Title: Vegetarian
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087399/00020
 Material Information
Title: Vegetarian
Series Title: Vegetarian
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: February 25, 1955
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087399
Volume ID: VID00020
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
STATE OF'FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA. AND COUNTY AGENT AND
u.,"'"nw o n .T^TeS O ^P* ^ Vegetable Crop Specialists ^o,. .T w,
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT VegetaIbl Crop Speci HOME DEMONSTRATION WORK
OF AGRICULTURE. COOPERATING GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
E VEGETARIAN
February- 25 199
MR. COUNTY AGENT:

Many of you and your vegetable growers are considerably concerned about the
PESTICIDE TOLERANCE status....and rightly so.

IT'S NOT SIMPLE
We wouldn't want to be accused of over-simplifying the problems raised....
because it's probably going to be everything but simple before all is said and
done....what with such things as initially filing tolerances on standard pesticides,
keeping up with new chemicals, research on ways of insuring safe practical usage,
adjusting recommendations to fit research results, enforcing, and what have you?

But haven't we been exposed all along to some of the same problems likely
to be encountered?
Sure, things in the tolerance picture are going to be cloudy for a while.
What can you as a county agent do at this particular point that will help now and
later?

BASIC REASONING APPLY?
Well, we've wondered about it too....and don't say we have the answer....
but we seem to keep coming back to what appears to us a very basic-consideration.
THERE IS NO PLACE FOR PIZOiISCUOUS RECO:'IEND'.TIOUS OR USAGE OF PESTICIDES. Both
exist...Mind you, friend, this is not saying all recommendations and usage are
included.

RESEARCH HAS A START
A tremendous task faces researchto determine where these limits lie and how
to stay within them....and we're proud to say that there was foresight enough to
get work along these lines underway several years agol It means that with this
head start, although limited, we can hope we are many steps more toward the
answers and how to best arrive at them in the future.


SOME ANSWERS THE SAME
When research begins to come through we predict you'll find yourselves and
your growers continuing to have a need for some of the same answers which apply
today. SUGGEST AND USE ONLY RECOiMM0NDED iLATEUIALS, AND IN THE RECOMMENDED MANNER.

Less attention is indicated toward high-pressure promotions, substituting
concoctions for diagnosis, little's good so more's better, and so on. More atten-
tion is needed for doing a good job with what we have....such as timing, coverage,
rates, supervision, and frequent observation. If a pesticide does the job properly
applied on a 7- to 10-day schedule, and it's being put on at 21. hours every way but
right.....something's amiss now or when tolerances become fully enforced.


TWO ENDS AND THE MIDDLE
Some operators may have only a few adjustments to make; others may need a
new leaf to turn over. In either event, in your area you'll do well to start the
conditioning process now for later. You can't lose. You'll have a good chance at
saving some headaches both times.





-2-


BEDDING SWEET POTATO SEED:....it's that time for many of you.

Looks like there's going to be lots of interest in sweet potatoes this year.
We can't guarantee the money end....but we'll guarantee you some steady inquiries!

Might not be a bad idea to pay some early attention to a few important items
such as:

Bed only GOOD SEED this year; it's a foundation for quality and
yields. Use only seed stock that is known to be free of any signs of
disease, insects and injury, and that has been carefully selected in
the field at harvest for seed purposes.
Thoroughly explore possibilities of insuring reliable seed
SOURCES. Clean-looking seed is one thing; trueness to variety can
be another. Florida does not have a complete Certified Seed Program
on sweet potatoes. Several nearby states have; we can furnish lists
of growers of certified stock.
Don't jump all the way into new varieties, just because they
sound good on paper. The standard VARIETY of the vining-type continues
to be Unit No. 1 or Copper-Skinned PortoRico, with Heart-o-gold and
Earlyport promising in North Florida.
On receiving and prior to bedding seed stock RE-EXAMINE it closely.
If a root is questionable, discard it. Always handle with care.
In LOCATING the plant bed, convenience will mean a lot in later
management Plan an adequate water supply. Avoid areas where drainage
water from old fields may run.

How about passing along some of these c similar reminders to your growers....
accompanied by a copy of the SWEET POTATO PRdDUCTIOIT GUIDE or appropriate excerpts?


DADE COUNTY POTATO GROWERS FIELD DAY... held February 15th.

Don't repeat us, but they said the other day at Homestead that it was so cold
even the late blight didn't come out....plenty of growers and industry folks did,
however.

A briefed down version of potato research viewed follows: (East Glade Farm,
Sub-Tropical Experiment Station)

Fungicide Trials: Included nabam plus manganese, zinc, or copper;
maneb; zineb; captain; tribasic copper plus Mn alone or Mn plus dichlone;
cuprocide. Neither foliage disease nor insects troublesome to date; data,
if any, will be based on yields; not yet harvested.
Seed Treatment: Bliss Triumph and Dakota Chief: suberized 48 hours;
cut and plant at once; captain; semesan-bel; antibiotics; zineb; maneb;
formaldehyde. Little seedpiece decay had occurred; unless some treatments
adversely affect yields, only limited information will be obtained.
Fertilizer Experiment: Included 500, 1000, 2000 lbs. of 5-10-10 per
acre, 1000 Ibs. of 2 -10-10, and a no-fertilizer check. Planted in mid-
November; no differences in vine growth apparent to date; any yield res-
ponses will be measured.
Variety Plots: Includes many numbered lines from USDA breeding pro-
grams; also testing seed sources of LaSoda and Bliss Triumph from Tennessee,
North Dakota, Nebraska and Colorado. Pontiac variety, checking 1 and 1l
ounce seedpieces at 3, 4, 6, 8 and 10 inch spacing; also checking several
2,L-D treatments for any intensification of red skin color.





-3-


Can't go by without mentioning variety trials with other vegetables. These
plots again included most crops grown in the area and many others. For example,
Florida 201-2 pole bean in comparison to several Blue Lakes and standard varieties.
Also, there were test plantings of such crops as brussel sprouts, parsnips, carrots
and fennel.
Might mention we observed very few people turning hand-springs over the taste
of fennel. Very few before tasting, too...


VEGETABLE FIELD DAYS COMING UP .... watch for them.

Lots of inquiries about vegetable field day plans....many people need a little
advance notice to adjust effectively when final dates are announced.

Here's some information on likely periods field days will be held over the
state this year. Last year's dafe is given as a guide for what it's worth,

1955
Station Location Last Year's Date Indicated Period
Hastings Mar 11 Mar. 15 definite
Homestead(tomato) Mar. 18 Mar. 28-Apr. 1
Ft. Lauderdale None held April 18-29
Ft. Pierce May 5 About same
Belle Glade May 4 May 9-20
Bradenton May 6 1-2 wks. later
Sanford May 14 About same
Gainesville May 20 About same
Leesburg May 27 About same

Note that the 1955 Field Day at the Potato Investigations Laboratory, Hastings,
is already scheduled for March 15th. We'll be forwarding more details on these
as we get them. Remember, it's very difficult and almost impossible in some cases
to pick the best date very far in advance.

However, it's our observation that an early tentative announcement setting
the probable period in which a given date will fall will do a lot toward alerting
local, area- and statewide individuals. Try it.

Your growers and other nearby folks would appreciate a reminder NMW on your
local plans, but....remember that a large and equally important portion of those
usually attending have interests in a number of areas.

TOMATO PLANT REGULATIONS....other states.
A mimeo from the State Plant Board, 2/21/55, reminds us your growers should
know that several states have regulations governing shipment of plants into them.
The mimeo sunmarizes current regulations; you might want to check-up again.
Requests for inspection and certification of tomato plants for shipment to
states requiring certification should be made in advance to the State Plant Board.
Florida does not have any regulations on the movement of tomato plants into
or within the State.

Sincerely,

FEM:asp
2/25/55 F. S. Jamison
250 copies Vegetable Crop Specialist




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