• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Our little soldiers






Group Title: House that Jack built
Title: Our little soldiers
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087386/00001
 Material Information
Title: Our little soldiers abounds in fun and merriment, containing pictures and stories for the wee ones; easy, amusing and instructive ; nursery rhymes and jingles for the playhouse and fireside ; simple tales beautifully illustrated : including a picture alphabet in colors written especially to teach and entertain young children
Uniform Title: House that Jack built
Cock Robin
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Cox, E. Morant ( Illustrator )
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: S.l
Publication Date: c1898
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1898   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1898   ( lcsh )
Alphabet books -- 1898   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre: Children's poetry
Children's stories
Alphabet books   ( rbgenr )
 Notes
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors; and text and illustratations printed in blue, black or red.
General Note: "The history of the house that Jack built" and "Cock Robin" illustrated by E. Morant Cox.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy lacks cover.
Statement of Responsibility: beautifully embellished with original drawings designed and adapted to the little folks.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087386
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224441
notis - ALG4705
oclc - 262617004

Table of Contents
    Front Matter
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Our little soldiers
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
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Full Text


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FEEDING THE BIRDS


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OUR LITTLE E SOL DIERS


ABOUNDS IN FUN AND MERIMENT

CONTAINING

PICTURES AND STORIES FOR THE: WEE ONES; EASY, AMUSING
"AND INSTRUCTIVE; NURSERY RHYMES AND'JINGLES FOR
THE PLAYHOUSE AND FIRESIDE; SIMPLE TALES
BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED

INCLUDING

A PICTURE ALPHABET IN COLORS

WRITTEN ESPECIALLY TO TEACH AND ENTERTAIN
YOUNG CHILDREN

BEAUTIFULLY EMBELLISHED WITH ORIGINAL DRAWINGS
DESIGNED AND ADAPTED TO THE LITTLE FOLKS
































Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1898, by
J. R. JONES,
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C.
All Rights Reserved.







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GREEDY WILLIE.

BREEDY Willie saw the jars
Placed upon the pantry floor,
Watched his mother count them all,
Through the big chink in the door.
Well he knew what they 'contained,
JAM, which made his glittering eyes,
As they viewed the tempting sight,/
Grow to twice their normal size.
"O, if I could only get
Inside there, all by myself,
What a feast I'd .have, before
Mother puts them on the shelf."
Peeping slyly all day long,
Loitering round the pantry door,
At last, unseen, he glided in,
Sat right down upon the floor,
Thrust his arm into a jar,
Smacked his lips in greedy joy,
When mother, through the open door,
Spied the feasting, naughty boy.
Jam was spread all o'er his face,
Jam was clotted in his hair,
Jam was spattered on the floor,
Here, and there, and everywhere.




















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AND PICTURES.


One kitten, fast asleep.


STwo brooms made to sweep.

3 Three spoons made for tea.

' 'Four forks with points three.

5 Five pens made to write.

6 Six leaves green and bright.

SSeven rings made of gold.

8 Eight candles from the mould.

9 Nine balls smooth and round.
o Ten plums sweet and sound.
Nothing more will you need
O To know of numbers till you read.
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MY LITTLE BOY BLUE.


His big blue eyes have fallen to;
No longer he winds his horn;
The softest pillow is neathh his head,
For he sleeps in the golden corn.


The mild-eyed cattle are feeding near,
While sleeps my little boy blue;
When they think it's time they all went home
They'll wake him with a "moo!"


Then he'll get up and drive them home
In the glow of the sunset red,
And have for his supper a shepherd's fare,--
A bowl of milk and bread!
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HAPPY CHILDHOOD.


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LITTLE PLAYERS. PART I.


THE SOLDIERS.

UB-A-DUB-DUB! The soldiers come,
With sword and banner and rattling
drum,
With feet that tramp and heels
That stamp,
They march in line from the nurs-
ery camp.
Oh, stiff and straight, with a rum-
-.r' -^ *tiddy-um,
y The soldiers come!


Rub-a-dub-dub! With stripe and star
Their beautiful banner shines afar.
Their bright eyes flash with courage rash,
Their General struts in a scarlet sash.
Oh, bold and brave, with a proud brum, brum,
The soldiers come!


Rub-a-dub-dub! In tones severe
The General utters his orders clear.
They march, they heel, they run, they kneel,
With ring of pewter and clash of steel.
They aim, they fire, look out! Bum, bum I
The soldiers come!








LITTLE PLA YEARS.


Rub-a-dub-dub! The pattering rain
Beats aloud on the window-pane.
Wh1' eicres for that? With a paper hat,
A stick and a pan and a rat-tat-tat,
In rain or in shine, sword, banner, and drum,
The soldiers come!
MARGARET JOHNSON,





























































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FUN ON THE BEACH.


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BUNNY'S LESSON.


AVE you ever heard of a rabbit learning to read?
No, I am sure you have not; and yet that is what
Bertie tried to make his pet Bunny do. Bunny was
always willing to play with his little master, and the
two would romp together in the garden for hours. Bertie's
mamma had given him a lovely picture book with pretty stories
in it, so that when it rained, and he could not go into the
garden, he had something to amuse him. indoors. He soon
learned to. know his letters, and was anxious to make Bunny as
clever as himself, so he showed him the letters, and told him
their names; but Bunny did not like learning, at all, and thought
it very stupid, and looked so unhappy, that ,Bertie gave up trying
to make him clever, and the two had a good game of hide-and-
seek instead.









































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As :o.u are tu-dla.?
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HELPING MOTHER.


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NERO'S MEAL.

DARESAY you think that Janey looks too small to pre-
pare a meal for such a big dog as Nero, but she has seen
J her mother do it often, and knows exactly how he likes it.
How attentively he is watching; he knows what
Janey is doing, and as he has just come in from a long walk with
his young master, he is quite ready for his supper, and will not
leave a scrap of it, for his appetite is sharp, and he is not spoiled or
pampered. Perhaps you imagine that Nero has not earned his sup-
per, but there you are mistaken, for he has traveled many miles
to-day. His master, Sam, is just nine years old, and goes four
miles to school on a very lonely road. His mother would be afraid
to let him go if Nero were not with him, because tramps pass that
way, and one day a wicked man tried to steal Sam's bag, which he
was carrying over his shoulder, but Nero caught him by the leg,
and held him tight till Sam told him to let go, when the man was
glad enough to run away, I can assure you. Since then Sam has
never gone alone. Nero takes him to the school door in the morn-
ing, and then runs back home as fast as he can. He always knows
when it is time to start off to meet him in the afternoon without
being told, and no one would have the courage to stop him as he
runs along the road, looking neither to the right nor to the left.
He waits at the school door until the boys come out, when he greets
Sam joyfully, and the two walk home together. Now I think you
will admit that Nero has earned his supper.








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BEDTIME.

MY dear, my dear, my dear little
dear,
'Tis clear, 'tis clear, 'tis perfectly
clear,
That bedtime is near, that bedtime
is here,
So kiss me and scamper, my dear
little dear.
.ANNA H. WAYNE.


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KEEPING GUARD.


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KEEPING GUARD.

{ T is a mistake to suppose that cats and dogs do not like
each other. Unfortunately, many people train their dogs
to worry every cat they meet; but if these animals are
left to themselves, they will agree perfectly well, and
usually become very fond of each other.
Nothing is more amusing than to watch a dqg and a kitten
at play, they seem to understand each other, as thought they
spoke a common language; the graceful, rapid movements of the
cat contrast in a striking manner with the more clumsy motions
of the dog, and their pretty poses, and intelligent~ faces are a
charming study of expression. The dog knows that with one
grip of his strong teeth he could give poor Pussy a mortal
injury, and Pussy knows that it would be as easy as purring to
scratch doggie's eyes so that he would be blinded for life, but as
they gambol, her sharp claws are carefully hidden away in their
velvet gloves, and her play-fellow's teeth sink no further than
the soft, silky fur, which she washes so carefully, and takes such
pride in.
A Scotch collie belonging to a gentleman in the country,
was brought up with a tabby cat, and the two became great
friends, puss often sleeping on the dog's back as he lay dozing
before the fire. She had a litter of kittens, and the little family
stayed in a shed, where the collie would visit them, playing with
the babies and often nursing them tenderly. One morning his
master went to look for him, and found him guarding the open
door, ar'l keeping out some geese that were trying to enter,,
much to the dismay of Mrs. Tabby and her children, who had
no desire to receive such visitors.
3





























THE FARM.


T was a very wet day, and Mary and Bob could not go
Sfor their walk; they looked out of the window and
watched the rain drops run after each other down the
>--. window-panes, but the streets looked so dreary and
sloppy, that they began to think what else they could do.
Bob had a nice new farm, with stables, and horses, and
wagons, and pigs, and hoes, and rakes, and all kinds of farming
tools, so he got it out of the toy cupboard, and spread it all over
the carpet. Then they put the horses to the plough, and drove
the pigs to market, and watered the shrubs, and were so busy
that when nurse came to say that it was supper-time, they could
hardly believe it, and said that the new farm was such' a good
game that they would keep it on purpose for wet days.


















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A NURSERY -'
CYCLONE. .

A CV'.Li'NL .'tll.l'k tlhe
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And .Ail t, l -.l that n'er I.'e-

Wer,.: tli,,, in such a state.

The l'. I klinL--hl':.rs. l:,st imani and
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Thle el:.plh.:ant an eve;
Th p\al.pr l.o.-it all l.ved toi l-t
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S "WHERE-A-WAY, anld where-a-way,
S Little Iap-O-Blue ; "
) Oh, I'm off to ,-ea. t,-day,
' With 'my jolly crew!
SSee. my rliil 's a man-o'-war!
S (C"iIire there'll b:e a fight;
S I .-,ll kill a hundred men
S Pr.obl'lyv ef[ore night."


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A' JACK-OF-ALL-TRADES.


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"Why that wrinkle ill $,it b1'1iw,
Say. Sir So1:ber-Face .
"('Cau:s t ii t a tlaviyOwr no:,W
Tryin:- ,n :-I c..-te.
Think I'll have to, cut it of
Ju t. a little b:it;
'Spose that's li-w mny iala 'es,
When it. doesn't fit


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A JACE-OF-ALL-TRADES.


" N..,w I wxv:nd:lr l here you go, \
Little Never-Still'"
' I'm a do:t.i., ,i, t You k u,,', '
SJust like C.-usiin W ill.
1 must, hurry v -ery fast.t;,t,. ,-
'Forre the im-in gets dead,
With these plasters for lii; feet,
'N powders for his head."

Now he wields a rnurlTer'ou-" sword:II;
Now the pe1ncil plies;
Peller., irber, traimpl, and lord, .
All I.v turn hlie tri.'s. ., ,
But at last a hiush-- a calmn;
What now, iCurly-H-ead "
"I'm just manimna's little loy, '
And I'mn ,:,ini to :l!".
c'OR W. BUI"ONSON.




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SSELFISH ADA.
OME little children are very selfish, and like to have
everything their own way. Ada was one of these;
and if she could not be mistress, and order .every
thing and everybody just as she wished, she would
get sulky and refuse to play. This was not always pleasant for
her sister Eva, who, although a very sweet little girl, used
occasionally to get tired of having to give in all the time. Eva
had a lovely kitten, which had been brought to her by a friend
from the country; it had a bow of blue ribbon on its neck, and
was the dearest, fluffiest thing you ever saw. Now as they were
playing one day, Ada wanted to dress the kitten in some dolls'
clothes, but Fluff-that was its name-objected very strongly,
and mewed and struggled, and looked so unhappy that Eva .said
she would riot have her dressed up like a doll.
"It is my kitten," she said, taking it in her arms, and
thro,.viug the clothes on the floor, "and I will not allow any one
to tease her while I am here to take her part."'
At this Ada threw herself on a chair and declared that she
would play no more, and although Eva coaxed her, and offered
to make her a present of her new Japanese doll, she refused to
budge unless she could dress Fluff. Their mamma happened
to come into the nursery at this moment, and when she heard
what was the matter, she said that Ada could either play with-
out Fluff, or go to bed supperless, whichever she liked, and she
gave her just two minutes to choose. I need hardly tell -you
that before the two minutes were up, she was playing busily
with the dolls, having decided that she could get on very well
without Fluff, .after all.






















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FATHER'S SHOES.


ITTLE Jack wanted very much to grow up to be as big
as his father. He was always saying, "I want to be a
man," and he would take off his own little slippers and
put on his father's big shoes, and when he had them on he would
feel very big indeed, and would walk about in them very proudly.
His nurse told him he must not put on his father's shoes, because
his feet were not big enough to hold them on, and some day he
would fall; but Jack did not heed what his good nurse said to
him, and when she went out of the room the first thing he did
was to put them on.
Now, this was very naughty of Jack, and you will see how he
was punished for his disobedience. His mamma had been out all
morning, and when Jack heard her come in he ran to meet her,
but forgot, in his hurry, that he had on his father's shoes; so he
fell over the stairs from the top to the bottom, and when they
picked him up he had a big cut on his head.
He cried very much when he saw the blood, and his nurse
said to him: "You see you cannot be a man by wearing your father's
shoes; men do not cry when they are hurt; you are only a silly little
boy."
She bathed his head and put a bandage around it, and for many
days there was a big lump on it, which hurt Jack very much. He
told his nurse next day that he would wait until his feez were
bigger before putting on his father's shoes again.





























41,


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FA S




FATHER'S SHOES.


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THE RUNAWAY.


LITTLE Maid Marian,
Weary with play,
Crept off to rest on
The newly mown hay.
A meadow lark, flying
Across the blue sky,
Came nearer to sing her
A sweet lullaby.



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THE R RUNAWAY


a bee from the clover,
Who came buzzing near,
Flew closer to whisper
Dream-thoughts in her ear.


Maid Marian slept while
The folks at home missed her,
And she did not awake
Till a butterfly kissed her.
GUINEVERE

































BABY'S SHOES.

ITTLE shoes, little shoes,
Bal.v shoes so cunning,
Russet-brown, lined with down,
Whither are you running'
Baby's eyes are blue and
merry,
Baby's lips are red Ea
cherry.
Shoes of russet,-bring her hither;
Bring the golden sunlight with her!








BABY'S SHOES.


Little shoes, little shoes,
Up and down they patter,
Russet-brown, lined with down:
What do kisses matter?


Little Mistress Sunnytresses
Cannot stop for your caresses.
By and by, when dreams enfold her,
Close the arms of love shall hold her!
JAMES BUCKHAMl














-.


1













SEEN, BUT NOT HEARD.

"COME, little one, we'll take a walk,'
To Baby May I said.
No answer came, she looked away,
And tossed her pretty head.


Amused to see the puckered face,
Yet fearing lest she'd cry,
I ventured, "What's the matter, pet?"
Then softly the reply:









SEEN, BUT NOT HEARD.


"Why, Auntie, do you fink I'd go,
And leave my dolly here?"
"Well, if she will be good," I said,
"By all means bring her, dear."


'.-






17.



















SShe's always dood, and when we're out
She never says a word,
I'se told her little children should
Be seen, but never heard."
AILEEN MARIE MoDONALDI

































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A LITTLE FISHER.

BRIGHT the waters gleamed afar,
Showing plainly every star,
In the lake so deep and clear;
And they seemed so very near

That a little child that night,
Charmed with the bewitching sight,







A LITTLE FISHER.


Thinking how we fished by day,
As the hours stole away,

Childlike, said, "Let's drop a line
Right down where the bright stars shine;
We can hook one if we will;
They don't move; they all stand still

"And I'd like a star to wear
In a ribbon on my hair."
Pretty fisher, you can try.
You can't reach it? Well, don't cry.


.Older fishers
Often


on life's main
seek, but all in vain,
For some prize that shines afar,
Idly fishing for a star.
EGBERT L. BANGS.




















































































AWAY! AWAY! TO LONDON TOWN.


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MAMMA'S CHRISTMAS SONG.

COME, my little one, come! Look on your Christmas-tree,
Gleaming so bright with the candle light,
Burning for brother and thee.
,Flushed and fair in your linen and lace,
With an angel smile on your baby face!

Hush, my little one, hush! over the pure white snow,
Swinging, swinging, the bells are ringing
Music of long ago ;
When the Christ-Child lay in a lonely place,
With,the light of stars o'er'his baby face.

Come, my little one, come! Warm from your cradled nest;
Your blue eyes wonder what joy lies under
The branches so daintily dressed.
Come hither, my king of winsome grace,
Heaven's gift is mine in your angel face!
HARRIETTE G. PENNELL.



















































\ '\

* -----*--


MAMMA'S CHRISTMAS SONG.











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GRANDPA'S PARTY.

-DOT was three years old. She had a dear grandpa who was
revnty years old, and that very night he had a party. Dot went.
There were so many people that Dot was afraid and clung close to
grandpa's knee.
Dot's grandpa was not afraid. A nice man got up, made a speech
to him, and handed him a new cane with a gold head to it. By and
by another man brought a large easy-chair, and made grandpa sit in it.
Dot climbed on the arm of the chair, and put her arm around
grandpa's neck.
The people laughed and looked happy. They said Dot must have
her picture taken sitting on the chair-arm.
Dot's papa and mamma and brother Rob gave the people nice
things to eat; but the very nicest thing was a big white cake all
sprinkled over with cocoanut.
Dot had a piece as she sat on the arm of the chair. Grandpa had







GRANDPA'S PARTY.

a piece in one hand, while the other held the new gold-headed cane.
Curly came and put his nose on grandpa's knee, k ,ki-u up into
his face; and grandpa said:
Curly, you have always been a good dog, and you shall have a
Apiece of my seventieth birthday cake," and he laid a large piece on
Curly's nose. He tossed it up and caught it in his mouth.


j

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Then all the people shook hands with grandpa and gave him L am
good wishes.
Grandpa thanked them all for their kind visit and their generous
gifts, and then they all went away. :
Dot thought grandpa's party was tihe best one she ever went to
and she gave him seventy kisses for her present.
Grandpa said they were sweeter than the birthday cake.






















THE LION'S ESCAPE.

THE CIRCUS.
HERE'S the circus coming to town!
Every child is alert and awake.
Out on the steps or garden gates
See each a good position take,

To watch the pageant moving by,
With music loud and tawdry show;
And hear the children's unfeigned glee
In many a shout aad loud
holloo."

"Hear the band! It's playing
now!
The elephant is marching slow!
i The baby elephant comes too!
Oh, mother, mother, may I go ?"

IA cry rings sharp upon the air,
SFilling each mother's heart with
.. .. dread;
The largest lion has broken his
P cage, -
pB Catch him quickly, alive or dead








THE LION'S








)


ESCAPE.

One young mother, missing
her boy,
Tumbles and shrieks in wild
alarm,
When quickly to her side he
runs,
And pats her cheek with
tiny palm.

"Now don't be frightened,
mamma dear,
That naughty lion sha'n't
hurt you;


For if he dares to come near
US,
I'll tell you just what I will .
do.

"You know that sword in
papa's room,
That once belonged to Uncle
Dick ?
I'll go for that, and if he comes,
I'll cut his head off pretty quick!"
MISS MARY C. PENNIMAI.































LITTLE MISS CHEEF.


WHY did the Brown girls call their gray cat Little Miss Cheeft
Listen and I will tell you.
Baby Brown, four years old, was sitting on a-rug in the playroom.
She was near a small round table. On the table stood a large vase
full of flowers.
Baby Brown, or Dolly, for her name was Dorothy, was'having a
fine time.
She was playing hen with one chicken. Dolly was the hen, and
Bob Bounce was the chicken. Bob Bounce was a doll, made of a
towel tied around a rubber ball. "Cluck, cluck said Dolly to her
one chicken. Then she danced Bob Bounce up'and down like a baby.
Real hens do not dance their chicks up and down. But Dolly was
just as happy. Sister Ella had left Dolly alone for a few moments.
When Dolly said, "Cluck, cluck," something answered. "Per-cow."








LITTLE MISS CHEEF.


It was the gray cat, who leapedlil through the open window from the
piazza.
"Per-cow," said the cat again. It meant "Good-morning," I
suppose.
"Cluck, cluck," echoed Dolly, and the cat hopped upon the .sofa.
Here she sat and watched Dolly for a minute. Then she began
to stretch out her paws. She wanted to play too.


Soon the gray cat jumped from the sofa. Ella's hoop was learm-
ing against a chair. The cat crept up to it, and began to pat it, with
her paw. All at once she hit the hoop so hard that it rolled out. It
went near Dolly and fell over her neck.
"Oh, dear, go away!" cried Dolly, trying, to lift -the hoop over
her head.
But now the gray cat spied the tassel of the cord which hung from
the window curtain. She seized it in her teeth and began to run.
" Br-r-r-r-r-r went the curtain, rolling up briskly, with a loud buzz.









LITTLE MISS CHEEF.


This noise scared the gray cat. She dropped the tassel and leaped
in fright upon the little table.
Bounce she went against the china vase. Down tumbled the vase
to the floor, spilling the water and the flowers into Dolly's lap.
Then the vase broke in two and lay still. The cat leaped out of
the window, saying How-phit-phit !" which meant Good-by I'm
in a hurry! "
Dolly began to scream. In ran Ella.
"Dear me !" she cried. What mischief a cat can do in two
minutes!"
She saw the gray cat racing across the lawn. Perhaps if she had
not seen that, she might have blamed Dolly.
And so Ella called the gray cat Little Miss Cheef."
It was a good name. I know some small folks whom this name
would suit nicely. Do you know any?
KHAM.


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THE LITTLE SOLDIER.

SOH, I would be a soldier boy! "
Said little Sammy Black.
"I'd have a gun and march along,
A knapsack on my back!


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HOME PETS.
7 EW animals are more familiar to us all than our
common pet, the cat. Children who lived before these
playful creatures were received into the home as
members of the family, certainly missed a great deal
of amusement, and yet the cat, as a pet, is not so very ancient,
except in Egypt where it has existed for many ages, but in
other countries it was quite unknown, in its domestic state, before
the Christian era.
Some people have very foolish notions about cats, the black
ones coming in for the larger share of their silly superstitions.
They will tell you that it is unlucky to take a cat away with
you, and will leave poor puss, who perhaps has been a pet ever
since she was born, in an empty house to starve; this is very
cruel, as well as silly, and no one should believe such idle tales.
The cat is a very fond mother, and will attack any animal,
no matter what its size may be, in defence of its young. A
favorite tabby was playing one day with her little ones in front
of a barn, and as she was joining them in their tricks and
gambols, an immense hawk darted upon one of the kittens, and
would have borne it off but for the courageous mother, who
quickly sprang upon the enemy. The hawk, to defend itself, let
the kitten fall, and then followed a dreadful battle, during which
the devoted mother lost an eye, and was cruelly torn by the
hawk's sharp claws. Nothing daunted, she fought until she laid
her foe dead at her feet, when, indifferent to her own injuries,
she ran to the bleeding kitten, and licked the wounds made by
the hawk's talons in its tender sides, purring happily as she
caressed her rescued offspring.
















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HOME PETS.


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e a "einrt o e.reA IAndJy
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IN THE ROSE.
t'Ip you look in the soft
Pink leaves, who knows
But you'll find a butterfly
In the rose?"
I said; "for within it
Are hidden things
Just the color
Of yellow wings."








IN THE ROSE.

Then, while' she searched
With eager face,
Sun and camera
Sketched her grace,


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And something sweeter
Far have I
Than


rose, or yellow-winged
Butterfly.
CLARAB DOTY BATES.


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SAILING THIE BOAT











BY THE LIGHT OF THE MOON.


I .E babies are sleeping quite
S J soundly in bed,
S.I And the moon's shining
til.' clear in the park.
The field-mice are peeping from
out their dark holes,
And the pussies are out for
a lark.

'1 IJemima has found a delicious
tit-bit
O'er the wall, at the foot of
the tree,
r Selina and Toodles in desper-
JIM ate haste,
Scramble down to see what
it may be.

But when they arrive it has all
disappeared,
And Jemima sits licking her
fist;
She tells them she's eaten a
juicy fat mouse,
And they sigh for the trer'
they have missed.

























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READY FOR CHURCH.

T is Sunday morning, and the bells are ringing joyously,
yet solemnly, to remind everybody that it is time
to go to church. Polly and Sadie are quite ready to
start, and look' very pretty in their red velvet bonnets.
While waiting for their father and mother, they walk about
together in the garden, but as they must not soil their clothes,
they do not

S hi always very

church, and do
not whisper or
laugh, as I have
seen some chil-
dren do, who
seem to think
that they can
make as much
noise as they
like, no matter
where they may
be. Polly and
Sadie know that
theyhaveplenty
0of time for play
out of church,
and when they
come home they
will take off their velvet coats and bonnets and put on cotton
dresses, in which they may romp and run about as much as
they please.











oq ouqu your, chick6 be-ar.-
Vtic h.bhcdP bo
wv ih Coal Inrirt m{q, Il?


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A QUIET AFTERNOON.
T was one of Nurse's busy days, so in the afternoon she
had to leave Julie and Edna alone. She asked them
I to be very good, and promised them, if they did not
make a noise, or break anything, or quarrel, or fall
down and hurt themselves, that she would give them a nice
surprise for tea. They said they would try and win the surprise,
and after she had gone down stairs, they held a consultation as
to what they should do.
"Something very quiet," said Julie, "that we can sit down
at, because then we shall be sure not to do any of the things
Nurse told us not to."
"Supposing we play that I am a sick lady," said Edna, "and
you will bring your little girl to see me, and help me pass
the time."
Julie agreed to this, and went with her doll, Seraphina,
behind the heavy curtains that divided the rooms. She returned
in a few seconds, and presented Seraphina to the make-believe
invalid, as though they had never met before. Then they sat
on the floor, because they said, and very wisely, that if they sat
on chairs, they might fall off, and so lose the surprise. Edna
told her visitor all about her bad health; she had brain fever,
and a broken back, and small-pox, and cholera, and a lot of other
dreadful complaints, one of which would have been sufficient to
kill an ordinary person. Julie showed a very deep sympathy
for all these misfortunes, while Seraphina expressed her sorrow
with a fixed stare and a stony silence, which spoke volumes.
When Nurse returned she said they had won the surprise, and
as it was a fine plum cake, they were very glad they had spent
such a quiet afternoon.

































































A QUIET AFTERNOON.


yr, A~ ''~
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NOBODY KNOWS.


EAR,. little Lilian! where has she
Sgone ?
Up in the attic, or out on the
lawn ?
There, in the cornfield, she's watching
the crows;
"'i ^What she is thinking of nobody
V1 knows.


' / r Now in the garden and now in the



Si I till dark;
hStopping to talk to the flowers as
she goes,
What she is telling them nobody
knows.


i i1 a)ear little Lilian, busy and bright,
Happy and smiling from morning till
S night,
Fair as a lily and sweet as a
rose :
How we all love her nobody knows.

MRS. SUSAN ARCHER WEISS.










ON THE RACE-COURSE.


I ONCE owned shares in railway stock,
And had a free pass yearly;
And how, or when, that road failed up
I never knew quite clearly.


The first I knew -the engineer
Wore pants, instead of dresses;
And from beneath the school-boy's car
I missed the golden tresses.


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ON THE RACE-COURSE.


And next this kilted Jockey came
His steed-a (rocking?) pacer.

My" four-year-old," in papa's boots,
Astride a Maud S." racer.


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~-.--


The trotting course I must confess it -
Is laid across my "body Brussels;"
And here the nag and Jockey come
To train, and stretch their muscles.


The arm-chair's next a tally ho!
And "Kitty" is postilion.
The coachman blows his penny horn
As if he owned a million.








ON THE RACE-COURSE.


A stylish turnout next appears.
Selected quite at random;
The saw-horse, boot-box, organ stool,-
All driven "a-la-tandem."


Now Jockey's cap and pony's tail
Go switching round the table;
Hurrah! they're on the home
stretch now,
As fast as they are able.


God's blessing on you, bonny boy l
Your race is just beginning,
And may you gain in future years
A race that's worth the winning,
FRANCIS COB.








A SAD DISASTER.

SBET us play at being at sea in a boat," said Danny,
climbing into the rocker, where he seated himself
comfortably and began to rock with great fervor.
Wait until we put up a sail," said Hank, and


walking a cover from the sofa he fastened it to the back of the
rocker, then Aggie sat beside Danny, but Hank stood up at the
back, because he said he was the coxswain and must steer them
safely or there would surely be a collision. They felt so happy,








A SAD DISASTER.


as the old rocker creaked and groaned under their weight, and
got so elated that prudence was thrown to the winds, and as they
gave an extra big lurch, accompanying it with a loud "heave,
ho!" over went their craft and they all came with a crash to the
ground. The brave coxswain began to cry as loudly as he had
been singing before, and Aggie felt as though she would like to
join him, but Danny proved to be of stronger metal and behaved
like a real
hero; quickly
picking him-
self up he said,
We've been
ship- wrecked
eri ba e ty in the middle
of the ocean,
and must try
to save our
Sship,allhands
to work i"
This made
Sthe others for-
get the bumps
they had re-
ceived, and so
they set about righting the vessel. This took some little time,
and when they succeeded in placing her on what Danny called
her beam ends, they found that she had sprung a leak and sus-
tained a good deal of serious damage, so they had to get her into
the nearest port and leave her there for repairs, as they did not
wish to run the 'risk of having another disaster similar to the one
through which they had just passed.












SI


A NAUGHTY PET.

DID you ever see a Persian cat ? A big, fluffy, yellow and white
fellow, that looks much, more like his big brother, the man-eating
tiger, than our common, every-day cats do.
My friend, Miss Pru-
dence, has one. It was a
I ~present to her- f ro her
brother. It is. a very
great pet, and Miss Pru-
dence often says ,money
could not buy her Jim.
All the same he is very
troublesome. Miss Pru-
dence is sometimes so an-
gry with him she is quite
ready to give him away.
But when Jim comes to
her, jumps on her lap,
arches his back to have it








A NAUGHTY PET.


stroked, and purrs and rubs his nose on her face, Miss Prue forgives
him just as your mamma forgives you when you have been naughty.
You see, Miss Prue has no one else to
love bht Jim, and so she loves him
very dearly. '
There is. a bell in the dining-roomr.
just inside the door, that is rung by NIP
a wire from the front entrance an ,
old-fashioned door-bell.
Miss Prue dearly loves an after-. i'i
noon nap. Just as she got into a ..:N
comfortable doze the other day, ding-
a-ling rang the bell. So poor Miss i
Prue got up, fixed her hair. anild
went to the door.- No one was ... .
there.
As she is a little deaf. the
good lady lay
down again,
thinking she i Il
had been mis-

But, no; "" :
there it was A. i
again Miss X i .
Prue ran
quickly this time, but no one
was there. Then she sat down I
by the door and waited. Only a
minute, when jingle went the bell.
Before it stopped Miss Prue had the door
open, but no naughty boy was caught.
"Well, I give up!" exclaimed the poor lady.
"Miaow! Miaow !" came from the dining-room.
"What is it, Jim? asked Miss Prue, walking out to see.
There was Jim standing on top of the half-open door. Miss Prue


4-A't.-








A NAUGHTY PET.


eat down, and Jim showed her how he reached out and rang the
bell.
Jim does not like company. He does not like to have the ladies
lay their hats and wraps on the spare bed, as he cannot sleep on it;
and then he always does something naughty.
Last week there was company. Jim went about with arched back
and fur standing out, scolding at every one who chanced to brush
against him or tried to pet him.


After the ladies had gone, he came to Miss Prue and tried to
make up.
What have you done that is naughty to-day, Jim ? asked Miss
Prue.
Jim mewed, and led the way upstairs. He went to a closet, the
door of which stood open, Mii~. Prue following.
What do you think she saw ?
Jim had torn up her best bonnet! That was the way he punished
her for having company.
Last Christmas Miss Prue received a large, handsome vase. She
admired it so much that she spent a good deal of time in the parlor
looking at it. Whenever she did so, Jim would go in and rub




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