• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Tiny folks alphabet
 Cunning mice
 Back Cover






Title: Tiny folks' alphabet
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087378/00001
 Material Information
Title: Tiny folks' alphabet
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: W.B. Conkey Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: W.B. Conkey Company
Place of Publication: Chicago ;
New York
Publication Date: c1898
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1898   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1898   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1898   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre: Alphabet rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Cousin Daisy.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087378
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223305
notis - ALG3554
oclc - 262617000

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Title Page
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Tiny folks alphabet
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
    Cunning mice
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
    Back Cover
        Page 93
        Page 94
Full Text






























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ALPHABET


By COUSIN DAISY


COPYRIGHT, 1898, BY W. B. CONKEY COMPANY


CHICAGO % NEW YORK
W. B. CONKEY COMPANY, Publishers.


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INTO MISCHIFnF.


F ---*













AMY.

A stands for Amy,
Trying to get the fish
From her mamma's window'
In the big glass dish.







i








BESSIE.


B stands for Bessie,
Sitting hushed and still;
Would you know the reason?
Dollie's very ill.














CHARLIE.

Stands for Charlie
Calling up his band;
Soon we'll see them marching,
Looking very grand.



















Stands for Donkey,
Patient, slow, and strong;
After he's done drinking
He will jog along.



















stands for Emma,
Who was so very bad
it even her big pussy cat
Seems to look quite sad.


EMMA&


11 E


Thze














FRANK.

F stands for Frank,
Waking with the lark;
Out into the harvest field-
Home again at dark.













GEORGIE.

UG stands for Georgie,
Who teaches his bear tricks;
Makes him open wide his mouth
And in it carry sticks.















*stands for Harry,
So jolly and so gay;
Has to kiss his sister
Before he goes to play.













INA.

I stands for Ina,
Playing with the ball;
Catch it quick, my darling,
Or it will surely fall.













JOSIE.

J stands for Josie,
So blithe and so gay,
Out in the sunshine
With the children at play.













KITTIE.


K stands for Kittie,
Looking at her cradle;
But to rock in one like that,
She will not be able.














LION.

L stands for Lion,
Feigning to be dead.
Look out, velvet pussy-cat!
Off may go your head.
















MINNIE.

stands for Minnie,
Resting from her play,
Underneath the shady oak,
On a summer's day.












NEDDIE.

N stands for Neddie,
Gathering mown hay,
From early morning
Until the close of day.











































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THE CRW'OEA
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OPERA.


O stands for Opera,
As given by the crows;
The big one sings a solo,
And so the music goes.














PUSSIES.

P stands for Pussies,
Dreaming of the time
When Mice will come to them
And stand in a line.












QUEENIE.


Q stands for Queenie,
Who a lamb has found,
Very wet and hungry,
On the muddy ground.
















ROBIN.


stands for Robin,
In the chilling storm;
Save him, dear, a little crumb
From your breakfast warm.
















S AMMY.

Stands for Sammy,
Feeding Snip and Snap.
Naughty Snip! take down your feet
Out of Sammy's lap.





























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HIS FIRST PANT9.


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TINY.


stands for Tiny,
The cunning little bear,
to is trying on the trousers
He is going to wear.


T


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UMBRELLA.


U stands for Umbrella,
Over the little pigs,
Who are trying to be artists,
But are only dancing jigs.















VALENTINE.


V stands for Valentine,
The children love so well;
If I send you one this year,
You must never tell.
13D














WINTER.


W

With


stands for Winter,
The season when we play
the great big snow=balls,
Rolling them away.


LI












































































GRANDPA'S PET.
















XMA S.


Stands for Xmas,
Of which dear grandpa tells.
Won't there come a merry time
With the Christmas bells!


aI















YOU.

y stands for You, dear,
With supper warm and nice;
Pussy thinks, I'm very sure,
'Tis better far than mice.


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ZACHARY.


Z stands for Zachary,
Who, with Bess and May,
Are having merry, merry times
In the new-mown hay.









































































THE LITTLE GOSSIPS.


















And, now my story's ended,
Right happy we should be,
As from this pretty picture book
We've learned our A, B, C.


4 4i^ ... .- .. .^ -..-. -. -






ALL AROUND THl~ CLOCK.


One wee little woman,
Only one year old;
Blue eyes bright and merry,
Curly locks of gold.
Everybody's princess,
Everybody's pet;
For a throne so cosey
On a pillow set.


Sister brings her playthings'
Brother brings her books;
Mother saves to please her
All her sweetest looks.
Love and hugs and kisses
More than can be told
Has this little woman
Only one year old.


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ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.


Two tiny tubs
With suds a-brim;
Two washerwomen
Neat and trim.
One dips and rinses,
Rubs and wrings,
And as she washes
Gayly sings.


But what has lazy
Dinah done ?
Her morning work
Is not begun!
Two tubs a-brim
With foam and froth;
One little maid
To use them both.


1i


-- ___~


ap---- 4YIL-~ -- .~rlt~~Ri~i .-r-i- Fla~_~rIl~rr---~n~l~-~--~-~-~-~-- ;,T*11~W







ALL AROUND TH CLOCK


Three thirsty thistles
Beside the stone wall,
So tired of waiting
For showers to fall.
Dear little Dicky
Wa3 passing the spot,
And brought, in a hurry,
His watering-pot.


Though it was heavy
Little cared he;
"I am a shower!"
He shouted in glee,
Three thirsty thistles,
They feel the cool rain;
"Thanks to you, Dicky,
We are happy again!"






ALL AROO-UAD THE CLOCK.


I...........


Four funny fans
Had Maud and May
To cool the air
One summer day:
A palm-leaf broad,
A feather fan,
And one that came
From far Japan;


And for the fourth
May took her hat
And made a fine
Big fan of that.
And then so strong
A breeze had they,
They played it was
A winter day!


It







ALL AROUND TBB CLOCK,


Five fairy fingers,
All dimpled and white,
Busily plying
The needle so bright.
One wears a thimble,
A cap for his head,
While gayly the others
Pull out the long thread.


Five fairy fingers -
Work very fast,
And hold up the treasure
Finished at last.
No matter how crooked
The small stitches are,
She knows the pincushion1
Will please dear papa ,


J'l






ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.


Six silver spoons
All bright and nice;
Six saucers full
Of orange ice.
Six little napkins
White as snow;
Six merry maids
All in a row.


The silver spoons
Make many trips
From heaping plates
To rosy lips.
And when they're empty
As before,
Six maids are ready
For some more!


I







ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.




,%_st


Seven shining .shells
We gathered on the shore,
And if we could have staid
We might have got some more.
We'd played and played all day
As happy as could be,
And when the sun went down
They called us in to tea,


We made a mound of sand
And put the shells inside;
"Don't touch our pretty things,
You little waves !" we cried.
O naughty, naughty waves!
We hurried back next day,
And mound and shells and all
Had vanished quite away!


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ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.


Eight eager elves
Flew high and far
To catch the sparkle
Of a star.
On butterflies
They rode, or bees,
Or floated softly
On the breeze.


But long before
They reached the sky,
A thunder-cloud
Came sailing by.
And blown with wind,
And wet with rain,
Eight eager elves
Flew down again.







ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.


Nine nodding nosegays,
Fresh and fine;
Which shall I choose,"
Said Tom, "for mine?"
He looked at roses,
Red and white;
At lilies fair;
At pansies bright.


At last he chose
A fine bouquet,
And proudly bore
His flowers away.
But I have heard-
I guess it is true-
He gave them all
To little Prue!







ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.


There were ten tin trumpets,
There were ten small boys,
And the ten still houses
Then were full of noise.
How they roused the mothers-
Grandmas, too, perhaps-
From their books and sewing,
From their peaceful naps!


How they waked the babies !
How they scared the cats !
Howthey shrieked and whistled
Tunes in sharps and flats
But at last the racket
Stopped at set of sun;
For the trumpets ten were
Broken, every one!


- -- ----~


- ----- -------------


4nt







ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.


Eleven elastic eels,
This fisher-boy has caught;
A splendid basketful
To carry home, he thought.
His sister, standing by,
Thinks Johnny very wise,
And watches all he does
With round, admiring eyes.


But when he starts for home
He finds, too late, alas!
That not a single eel
Lies in the long wet grass
The naughty, squirming things
-The truth is very plain-
Have wriggled to the edge,
And tumbled in again


/


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ALL AROUND THE CLOCK.


Twelve twirling tops
As light as air:
Two children gay
With streaming hair.
So many times
The tops they've spun,
To spin themselves
They have begun.


Round go the tops,
A dizzy whirl!
Round go the flying
Boy and girl!
Till who can see
Boy, girl or top
1 wonder if
They'll ever stop!


- 1"~""~""~~"1~~1~1-r~"~~-~.~ C--_


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GOING TO BED.
THE little brown sparrows have long ceased to sing,
They're each fast asleep in his nest;
The chickens are quiet beneath the hen's wing;
The cow-bell has hushed its ding-a-ling, ding, -
'T is time Bertie-boy was at rest.






CUNNING MICE.


I '11 take off his pretty kilt dress and blue tie,
And put on his wrapper instead;
Then, after his sweet good-night kiss to dear Guy,
And low-spoken prayer to Heaven on high,
I '11 cover him nicely in bed.

And all the night long an angel will keep
A loving watch over his rest;
While in through his window the bright stars will
peep,
And dreams soft and pretty around him will creep,
Till morn wakes each bird in its nest.
MOTHER CAREY.



CUNNING MICE.
UP in the garret in our house there used to be
lots of mice. But they never were any trouble
until one day papa put some corn there to dry, so
that he could use it to plant in the spring. When
he went to look at it, not long after, he found that
much of it had been carried off by the mice.
So he told me that he would give me a penny
for every mouse I would catch. I was delighted.







CUNNING MICE.


and immediately got our old trap, put some cheese
in it, and placed it in the garret.
The trap had but two holes, and so could catch
but two mice at a time. But I thought that a
great many, when for three mornings I had found
the trap full, and had been paid six cents for the
mice. I thought how rich I should be if I found















One morning, when I went to look at my trap,
I found it sprung, and the cheese all gone, but
there was no mouse. I set the trap again, and
the next morning it was the same way,-trap
sprung, but no mice and no cheese. I told papa









CUKNINrG MICEo


about it, and he was so much surprised that he
said he would watch for the mice the next night
and find out how they did it.
Well, he went up to the garret long after I had
gone to sleep. First, he heard a little squeak,
then in the bright moonlight he saw a little gray
mouse, with large ears and bright eyes, looking
out from behind a barrel. Then the little fellow
came out, looked around to see that there was no
danger, and then gave another little squeak, when
three or four more came out, and all went to the
trap, peeked into it, and saw that there was more
supper for them. But they did not any of them
put their heads in to eat it. The largest mouse
put his tail into the holes, and, hitting the cheese,
sprung the trap; then he pulled out his tail, got
the cheese, and shared it with the others.
They all seemed quite happy in thinking how
nicely they were cheating that little boy whom
they saw so carefully setting the trap to catch
them.
CULMER BARNES.
























BABY'S GONE TO LAPLAND.

BABY'S gone to Lapland, on her mother's knee;
Baby's gone to Napland, sound as she can be;
Bring the baby's nighty, little sister, run;
She is Queen and mighty,-rules us every-one.

Breath is like the posies; teeth are like the pearls;
Lips are pretty roses; golden are her curls;
Roguish baby's eyes are; ears are dainty shells;
How she's growing wiser everybody tells.









BABY'S GONE TO LAPLAND.


Dimples on her shoulders; say just what you may,
Baby's getting older every blessed day.
Fingers all so slender; toes so white and pink;
Babies are so tender-wonder what they think?

Baby's gone to Lapland, on her mother's knee,
Baby's gone to Napland, sound as she can be;
Bring the baby's nighty, little sister, run;
She is Queen and mighty,--rules us every-one.
Lay her on the pillow, soft as soft can be-
Sailor on the billow of the Silent Sea.


R. W. LOWRIk










THE WATER-MILL.
Oh! listen to the water-mill, through all the live-long day.
As the clicking of the wheels wears hour by hour away;
How languidly the autumn wind doth stir the withered leaves
As on the field the reapers sing, while binding up the sheaves!
A solemn proverb strikes my mind, and as the spell is cast,
"The mill will never grind again with water that is past."

THE SERPENT AND THE EAGLE.
A Serpent and an Eagle were struggling with
each other in the throes of a deadly conflict. The
Serpent had the advantage, and was about to
strangle the bird. A countryman saw them, and
running up, loosed the coil of the Serpent, and
let the Eagle go free. The Serpent, irritated at
the escape of his prey, let fly his poison, and in-
jected it into the drinking-horn of the countryman.
The rustic, ignorant of his danger, was about to
drink, when the Eagle struck his hand with his
wing, and, seizing the drinking-horn in his talons,
carried it up aloft.
BRIDLE YOUR TONGUE.
Speak no evil and cause no ache;
Utter no 'jest that can pain awake;
Guard your actions and bridle your tongue;
Words are adders when hearts are stung.
24C





























































DAVID LIVINGSTONE.









DAVID LIVINGSTONE.
The three greatest Scotchmen of modern times
were Hugh Miller, Thomas Carlyle and David
Livingstone. The latter started forth as a mis-
sionary to Africa, but as time went forward he
united the work of an explorer to that of the mis-
sionary, and, while he never lost sight of the
religious side of his work, he felt it to be his
duty to open up to the civilized world the won-
ders and boundless possibilities of a continent,
concerning which the world knew next to noth-
ing. Boys and girls should read and study the
life and labors of this distinguished pioneer. The
death of Livingstone was felt as a heavy loss
throughout the whole world; and when his body
was brought at last to London, to be interred in
Westminster Abbey, tens of thousands of people
lined all the ways to the Abbey; the bells tolled,
and business was suspended -so honored and
beloved was the missionary traveler of Africa.
THREE WISE MAXIMS.
Estate in two parishes is bread in two wallets.
Diseases of the eye are to be cured with the elbow.
The hole calls the thief.














"PROUD MAISIE IS IN THE WOOD."


SIR WALTER SCOTT.
Proud Maisie is in the wood
Walking so early;
Sweet Robin sits on the bush
Singing so rarely.

"Tell me, thou bonny bird,
When shall I marry me?"
"When six braw gentlemen
Kirkward shall carry ye."

"Who makes the bridal bed,
Birdie, say truly?"
"The gray-headed sexton
That delves the grave duly.

"The glow-worm o'er grave and stone
Shall light thee steady;
The owl from the steeple sing
Welcome, proud lady!"


REMEMBER

That it is not the clock with the loudest tick
that keeps the best time.
That valuable as is the gift of speech,
silence is often still more valuable.






































































THE LITTLE MARKET WOMAN.










THE LITTLE MARKET WOMAN.


From Grooby Pool to Anstey Glen, there
is not a bonnier little maiden than Margaret
Vaughan. Her face is the home of happy
smiles, and the dimples of her cheeks and chin
give you the impression that she can be as
mischievous as she is merry. Margaret's father
died when she was quite young, and her
mother has had a hard tussle with fortune;
but friends have been kind and Margaret is
her comfort and joy. The little general store
at Anstey Glen is bright and neat and clean,
and little Margaret goes to and fro with such
a glad free will, that everybody admires the lit-
tle market woman. The plums and peaches and
pears seem to catch a ruddier glow from her
youthful beauty, and her smiling cheeks aie:
Like a Katherine pear
The side that's next the sun."
Margaret is returning from the vicarage and
is hot; she has turned the empty basket over
her head and made a capital sun-shade of it.
She is counting the money over again to be
sure she has made no mistake.














































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THE SHEPHERD BOY OF BETHLEHEM.


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THE SHEPHERD BOY OF BETHLEHEM.
David, the son of Jesse, little thought as he
kept his father's flocks on the plains of Bethlehem
what greatness was in store for him. With his
greatness there came many sorrows, and many a
time he longed for the quiet of the shepherd's life.
He would gladly have changed his throne for the
shade of a spreading tree in his father's happy
fields.
LITTLE WHITE SAIL ON AN ENDLESS SEA.
WOMAN'S JOURNAL.
Little white blossom, so faintly flushed,
Delicate petals, so lightly crushed,
Leaves of a laughter so quickly hushed.
Little white sail on an endless sea,
Passed from the ken of the eyes that be
Straining ashore for a glimpse of thee.
Little white star on the night's blue strand,
Into bowed souls of this lower land
Shine thou forever from God's right hand I

FIRST VIRTUE.
I think the first virtue is to restrain the tongue;
he approaches nearest to the gods who knows how
to be silent, even though he is in the right.-Cato.










































W ICTOF, VIUGO.










VICTOR HUGO.
Vicomte Victor Marie Hugo, the most
illustrious French poet and novelist of his age,
was born at Besancon, an ancient fortified town
on the eastern border of France, on the 26th
of February, 1802. His life itself was as
romantic as any of his marvelous works. In
185 I, after the celebrated coup d'elat of Decem-
ber, he was driven into exile, taking refuge
in the Island of Jersey. Here he wrote his
celebrated satire, "Napoleon le Petit." In
1859 he published the work by which he will
be longest remembered, "Les Miserables."
After the fall of the emperor, Hugo returned
to Paris and became for many years the idol
of the French people. He lived to be more
than eighty years of age. His death took
place on the 22d of May, 1885. His funeral
was the most magnificent pageant France has
seen this century. He was buried with all
national honors, in the Parthenon.

THE GLORY OF BEING GOOD.
Great hearts alone understand how much
glory there is in being good.-Michelet.


































































PHILIP. MY KING.









PHILIP, MY KING.


DINAH MULOCK CRAIK.
Look at me with thy large brown eyes,
Philip, my king!
For round thee the purple shadow lies
Of babyhood's royal dignities.
Lay on my neck thy-tiny hand
With Love's invisible sceptre laden;
I am thine Esther to command
Till thou shalt find thy queen-handmaiden,
Philip, my king!

GRAINS OF GOLD.

Moral courage is the rarest of qualities, and
often maligned.
Life is too short to be spent in minding
other people's business.
It is easier to suppress the first desire than
to satisfy all that follow.
The seeds of our punishment are sown at
the time we commit the sin.
The sympathy of sorrow is stronger than
the sympathy of prosperity.
Faith steps in to our aid when our boasted
knowledge and reason fail.















N


"AHE t JF YFLOWER.


THE MANfDINGG OF









THE LANDING OF THE MAY FLOWER
Since the days when the fisherman's boat
bore the apostles and their Lord over the blue
waters of Galilee, never has vessel borne a cost-
lier cargo than the Mayflower," as she sailed
out of Delft Haven, with a hundred souls on
board. The men and women of the May-
flower" left home and friends and graves, to
seek in a strange land the liberty they could
not enjoy at home. After sixty-five days of a
trying voyage, they landed, and, falling upon
their knees, they consecrated this land by the
word of God and by prayer, to God, and truth
and freedom.
HANDS AND LIPS.
Oh, what can little hands do
To please' the King of Heaven?
The little hands some work may try,
To help the poor in misery.
Such grace to mine be given!
Oh, what can little lips do
To praise the King of Heaven?
The little lips can praise and pray,
And gentle words of kindness say.
Such grace to mine be given




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