• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Frontispiece
 The field mouse and the town...
 The wolf and the crane
 Little Bo-Peep
 The mice, the cat and the bell
 The North Wind doth blow
 The two friends and the bear
 The cock and the pearl
 The dog and the stream
 If all the world were apple-pi...
 The fox and the goat
 Lady Moon
 Little Robin Red-breast
 The mouse and the lion
 Rock-a-bye baby
 The frog and the ox
 Tom, he was a piper's son
 The fox and the crow
 The man and the stork
 Little Boy Blue
 The house that Jack built
 The dogs and the lion's skin
 The oak and the reeds
 Ba-a, ba-a, black sheep
 The wolf and the fox
 The stag at the lake
 O, look at the moon!
 The fox and the lion
 The fox and the grapes
 The goose and the golden eggs
 There was a little girl
 The boy and the wolf
 The fox that lost his tail
 The dog in the manger
 Some little mice
 The old man and his sons
 The wolf and the goat
 The hunter and the woodman
 I like little pussy
 The cat, the ape and the nuts
 The fisherman and the perch
 The lamplighter
 The wolf and the house dog
 The Sun and the North Wind
 The crow and the pitcher
 The hare and the tortoise
 Red in summer
 The hares and the frogs
 The lark and her young ones
 Back Cover






Group Title: Lakeside literature series
Title: Fables and rhymes
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087375/00001
 Material Information
Title: Fables and rhymes Æsop and Mother Goose
Series Title: Lakeside literature series
Uniform Title: Mother Goose
Physical Description: 96 p., 10 leaves of plates : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Aesop
Western Publishing House
American Book Company
Publisher: Western Publishing House
Place of Publication: Chicago
Publication Date: c1898
 Subjects
Subject: Fables -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1898   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1898   ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature -- 1898   ( rbgenr )
Fables -- 1898   ( rbgenr )
Moral tales -- 1898   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre: Children's poetry
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
Fables   ( rbgenr )
Moral tales   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Ohio -- Cincinnati
 Notes
General Note: Illustrated title page.
General Note: Pictorial front cover.
General Note: Cover imprint: American Book Company, New York, Cincinnati, Chicago.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087375
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225999
notis - ALG6281
oclc - 262612902

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Preface
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Table of Contents
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Frontispiece
        Page 8
    The field mouse and the town mouse
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    The wolf and the crane
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Little Bo-Peep
        Page 15
    The mice, the cat and the bell
        Page 16
        Page 17
    The North Wind doth blow
        Page 18
    The two friends and the bear
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The cock and the pearl
        Page 21
    The dog and the stream
        Page 22
    If all the world were apple-pie
        Page 23
    The fox and the goat
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Lady Moon
        Page 26
    Little Robin Red-breast
        Page 27
    The mouse and the lion
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Rock-a-bye baby
        Page 30
    The frog and the ox
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Tom, he was a piper's son
        Page 33
    The fox and the crow
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The man and the stork
        Page 36
    Little Boy Blue
        Page 37
    The house that Jack built
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    The dogs and the lion's skin
        Page 43
    The oak and the reeds
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Ba-a, ba-a, black sheep
        Page 46
    The wolf and the fox
        Page 47
    The stag at the lake
        Page 48
        Page 49
    O, look at the moon!
        Page 50
    The fox and the lion
        Page 51
    The fox and the grapes
        Page 52
    The goose and the golden eggs
        Page 53
    There was a little girl
        Page 54
    The boy and the wolf
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    The fox that lost his tail
        Page 59
        Page 60
    The dog in the manger
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Some little mice
        Page 63
    The old man and his sons
        Page 64
        Page 65
    The wolf and the goat
        Page 66
    The hunter and the woodman
        Page 67
        Page 68
    I like little pussy
        Page 69
    The cat, the ape and the nuts
        Page 70
        Page 71
    The fisherman and the perch
        Page 72
        Page 73
    The lamplighter
        Page 74
        Page 75
    The wolf and the house dog
        Page 76
        Page 77
    The Sun and the North Wind
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    The crow and the pitcher
        Page 81
        Page 82
    The hare and the tortoise
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Red in summer
        Page 86
    The hares and the frogs
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    The lark and her young ones
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text






Lakeside Literature Series.


BOOK I.




FABLES AND RHYMES


/ESOP AND MOTHER GOOSE.


CHICAGO:
WESTERN PUBLISHING HOUSE.









































Copylflht, 1898,

By WESTERN N PUBLISHING HOUSE.


FPtk & Rbimts. 2-8









PREFACE.

The nineteenth century has been a period of wonderful
changes. Discoveries and inventions of vast importance have
followed each other in rapid succession. Many things which a
few years ago were enjoyed exclusively by the rich, are to-day
common among the poor; but from none of the improved con-
ditions of life is it possible for us to secure greater benefit than
from the present accessibility of good books.
In the fields of literature, once reserved for only a favored
few, all men today meet on nearly the same plane and may
share, at least in part, its treasures.
Next to the alphabet, the invention of greatest value is that
of printing. Certainly a large part of what is called an educa-
tion-even the knowledge of facts, which is often mistaken for
real education-is gained directly from books. .:
In educating our children, it is then of the first import ice to
teach them to read, and with the opportunities for obtaining the
best in literature constantly increasing we look to the primary
school, to which is entrusted the entire education of so large a
percentage of all of our children, to teach them not only to read,
but to read easily, so that they will like to read, and thus form a
habit of reading. The wise teacher will not be led astray by
S the example of a few superficial teachers, who, through a desire
to find a short cut to culture, are gaining the semblance rather
than the substance by at once plunging the young pupil, with-
out previous preparation, into the midst of literature. She will
content herself for a time with teaching her pupils the art of
reading, with giving them the ability to find out what the printed
word says, and encouraging them to discover for themselves the
thought concealed therein. If she succeeds in accomplishing
this, she has at least placed in the pupil's hands a key to the
storehouse of knowledge.
But while learning to read is the first and most important step
in the direction of an education, and while the habit of reading
is perhaps singly the best educational habit, a taste for good
reading is certainly an acquisition the value of which can hardly
be over estimated. There is no one thing which to the same
s







PREFACE.


extent will develop character and lead to as broad culture as
will the reading of the best literature. A taste for such reading,
however, usually comes to the individual not as a gift of nature,
but through a process of cultivation. In view of this fact, a
course of reading should be instituted for the definite purpose
of cultivating the literary taste of the pupil, and as soon as he
is prepared for such reading, he should be given something
which possesses genuine literary merit.
The necessity of cultivating the moral sentiment is recognized.
Poetry is one of the most efficient means of such culture. The
importance of the proper development of the irhagination, how-
ever, is not so well understood. Dugald Stewart says: "The im-
agination prevents us from ever being satisfied with our present
condition or with our past attainments and engages us con-
tinually in the pursuit of some untried enjoyment or of some ideal
excellence. Hence the zeal of the patriot and philosopher
to advance the virtue and the happiness of the human race.
Destroy this faculty and the condition of man will become as
stationary as that of the brutes." But while, as he says, the
imagination is the principal source of human improvement, yet,-
of all the intellectual faculties, it is the one which receives least
attention in our educational systems. We believe that apart
from the drill work which is necessary to teach the child to read,
his first reading should consist mainly of what will cultivate his
ear for the music of verse and will stimulate his imagination.
For these purposes, the forms of literature which are best
adapted to young children are the Classic Rhymes and the
Fables. The former have been sung from generation to gen-
eration, and their virtue approved by long consent. A recent
writer says: "Many a poet might learn the lesson of good
versification from them, and the child, in repeating them, is
acquiring the accent of emphasis and of rhythmical form."
They may, then, well be used as an introduction to poetry.
The value of the Fables is apparent. In them are embodied
the teachings of long experience, and in each is a plain moral,
-a virtue to be acquired, or a fault to be avoided. The Fable
aims at the representation of human motive, and the improve-
ment of human conduct; yet it is not didactic, and so conceals
its design under the disguise of fictitious characters that the







PREFACE. 5

reader receives advice without perceiving the presence of the
adviser. It is interesting alike to boys and girls, and as it gen-
erally introduces some animal which is personified and made to
speak, it appeals strongly to the imagination. Its structure also
especially adapts it to the use of children. An authority says:
"It is the most perfect literary instrument of association be-
tween the young and the old, and becomes therefore by right
the first possession of the child in literature."
In preparing this book, our aim has been to select the Fables
which are of the greatest interest and contain the best morals;
then to observe the exact lines of the original story and to tell
it in language which a child can understand. In a recent book
for second and third grade children, the author says: "The
child's first reading- should be made attractive by its ease and
entertainment." In the selections which follow, frequently occur
paragraphs of a page in length and sentences of more than 60
words-sentences which, to read aloud, require a sustained effort
on.the part of an adult, and even in silent reading an eye prac-
ticed in scanning long and involved sentences. Again in many
" versions of the Fables prepared for school use, in the effort to
adapt them for the child, not only is the entire flavor &f the
Fable lost, but even its plan and purpose are sacrificed. In-such
books it seems to us that the Fable is brought to the exact level
of the stories of the ordinary School Reader. "A composition
is not a classic because of the theme considered, but because of
the garb in which it is presented."
We trust that this version of the Fables will not descend to
silliness on the one hand nor rise far above the average compre-
hension of childhood on the other.
The value of the pictures will be appreciated by all teachers.
With the exception of those copied from masterpieces, they
were prepared especially for this book. The pictures not alone
illumine the story and make it more real, but they can also be
utilized in obtaining original expressions from the pupil and
will serve as material for language lessons.
Many of the Rhymes should be committed to memory, and
few exercises will prove of greater value in developing the
pupil's power of thought and expression than that of telling
the Fables in his own language.















CONTENTS.



PAGE.
"AN OLD MONARCH" .........................Rosa Bonheur 8
THE FIELD MOUSE AND THE TOWN MOUSE. ....... ..... 9
THE WOLF AND THE CRANE............. ............... 13
LITTLE BO-PEEP........................................... 15
THE MICE, THE CAT AND THE BELL ..................... 16
THE NORTH WIND DOTH BLOW .................... ..... 18
THE TWO FRIENDS AND THE BEAR....................... 19
THE COOK AND THE PEARL.............. ............... 21
THE DOG AND THE STREAM ............................. 22
IF ALL THE WORLD WERE APPLE PIE ................. 23
THE FOX AND THE GOAT. ............................... 24
LADY MOON................... ............................ 26
LITTLE ROBIN RED-BREAST............................... 27
THE MOUSE AND THE LION ............................... 28
ROCK-A-BYE BABY......................................... 30
THE FROG AND THE Ox.................. .............. 31
TOM, HE WAS A PIPER'S SON.............................. 33
THE FOX AND THE CROW................................ 34
THE MAN AND THE STORK. .............................. 36
LITTLE BOY BLUE ...................................... 37
THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT......................... 38
THE DOGS AND THE LION'S SKIN ......................... 43
THE OAK AND THE REEDS...:.... ....................... 44
BA-A, BA-A, BLACK SHEEP............................... 46
THE WOLF AND THE FOX............................... 47
c








CONTENTS. 7

PAGE.
"KING OF THE FOREST "........ .......Rosa Bonheur 48
THE STAG AT THE LAKE................................. 49
0, LOOK AT THE MOON ....... ........................... 50
THE FOX AND THE LION ............................. 51
THE FOX AND THE GRAPES ............................... 52
THE GOOSE AND THE GOLDEN EGGS........ ............. 53
THERE WAS A LITTLE GIRL............................. 54
THE BOY AND THE WOLF ..... ......................... 55
THE Fox THAT LOST HIS TAIL........... ............. 59
THE DOG IN THE MANGER ......................... ...... 61
SOME LITTLE MICE....................................... 63
THE OLD MAN AND HIS SONS ................ .......... 64
THE WOLF AND THE GOAT ...... ....................... 66
THE HUNTER AND THE WOODMAN ....................... 67
I LIKE LITTLE PUSSY................................... 69
THE CAT, THE APE AND THE NUTS. .................... 70
TnI FISHERMAN AND THE PERCH ............... ........ 72
THE LAMtIIGHTER ......... Robert Louis Stevenson 74
THE WOLF AND THE HOUSE DOG.................. .... ; 76
THE SUN AND THE NORTH WIND....................... .. 78
THE CROW AND TIE PITCHER............................ 81
THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE........................... 83
BED IN SUMMER ................... Robert Louis Stevenson 86
TIE HARES AND THE FROGS............... .............. 87
THE LARKS .................r.....o.. om Photograph 90
THE LARK AND HER YOUNG ONES....................... 91






.r$.


AN OLD MONARCH.


'~C '"~ ~~r~
-












THE FIELD MOUSE AND THE TOWN MOUSE.
A Field Mouse had a friend
who lived in a house in town.
The Town Mouse was asked
one day to dine with the Field
Mouse.
Out he went and sat( d_6ow W
a meal of corn and wheat.
T*- Town Mouse looked at-'
this plain fare with scorn, and .
said: e
"Do you know, my friend,


". : -





10 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

that you live a mere ant's life
out here ? Why, I have stores
of good things to eat at home.
Come to town and dine with
me, and see what I have to
give you."
So the two set off for town,
and there the Town Mouse
showed his meal and dates, his
cheese and cakes, and many
sweets.
As the Field Mouse ate,
he thought how rich his friend
was and how poor he was.
But while they were feasting,
a man came into the room, and





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 11

the mice were in such fear that
they ran into a crack.
By and by, when the man
had gone, they crept out again.






n-7


Just then a cat came in.
"Run for your life!" cried
the Town Mouse.
Away flew the mice, and





12 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


reached a hole just
save their lives.
Then the Field M<
eat no more, but sa
Town Mouse:
"Please yourself,
friend; eat all you
are rich, but you
fright the: 'whole ti

poor, I know. I ha
to eat but wheat
but I will live on tl
fear of any one."


in time to


house would
lid to the


Thy good
want. You
are in a
me.- I am
ve nothing
and corn;
lose, in no


U Y ~ w~ v d w c at i-h Ab

JRrfMw~P )el~~


i*;
--i
1,
r.,





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 13
















g --et it out. Just then he saw
THE WOLF AND THE CRANE.
A Wolf, one day, while eating,
got a sharp bone in his throat.
He choked and coughed, but,
try as he might, he could not-:
get it out. Just then he saw
*a Crane passing by, and asked .
--her to help him.




14 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

"If you will put your head
into my mouth and draw out
the bone," said he, "I will pay
you well for it."
"I will try," said the Crane,
and, with her long bill, she soonr
drew the bone out of his throat,
and threw it on the ground.
This done, she asked for her
pay.
Pay you, indeed!" cried' the
Wolf. You have had your
head in the jaws of a Wolf!
With one bite I could have'
killed you! I spared your life.
What more could you ask ''

*.1





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 15



LITTLE BO-PEEP.

Little Bo-Peep has lost her sheep,
And cannot tell where to find them;
Leave' them alone, and they'll come home,
And bring their tails behind them.


Little Bo-Peep fell fast asleep,
And dreamt she heard them bleating;
When she awoke, she found it a joke,
For still they all were fleeting.


Then up she took her little crook,
With :mind made up to, find them;
She fouddi them, indeed, but it made her
.heAir bleed,
For they'd left their tails behind them.

2"/ ,





16 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


THE MICE, THE CAT AND THE BE:
There was a sly Cat
house, and the Mice liv
great fear of her.
One night they held a
ing to find some way by
they might .guard against
caught by her.
A big Mouse stood up
box and said:


LL.
in
ed


meet-
which
being


on a





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


"Friends, we meet to-night to
talk about the Cat. Many of
oiuf'friends have been caught
by her sharp claws. She is our
great foe. Her step is so soft
that we cannot hear it. What
can we do? Has any one a
plan ? "
"If you will be ruled by me,"
said one of the Mice, "there is
nothing like hanging a Bell to
the Cat's neck to tell us when
she is near."
They all thought this a bright
plan.
"Well," said an old Mouse,





18 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

"we are all agreed that we


have a good
shall hang the
neck ?"
But no or


plan; now,
Bell to the


ie had


who
Cat's


anything


more to say.



THE NORTH WIND DOTH BLOW.
The North Wind doth blow,
And we shall have snow,
And what will poor robin do then?
Poor thing!

He'll sit in a barn,
And keep himself warm,
And hide his head under his wing.
Poor thing!





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 19


THE TWO FRIENDS AND I f
THE BEAR.
Two Friends were
walking along a
road, when a bear
rushed out from a
wood near by.
One of them, to
himself, climbed up a
His Friend, finding
he could not reach.
the tree in time,
,ek;'r8~lJ,$iB~


save
tree.





20 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

fell flat upon the ground. When
the Bear came up and poked
him with his nose, he feigned
death.
The Bear soon left him, for,
it is said, a bear will not touch
a dead man.
"What did the Bear say to
you when he had his nose so
close to your ear ?" asked the
man in the tree, as he climbed
down.
SI will tell you," said his
Friend. "He told me not to
trust a man who leaves a friend
in time of need."





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 21
THE COCK AND THE PEARL.
One day a Cock was search-
ing in the barnyard for food
for himself and his hens.
"If I could find a grain or
two of corn, how glad I should
be," said he.
Just then he saw something
shining in the straw. It was a
Pearl that by chance had been
lost in the. yard.
"No doubt you are of much
worth to some one," said the
Cock, but, as for me, I care
more for one grain of corn than
for a whole peck of Pearls."





22 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.
THE DOG AND THE STREAM.
One day a Dog was taking
home a piece of meat.
On his way, he had to cross













a stream, which was smooth and
clear.
Looking down, he saw in the
stream what he thought was. a





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 23

dog with a piece of meat in
his mouth.
He made up his mind to have
that piece, too.
"It is twice as large as
mine," thought he.
But when he tried to snatch
the meat from the strange dog,
his own piece fell out of his
mouth and sank in the stream.


IF ALL THE WORLD WERE APPLE-PIE.
If all the world were apple-pie,
And all the sea were ink,
And all the trees were bread and cheese,
What should we have to drink ?


~wv~


- `





24 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


THE FOX AND THE GOAT.
A sly old Fox fell
into a well, and could
not climb out, though
he tried again and
again.
A Goat came to
this same well for a
drink. Seeing the
Fox, he asked him
if the water was
good.





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 25
SGood ?" said the Fox; "it is
the best water in the world.
Come down, my friend, and try
it."
The Goat, without waiting to
think, jumped into the well.
As he was quenching his
thirst, the Fox said: "Pray drink
all you want."
And, as he spoke, he leaped
upon the Goat's back, then -6.-
the curb of the well, and out
upon the ground.
The Goat, finding that he
could not get out, begged the
Fox to help him.





26 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

But the Fox laughed, as he
said:
S"What a foolish old Goat you
are! If you had as many brains
in your head as you have hairs
in your beard, you would not
have jumped down there until
you had first seen a way to get
out."


LADY MOON.
Lady Moon, Lady Moon, where are you
roaming ?
Over the. sea.
Lady Moon, Lady Moon, whom are you
loving ?
All that love me.





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERtIES. 27


LITTLE ROBIN RED-BREAST.

Little Robin Red-breast sat upon a tree;
Up went Pussy-cat, and down went he;
Down came Pussy-cat, and away Robin
ran;
Says little Robin Red-breast, "Catch me
if you can."



Little Robin Red-breast jumped upon Ai
wall;
Pussy-cat jumped after him, and almost
got a fall;
Little Robin chirped and sang, and what
did Pussy say?
Pussy-cat said "Mew!" and Robin flew
away.





28 LAKESIDE LITERATURE .SERIES.











THE MOUSE AND THE LION.
A Mouse, by chance, ran
across the face of a Lion as he
lay asleep in the woods.
The Lion awoke and was
about to eat him, but the Mouse
begged hard to be let go, say-
ing, "If you will spare my life,
I shall not forget it."





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


"You amuse me," said the
Lion. "What could a little
Mouse like you do for a great
Lion like me?"
"Let me go," said the Mouse,
" and some day you may be
sure I will do you a good
turn."
At this the Lion laughed,
and let the Mouse go.
It was not long until the
Lion was caught by some men,
and bound fast with strong
ropes.
The Mouse heard him roar
and came to his aid.





30 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

With his sharp teeth, he
gnawed the ropes until they
broke, and the Lion was free.
"You laughed at me once,"
said the Mouse, "but now you
know that a mere Mouse may
sometimes help a Lion."










WGOrv 4Armou A00j11
C0olu, Ou tQAA)4J.






LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 31

V -----' -


THE FROG AND THE OX.


An Ox, while drinking at a

pool, chanced to set his foot

among some young Frogs, and

crushed one of them to death.

When the old Frog came

home, she missed her son.

"Where is my child~?" she

asked.

"Alas!" said the young Frogs,

"he is dead. A great beast,


4,r~

V-Z


I .






;
--
C,

'


`'y ."".





32 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

with horns, came to the pool,
and crushed him with his huge
foot."
"How big was the beast?"
asked the old Frog. "Was he
as big as this ?" and she puffed
out her sides.
"Oh, he was many times as
big as that," said the young
Frogs. "You were not meant
to be as big as he."
"Was he as big as this?"
asked the old Frog, and she
swelled herself out yet more.
"Yes, indeed!" said they, "and
if you were to burst yourself,





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 33

you could not reach half his
size."
But the old Frog was vain.
She tried once more and burst
herself indeed.




TOM, HE WAS A PIPER'S SON.
Tom, he was a piper's son;
He learnt to play when he was young,
But all the tune that he could play,
Was "Over the hills and far away."


But Tom with his pipe made such a noise,
That he pleased both the girls and boys;
And they stopped to hear him play,
"Over the hills and far away."




34 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

*-~-- -. u


Vk


"How well you
are looking, my
friend!" said the
SFox. "How your
Swings shine!


^'- .THE FOX AND THE CROW.
S A Fox once saw a
i Crow fly into a tree,
With a piece of cheese
in her beak.
He came close to
';;: the tree and planned
, to get the cheese for
la himself.





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 35
What bright eyes you have!
I am sure your voice is as
pleasing as your looks. Let me
hear but one song from you,
that I may greet you as
Queen of the Birds."
The Crow, much puffed up
by this praise, raised her head.
"Caw! caw! cried she, and
of course the cheese fell from
her beak.
"Ha, ha!" laughed the Fox,
as he snapped up the cheese.
"You sing very well. It is a
pity you are so lacking in
sense!"





36 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


THE MAN AND THE STORK.
A man who had just sown
some wheat in his field, spread
nets on the ground.
"Now," thought he, "I shall
trap any birds who may try
to take my seed."
He caught some Cranes, and
with them, one day, a Stork.
The Cranes knew they must
die, and took their fate&as part
of the lot of a thief, but the
Stork pleaded hard for his life.
"Do not kill me!" he cried, ,
"for I am no Crane. I am a
poor, harmless Stork. t Cranes





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 37


are thieves, I know, but Storks
are the best of birds. Pray
let me go."
The Man laughed as he said:
"All this may be true, still I
know but one thing about you.
I have caught you with thieves,
and with thieves you must die,"-



LITTLE BOY BLUE.
Little Boy Blue, come blow your hoe;n;:: ":
The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in
the corn.
What! is this the way you mind your
sheep,-.
Under the hay-cock, fast asleep ?


.... <





38 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


- - -


f .~ -.

THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.
This is the house that Jack built.

This is the malt
That lay in the house
that Jack built.
This is the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cat,
That, killed the rat,
.. That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.


st a:7.1






LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 39

This is the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
'- That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.


This is the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,










That killed the rat
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.






40 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

This is the maiden, all
forlorn,
That milked the cow with
the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.


This is the man, all tat-
tered and torn,
That kissed the maiden, all
forlorn,
That milked the cow with
the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.
? ,-





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


This is the priest, all shaven and shorn,
That married the man, all tattered and
torn,
That kissed the maiden,
all forlorn,
That milked the cow with
the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cock that crowed in the morn,
That waked the priest, all
shaven and shorn,
That married the man, all -
tattered and torn, ~ r .
That kissed the maiden, 1
all forlorn,
That milked the cow with
the crumpled horn,





42 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack 'built.

This is the farmer, sowing his corn,
That kept the cock that crowed in the
morn,
That waked the priest, all
shaven and shorn,
That married the man, all
tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden,
all forlorn,
That. milked the cow with
the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat, .
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 4.3
THE DOGS AND THE LION'S SKIN.
Some Dogs once found the
skin of a Lion, and began to
tear it into shreds with their
teeth.
A Fox, who was passing,
called out:
"You are not so brave as
you would seem. If that Lion
were alive, you would take
good care to keep out of his
reach, as you well know that
his claws would be much
stronger than your teeth.".,
Any one can show a bold
.face when no danger is near.





44. LAICI-IDE LITERATURE SERIES'













THE OAK AND THE REEDS.

A great Oak grew on the
bank of a stream. As it stood
with roots firm in the ground
and head high in the air, it said.r
"I look down upon the whole
world. Nothing can make m@
bend. How strong I am!".1

S.. ";. 9





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 45

But one day there was a
storm. The fierce Wind tore up
the proud Oa-' byj: the roots,
and cast it into the stream.
As it floated away, it passed
by some Reeds- that grew of .
the bank.
The Reeds stood up straight
and tall.
"0 Reeds," said the Oaky
"how is it, that you who are:
small and weak can withstand
the Wind, while I must fall and
die ?"
"Friend," said the Reeds, "no
one can withstand the Wind.

'o -. -





46 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


It does not harm us, for we
do not fight against it. We
bend and let it sweep by:
When the storm is past, we
rise again, safe and sound.
You were so proud that you
would not bend, and he who
will not bend, must break."



BA-A, BA-A, BLACK SHEEP.
Ba-a, ba-a, black sheep, have you.
any wool ?
Yes, sir; yes, sir; three bags full:
One for my master, one for his dame,
And one for the little boy that lives
in the lane.




LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 47
THE WOLF AND THE FOX.
There was once a Wolf who
.was so large that all the other
wolves seemed small beside him.
Because of his great size and
strength, they called him Lion.
The Wolf was so flattered by
this proud title, that he left his
own race, and went to live with
the lions.
A wise old Fox, meeting him
one day, said: "How foolish
you are! When you were w it.h-i
the wolves, you seemed like a
lion, but among the lions you
look like a Wolf indeed."







LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


Rosa Bonheur.


KING OF THE FOREST.


48




LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


THE STAG AT THE LAKE.
One warm day a Stag
stopped to quench his thirst at
a Lake. The water was so clear
that he saw himself in it as he
bent down to drink.
"What fine, large horns I
have," thought he; "but how
weak and thin my legs are!"
As he was thinking about these
things, a Lion sprang at him.
The Stag turned and ran.:
His thin legs were swift and
his feet were sure, and so long
as they were on the plain, he
outran the Lion. But when they




50 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

came to the woods, his horns
caught in the boughs of the
trees, and held him fast, until
the Lion came up with him.
As the Lion fell upon him,
the Stag cried out:
"Alas! the legs I scorned
would have saved my life; but
the horns, of which I was so
proud, have caused my death."



LO, LOOK AT THE MOON
O, look at the moon!
She is shining up there;
0, mother, she looks
Like a lamp in the air.





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


Last week she was smaller,
And shaped like a bow,
But now she's grown bigger,
And round like an O.



THE FOX AND THE LION.
The first time the Fox met
the Lion, he was much afraid.
"How fierce he looks!" said
the Fox, and away he ran.
The next time the Fox met
the Lion, he was afraid, to be
sure, but not as at first.
The third time the Fox met
the Lion, he was so bold that
he went up and spoke to him.





52 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


THE FOX AND THE
GRAPES.
A Fox -once
saw some Grapes
-. hanging from a
vine which was
twined around
the boughs of a
tree.
They were
large and ripe,
and he longed
' ; to get them.





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 53

He jumped as high as he
could, and snapped at the Grapes.
Again and again he tried, but
could not quite reach them. At
last, growing tired, he went on
his way, saying to himself:
"Let those have them who
like them.. They are green and
sour, and I would npt eat them
if I could."


THE GOOSE AND THE GOLDEN EGGS.
There was once a man who
had a Goose that laid each day
an egg of gold.
He thought that to lay such





54 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

eggs she must have a great
mass of gold inside of her.
Hoping to get it all at
once, he killed the Goose, but
found in her no gold at all.
So, by being greedy, he lost
all he had without getting the
wealth he sought.


s1
THERE WAS A LITTLE GIRL.
There was a little girl,
And she had a little curl
Right in the middle of her forehead.
When she was good
She was very, very good,
But when she was bad she was horrid.






LITERATURE SERIES. 55


THE BOY AND THE WOLF.


A man who had a fine flock
of sheep, set a Boy to watch
them on the hillside.
"If a Wolf should come," said
the man, "shout, 'Wolf! Wolf!'
I shall be at work with my
men, in the fields near by, and


I_


LAKESIDE





56 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

if you call, we will run to
help you."
One day the men heard the
Boy shouting, "Wolf! Wolf!"
They dropped their tools and
ran to help him.
"Where is the Wolf?" they
asked.
"It is a joke," laughed the
Boy. "I have not seen any
Wolf."
The men took it all in good
part, and went back to their
work.
The next day, the Boy called,
"Wolf! Wolf!" as before, and





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 57

once more the men came to
help him.
When they found it was
again done for a joke, they
were vexed, and made -up their
minds that they would go no
more to help him.
At last a Wolf came indeed.
Then the Boy ran, shouting,
"Wolf! Wolf! as loud as he
could.
But the men did not heed
him, thinking he was again
making sport.
When the Boy came up to
the men, he cried: "Why did





58 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

you not help me.? The Wolf
has killed all the sheep!"
The men then went to see,
and found it as the .Boy had
said.
"There was a Wolf, in truth,"
they cried. Why did we not
heed the call?"
"Alas!" said one, "if boys
sometimes tell lies, how can
we know when they speak the
truth ?"





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES 59


THE FOX THAT LOST HIS TAIL.
A Fox was once caught in
a trap. In pulling himself loose,
he lost his Tail, of which he
had been most proud.
Filled with shame, and fear-
ing that his friends would laugh
at him, he asked them to meet





60 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

him in the woods at a place
which -he named.
When they had come, he
jumped up on a log and said:
"As you all know, our tails
are of no use to us. Then,
too, they are a dead weight,
and so help the dogs to catch
us. I think it would be well
to do away with them all."
When he had ended his
speech, a sly old Fox arose and
said:
"Had I lost my own tail, I,
no doubt, should agree with
our friend. As it is, I shall





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


keep mine; and I think, were
it not that he had lost his
tail, he would not now urge
us to do away with ours."


THE DOG IN THE MANGER.
A Dog once made his bed in
a Manger.
Some grain had been placed
in the Manger for an Ox that
was plowing in the field.
When the Ox came hoine
from his work, he found the
Dog lying in the Manger, and
said to him:
"You have no right here.





62 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

Mangers were not made for
dogs."
But the Dog jumped up and
snapped at him.












..
The Ox then said: "Lie in
the Manger, if you will, and I
shall not trouble you; but let
me eat the grain. It was





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


placed here for me, and I am
hungry."
"What is that to me?" snarled
the Dog.
"How selfish you are!" said
the Ox. "Though you do not
want the grain yourself, you
will let no one else have it."



SOME LITTLE MICE.
Some little mice sat in a barn to spin,
Pussy came by and popped her head in;
"Shall I come in and cut your threads
off ?"
"0, no! kind sir, you will snap our
heads off."





G4 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.
THE OLD MAN AND HIS SONS.
An Old Man had some Sons
who were not well agreed.
He had tried in vain to make
them good friends.
At last, when at the point
of death, he called them all to
his bedside, and bade them
bring him some sticks.
These he tied into a bundle,
and told, each of his Sons, in
turn, to break it.
Each Son took the bundle
and tried with all his might,
but not one of them could
break it.





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


Then he untied the bundle
and gave each of his Sons one
of the sticks to break.
This they did with ease, and
he then said:
"My Sons, learn this truth
from the sticks. If you are all
of one mind, you can stand
against your foes; but -if you
try to stand alone, you will fare
like the sticks at your feet."





UjtuMU^AAI-UL AAI J/YV
A/ruto^ ~Vu ^jAA`.





66 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


THE WOLF AND THE GOAT.
A Wolf saw a
Goat feeding on the
side of a high cliff.
A Wolf's feet are
not like a Goat's,
and he could not
climb the steep
rocks. So he tried
to coax her down.
"My friend," said
he, "I fear you will
fall and break your
neck. Then I am
sure the grass is
not so sweet among





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 67

those rocks as it is in this
green field."
"Thank you, good sir," said
the Goat. "I am not afraid
of falling. What you say of
the grass may be true, but as
wolves have been known to eat
Goats, I fear you are coaxing
me down, not to get food for
myself, but in order that I may
become food for you."


THE HUNTER AND THE WOODMAN.
There was once a Hunter,
who, though prone to think
much of his own safety, wanted





68 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

to be thought brave by his
friends.
He was one day in some
woods, searching for the tracks
of a Lion, so that he might
boast of having seen them.
Coming upon a man who was
felling some trees, he asked:
"Have you seen any tracks of
a Lion about here ? Or," he
added in a bold voice, "it may
be you can tell me where he
has his lair."
"I can do better for you,"
said the Woodman; "I will
show you the Lion himself."




LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


But the Hunter turned pale
with fear, as he said:
"No, I did not ask that. It
is not the Lion himself I seek.
I merely wish to see his tracks."
Brave men are bold in deeds
as well as in words.



I LIKE LITTLE PUSSY.
I like little pussy,
Her coat is so warm,
And if I don't hurt her
She'll do me no harm;
So I'll not pull her tail,
Nor drive her away,
But pussy and I
Very gently will play.




70 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.
THE CAT, THE APE AND THE NUTS.
A Cat and an Ape were
sitting one day by the hearth,
watching some Nuts, which
their master had laid down to
roast in the coals.
Soon the Nuts began to burst
with the heat, and their tempt-
ing smell set the Ape to plan-
ning a way to get them. Being
afraid to pull them out himself,
he said to the Cat: "Your
paws are just like our master's
hands. It is plain they were
made to pull out those Nuts."
The Cat was much pleased





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


with this speech, and reached
after the Nuts; but she at once
drew back with a cry, for she
had burnt her paw with the


hot coals. She tried once more,
and this time pulled out a nut.
Again and again she made
out to get one of the Nuts,





72 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

though each time she burned
her paw worse than before.
At last, when she could get
no more, she turned and found
that the Ape had used the time
to crack the Nuts and eat them.


THE FISHERMAN AND THE PERCH.
A Man who lived by catch-
ing and selling fish, one day
found but a single small Perch
in his nets.
The Perch, gasping for breath,
thus begged for his life:
"0, sir, what use can I be
to you? Think of the little I





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 73
am worth. I am not yet
come to my full size. Pray
spare my life, and put me back
into the sea. I shall soon be-
come a large fish, fit for the
tables of the rich. Then you
can catch me again, and sell
me for a much greater price."
But the Fisherman said:
"How foolish I should be to
let go what I now have for
the chance of getting some-
thing better by and by."


G} ; AV.t






74 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.
















THE LAMPLIGHTER.
My tea is nearly ready, and the sun has
left the sky;
It's time to take the window to see Leerie
going by;
For every night at teatime, and before
you take your seat,
With lantern and with ladder he comes
posting up the street.





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 75

Now Tom would be a driver, and Maria
go to sea,
And my papa's a banker, and as rich as
he can be;
But I, when I am stronger and can
choose what I'm to do,
0 Leerie, I'll go. round at night and
light the lamps with you!



For we are very lucky, with a lamp
before the door,
And Leerie stops to light it as he lights
so many more;
And 0! before you hurry by with ladder
and with light;
0 Leerie, see a little child and nod to
him to-night!
ROBERT Louis STEVENSON.
From "A Child's Garden of Verses."
SPermissirnm of Chas. Scribner's Sons.




76 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

THE WOLF AND THE HOUSE DOG.
A Wolf one night met a
sleek, well-fed House Dog.
"How is it, my friend," said
the Wolf, "that you are so
plump, while I am so thin ?
Though I search for food day
and night, I am half starved
all the time."
"Why," said the Dog, "I do
not have to search for food. I
get as much as I want to eat,
and all I have to do is to
guard the house at night.
Come, live with me, and you
shall be as well off as I am."





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 77

The Wolf thought he should
like such a life, and started
home with the Dog.
On the way to town he saw
a place on the Dog's neck
where the hair was much worn.
"What did that?" asked the
Wolf.
cO," said the Dog, "that was
done by my chain."
"Chain!" cried the Wolf.
"Do you wear a chain?"
"Yes," said the Dog. "Dur-
ing the day I am tied, but at
night I am free to go where
I please."





78 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

"Good bye," said the Wolf.
"That is no life for me. I
may not be so well-fed as you
are, but I am, at least, free."


THE SUN AND THE NORTH WIND.
There was strife between the
Sun and the North Wind as to
which was the stronger.
Each told of his great deeds,
and boasted of his strength.
Just then a man came in
sight, walking along the road.
"I see a way to end this
strife," said the Sun. "The one
who can make that man throw





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


aside his cloak shall prove him-
self the stronger. You may try
first."
To this the North Wind









4- -



agreed, and blew a fierce blast.
But the harder he blew, the
more the man needed his cloak
to keep out the cold, and the





80 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

closer he drew it round him.
At last the North Wind, hav-
ing put forth all his strength
in vain, gave up trying.
Then the Sun took ts turn.
Driving away the clouds, he
shone forth, and it was warm
and bright.
The man soon threw back
his cloak, and at last took it
off and sought the shade of a
tree.
So the Sun proved himself
the stronger, and it has ever
since been deemed that kind-
ness is better than force.





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


THE CROW AND THE PITCHER.
A Crow, who was dying of
thirst, saw a Pitcher, and, hop-
ing to find some water, flew to
it with joy.
But great was his grief when
he found that, while there was
a little water in it, the neck of
the Pitcher was so small, and





82 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

the water was so far from the
top, that he could not reach it.
In order that he might get
at least a little of it, he first
tried to break the Pitcher, then
to turn it over, but it was both
too strong and too heavy for
him.
Seeing a great many pebbles
on the ground, he thought of
a new plan, and began at once
to pick them up and drop them
into the Pitcher.
As the pebbles dropped in,
one by one, the water slowly
rose in the Pitcher, until at last





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


he could reach it. Then the
Crow fully quenched his thirst,
and thanked his bright wits for
having saved his life.


THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE.
A Hare once laughed at the
short legs and slow pace of the
Tortoise, and boasted of his
own great speed. "I can run
like a deer," said he, "but you
creep along at a snail's pace."
"That may be true," said the
Tortoise. "But try a race with
me, and I will beat you."
The Hare at once agreed to





84 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


a match, and
to mark off
the judge.
After the


they asked
the bounds


Fox had


the Fox
and be


shown


them where they were to
and how far they were to
he gave them the word,
away they both went.
Though the Tortoise plo


start,
run,
and


>dded





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 85

along with a steady pace, her
best gait was slow indeed; and
the Hare so outran her that,
when he had gone half way,
he was far in the lead.
Seeing this, he laid himself
down for a rest, thinking that,
if by any chance she should
pass him, he could catch up
with her when he pleased.
But, the day being warm,
he fell asleep, and when he
awoke, though he ran as fast
as he could, he found that the
Tortoise had reached the goal
before him.





86 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


BED IN SUMMER.


In winter I get up at night
And dress by yellow candle-light;
In summer, quite the other way,
I have to go to bed by day.


I have to go to bed and see
The birds still hopping on the tree,
Or hear the grown-up people's feet
Still going past me in the street.






LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


And does it not seem hard to you,
When all the sky is clear and blue,
And I should like so much to play,
To have to go to bed by day?
ROBERT Louis STEVENSON.
From "A Child's Garden of Verses,"
Permission of Chas. Scribner's Sons.





tcA u~ u- A /YiL tu- u to






THE HARES AND THE FROGS.

In a great wood there were

once some Hares, who lived in

such fear that they would run

at the least sound.





88 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


If a leaf
or a twig
in fright.
They all
agreed that
life.


"We
[


fell to the ground,
broke, they started


met
they


one
led


day
a


have no peace,"
*T 1 1


I


and
ard


said


one. vv e eat and sleep in
fear."
"True," said the rest. "Let
us drown ourselves! Such a
life is far worse than death."
With this they all started for
a pond, meaning to end their
lives.
In this pond there lived




LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


some Frogs, who were sunning
themselves on the bank.
When the Hares drew near,
the Frogs, in great fright, dived
into the pond.
"Stop!" said a wise old Hare.
"Let us do nothing rash. The
Frogs are still more afraid than
we, for they run from us! It
may not be as bad as we
thought. We, too, may have
feared without cause. Let us
be brave, and make the best
of our lot."
And back they all went to
their home in the woods.








90 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


From .nowograpn.


THE LARKS.





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 91
THE LARK AND HER YOUNG ONES.
A Lark had her young brood
in a field of grain.
All summer, while the wheat
had been growing taller and
riper, the Young Larks were
growing larger and stronger.
They were now about ready
to fly.
But, as the wheat was nearly
ready for harvest, the old Lark
. was watchful lest the reapers
should come before her brood
was fledged.
Each morning, before she
flew off for food, she charged





92 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.
the young birds to take note
of all they heard while she
was away, and to tell her of
it when she came home.
One day, when she was gone,
they heard the owner of the
field say to his son:
"The grain is now quite ripe.
Go tell our friends that I wish
them to come in the morning
and help us with our harvest."
When the old Lark came
home, the little ones told her
what they had heard, and begged
her to take them away.
Have no fear," said she;




LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES. 93

"there is no cause for haste,
but do not fail to" hear all
he says to-morrow."
The next morning the farmer
came and waited for his friends.
But though the wheat was riper,
nothing was done, for not a
soul came.
You see," said he to his
son, "we cannot trust to our
friends. Go at once to our
kinsfolk and bid them come
early in the morning and help,
us reap."
As soon as the old Lark
came home, the Young Ones,





94 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

in great fear, told her what the
farmer had said, and pleaded
with her to help them to some
place of safety at once.
But she said: "There is still
no cause for haste. If he stays
the harvest for the coming of
his kinsfolk, I am sure the
grain will not be reaped to-
morrow."
When the old Lark left her
brood the next morning, she
said: "The owner of the field
will be here with his son
again to-day. Watch for their
coming and hear all they. say.





LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.


To-night I shall want to know
about their plans for the
morrow."
As the old Lark had foretold,
the farmer came, but, though
he waited for his kinsfolk until
the day was nearly gone, not
one of them came.
Then, finding that the grain
was falling to the ground be-
cause it was over-ripe, he said
to his son:
"We will wait no longer.
Friends and kinsfolk alike have
cares of their own. Do you
make ready two good sickles,





96 LAKESIDE LITERATURE SERIES.

and in the morning we will
come and reap the wheat our-
selves."
That night, when the old
Lark greeted her little ones,
they told her what they had
heard, and she said to them:
"It is now time for us to go.
For when a man no longer
leaves his work to others, but
takes it up himself, you may
be sure that it will be done."
She took her little ones away
at once, and the grain was
reaped the next day by the
farmer and his son.




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