA, AND L Crop c COUNTY AGENT AND
UNITED STATE DEPARTMENT Vegetable Crop Specialists HME DEMONSTRATION WORK
OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATING GAINESVILLIE FLORIDA
r. V E VEG E TAR IAN March 2, 1956
MR. COUNTY AGENT:
It's about the time of year when folks begin to ask, "When's the field day?"
Thought we might mention a couple of dates already selected:
April 3: POTATO INVESTIGATIONS LABORATORY, HASTINGS; 9:30 AM.
April : PLANTATION FIELD LABORATORY, FT. IAUDERDALE; 1:30 PM.

And use some last years dates as reminders that this year's dates may be around
the same time: Homestead tomatoes), March 24; Ft. Pierce, May 5; Belle Glade, May 6;
Bradenton, May 11; Sanford, May 12; Leesburg, June 2. More details will be passed on
to you as they are made available to us. No vegetable field day was held at the Hain
Station last year, however, enter one about May 22-24 for this year. We'll be wel-
coming you to the new farm.
POTATO FIELD DAY, HOMESTEAD: held February 17th.
Alwfayseel hesitant to summarize information presented at field days; hope you'31
accept the following as a few of the comments, and ask for complete details where in-
terested. Copies of the program can be supplied.
Dr. George Ruehle explained fungicide and seed treatment trials. Fungicide com-
binations included checks on reports from Maine indicating stimulation from zineb-ag-
rimycin, and follow-up on an observation that where copper was used there seemed to
be less sclerotinia; all in all, no immediate changes in recommendations indicated.

In the seed treatment trial, seed pieces were contaminated with decayed tissue at
cutting; seed piece decay was. not a serious factor in reducing stand, Was a nice try
with such treatments as semesan bel, captain, agrimycin, formaldehyde, and several
methods.
Mr. John C. Noonan showed numbered liTes from USDA plots in North Dakota; many had
genes for resistance to late blight and scab; most had late blight lesions. Best ec-:
onomic yields in weight-spacing tests pointed to- inch spacing using 1i ounce seed
pieces,

Source of seed plots checking performance from North Dakota, Nebraska and Colorado
last year N.D. was best. Particular interest shown in seed which had been grown-out
at Homestead for several seasons; no virus showing, yet. Also displayed some unhappy
winter-grown soybeans, fava beans that wouldn't set, and variety trials with a number
of crops.
Dr. D. 0. Wolfenbarger reported small scale tests where DDT was effective in con-
trol of the banded cucumber beetle. Appearing within last year, a beetle of the fam-
ily Ptilodactylidae" no common name) prompted further work to evaluate injury and pos-
sible control. Control of leaf miners, aphids, young larvae and many other insects
feeding on foliage reported satisfactory with parathion. High vs. low concentration
sprays and wet vs. dry foliage included in parathion toxicity studies on squash.

SOIL SAMPLES AND NEMATODES: predicting incidence on crop?

Or, J, R. Christie, Nematologist, gave us benefit of his wide experience with some
comments forwarded the other day:
So far as the root knot nematodes are concerned, an examination of soil samples
does not provide information that is of much value. The females, which cause most of
"the damage, are sedentary parasites and once they become established they never leave
the root or otherwise move about. The only stages that can be found free in the soil
are the newly hatched larvae and occasionally *dult males. Whether or not larvae are
present in the soil depends on the extent to which eggs are hatching. during sola






-2-
times of the year, especially during cool weather, eggs do not hatch to any appreci-
able extent, even in Florida. WJe have frequently examined soil samples taken from
land known to be root knot infested without finding larvae,

"For most of the other plant nematodes an examination of soil samples is more
informative. Such kinds as the meadow nematodes and lance nematodes are internal
root parasites but they are vagrant nematodes that move about, going into and out of
roots and from plant to plant. When a susceptible crop is growing on the land many
of the nematodes of this type are within roots and at such times it is best to include
in a sample both roots and surrounding soil, When no susceptible crop is growing on
the land most of these nematodes are in the soil and an examination of soil samples
gives a fairly good indication of their prevalence.
"With regard to the external feeders such as the sting nematode, they are always
in the soil and soil samples are all that is needed at any time. However, when suit-
able host plants are growing on the land, nematodes of this type tend to concentrate
close to the roots and soil samples should be taken from tnis section.

"The extent to which a given number of nematodes or a given degree of infestation
will injure a crop and reduce yields is a complicated matter and depends on many dif-
ferent factors, some of which are not well understood. At best, predictions would be
unreliable and they might be misleading, especially with regard to root knot."

NEW USDA PUBLICATIONS: examine them for usefulness.
Thought you might appreciate reminders that several rather recent USDA publica-
tions may be of use to you. We'd suggest you have a file copy on hand at least.
Farmer's Bulletin 2086 ...............pumpkins and squashes
Technical Bulletin 1134...............rabbit repellents
Circular No. 972.....................sewage sludge for soil
improvement
Farmer's Bulletin 2082................greenhouse tomato production
Circular No. 956.................. Chinese waterchestnut
Farmer's Bulletin 1875...............mushroom growing

AIR POLLUTION: not necessarily hot.
Believe you'd be interested in a talk by K. S. Quisenberry, Assistant Director of
Crops Research, USDA, before a 1955 Symposium on Air Pollution and Its Control up in
New York. It's relatively short, yet will give you quite a wide review of the
question.
Goes all the way back to 1306 td a proclamation by Edward I, traces work in the
United States starting 50 years ago, and projects opinions on the problem ahead.
Copies can be made available for your study,

Sincerely,



F. JAiISON
Vegetable Crop Specialist

FEM1ml
275 copies




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