• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Foreword
 Baby is king
 Back Matter
 Back Cover






Title: Baby is king
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087385/00001
 Material Information
Title: Baby is king stories and rhymes for the very littlest ones
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Lothrop Publishing Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: Lothrop Publishing Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1898
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1898   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1898   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1898   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre: Children's poetry
Children's stories
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: fully illustrated.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
General Note: Date of publication on t.p. verso.
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087385
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002222700
notis - ALG2946
oclc - 154284421

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Foreword
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Baby is king
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
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    Back Matter
        Page 197
    Back Cover
        Page 198
        Page 199
Full Text














































C -z~









BABY IS KING



STORIES AND RHYMES FOR THE
VERY LITTLEST ONES


.L ._ ,


FULLY ILLUSTRA



BOSTON


LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY



















































COPYRIGHT, 1898,
BY
LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY.




















EAR little people, all tired of play,
Bonny bright laddies and lassies so
gay,
Lay by the playthings, the bat and tke
ball,
Bicycles, tricycles, dollies and all;
Come to mamma while together we look
At tIe feast of good things in this beautiful
book.














BABY IS KING






OUR BABY'S DREAM.


To sleep our baby goes,
In her cradle-bed,-
Her cradle-bed,--
Then comes a little Dream,
And nestles in her head.

A little Dream with rosy
wings,
That whispers to her
low,.
Wh ispers to her low,-


And tells our


baby pretty


tales
Till night begins to go.

But when our baby wakes
again,
And sees the morning
light,-
Sees the morning light,-
The little Dream is far away,
Upon the wing of night.






LITTLE ROSALIE EUGENIA.


Little Rosalie Eugenia was
just two years old. She had
the prettiest, softest black hair,
and the prettiest big black
eyes, and the rosiest cheeks
you ever saw. She was the
only child of Papa and Mam-
ma, and the very best baby in
the world. She always had
what she wanted, and never
cried, and would sit in her lit-
tle chair as quietly as the big-
gest lady in the land. Papa
loved her, and Mamma loved
her, and Grandma loved her.
Little Rosalie Eugenia was
a little queen, and the nurse
told her every day that there
was not a baby on the whole
earth half so sweet as she
was.
Then one bright day, little
Rosalie Eugenia cried as if


her heart would break. She
cried and cried all the morn-
ing. Would you like to know
why ?
Little Rosalie Eugenia had
a little brother. He was a
pretty little baby boy, but
when his mamma took him in
her lap, little Rosalie Eugenia
ran up to him, put her little
fist in his face and cried, and
said:
"You sha'n't have my mam-
ma! you sha'n't have my mam-
ma! "
Then the poor little baby
boy cried, and little Rosalie
Eugenia stamped her little
foot, and said he was a "bad
uggy boy."
But in a little while Rosalie
Eugenia will learn to love her
little brother.












































plL


SUL


t


BABY WANTS TO PLAY.







MAGIC CHEST.


The chest is at Grand-
mamma's house, in the corner
of the sitting-room. But the
children are almost always at
Grandmamma's house, too, and


that is how it happens that the
chest and the children have so
many good times together.
The chest is low and long,
and it looks quiet enough,
standing there against the
wall. But it is a magic chest,


and will turn into all sorts of
things to please the children.
It can be a-but that is tell-
ing. You shall see what
merry games go on at Grand-
mamma's on rainy afternoons.
This is the little song they
sing about the chest to the
tune of Yankee Doodle":

In the corner stands a chest,
We children dearly love it,
For all our nicest games we
play
About, around, above it.
Oh! the chest, the magic chest,
Such fun we have together,
We scarcely know which we
like best,
Sunshine or rainy weather.





THE RABBIT THAT MADE BABY HAPPY.


One night at By-lo Time
Baby could not think of any-
thing but her teeth. They
hurt her so. She clapped her
little hands to her face, and a
scowl came between her dear
little eyes. But she did not
cry out loud.
Mamma knew what ailed
Baby. She lifted her out of
her Cribsie-bed, and took her
into her arms. Then she sat
down by the open fire.
Now see what papa will
do to make Baby happy," said
mamma.
Papa put up one of his
hands, and fixed his fingers
in a funny way. He put his
other hand close to it, and
stuck out two fingers and a
thumb.
"Look, Baby," said mamma.


Baby looked, and there was
a shadow rabbit on the wall.
Papa moved his hands and
the little fellow hopped about
as lively as could be. Baby
forgot about her teeth. She
watched the rabbit a while,


THE SHADOW RABBIT.


then she cuddled down in
mamma's arms, and went off
to By-lo Land.
The rabbit jumped off the
wall, and went away, too.





PLAYING EDITOR.


Johnnie had been sick, so
the doctor said he must not
get down on the floor to play.
Mamma brought in a big
table and his high chair.
Now, Johnnie," she said,
" what would you like to
play ? "
"Well," said Johnnie, I
think I'll be the editor to-day."
Johnnie sat in his high
chair with mamma's big waste
basket by his side, a pair of
dull shears and some. pictures
to cut out. He filed the pict-
ures away on mamma's hat
pin which she stuck through
a box cover.
When papa came home he
handed Johnnie a letter, say-
ing, Mr. Editor, here is some
poetry I have written for your
excellent paper."


Johnnie read it, and said:
" Mr. Man, this is good for
nussing- I can't use it."
In a little while the waste
basket was full and Johnnie
called, Mamma, I think I
better tell the office boy to


AT HIS DESK.


empty my basket. I'm tired,
and I want to sit on your lap
and have you read my new
BABYLAND."
Don't you think Johnnie is
a queer little editor?



































A, I. 7. -

~~ ~~ii',, !'l rll


COMBING BROTHER'S HAIR.





A WONDERFUL CHRISTMAS-TREE.

Our Baby was crossing the ship, where we could rur
ocean. The winds and the tell Santa Claus what to


Sand
bring


Baby. And it did not seem
as if it could be Christmas.
Our Baby said that Santa
Claus would have lots of toys


IN THE BABIES' STATE-ROOM.


waves tossed the great ship left over, so
about like a ball. on the sea.
There was no chimney on the Claus never


many folks were
But old Santa
forgets his duty,


I I-__ '








and so on Christmas Eve, our
baby, and all the other babies,
saw a wonderful sight. It
was a Christmas-tree that grew
right in the middle of the big
table. Santa Claus told the
ship's carpenter how to make
it out of broom stick, with
little sticks bound .about it.
He painted the tree green.


There were oranges and ap-
ples, and cake animals and
paper fairies, and every kind
of a goody you could think of.
The captain shook the tree
and down came the presents
for the babies. They all
thought it was a nice thing
for Santa Claus to make a
Christmas-tree grow at sea.


ENTERING THE ARK.


O, Mr. Giraffe!
You are almost half
As tall as the ark itself.
And, elephant dear,
I very much fear
You'll never be safe on the
shelf!


But all the same
It would be a shame,
To say you shouldn't go in;


So hurry along,
And join the throng








WATCHING THE ANIMALS GO IN.

Your place in the ark to
win!
















(The Magic Chest.)


The Magic Chest
is piled with
books,
And slates, and
pictures gay;
Miss Nelly sits
quite stiff and
prim,
She is keeping
school to-day.


At first the rooi
The schola
spell;
But mischief
begins,
They do not


is very
read


still,
and


all too soon

heed the bell.


They talk and play, they laugh
aloud,
They break each single rule;
One wears a dunce's cap at last
And stands upon a stool.


The little teacher, in despair
To hear her scholars shout,
Puts down her book, pulls off
her cap,
And cries that school is out!


HE BROKE A
RULE.




























































































BRINGING HOME THE CHRISTMAS DINNER IN A SUNNY LAND.










THE

CRADLE .
(The Magic Chest.)


In the chest, a cradle now,
Shawl and pillow neatly spread,
Nan, the little mother, puts
Both her children small to bed.
She and Papa Jack must go
To the Opera to-night.
So she sings her lullaby
To the little nightcaps white.
Steals away with Papa Jack.


Pop! four eyes are peeping.
Naughty children, wide awake
When she thinks them sleeping!
Lullaby again. But still
When she goes, they wake
in glee.
Sleep that's only make-
believe "
Isn't very sound, you see
















FAY STRAWBERRY.


.- That is
what he called
himself when
I:' he began to
.J j ',i') talk, so
;"[ e very-
body else
*, i called him
,,F', ay Straw-
i 1 berry, too.
He was as
sweet as a strawberry, they all
declared. Mamma Crosby
said a better boy than Fay
Strawberry never lived.
One day brother Charlie


came home from school, and
said: All the babies are
going to the County Fair
to-morrow, and the prettiest
is to have a premium! Can't
Fay Strawberry go?"
Sister Lena said: "Do let
him go, Mamma; for he is
the prettiest baby in the
county, I am sure."
So to please the children,
Mamma Crosby dressed Fay
Strawberry in his prettiest
white gown and blue ribbons,
and took him to the Fair.
His friends all knew he






would take the premium. He
had such laughing brown
eyes, and long golden curls,
and a face as sweet as a June
rose. Then, too, he had such
a bright sunny smile for
everybody, and was so gentle
and sweet-tempered.
There were many lovely


things at the Fair; but the
babies were loveliest of all.
Fay Strawberry made
friends with them all. He
trotted around among them,
and every one said: He'll
take the premium." And so
he did; which made Lena and
Charlie very happy.


KNEE-DEEP IN DAISIES.


All the little daisy-flowers,
Laugh with one another;
Nod their heads and welcome
give to
Sister, Daisy and Mother.
Our Daisy is a summer
girl,
And we're her birthday
keeping -


Picking daisy-flowers tall,
For daisy chains a-weaving.
Full of glee and joy are we,
Our Daisy's birthday
keeping;
But happier are the daisy-
flowers
We're in the chains a-weav-
ing.








WHAT SHE DID WITH THE LILIES.


Aunt Annie, and our Lily
and I were to have a holiday.
So off we started. Near our
village is a beautiful river.
Aunt Annie said if we would
get into one of the boats she
would row us about. Then
we went in among the lilies


that grow there, and we stayed
to gather some. After that
we went ashore and made them
up into little bunches. Going
home, we met a picnic of poor
children, and our little girl
took her lilies all apart, and
gave one to each child.


As curious a thing as I ever
saw,
Was a girlie's doll made of
grass and straw;
But in the house were dollies
none,
And all of hers were left at
home,
So, the best thing to do, this
girlie saw,
Was to make a dollie of grass
and straw.


HER DOLLIES WERE ALL AT HOME.

















































































KNEE-DEEP IN DAISIES.


* '


i"
c1


*"r;; -'**/








THE STORY OF BABY'S COTTON GOWN.


Sing ho! for the planter
Who planted the cotton,
Sing ho! for the sunny fields
Where it did grow!


Sing ho! for the workers
Who gathered the treasure
From all the big buds
As they burst with its snow!


Sing ho! the good spinner
Whose busy wheel turning
Then spun out the cotton
To thread strong and thin


'-.-, -?
s-zt ~---'

~;/ J:
? ")







Sing ho! for the weaver
Who wove them together
Within his great loom -
Oh! the clatter and din!

Sing ho! for the merchant
Who sold the new cotton
To many a mother
In city and town.

Sing ho! for the mothers
And babies together,
For baby is dressed
In a new cotton gown.


:7L7;







FAY STRAWBERRY.- II


Fay Strawberry was only a
baby when Mamma Crosby
taught him to say the little
prayer, Now I lay me down
to sleep," and then to add,
" God bless papa and mamma,
Lena and Charlie, and grand-
pa, and all the dear friends."
One night Fay Strawberry
got as far as God bless papa
and mamma," when his golden
head drooped. Who else,
dear? said Mamma.
Oh! that's enough," said
Fay Strawberry sleepily.
Once, when prayer-time
came, Mamma Crosby was
busy, and Lena said she would
hear him say his prayers. But
he ran to mamma's knee and
said, Mammas are the things
to pray on!"
Fay Strawberry was afraid


to go to bed in the dark. He
would talk and sing himself to
sleep, and one night he called,
" Mamma, I's fast to sleep."

-- -
S. .. L' I




', . -


Every morning he had a
delightful half-hour in -his
mamma's bed. He would pat
her neck, and smooth her
cheek and say, 0, Mamma!






I love you hard a whole
bunch; a lot of 'em; I don't
love you just one, do I ?"
Sometimes, when Mamma


didn't seem well, he would
stroke her head and say, in a
very tender tone, "Mamma,
are your headaches ?"


AT MAMMA'S KNEE.


A FAVOR.

Should you pass through the Long-
man Wood,
And see an old tree high,
Look up into its branches tall,
Then tell me what you spy;
I wish to ask if you go there -
Why Squirrel sits that nest so nigh.


WHY IS SQUIRREL HERE?











U.


THE CHILDREN GO DOWN AMONG THE FISHER FOLK.


S-- : I -7! -- -- ...


i.. --- '1; F--~- --r -" "r







FAY STRAWBERRY.- III.


Fay Strawberry's mamma
made him a gay little cap and
coat, so he could play out
doors, but he soon learned to


SO HE CANNOT RUN AWAY.


push open the gate and trot
off down the street.
Mamma wanted him to play
out doors, but she couldn't
have him running away, so she
took a long rope and tied one
end to the porch and the other


around his waist. Then he
was safe.
People laughed to see him
tied up, but he didn't care.
When it grew too cold
to play out doors he had
blocks and other nice play-
things, but a little girl in
the next house had a doll,
and he wanted one, too.
So Lena dressed one for
him.
After a while a dolly
was given to a child near
him, and he was glad for
her, too, and said:
Bless her dear heart."
By the time spring came he
was old enough to play out
doors without running away.
Such good times as he had
with an old tin can, a big
spoon, and a great pile of






white sand, that Papa Crosby
had brought from the lake
shore on purpose for him.
He made pies, and custards
and forts, and a great many
fine things.
One night he said," I've been
a naughty boy to-day, Mamma."
Mamma looked very sorry
when Fay Strawberry told her
















.O.. .
T- : O D
OLD T


he had been naughty. She
wanted her little boy to be
always good.
What have you done, Fay ?"
she asked.
"I took some water out of
the rain-water barrel to mix
my sand with, but"--he ad-
ded with great earnestness-
" I didn't drink any!"


O RUN AWAY.










CHURCH
@ PEW


(The Magic Chest.)


It rained, and they could not
go to Sunday-school, so they
played church. The Magic
Chest made a good family pew.
Grandmamma played she
was the minister, and told them
a little story, which she called a
sermon. Dan went to sleep,
and had to be waked up when


the sermon was done, and he
would say the verse he learned
for Sunday-school, which Nan
said was not proper in church.
But they all stood up and
sang the last hymn, and the
minister kissed them all round
before they took off their
things and went down to tea.






































'*1


I-i1~


HAVING TEA OUT-OF-DOORS.


-+e a







FAY STRAWBERRY.- IV.


When Fay
Strawberry was
about three years
old he did some-
thing that was
very naughty in-
Sdeed. He took
the scissors and
cut off his long,
AFTERWARDS. beautiful curls-

all he could reach on each side
of his head. He put some
behind the door, and some in
the front of the stove.
Mamma was. so sorry she
almost cried. Then Lena
took him to the barber and
had his hair cut short.
When he came home,
mamma sighed and said: I
haven't any baby, any more !"
But papa laughed and said:
" You can't always keep him a


baby, little mother. He
ought to begin to be a man."
Fay seemed to think so, too.
He came stamping into the
porch, making a great noise,


A NAUGHTY THING TO DO.


like Charlie. Soon he began
to want to play horse and






pull-away with the boys, and
talked about helping mamma.
One day when he was teas-
ing to help, his mamma said:
When you are a big boy,
you may.
I am a big boy now," he
said. My feet touch the floor
and my head is as big (high) as
the stove."
The children were doing ex-
amples, so he wanted to "do


jampleses, too." Mamma said:
" If you have four apples and
I give you two more, how
many will you have ?"
"A lot of 'em," he said.
Fay Strawberry is four
years old now. He can spell
and he can print beautifully.
He gets into mischief, but
mamma still says: There
never was a better boy than
Fay Strawberry."


THE DONKEY CALLS ON THE SHEEP.





















(The Magic Chest.)


In lovely crowns of paper,
And robes of red and green,
They mount their throne to-
gether,
The little king and queen.

The whole room is their
kingdom,
And faithful Dan and Nell
Come kneeling low before
them,
And mind their bidding
well,

Till, tired of giving orders,


The little king jumps down;
The queen comes scrambling
after,
Forgetful of her crown.

The throne is quite deserted,
With all its cushions gay,
While romp the little rulers
And with their subjects
play.

For sitting proud and idle
While others work and sing,
Is not much fun, now is it,
O little queen and king?

























































































" CO 'WAY, I SAY I"






















IN THE STALL.


THE GRATEFUL SPARROW.


Bobby had had the earache.
But although the pain had
stopped he had to lie still lest
it should begin again; so it
was a good time for a story.
Now you shall hear," said
Nurse Karen, putting up her
forefinger, now you shall
hear how kind two friends were


to each other, though one was
big and the other little.
"The big horse was standing
quietly in his stall, resting, and
thinking of going to sleep,
when suddenly he heard a whirr
of wings, and the next moment
a tiny sparrow perched on the
edge of his manger.







Chee chee! How hungry
I am!' chirped the wee thing.
Your manger is so full, Dob-
bin dear, won't you let me
have some of your oats ? Such
a little will do for me Just
one little grain or two; and
there will be plenty left for
you more than you can eat.'
And the sparrow hovered over
the tempting oats, looking up
coaxingly at the big horse.
"' Take all you wish, little
bird,' said Dobbin kindly.
We may both feast, and there
will still be some left.'
Then. the two friends ate
and ate of the delicious oats
till they both were satisfied.
"By and by the summer came.
Even in the dim stable it was
very hot, and oh! how trouble-


some the flies were.


Poor


Dobbin had no rest from their
stinging and biting. But one
day he heard a whirr of wings,
and the next moment his little
friend Sparrow perched on the
edge of his manger.
"' I do not come begging
this time,' she chirped. 'Chee !
chee No, indeed. I can
get my own living in the sum-
mer time. But now I will
show what I can do for you.'
Then you should have seen
how the sparrow darted about
and how she snapped at the
flies. And every day through
the whole summer the sparrow
came and caught the torment-
ing flies so that they could not
hurt and tease Dobbin any
more.


b


4
*. -


z
Y,
L
,







GREAT-GRANDPAPA'S PICTURE.

< Great-Grandpa's picture looks so
funny
But when I laugh, he says, O,
honey!
You think your Grandpa a black boy
was,
But that, my dear, is just because
We had not then a Kodak new,
And so our pictures all we drew
On cloth as black as this you see
The artist clever used for me."




I hope Doll Antoinette won't
wake up. For if she does her
little mother will not bring her
Christmas present before morning.
They are visiting at Uncle Hen-
ry's house, and Doll Antoinette's / / '
mother wants her to behave the DOLL ANOINETTE.
same as her uncle's children do the night before Christmas.,
They all sleep until they are called to get up and dress.




















































































HOW WE LOVE THE SEASHORE!







OUR BABY.


Laughing, dimpling, merry girl,
Lump of sweetness, just like
this:
Eyes of blue and teeth of pearl
And a mouth just right to kiss.


Fluffy, soft and flaxen hair,
Like a bit of cloud, wind-
driven;
Is she but a petal rare


Wafted


from some rose


Heaven ?


uux< MERRY GIRL.


BABY'S


FIRST


A pretty little fellow, with coat of dusty yellow,
Attracted Baby's eyes and her tiny fingers pink;
A shriek, and then I heard, "Mamma, 'at naughty
bird,
He mus' fasten up he's coatee wiv a pin, don't
you fink ?"


BEE.




















































































THE SANDMAN.









THE STORY


Grandmamma has brou--t a
gift
Beautiful as may be-
Such a dainty silken sash!
We must thank her, Baby.


"No," said Grandmamma, "for I
From the Merchant bought it."
"Thank me not," the Mer-
chant said,
"'Twas the Weaver brought it."



" Thanks to me/" the Weaver
cried,
"I can scarce believe it!
'Twas the Dyer gave the silk,
And I did but weave it."


To the Dyer, then, we'll go
Many thanks bestowing:


OF BABY'S


SASH.








" For the sash Why, I gave
naught
But its colors glowing."

"Nor to me your thanks be-
long,"
Quickly said the Spinner;
" But I think I know the one
Who should be their winner.

" All the silken thread so fine-
Listen now! I found it
In a Silkworm's small cocoon,
And from there unwound it!"

Here, then, was the sash begun;
So, though strange it may be,
'Twas the Silkworm, after all,
Gave the sash to Baby.







HOW HE MADE KISSES.
(All about Babykins.)


One day Nora came upstairs
and said, Babykins, do you
want to come down into the
kitchen and help me cook ?"
Babykins did, so Nora car-
ried him down and put him in
his high chair at one end of
the kitchen table.
Nora was making pies.
Babykins wanted the rolling-
pin. So she gave it to him.
Babykins rolled it backward
and forward.
Why, you are a fine little
cook," said Nora. "A cap is
all you want."
Nora took an empty paper
bag and put it on Babykins'
head. Babykins was pleased.
Then she sprinkled some su-
gar on the table, and Babykins
rolled it with the rolling-pin.


Every now a
kins stopped
After he had
he would roll
rolling-pin.
What are


nd then Baby-
to eat some.
eaten a little,
again with the

you making


BABYKINS ROLLS THE SUGAR FOR HIS KISSES.

now, Babykins ? asked Nonr
Kisses," said Babykins.
"I want to know," said
Nora. "Well, you must give
me the receipt for your kisses.
Babykins."















































*1~~
L~r~L)


- --




-


BABY GOES COASTING ON HER NEW SLED.


Jt!


-3
i_ 5~
---
,=







WHAT JUDY DID.
(All about Babykins.)


When the Auntie he loved
best brought Babykins a pussy
cat, he felt very happy.
Her name is Judy," said
Auntie. You must be very
kind to her."
Judy curled herself up into
a soft round ball and laid








SMAMMA,'' CRIED BABYKINS.

down in Babykins' lap. Baby-
kins listened. What a funny
noise she made when she shut
her eyes.
Babykins wanted to know
what made the noise.


So he took tight hold of
Judy's black fur with both
hands, and then he tried to
pick Judy up.
Poor Judy was frightened.
She put out her sharp claws
and gave a quick little scratch.
Babykins let go of Judy as
fast as he could.
Mamma," he cried. Mam-
ma came and took Judy away.
Then she kissed the little
scratch to make it all well.
Babykins soon learned that
Judy did not like to be taken
hold of by her fur, and Judy
saw that Babykins meant to
be kind.
So Judy and Babykins be-
came warm friends, and had
a great many good times to-
gether.

















A STORY THAT TELLS ITSELF.


BOBBY'S TRIP TO

One afternoon Bobby's
mamma put on his white
nightie and laid him in his
crib.
"Now galop off to Shut-
Eye Town," she said, closing
each big, blue eye with a kiss
before she leaves the room.
Bobby lies for awhile with
his eyelids puckered up in
little knots. By and by one
eyelid opens a wee bit and


SHUT-EYE TOWN.

one eye peeps out. Then the
other opens a wee bit and
peeps out. Then both eyes
fly wide open and look up at
the ceiling. Bobby is very
still, for he is thinking what
Mamma said.
"Dess Bobby will det some
drivers," he says by and by to
himself. (He always calls
lines "drivers.") So he creeps
out of his crib and goes to







Mamma's work-basket and
finds two long pieces of cord.
Then he sits down upon the
floor and ties one cord to the
great toe of one little pink
foot, and the other, to the
great toe of the other little
pink foot, and calls his toes
his horses. One he names
Dash, and the other Flash.
Det up, Dash!" he cries,
and gives him such a jerk,
that Dash prances right up.
Then he jerks Flash and he
prances too.
"Now dalop," Bobby says,
and both horses prance up at
once, and Bobby up-sets.


Bobby's head goes bump!
against the screen, and the
screen goes thump! upon the
floor.
Mamma runs in and sees a
little white heap on the carpet
with two big eyes and two
pink feet held up in the air
by two long cords held in
two dimpled hands.
Mamma told Bobby to
dalop to Shut-Eye Town!"
Bobby says as he is' laid in
his crib again.
And this time Mamma
sits down beside the crib
and watches her boy into
the Town.


1.,


BUILDING A BRIDGE.





















NN7







'~Y's
~~/4
1 I/


.-


WHAT KRISS KRINGLE BROUGHT BABYKINS.







BABYKINS AND HIS BATH.
( All about Babykins.)


Babykins always liked to
have his bath. He never
wanted to .come out when
Nursie was ready to dress him.
Babykins told Judy that a
bath would be nice for her.
But Judy went on lapping up
her milk, or purring by the fire,
as if she could not hear him.
Babykins had very nice times
with Judy. Nursie would tie
a spool to a string and roll
it on the floor, and Judy would
jump at it, until Babykins
would laugh to see her antics.
But he thought it was too bad
that he could never catch Judy
when he was going into his bath.
Sometimes when Nursie
was quite through washing
Babykins, she would give him
the sponge and let him play


with it a few minutes. This
was great fun.
Babykins would try to wash
Nursie, and would rub his own
little face with it, for he knew
what a sponge was good for.


BABYKINS TAKES HIS BATH.
Sometimes he would kiss it.
For whenever Babykins loved
anything very much, he would
want to kiss it.
Altogether a bath was very
nice, and Babykins would have
been glad to have a bath four
or five times a day, if Nursie
had liked it as well as he did.



















~t
--::~, ,-


*f ** .


JUST OUT OF -HIS, BATH.,


: 'I"

'


B

~_~ki~b


B '::'~






JUDY HAS A BATH.
(All about Babykins. )


One day Judy had a bath
as well as Babykins.
Babykins crept up to the
bath tub, and began to play
with the sponge that was lying
by the side of it.
Judy came up close to Baby-
kins. He picked her up and
threw her into the water.
"Oh! oh!" shouted Baby-
kins in delight, as he watched
Judy swimming about.
Miou! miou!" wailed Judy,
trying to get out. Babykins
laughed and shouted.
He tried to wash Judy just
as Nursie washed him.
When Nursie came back
she ran to the tub andtook
poor Judy out.
Dear little Babykins did not
know that he had been treating
Judy badly, so he only laughed


when he saw Nursie rubbing
her to make her dry. Nursie
rolled Judy up in a piece of
flannel and put her down by the
fire, so she would not take cold.
Judy sneezed a great many
times before she got over her


BABYKINS PUTS JUDY INTO THE WATER.


bath, and it was two or three
days before her pretty fur
looked as it used to.
After that, Judy was afraid
of the bath tub. When Nursie
brought it into the room she
would run away and hide.










-c-r
I:LI
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IL h:
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-11 ~;

1 Pi-I.-~pi
~f~j~Jk~


IN THE TUNE SUNSHINE.

































The red cherries are so pretty that Fan has forgotten to eat
her bread and butter. "See my earrings," she says to her
brother. I don't think she will forget to eat the pretty cherries
when she gets tired of looking at them, do you ?







A FUNNY GAME.
(All about Babykins.)


One day Babykins had a
present of a nice box. Baby-
kins worked away for a long
time before he could push back
the hook that fastened it.
What do you think was in it?
It was a Jack-in the-box, who
sprang out with a loud squeak,
just as if he had been hurt.
Babykins pushed the box away.
Mamma came to Babykins
when he cried. She told him
that poor Jack could not help
jumping up in such a hurry.
If you were shut up in a
box, and squeezed down so
tight that you could hardly
breathe, I think you would
jump up very quickly, too,
Babykins darling," she said,
and then Babykins was sorry
for poor Jack.


The next day Babykins saw
an empty basket in the kitchen,
and he wanted Nursie to put
him in it. Can you guess
what he wanted to play? He


PLAYTNG JACK-TN-THE-ROX.


pretended he was Jack-in-the-
box, and he would sit down in
the basket, and then jump up
with a merry shout and laugh.
Was not that a funny game
for little Babykins to play?








BABYKINS AND HIS FRIEND.
(All about Babykins. )


Babykins had a little friend
that used to come to visit him
once a week.
It was the day in the week
when the nursery was swept.
Nursie would put the glass
from the bureau down upon
the floor while she was dusting
and putting things away, and
then it was that this other little
Babykins came.
It was a dear little Baby-
kins, that had curly hair wav-
ing all over its head.
Babykins would creep up
close to the glass, but he never
could touch the little visitor.
One day Babykins thought
he would creep; around behind
the glass, and have a romp
with the dear Babykins who
lived there.


Oh he was so disappointed.
What do you suppose was
there ? Nothing at all but
the back of the glass! Baby-
kins made haste to creep back








t\


HE GOES BACK TO HIS FRIEND.

again to the front of the glass,
and there was the visitor.
Babykins played with him
until Nursie came and took
the glass away. Then Baby-
kins' little friend went, too, for
another week.

















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THANKSGIVING AT GRANDPA'S.


This is a fine coach, and the
jolly load are bound for
,/ grandpa's to eat a big Thanks-
giving dinner. Jack drives
like fun, for who wants to
be late! The horses are fat
and lazy, but must go when
Jack cracks his whip. It is
a cold day, the snow flies,
the wind blows, but they
sing and laugh and joke,.
for soon they will be by
THE COAH. grandpa's good fire.


WHAT THE FOX SAID.

Ah! what did I tell Bun
.,ast night! Bun," says I,
"this is a trap." No," says
Bun, "it is a hoop to jump
through." I went a long way
round I knew it was a
trap but Bun must have
come back to jump through. "I AM GLAD I AM A FOX."






THE STORY OF BABY'S MUG.

Silver comes to Baby soon -
Silver mug and silver spoon:
Sing a song of silver!

With a mountain first begin,
Where the silver hides within:
Sing a song of silver!

Dull and rough the rocks ap-
pear;
Who would think a treasure
here ?
Sing a song of silver!


Sing the mines as dark as
night,
Sing the miner's little light: :
Sing a song of silver!

Digging, digging, day by day,
So the miner works away:
Sing a song of silver!







Swinging, from the mines be-
low,
Up the loaded baskets go:
Sing a song of silver!


Sing the fire's flash and roar,
Silver gleams in melting ore:
Sing a song of silver!


Silver sleeping in the mould,
And the rest is quickly told:
Sing.a song of silver!


Shapen is the silver soon-
Silver mug or silver spoon;
Sing a song of silver!



L--~-~3/














































































BLOWING BUBBLES.






THE NURSERY BLACKSMITH.


" Pitty, patty, polt,
Shoe the wild colt;
Here a nail, and there a nail,
Pitty, patty, polt."

See how Baby laughs,
Nurse, when I play this!"
said Bobby, as he patted the
baby's pink feet while Nurse
Karen was opening the little
crib. It's out of my Mother
Goose book, and mamma used
to play it with me when I was
little. Do the children have a
Mother Goose book in Nor-
way, Nurse Karen ?"
Not like yours," said Nurse
Karen; but we have a play
something like that one."
Oh! show us! Do show
us!" said Sue and Bobby.
So Nurse Karen took Baby


in her lap and patted the soles
of her feet in time to the music
as she sang:

" Shoe Dobbin! shoe Dobbin!
With hammer and tongs;
Such shoeing as this
To the blacksmith belongs.

"Shoe Dobbin! shoe Dobbin!
The nails must be tight,
For we've a long journey
To travel to-night."

"There!" tossing Baby into
the crib. Now go your long
journey through Dreamland, lit-
tle dear. Sue and Bobby will
be on the way soon," she said,
And play we are little, and
' Shoe Dobbin.' for us before
we go, will you, Nurse ?"






We'll play that undressing
is having the harness taken off.
Bobby is a wonderful trick
pony who can unharness him-
self," said Nurse; but Sue is
not trained yet, so I will attend
to her; after that I will be the
blacksmith and shoe you both."















Sue was soon ready, and had
thrust her feet out from be-
tween the blankets before
Nurse had time to say, Now
you shall hear;" and Sue's
squeals of delight showed that


being shod was a jolly process.
Then Nurse Karen went to
Bobby's bed, where he lay
waving his feet in the air.
"The trick pony's shoes must
















be very firm," said Nurse; sing-
ing the little rhyme again; she
patted and thumped Bobby's
sturdy feet, and gave each toe
a sharp little tweak, as if try-
ing them to see if they were
tight. Oh! she was a merry
blacksmith, I can tell you!






















SUE AND BOBBY CATCH FISH.


ROW, ROW! A-FISHING GO.


"What are you singing,
Nurse Karen ?" asked Bobby,
as he came into the nursery
where she sat mending and
singing -as she worked. Baby
had just been put into the crib
for a nap.
"It is only a little song
we sing to sleepy children in


my own country," said Nurse
Karen. Shall I sing it
to you ?"
"Yes, please, Nursie. In
the queer words first, and then
tell what it means."
Nurse Karen smiled, and
sang without delay, first in the
" queer words," as the children






called her own language, and
then in words they could under-
stand:

" Row, row! A-fishing go!
How many fishes, I pray, can
you show ?"
One for the father,
And one for the mother,
One for the sister,
And one for the brother;
One little fish is still left, you
see,
And that one the fisherman's
share shall be."

The children were pleased
with the song, and Bobby im-
mediately said:
Let's play it, Sue! I'll


go fishing, and you can ask me
how many fish I caught."
O, no, Bobby! I want
to go in the boat with you and
help you row."
"And you can come to me
with your fish, Bobby," said
Nurse Karen.
So Sue and Bobby sat down
on the floor and pretended to
row and catch fish, and then to
row home again.
They had pieces of paper for
fishes.
The first time Bobby only
caught four, so there was no
little fish for the fisherman's
share; but you may be sure he
took care to have five fishes
every time after that.







ffl GE3 o~bby


WHAT THE CAT SAID.


Bobby and Sue and the
Baby had had their tea, and it
was now almost bedtime.
What shall we play,
Bobby ? asked Sue.
Bobby had thrown himself
flat on the floor, and lay there
lazily stretched out.
I don't feel like playing,"
said he. It's warm, and'I've
just had my tea, and I feel
lazy and sleepy."


Aha!" said Nurse Karen,
" that is just what the cat
said."
What cat ? and Oh! a
story, a story!" said Bobby
and Sue together.
Not much of a story," said
Karen; but a funny little
rhyme written by a great man.
Off with your clothes, now,
and I will tell you about the
cat as soon as you are iti-bed."


-- c)







In a very little while
children were ready.


" Now


the


you shall hear,


said Nurse 'Karen:

" The sun in the west
Was sinking to rest,


Four big bits of fish
Cut up on a dish,
I found on the cook's pantry
shelf;


When the lazy
Half-asleep on


old cat,
the mat,


Began thus to talk to herself.

" Two fat tender mice,
And cream sweet and nice,


These made me a very good
meal.

Now, not a bit hungry I feel;
But lazy and sleepy and
very well fed,
The cat said."













-o Tnacj7U) &


13ut.











































































A PICTURE FOR BABY TO READ.








THE STORY OF BABY'S PLATE.


Near and far away
The Potter sought for clay
Till the finest he had found,
And this finest, finer ground.

Then, with careful hand,
Measured marl and sand;
Softened all with water, then
Mixed and ground, and ground
again.

Ready then, the clay
Tough and plastic lay,
Till beside his wheel he stood
Where he shaped it as he
would.

Swift his wheel did turn,
Shaping vase or urn;
Toiled the Potter, early, late,
Shaping pitcher, cup or plate.

When they all were done,
Then he dried each one;






Packed in ovens all, to bake-
Harder:still the clay to make.


Harder grew the clay,
While, both night and day,
Faithful men the fires fed,
Kept them glowing fiercely red.


When the clay had grown
Firm and hard as stone,
'Neath the Potter's hand there
grew
Other wonders strange and
new.

Dipped in glazing white
Soon the ware shone bright!
Decked with patterns gilt and
gay
One could scarcely think it
clay!

Furnace heat again
Hardened all, and then
Finished was the labor great-
Therewas Baby's China Plate!








SCOTT AND THE BABY.


Once Baby Tom went with was. He sat down beside
papa and mamma to grand- the cradle, and watched the
pa's house. Everybody was little creature in it very
glad. Grandma brought down closely.
the red cradle from the gar- By-and-by Baby Tom opened


ret. Uncle George bought
him a string of coral beads
with a gold clasp. Aunt Nell
let him play with her soft
embroidery silks and wools.
Grandpa had a good dog
named Scott. He was not a
shepherd dog, but he drove
the sheep and cattle to pas-
ture in the morning; and at
night he would go and bring
them home again.
Scott did not know any-
thing about babies, for all the
folks at grandpa's were grown-
up folks. When he came
into the house and saw Baby
Tom in the cradle asleep, he
could not understand what it


his eyes and smiled. Then
Scott began to lick his face
and hands. After that, Scott
did not wish to stay out of
doors at all. He would not
go for the sheep at night
until .grandpa had told him
the second time. Then he
would bring them as quickly
as he could, and come directly
back to the house to see
Baby. Baby would toss her
little hands when he came in.
Scott would frolic for Baby
hours at a time; and once
grandma found them both
asleep on Baby's rug, with
their heads close together on
the pillow.












































































SCOTT AND THE BABY.


~uG
























: --. 'M E ":








One time when pa-pa and and, Fleece all a-lone, and
mam-ma were gone, Ann staid Ba-by Joe want-ed .to go
out at the gate and talked bed." So, like a lit-tle wornm-
with oth-er cooks, and left an, Sue took off her own
Ba-by Joe and Sue, and Flake lit-tle clothes -nd un-dressed
Ba-by Joe and Sue, and Flake lit-tie clothes and un-ctressed








Ba-by Broth-er, and then Ba-
by Broth-er would-n't have on
his night-gown and cried, and
Ann did-n't come in to help,
though Fleece and Flake
barked to her loud, very loud.


What did pa-pa and mam-ma
see when they came? Four
lit-tie white crea-tures, nest-ed
in two big chairs; Ba-by Joe
and Sue a-sleep in one, Flake
and Fleece in an-oth-er.


FLAKE AND FLEECL







FEEDING THE BIRDS.


Sue stood at the nursery
window watching the falling
snowflakes. Papa had said
there was to be a big snow-
storm.
Karen, everything is white
now, and the snow is getting
so deep! Do come and see!
And, O, Karen! there are
some birds, too."
"So?" said Nurse Karen,
as she went to the window.
" Then you have the little win-
ter birds in America? We
love them much in Norway,
and our little children are very
kind to them."
"What do the children do?"
asked Sue.
"That shall you hear in a
story," said Nurse Karen, tak-
ing Sue in her lap.


It was a bitterly cold win-
ter, and everything was covered
with snow and ice. A little
girl named Inga, used every
day to get bread and scatter
crumbs over the snow for the
poor hungry birds. They
would fly down in great flocks
all about her. Inga's hands
nearly froze as she stood there
in the icy wind; but she was
so happy that she never thought
of the cold.
Inga's father and mother
were glad to see that their little
daughter was so kind and
thoughtful for the birds, but
her father said, 'Why do you
do that, Inga?'
"' Oh!' said Inga, 'there is
so much snow that the birds
can find nothing to eat.
9.





"' Yes; but you cannot pos-
sibly feed them all,' said her
father.
Little Inga smiled and
said: No; I can't feed them
all; but there are
many other little chil-
dren all over the world
who will like to feed
them. And so, father, ,-
if I give crumbs to '- '
the birdies here, and ,
other children ,give 'ii
crumbs in other 'l!'
places, all the dear
little birds will be fed,
won't they, father?' _
And that is the
whole of the story,
I believe," concluded Nurse
Karen.
Sue looked up into her face,
and then ran towards the win-
dow.
O, .Nursie !" said she,
" the birds are here yet. May


I have some bread to give
them ?"
After that Sue used often


HELPING INGA FEED THE BIRDS.


to scatter crumbs on the snow,
and liked to call it helping I nga
feed the birds.
















































































ROVER'S ON GUARD.








THE STORY OF BABY'S BREAD.


(The mother speaks.)
Help, Neighbors, help !
For our bread, good Neighbors,
Please to lend your labors -
Help, Neighbors, help!


Drive, Plowman, drive!
Keep the plowshare steady,
Make the wheat field ready-
Drive, Plowman, drive!


Speed, Farmer, speed!
Sow the wheat and tend it,
To the Miller send it-
Speed, Farmer, speed!


Grind, Miller, grind!
By the mill-stream's power
Grind the wheat to flour-
Grind, Miller, grind!








Haste, Baker, haste!
Here's the flour- take it,
Sift and mix and bake it-
Haste, Baker, haste!


(The neighbors speak.)

See, Mother, see !
By our labors granted,
Here's the bread you wanted -
See, Mother, see!


(The mother speaks again.)

Thanks, Neighbors, thanks!
Baby, too, un-knowing,
Many thanks is owing -
Thanks, Neighbors, thanks!


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.151

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LITTLE MISCHIEF.


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THE TICK-TOCK FAIRY.


Clock, clock! funny clock!
Baby wonders how you do
things and never come down
from the table! You tick, tock,
and breakfast comes! You tick,
tock, and my papa goes to the
store! You tick, tock, some


more, and Baby takes a nap!
And you tick, tock, and my
papa comes home! And you
tick, tock, and nurse brings
Baby's nightie, and Baby goes
to bed, and she don't want
to, naughty, naughty clock!








A HARD DAY'S WORK.


Once there was a ba-by girl
so ver-y, ver-y pret-ty that the
fair-ies heard of it and came
to look at her, and they found
her so love-ly that two of the
fair-ies said they should like
to take charge of her; so
they took charge of her, to
try it for one day, and they
had their hands full, for this
ba-by girl was a ba-by rogue.
But the fair-ies were so
charmed by her beau-ty that








BA-BY'S FA-VOR-ITE PLAY
they were pa-tient, though she
kept them trot-ting and fly-ing
from morn-ing till night.


This rogue ba-by liked to
pull the ta-ble-cloth off, and
hear things go smash, and the


BA-BY LIKES AN-I-MALS.


fair-ies had to look out for
light-ed can-dies, bowls of
wa-ter, and such things.
This rogue ba-by was fond
of an-i-mals, and not a-fraid
of an-y ; she would just as
soon creep up to a cross
dog as to a gen-tle one, and
some-times it was all the
fair-ies could do to hold the
dog back from bit-ing.
Then, too, this hap-py-go-
luck-y ba-by liked to climb up







by chairs, and e-ven to the
top of the ta-ble, and the
fair-ies had
to hold to
her clothes
to keep her
from fall-
ing off. BA-BY IS A GREAT CLIMB-ER.
And, at din-ner, this live-ly
ba-by would not wait for her
food to cool, so they had to
take turns blow-ing her por-
ridge, or she
would sure-ly
have burned her
ro-sy mouth.
BA-BY IS HUN-GRY. But it was
the hard-est at night, for she
would not go to sleep, and
they had to call in a third


fair-y to fan her, while one
read dream-land sto-ries, and
the oth-er rocked. By the
time she was a-sleep, ev-er-y
bone in their lit-tle bod-ies
ached, their wings were quite
wilt-ed, and
they con-clu-
ded to leave
her to her
moth-er.
So they all
went back
to fair-y-land,
and left her BA-BY GOES TO SLEEP.
to her moth-er. But she has
got a-long just as well, for
one moth-er is bet-ter than
ma-ny fair-ies, and does not
get dis-cour-aged.


A TUG OF PEACL























































































A NEW RIBBON FOR THE PET LAMB.







THE VERY NAUGHTY HENS.


My own dear little hens! you have
scratched up all my garden, -
My garden that I planted and .
made to look so neat; ,

Oh! naughty, naughty hens! you have caused my heart to
harden,
And to-morrow I will surely tie up all your little feet.



PAPA'S WELCOME.

One night, when the train
came in, a very mag-nif-i-cent
team dashed down from the
house, over the lawn, to meet
Mr. Lee as he came up from
the station. Tirra-7irra-lirra,
the horn blew its sweet wild
notes in and out among the
trees, and in a minute more
Mr. Lee saw the gay turn-out
come in sight. Was not that a
nice way to "go to the sta-
tion to meet papa"?





















(The Magic Chest.)


Nan and Jack had gone to
a party, and Nell and Dan
were too small to go.
Never mind," said Nurse
Mary; "we will look in the
Treasure-house, and see what
we can find."
She opened the Magic
Chest, and lifted out the tray,
and the children peeped in
with her.
There were funny old caps
and gowns, and toys that


Grandmamma used to play
with, and a silver mug and
spoon, and, best of all, a
beautiful picture-book full of
lovely stories, which the chil-
dren had never seen.
Nurse Mary read to them
out of the wonderful book
they found in the Magic Chest
until they forgot all about the
party, and jumped with sur-
prise when Nan and Jack
came home.







CHRISTMAS EVE.


(All about Babykins.)


Some one was coming, and
Babykins was so glad that he
would crow and shout with
delight, whenever he heard
Mamma say, Kriss Kringle
is coming!"
Babykins had heard so much
about Kriss Kringle, that he
wanted to see him.
One evening when Cribsie
bye-time came, Mamma showed
Babykins a gay little stocking,
all hung with jinglety bells, and
then she fastened the stocking
up beside the fire-place.
Now you will see what
Kriss is going to bring you,"
she said when she kissed Baby-
kins good-night.
The next morning when
Babykins opened his blue eyes,
the little stocking was full and


running ovei
rug were all
could not go
Babykins


.Down on
I the things
into it.
sat up in his


the
that

crib


and shouted and waved his
arms, he was so eager to get
over to the fire-place and play
with all his new toys.
There were books and balls
and choo-choo cars, and build-
ing blocks and a little chair
just big enough for Babykins
to sit in and look at his books.
There was a Noah's ark full
of dear little baa-baas and moo-
lies, and deers with long horns,
and many other things.
Oh! Babykins was so glad,
that he shouted and crowed
when he saw all the fine toys
Kriss Kringle had brought
him.


:~b~
-~































































































BABY DUCKS' FIRST SWIMMING LESSON.








THE STORY


There once was a Tree, Baby
dear,
And it grew and grew
Till the sky so blue
Seemed right at its top, Baby
dear.



A Man brought an ax, Baby
dear,


And he chopped
chopped


and


Till the branches
And crash! fell the
dear.


dropped
tree, Baby


Away to the mill, Baby dear,
Did the Tree go then,
And the busy Men
Sawed it up into boards, Baby
dear.


OF BABY'S


CRIB.







The Carpenter worked, Baby
dear,
With a saw again,
And his hammer and plane,
And made you a Crib, Baby
dear.


Papa brought it home, Baby
dear;
And so, from the Tree
There has come, you see,
Your own little Crib, Baby
dear!


442/' >


___ w/IA~


I~ ii



















. ~


"I AM WHITE, AND SOFT, AND NEW," SAYS THE BAA-BAA.


BABY'S


VALENTINE.


Baby dear, with eyes so blue, let me be your valentine?


I am white, and soft, and new, and I'll


Thy


be forever thine-


Baa-baa-alantine.


FEEDING THE BIRDS.


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7


i .. .


WATCHING BUNNY.


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~f~E~2. L







BABY'S VISITOR.


Baby Powell sat in his high
chair, and kicked off one red-


IN HIS HIGH CHAIR.
toed slipper. "Sh-sh-sh! Toot,
toot!" said the cars outdoors,


and baby stared with round
eyes.
A black-haired little visitor
came in with a soft pat-pat,
Baby leaned over to see, and
doggie wagged his tail, and
said, as plainly as a doggie
can, "How do you do?" He
tried to kiss baby.
Then he picked up the red-
toed slipper and ran off, but
remembering this was not
polite, he laid it on the step,
and said, Bow-wow," for
good-by.


This doll so long and straight and slim,
Our Nellie calls her dear Miss Prim;
But she by Santa was not brought -
She's just a gift from Cousin Dot.







SONG TO SANTA CLAUS.


Sing a song to Santa Claus,
Says the baby boy,
Play, dear sister, I will sing-


Bring a trumpet and a drum,
Bring a wagon I can pull
And a great long stocking full


" I'M A BIG BOY."


O, good Santa, come and bring
Every kind of toy!
Bring a pony when you come ;


Of your goodies sweet, be-
cause -
I am big, now, Santa Claus!







THE CONDITIONS
HAVE


BUILDING HIS HORSE.


ON WHICH HE
A HORSE.


CAN


He thought he could build a horse
that wouJd go,
But his hammer slipped, and it hurt
him so
He said he never again would try
To build a horse when one he could
buy
For trouble less, and value more,
Than the one that
lay on his play-
room floor.


His mamma asked where his money he'd
find;
And he laughed and said: Oh! money
a kind


Old fairy


He's kind and


good.
He can buy me a horse not made
of wood,
But I s'pose he'll say If I'm
kind and good !"


Ir HURT HIM SO.


0)
8'



















































































BREAKFAST IN THE BARNYARD.







BOSSY-COW AND THE FLOUR-BARREL.


OSSY-COW
is Mrs. Lynn's
little boy's pet.
One day Mrs.
Lynn heard a
strange noise out in the barn.
It sounded as if somebody was
throwing stones against the
wall. What could it be ? She
sat perfectly still and listened.
Bump-bump-bump! Whack-
whack-whack!
Down went her sewing, and
off she flew to the barn.
The big door was standing
wide open. She peeped care-
fully in and saw -nothing!
But all the time she heard
bump-bump-bump! and she
felt quite certain that whoever
was doing the bumping was
in the feed-room, and, sure
enough, the bars leading into


the feed-room were knocked
down.
So she went and peeped in,
and what do you think she
saw ? She saw Bossy-cow
with a flour-barrel on her head!
You see naughty Bossy
wanted to get some bran, and
she knew it was kept in the
feed-room, so she worked away
with her horns till the bars
came down; then in she went,
and right straight to the bran-
barrel.
There was just a little bit
left in the barrel, so she had
to put her head way down to
get it, and, oh! dreadful; her
head stayed way down.
Bossy was so frightened!
She thought she would run
away, but she could only run
a few yards, and bump! she




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