• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 The rhyme of the bowl of milk
 Baby's breakfast
 The breakfast song
 Baby's troubles ended
 The story of baby's picture...
 The story of baby's play-thing...
 A riding song
 Bed-time song
 A lullaby
 The story of baby's blanket
 The story of baby's pillow
 The wonderful hay-making
 The wonderful story of Baa-Baa
 Bun as driver
 Nifty and Scrubby
 What was the trouble?
 Bun and his wonder-ball
 What happened to the black...
 Naughty in nap time
 The talking clock
 Bun at the farm
 Bun and Mother Hen
 A Santa Claus story
 How Bun caught a bird
 Bun's happy Easter
 The lovable child
 Politeness
 The little reader
 A lesson in numbers
 Mamma's game
 The toys at liberty
 Out again
 The doll's plan
 The Paris pig
 The egg that hatched brownies
 The black horse tells a story
 Almost caught!
 The frog who would a-hopping...
 The voyage of the waterlily
 How the wax doll saved Peggy
 The mother eagle's story
 A jolly visitor
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Child stories and rhymes
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087367/00001
 Material Information
Title: Child stories and rhymes for the little people of nursery and kindergarten
Physical Description: 89 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Poulsson, Emilie, 1853-1939
Bridgman, L. J ( Lewis Jesse ), 1857-1931 ( Illustrator )
Lothrop Publishing Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: Lothrop Publishing Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1898
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Pets -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Toys -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1898   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1898   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Emilie Poulsson ; illustrated by L.J. Bridgman.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087367
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224589
notis - ALG4855
oclc - 07543475
lccn - 04018453

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 1a
    Front Matter
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Title Page
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Table of Contents
        Page 6
    The rhyme of the bowl of milk
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Baby's breakfast
        Page 11
        Page 12
    The breakfast song
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Baby's troubles ended
        Page 15
    The story of baby's picture book
        Page 16
        Page 17
    The story of baby's play-things
        Page 18
        Page 19
    A riding song
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Bed-time song
        Page 22
        Page 23
    A lullaby
        Page 24
        Page 25
    The story of baby's blanket
        Page 26
        Page 27
    The story of baby's pillow
        Page 28
        Page 29
    The wonderful hay-making
        Page 30
        Page 31
    The wonderful story of Baa-Baa
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Bun as driver
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Nifty and Scrubby
        Page 36
        Page 37
    What was the trouble?
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Bun and his wonder-ball
        Page 40
        Page 41
    What happened to the black horse
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Naughty in nap time
        Page 44
        Page 45
    The talking clock
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Bun at the farm
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Bun and Mother Hen
        Page 50
        Page 51
    A Santa Claus story
        Page 52
        Page 53
    How Bun caught a bird
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Bun's happy Easter
        Page 56
        Page 57
    The lovable child
        Page 58
    Politeness
        Page 59
    The little reader
        Page 60
        Page 61
    A lesson in numbers
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Mamma's game
        Page 64
        Page 65
    The toys at liberty
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Out again
        Page 68
        Page 69
    The doll's plan
        Page 70
        Page 71
    The Paris pig
        Page 72
        Page 73
    The egg that hatched brownies
        Page 74
        Page 75
    The black horse tells a story
        Page 76
        Page 77
    Almost caught!
        Page 78
        Page 79
    The frog who would a-hopping go
        Page 80
        Page 81
    The voyage of the waterlily
        Page 82
        Page 83
    How the wax doll saved Peggy
        Page 84
        Page 85
    The mother eagle's story
        Page 86
        Page 87
    A jolly visitor
        Page 88
        Page 89
    Back Cover
        Page 90
        Page 91
    Spine
        Page 92
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ONCE THERE WERE TWO CHILDREN."

" ONCE THERE WERE TWO CHILDREN."







CHILD STORIES AND RHYMES


FOR


THE LITTLE PEOPLE OF NURSERY
AND KINDERGARTEN


BY
EMILIE POULSSON
AUTHOR OF "NURSERY FINGER PLAYS," "IN THE CHILD'S WORLD," "THROUGH THE FARMYARD GATE," ETC.





ILLUSTRATE D BY L. 7. BRIDGMAN


BOSTON
PUBLISHING


LOTHROP


COMPANY








































COPYRIGHT, 1898,
BY
LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY.


All rights reserved.














CONTENTS.


PAGE.
THE RHYME. OF THE BOWL OF MILK 7

BABY'S BREAKFAST . 11

THE BREAKFAST SONG 13

BABY'S TROUBLES ENDED . 15

THE STORY OF BABY'S PICTURE-BOOK. 16

THE STORY OF BABY'S PLAYTHINGS 18

A RIDING SONG. 20

BABY'S RIDE 21

BEDTIME SONG. . 22

A LULLABY 24

THE STORY OF BABY'S BLANKET 26

THE STORY OF BABY'S PILLOW 28

THE WONDERFUL HAYMAKING .. 30

THE WONDERFUL STORY OF BAA-BAA. 32

BUN AS DRIVER . 34

NIFTY AND SCRUBBY . 36

WHAT WAS THE TROUBLE? 38

BUN AND HIS WONDER-BALL 40

WHAT HAPPENED TO THE BLACK HORSE, 42

NAUGHTY IN NAP-TIME 44

THE TALKING CLOCK 40

BUN AT THE FARM . 48


PA
BUN AND MOTHER HEN .

A SANTA CLAUS STORY

HOW BUN CAUGHT A BIRD

BUN'S HAPPY EASTER.....

THE LOVABLE CHILD .....

POLITENESS .

THE LITTLE READER. . .

A LESSON IN NUMBERS .

MAMMA'S GAME . .

THE TOYS AT LIBERTY .

OUT AGAIN .

THE DOLL'S PLAN.

THE PARIS PIG . .

THE EGG THAT HATCHED BROWNIES

THE BLACK HORSE TELLS A STORY

ALMOST CAUGHT . .

THE FROG WHO WOULD A-HOPPING

GO .

THE VOYAGE OF THE WATER-LILY

HOW THE WAX DOLL SAVED PEGGY

THE MOTHER EAGLE'S STORY .

A JOLLY VISITOR . .


AGE.
50

52

54

56

58

59

60

62

64

66

68

70

72

74

76

78



80

82

84

86

88







CHILD STORIES AND RHYMES.


The Rhyme of
the Bowl
L of Milk.


OH! here is the Milk, so sweet and white,
All ready for dear little Baby.


This is the Mother who, with delight,
Poured into the bowl the Milk so white,
All ready for dear little Baby.


This is the Milkmaid who worked with a will,
Her pail with the Cow's good milk to fill,
To take to the Mother who, with delight,
Poured into the bowl the Milk so white,
All ready for dear little Baby.
7




THE RHYME OF THE BOWL OF MILK.


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This is the Cow that gave milk each day
To Molly, the Milkmaid, who worked with a will
Her pail'with the Cow's good milk to fill,
To take to the Mother who, with delight,
Poured into the bowl the Milk so white,
All ready for dear little Baby.

This is the dry and sweet-smelling Hay,
That was fed to the Cow that gave milk each day
To Molly, the Milkmaid, who worked with a
will
Her pail with the Cow's good milk to fill,
To give to the Mother who, with delight,
Poured into the bowl the Milk so white,
All ready for dear little Baby.

This is the Grass (in the field it grew,
Helped by the sunshine and rain and dew)-
The grass that was dried into sweet-smelling
Hay,
And fed to the Cow that gave milk each day
To Molly, the Milkmaid, who worked with a
will
Her pai- with the Cow's good milk to fill,
To take to the Mother who with delight,
Poured into the bowl the Milk so white,
All ready for dear little Baby.
8





















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MOLLY THE MILKMAID BRINGING BABY'S MILK.
9


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THE RHYME OF THE BOWL OF MILK.

This is the Mower who worked at the farm,
Swinging his scythe with his strong right arm,
Mowing the fields of Grass (that grew,
Helped by the sunshine, and rain, and dew),-
The grass that was dried into sweet-smelling Hay,
And fed to the Cow that gave milk each day
To Molly, the Milkmaid, who worked with a will
Her pail with the Cow's good milk to fill,
To take to the Mother who, with delight,
Poured into the bowl the Milk so white,
All ready for dear little Baby.





Said the
cut!
I have


hen "Cut-dah


laid an egg
(3


For the Baby's break-
fast-
Take it now, I beg!


And the buzzing bee
said,
Here is honey sweet.
Don't you think the Baby


Would like that to eat?"


BABY'S BREAKFAST.



BABY'S BREAKFAST.


BABY wants his breakfast,
Oh! what shall I do?
Said the cow, "I'll give him
Nice fresh milk moo-oo/"


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BABY'S BREAKFAST.


Then the baker kindly
Brought the Baby's bread.
"Breakfast is all ready,"
Baby's mother said;

"But before the Baby
Eats his dainty food,
Will he not say Thank
you!'
To his friends so good ?"







Then the bonny
Baby



That was all the
S"uThank you
He knew how to say.




THE BREAKFAST SONG.


THE BREAKFAST


AT five o'clock he milks the
cow,
The busy farmer's man.
At six o'clock he strains the
milk
And pours it in the can.


At


SONG.


seven o'clock the milk-
man's horse


Must go to town-" get up!"
At eight o'clock Nurse Karen
pours
The milk in Baby's cup.




THE BREAKFAST SONG.


At five o'clock the Baby
sleeps
As sound as sound can be.
At six o'clock he laughs and
shouts,
So wide awake is he.


At seven o'clock he's in his
bath,
At eight o'clock he's drest,
Just when the milk is ready,
too,
So you can guess the rest.




BABY'S TROUBLES ENDED.


BABY'S TROUBLES ENDED.


THERE once was a Baby
Who wanted to play,
But Kitty and Doggy
Had both run away.
His blocks tumbled over,
His lamb wouldn't squeak,
And out of his dolly
The saw-dust would leak.
His drum had a hole in,
His soldiers woudd fall,
He'd broken his wagon,
And lost his nice ball;
His "Jumbo" was stupid,
His gun wouldn't shoot,
His reins were all tangled,
His horn wouldn't "toot."


And Nursie was busy,
And mother was out -
So there was poor Baby
Almost in a pout,
When in came Big Sister
"O Baby, just look!
I've brought something for you,
A nice picture book!"
And then little Baby
Had suck a nice time!
And while he was laughing
At picture and rhyme,
In walked his dear pussy
And little dog Jack,
Nurse mended his playthings,
And mother came back!


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THE STORY OF BABY S PICTURE-BOOK.


THE STORY OF


BABY'S


PICTURE-BOOK.


One day I went strolling-
And what did I see ?
A man who was busy
As busy could be.


They called him an Artist,
And all that he saw
He could with his pencil
Most cunningly draw.


Cats, kittens and doggies,
Birds, butterflies, bees,
Hens, chickens and horses,
And flowers and trees,
16




THE STORY OF BABY'S PICTURE--BOOK.


And houses and churches,
And sun, moon and stars,
And sailboats and steamships,
And engines and cars,


And people and children,
At work and at play,
This Artist could draw
In a wonderful way!


And why was he working
From morning till night?
Why, just to make pictures
For Baby's delight!




THE STORY OF BABY S PLAY-THINGS.


THE STORY OF BABY'S PLAY-THINGS.


A




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Said the Ivory Ring:
" I can tell a strange thing
That perhaps you don't know;
But a long time ago -
In an Elephant's tusk did this
ivory grow.


Said the new Noah's Ark
With its animals: "Hark!
If your wooden toys please,
You must thank the good
Trees,
For they give all the wood to
make such things as these."


Said the big Rubber Ball:
" Yes, and that is not all!
For a Tree far away
Gave its sap so they say -
To make soft 'rubber toys for
the wee Babies' play."
18




THE STORY OF BABY S PLAY-THINGS.


Said the little Tin Pail:
"And now I'll tell a tale!
'Twas the Miner who found
Me at first underground,
And the Tinsmith who made
me so shiny and round."


Said the pretty pink Shell;
" Many things I could tell
Of the wonderful Sea
Where my home used to be,
And the queer little creature
who once lived in me! "


Baby dear, it is true!
All mankind works for you;
And the Creatures and Trees,
And the Earth and the Seas,
One and all give up something
the Baby to please.


~-~-~--~-~~




A RIDING SONG.


A RIDING SONG.


I SEE a big horse, and a child
is astride,
And where, and oh where,
shall the little one ride?
Away to the palace he gal-
lops afar,


And out to the park where
the royal dogs are.

There, under a bench, gnaw-
ing hard at their chain,
They bark and they growl, and
then both bark again.

The little dog barks in a fine
little voice,
"Bow-wow-wow /"
The bigger dog barks with a
very loud noise!
"Bow, wow, wow!"

"BOW, WOW, WOW!"




BABY'S RIDE.


RIDING TO THE MILLER'S HOUSE.
Ride and ride away The miller grinds the corn
Till we reach the miller's house; For Bobby and for Sue;
No one is at home, The rooster flaps his wings,
But a morsel of a mouse. Singing Cock-a-doodle-do!"




BED-TIME SONG.


BED-TIME


SONG.


my baby, while


I sing
Bed-time news of
thing.


every-


Chickens
hen;


run to mother


Piggy curls up in the pen.
In the field, all tired with
play,


Quiet now
stay.


the lambkins


Kittens cuddle in a
heap-
Baby, too, must go to
sleep!


SLEEP,


-----


ME iW 6


IF-W




BED-TIME SONG.


Sleep, my baby, while I sing
Bed-time news of everything.
Now the cows from pasture
come;
Bees fly home with drowsy
hum.
Little birds are in the nest,


Under mother bird's
breast.


Over all soft shadows creep-
Baby now must go to sleep.


Sleep, my baby while I
sing
Bed-time news of every-
thing.
Sleepy flowers seem to nod,
Drooping toward the dewy sod;
While the big sun's fading light
Bids my baby dear good-
night.
Mother loving watch will
keep;
Baby now must go to sleep.


,

soft


f
s*


.L'


--~-- ~-




A LULLABY.


A LULLABY.

THE sunlit day has passed away,
The stars begin to show.
Bedtime is here, and Baby dear
To dreamland now must go.

But ere he goes, we'll toast his toes,
And cosy let him rest
On mother's arm; then, snug and warm,
We'll tuck him in his nest.

Across his eyes the lullabies
Have brought the shadows deep.
The lashes brown are dropping down.
Hush! Baby is asleep!






A LULLABY.


HUSH! BABY IS ASLEEP."

25


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THE STORY OF BABY S BLANKET.


THE STORY OF BABY'S BLANKET.

Once a little Baby, -
On a sunny day,
Out among the daisies
Took his happy way.
Little lambs were frisking
In the fields so green,
While the fleecy mothers
All at rest were seen.


For a while the Baby
Played and played and
played;.
Then he sat and rested'""
In the pleasant shade.
Soon a Sheep came near him,
Growing very bold,
And this wondrous story
To the Baby told: / .


.~S1~P




THE STORY OF BABY S BLANKET.


" Baby's little blanket,
Socks and worsted ball,
Winter cap and mittens,
And his flannels all,
And his pretty afghan
Warm and soft and fine,
Once, as wool were growing
On this back of mine!


"And the soft bed blankets,
For his cosey sleep,
These were also given
By his friends, the sheep."
Such. the wondrous story
That the Baby heard:
Did he understand it ?
Not a single word!





THE STORY OF BABY S PILLOW.


THE STORY


OF BABY'S


PILLOW.


These are the Eggs that were
put in a nest;
These are the Goslings in yel-
low down drest.



This is the Farm-yard where,
living in peace,
All the young Goslings grew
up to be Geese.



Here's the Goose-family wad-
dling about-


In a procession
walk out.


they always


This is the Farmer who said,
Every Goose
Now has some feathers on,
ready for use."




THE STORY OF BABY S PILLOW.


This is the Farmer's Wife,
plucking with care
All of the feathers the Geese
can well spare.


This is the Pillow the Mer-
chant displayed:
"Yes, of the finest Goose-
feathers 'tis made."


This is the Mother who put on
its case,
Laid the wee Pillow away in
its place.



This is the Crib with its fur-
nishings white,
This the dear Baby who bids
you Good-night."




THE WONDERFUL HAY-MAKING.


THE WONDERFUL HAY-MAKING.


THE squirrel went out in the
meadow to mow,
So merry and blithe,
With his glittering scythe;
And still as he mowed, he was
chattering so.
Oh! the squirrel went out in
the meadow to mow.

The raven went with him to
rake up the hay,
The rake in his claw;


Such a sight you ne'er saw!
And still as he raked he was
croaking away.
Oh! the raven went with him
to rake up the hay.


The crow and the cat to the
meadow went, too.
The crow dragged the cart,
And the cat did her part;
For she drove the hay-cart, and
said "Mew, mew, mew!"
Oh! the crow and the cat to
the meadow went, too.




THE WONDERFUL HAY-MAKING.


The children went out in the
meadow to see;
But squirrel was done,
And the raven was gone.


The crow and the pussy cat,
where could they be?
Oh! the children went out in
the meadow to see.




THE WONDERFUL STORY OF BAA-BAA.


THE WONDERFUL


One day in
spring Baby
Bun's mam-
ma said, I'm
BABY BUN.
ABY BN going to take
you to the farm to-day."
Baby liked that; and when
he was ready to go, what do
you think he had in his hand?
"A dolly?" Oh! no. His
dear little woolly lamb.
"Why don't you take your
new horse, Baby ? asked mam-
ma. Doesn't he want to go?"
"Oh! yes," said Baby; "but
'Baa-Baa is sick, so I must take
him to-day."
Poor Baa-Baa did look


STORY OF BAA-BAA.

badly. One ear was gone, one
leg was broken, and his head
hung down in a forlorn way.
He was wrapped in an old
doll-blanket, and Baby carried
him very carefully.
When they got to the farm
Baby trotted about, looking till
he found the very greenest,
freshest grass anywhere near
the farmhouse.
There, Baa-Baa, eat all
you want," said Baby.
While Baa-Baa stood look-
ing at the grass,
but before he
had begun to
eat, Farmer
Robbins came
that way. FARMER ROBBINS.
"How do you do, Baby
Bun? said he. Come and
see the Bossy in the barn."
Baby looked at Baa-Baa.


-~ -- -----




THE WONDERFUL STORY OF BAA-BAA.


Farmer Robbins said, "Oh!
you need not worry about him;
animals sometimes like best to
be alone when they eat."
So Baby went with the
farmer to see the Bossy, and
left Baa-Baa
to eat the
THE BOSSY. fresh tender
grass as he liked.
After Baby Bun had seen
the Bossy, Farmer Robbins
showed him the pigs and the
horses and the ducks, until it
was dinner-time.
Then, after dinner, Baby
took a drive with mamma.
He did not forget Baa-Baa, but
thought, He will have plenty


of time to .eat all he wants."
When mamma said, Now,
we must go home," Baby ran
to get his pet. There stood
Baa-Baa just where he had
left him -but oh! oh! oh!-
he had two ears, his broken foot
seemed to have grown on again,
and his head was up just as it
should be!
Baa-Baa is all well!"
shouted Baby, "Baa-Baa is
all well!"
Baby always thought it was
the fresh grass that had cured
his pet, but mamma knew that
kind Farmer Robbins had
mended Baa-Baa while Baby
was at dinner.


BAA-BAA IS ALL WELL NOW! F
33


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BUN AS DRIVER.


BUN AS

SBarney was
a fat, strong.
little donkey.
The children
had a small
gay cart which
he could draw,
\,':i 9 so they had
\ great fun driv-
Sing about.
But Baby's
mamma al-
BARNEY.
ways said
"No," when Baby wished to
go with the children; perhaps
telling him that Jane, the nurse,
would take him some time. To
go with Jane, however, was not
what Baby Bun wanted.
At last, Baby thought he
would invite some other grown-
up person to go with him.
His mamma was not well and
never went to drive, so he first
asked his dear old grandmam-


DRIVER.

ma; but she said, "I am too
old." Then he asked his Aunt
Helen; but she said, I am
too busy." Then he asked his
Aunt. Sue; but she said, "Oh!
I should be afraid."
That was the worst of all,
Baby Bun thought. He was
four years old and of course
he could take care of her.
One day,
soon after this,
his mamma
had a visitor,
a lady who
showed that
she knew
Baby was a
big boy even
if he did wear
dresses. So
Baby walked
BABY BUN AS DRIVER.
up to her and
said, "I should like to take you
to drive in the 'Barney cart.'"




BUN AS DRIVER.


Miss Dare was delighted
and said she would go as soon
as he and Barney were ready.
When they got into the cart
Miss Dare said, "Where are
we going?" "\Vell," said Baby





I I


go to the stable, and though
Baby pulled and scolded, to
the stable they went. Never
mind," said Miss Dare. "I
shall like to visit the stable and
we can go to the farm another






1. -


--- 1 --.


THE RIDE IN THE BARNEYY CART."


Bun grandly, "we'll go all over
the farm and out on the main
road and everywhere." "That
will be fine!" said Miss Dare.
.The donkey started.
"That road leads to the sta-
ble," said Baby Bun, "but we
will go the other way."
But when they came to the
the two roads Barney chose to


time. How nicely you drive,
Baby Bun !"
After seeing the horses and
driving back to the house, Miss
Dare thanked Baby and told
mamma and grandmamma and
the aunties that she had had a
delightful drive. And you
may be sure Baby Bun was a
proud and happy little boy.




NIFTY AND SCRUBBY.
&


NIFTY AND SCRUBBY.


Nifty, Bun's canary, was a
great dandy and a great pet.
When Bun's mamma sat down
to sew, she often put Nifty's
















"*
BUN'S MAMMA.
cage on the seat which extended
around the bay window.
Once, when she came back
after having been out of the
room a long time, she found
that Nifty had company! Com-


pany inside his cage! What
do you think of that ?
There sat Nifty on his lower
perch, and close beside him sat
the rustiest, dirtiest, scraggiest
little bit of a mouse that you
ever saw.
They made a strange-looking
pair: Nifty so gay and sleek in
his yellow coat, and Scrubby
(as Bun's mamma named the
mouse), so shabby and dingy
in his rough dull fur.
No one knew how they got
acquainted; but after this, the
mouse came almost every day.
When Nifty's cage was taken
down and Bun's mamma was
quietly seated in another part
of the room, Scrubby would
generally appear. But if he
did not come soon, Niftywould
give a soft low chirp and repeat
it until Scrubby heard the call.
Then Scrubby would come run-
36




NIFTY AND SCRUBBY.


ning across the room and up
to the window seat, and, squeez-
ing himself in between the wires
of the cage, would scramble up
on the perch beside Nifty.
Scrubby was always hungry.
It was never long after he got
into the cage before he went to
Nifty's seed dish to have a feast.
Nifty would let him eat a
little while, but when he thought
Scrubby had had enough, he
would hop over to him, and,
catching hold of Scrubby's long,
thin tail, nip it with his bill.
Oh! how Scrubby hated to
stop eating! but oh! how Nifty
did hurt his tail! He always
had to leave the delicious seed
and go. and play with Nifty.


After they had had a good
frolic, Scrubby would squeeze
between the wires of the cage


BUN'S PETS.


again and scamper away to his
home which was somewhere
about the fireplace.
The mouse came day after
day, either of his own accord
or in answer to Nifty's chirp.
Wouldn't you like to see
Nifty and Scrubby ?


I a


"YOU HAVE HAD ENOUGH, SCRUBBY!"
37


71




WHAT WAS THE TROUBLE '


WHAT WAS THE TROUBLE?


Baby Bun and Fritz the dog
were the best of friends. They
ran races, tumbled over each






;.. 6 :.- *" .-
BABY BUN AND FRITZ.
other, and had fun all day long.
When Fritz saw Baby Bun
coming, he would crouch down
all ready for a spring, and Baby
Bun would dash after him;
and the boy would laugh so,
and the dog would bark so, that
you could hear nothing else.
But one day, when Fritz as
usual expected a good play,
Baby Bun called out, Go
away, Fritz! keep off! Don't
jump on me! "
Fritz could hardly believe


his flopping ears; so he kept
slowly on his way toward Baby
Bun.
But Baby Bun again called
out, Go away!" and then
Fritz saw, by the way Baby
Bun kept moving off and shout-
ing, that he really did not mean
to play with him at all.
Poor Fritz put his tail be-
tween his legs and went sadly
away. He could not think
why Baby Bun would not play
with him.
As Fritz passed the barn, a




FRITZ IS UNHAPPY.
man called out, "Here, Fritz,
old fellow Come in here!"
Fritz was glad to have any
one speak to him, so he went


38




WHAT WAS THE TROUBLE?

into the barn to tell the man and wondering still about Baby


how very badly he felt about
Baby Bun.
"He knows something is
wrong," said another man who
was in the barn.


Bun, he heard little feet running
over the grass. He jumped up.
Yes, it was Baby Bun, who


called, "0, Fritz!


Fritzie!


Now come,


Nice doggie!"


and


" He will be all right soon," they were soon rolling over in


said the first man.


Then they


both took hold of Fritz and


i. -

F:
i \a j


the grass, one of them barking
and the other laughing.


-^ ^ '^, ', ,



' ;i ,


FRITZ IG HAPPY AGAIN.


put him into a big tub
-gave him a bath!


and


Fritz did not like it at all;
but oh! how fine he looked
when he came out of the tub!


Then they lay still; and Baby
Bun hugged Fritz and said, I
am so glad you are clean again.
Mamma told me not to play
with you when you were all


As he lay sunning himself I covered with black ditch mud!"


%..._




BUN AND HIS WONDER-BALL.


BUN AND HIS WONDER-BALL.

Baby Bun did not know at and unrolled the paper. A
all what his Auntie meant ball it was, to be sure so
when she said, "Bun, I have big that it took Bun's two
brought you a wonder-ball," so hands to hold it. It was made
of gay red worsted, and Bun
thought it was rather heavy.
"I have brought you a toy
knitter, too," said Auntie.
"Come and sit by me and I
will teach you to knit."
In a little Wxhile -a very lit-
tle while, because it is so very
nice and easy Bun had
learned to knit, using the
worsted of his big wonder-ball,
i lof course. That was what it
h" w was for, Auntie said.
Bun knitted and knitted.
Suddenly, pop !
out on the floor
fell a little pack-
age. It was a
he watched his Auntie as she chocolate! "I wonder where
took a bundle out of her bag that came from," said Bun.
40




BUN AND HIS WONDER-BALL.

"You wonder?" said Auntie. Why, wonders come out of
wonder-balls. Don't you know that, little Bun ?"
Bun clapped his hands, saying, "Oh! I
think wonder-balls are fine, Auntie. Do
they always have chocolates in them?"
Wonder-balls always have wonders in
them," said Auntie; and that was all she
would tell little Bun about it.
The next day Bun knitted more,
and more won-
/ ders dropped
out of the ball.
A bright penny,
a 'candy bird, a
wee, wee bottle
of cologne, and
a whistle -all these came; and,
besides, the strip of knitting was
growing so long, too!
By and by Bun had a piece of the knit-
ting long enough to make a fine pair of
reins to play horse with, and there was
no more worsted. The last thing he found\
was a pretty pink box, and in the box was a
china cat and five little kittens !
Wouldn't you like to learn to knit if
you had a wonder-ball?




WHAT HAPPENED TO THE BLACK HORSE.


- I


DONO AND DOBBIN.


WHAT HAPPENED TO THE BLACK HORSE.


Baby Bun was taking his
nap. He had been a very
naughty boy that morning.
He would not mind his nurse
when she called him to come
into the house, and he would
not put away his new horse
with which he had been play-
ing. So while Baby Bun was
asleep the new horse stood out
on the lawn. He was a big


black horse and his name was
Dobbin. As he stood there
who should come along but
Dono the big puppy!
When Dono spied the horse
he thought he had found a
playfellow; so he went up to
Dobbin and sniffed at him.
Dobbin did not stir. Dono
then put a paw up and hit
Dobbin; but the black horse


i '




WHAT HAPPENED TO THE BLACK HORSE.


never even turned his head.
Then Dono thought this the
strangest animal he had ever
seen. He began to play more
roughly with it. He bit the
shiny harness, took Dobbin's
head into his mouth, jumped
on him, rolled him over and
over, pulled out his tail, and
bit a great hole in his side.
Just then his master called,
" Dono!" and Dono ran away.
After dinner Baby Bun went
out to play again; but oh!
what a pitiful-looking horse he


DONO INVESTIGATES DOBBIN.


found! Poor Dobbin was so
scratched and torn and bitten


OH, HOW SORRY BABY WAS!
that he could never be mended.
Oh! how sorry Baby Bun was
that he had not minded Nurse.
Dobbin was not fit to play
with any more; but Nurse put
him up in the toy closet, and
whenever Bun
fretted about hav-
I / ing to put his play-
things away, she
only needed to
point just once to
poor Dobbin.




NAUGHTY IN NAP TIME.


NAUGHTY IN NAP TIME.


Baby Bun had been put to
bed to take his nap. And
Nurse had gone downstairs to
get her dinner. All was quiet.
I wish I didn't have to go
to sleep," thought Baby Bun.
0


3M
C QO-&O.


" I wish I had something here
in my crib to play with! "


As he lay with his nose be-
tween the bars of his crib he
saw his slippers on the chair
near.
"Oh! I can play 'choo-
choo!'" said Baby Bun; and
he reached over and got
one of his slippers.
"Choo-choo! choo.
choo!" Up and
down the crib
hJ went the red
/ morocco train;
but in a few
minutes Baby
Bun thought of some-
thing else. Suppose
he should put on his
slippers! And get out
Sof bed!
Oh! naughty Baby
Bun! Lie down again
and go to sleep like a good
child. But no the red slip-




NAUGHTY IN NAP TIME.


pers were soon on
and Baby Bun clam-
bered over the side
of his crib to the
chair.
Bump! Wlack !
Oh, what a hard hit
his head got! And
how it hurt! Baby
Bun did not often
cry, but this made
the tears come.
He got up and
stood rubbing his
poor little head. Over
He did not want side oJ
to play any more.
He looked at his nice bed. "I
think I will take my nap now,"
said Baby Bun.
When Nurse came to take
him up he was fast asleep; but
he soon waked.
"Why, you have your slip-
pers on! said Nurse.
Soon she found the bump;
and then Baby Bun told her


how he had played
" choo-choo and
climbed out of the
crib and fallen off
the chair.
The next day
when he went to
take his nap Baby
Bun said "You'd
better take away the
chair so I can't reach
my slippers." And


then he turned over and went
to sleep as soon as he could.


45




THE TALKING CLOCK.


THE TALKING CLOCK.


In mamma's room there
was a china dish with a cover.
On this cover was a pretty rose,
and when you
took hold of
1' the rose and
lifted the
cover, you
would find
1 I, candy.
i One day


when Baby Bun was left alone
in the nursery for a few minutes
he happened to think of that
dish of candy in mamma's room.
4


Mamma was not at home.
Nurse was busy. Baby Bun
went out into the hall and
down the stairs. He went
quietly and listened all the
time, fearing lest Nurse should
find out that he was not in the
nursery.
Suddenly, just before he
opened mamma's door, he
heard a queer voice saying
very slowly,
Go back!
Go- back! "
Baby Bun was
Frightened and
S looked all about,
but he could see
no one. Yet still
that very slow,
solemn, strange
voice kept on,
saying distinctly,
"Go -back! Go back!"
Baby Bun felt more and




THE TALKING CLOCK.


more afraid. What should
he do?
Go back Go back!"
said the voice again.
And this time Baby Bun
obeyed the command.


ever, he heard the front door
close; and then his mamma
called him. Down he ran, not
stopping to listen this time;
and you may be sure he told
his mamma all about it.


He ran upstairs as fast as
ever he could. He did not care
if Nurse did hear him now. In
fact he wanted very much to
find her or somebody. Just
as he reached the nursery, how-
47


His mamma was sorry he
had been so naughty as to go
to get the candy; but she told
him it was the good old clock
that spoke to him and told him
to go back.


I-_I I




BUN AT THE FARM.


/-




,, ,. \J .
<___:^i--_ .

DOWN BY THE DUCK POND.

BUN AT THE FARM.


When Baby Bun was in the
country, of course the thing
he liked best to do was to go
down to the farm; though
there were a great many other
interesting places.
For at the farm, there was
everything, it seemed to Baby
Bun. There were horses, and
hay carts, and dump carts, and
the carry-all. There were big
barns with ladders to climb
and with hay to jump into.


There was the orchard,
where you could find blossoms,
or green apples to throw to
the pigs, or ripe apples to eat.
The pigs lived near the barn;
big, funny old grunters, and
darling little pink piggies that
were so cunning.
Baby's own garden was
down at the farm, too; and
the pastures one for the
cows, one for the calves, and
one for the sheep; and be-




BUN AT THE FARM.


sides all this there was the-
poultry yard.
Baby Bun always threw corn
to the hens and chickens, and
looked in the nests for eggs,
first; and then he would run
down to the duck pond. This
was not a real pond, but a
small place arranged for the
ducks to swim in.
Bun sailed boats there some-
times; but what he liked best
was to keep the ducks swim-
ming from one side of the
pond to the other.
The ducks liked it for a lit-
tle while, but they got tired of
it before Baby Bun did.
One day, one of the largest
ducks tried to get out. Baby
Bun ran quickly round to the
other side of the pond to chase
him back into the water.
The ground was a little wet
at the edge of the duck pond.
Baby Bun was running fast
and his foot slipped just at the


brink of the water, and in he
fell with a great splash.
The pond was not deep
enough to be dangerous, but
Baby Bun was well frightened.
He screamed and gurgled


"DRIPPING LIKE A WATER-CART."


with his mouth full of water,
and the ducks quacked in ter-
ror and waddled out and away
as fast as ever they could.
Baby Bun had to walk
home "dripping like a water-
cart," as Nurse said. He has
always been more careful since,
when near the duck pond.




BUN AND MOTHER HEN.


.74-.F


BUN CHASES THE RUNAWAY CHICKEN.


BUN AND MOTHER HEN.


Baby Bun went out to see
the little chickens. It was
safe for him to go out in the
farmyard alone, for the horses
were gone to the blacksmith's
to get new shoes put on, and
the cows were out in the fields.
Be a good child, Bun, and
nothing will hurt you," Baby's
mamma had said; and don't
touch the chickens." So Baby
Bun trotted off to the big
cherry-tree where Mother Hen


and the downy chickens lived.
There they were the cun-
ning, yellow things just out-
side the coop. Mother Hen
was out with them that morn-
ing, and she was cluck-cluck-
ing very earnestly to her babies;
and what do you think she
said ? Why, just about what
Baby Bun's mother had said
to him: Be good little chick-
ens, and nothing will hurt you;
and keep close to me."


.. .. ......




BUN AND MOTHER HEN.


But one little chick was
naughty. He did not .keep
close to his mother but ran
away.
Baby Bun ran after him and
caught him. Baby only wanted
to pet him, but he was fright-
ened and began to cry. Mother
Hen heard him, and when she
saw that Baby Bun was hold-
ing him, she called out fiercely,
" Cluck! cluck! cluck! cluck!"
and this time it meant, "What
are you doing to my child?
Let him go! "
Baby Bun did not let the
chicken go ; he was so soft and
yellow and cunning. Then
Mother Hen flew up and
pecked 'Baby Bun's cheek.
This frightened Bun and he
began to cry.
His mamma heard him, and
came out. She took the little
chicken away from Baby Bun
and put him on the ground be-
side Mother Hen.


Then she said, If you had
not touched the chicken, Mother
Hen would not have hurt you."
And Mother Hen just then
was saying to her little one,
"If you had kept close to me,
Baby Bun would not have
caught you."
And Baby Bun and the lit-


MOTHER HEN ATTACKS BABY BUN.


tie chicken both knew that
their mothers were right.




A SANTA CLAUS STORY.


A SANTA CLAUS STORY.


The night before Christmas
Baby Bun's mamma told him
a strange story about "The
Dreadful Thing which might


SANTA CLAUS WAS SOUND ASLEEP.


have Happened,. and What
Prevented it."
One Christmas Eve Santa


Claus had to wait longer than
usual for all the children to get
to sleep, so that he could start
out to fill the stockings. One
of the windows in his room
had a magic curtain. As long
as there was a single child
awake, this curtain remained
rolled up; but when the last
child had gone to sleep, down
dropped the curtain, and off
started Santa Claus.
Santa sat waiting, waiting,
for the curtain to unroll. At
last he began to doze and was
soon sound asleep! When the
curtain finally dropped, Santa
Claus did not know it. The
reindeer outside pawed and
clattered noisily, but it did not
waken him. The moments
passed slowly. Could it be
that the stockings would hang
empty on Christmas morning?




A SANTA CLAUS STORY.


But the dreadful thing which
might have happened did not
happen; and it was the White








THE WHITE KITTEN KNOCKS DOWN THE TIN PAN.
Kitten who prevented it. She
saw the curtain drop and knew
it was time for Santa to start.
So she rubbed against her
master and mewed her very
loudest. She jumped upon
the shelf and knocked down a
tin pan. But even that did not
wake him.
Then the White Kitten
grew anxious and desperate.
Santa Claus must be wak-
ened, and there is no one but
me to do it; it is my duty;"
so saying, she gave a spring
and caught her claws in his


snow-white beard, giving it a
quick jerk.
Ow, ow !" shrieked Santa,
jumping up. What's the
matter ?"
No one answered. The
White Kitten sat demurely
washing her face.
"I must have been asleep
and dreamed that some one
pulled my beard," said Santa.
" But it actually hurts still !-
Why! why!! the curtain is
down! 1 must be off! And


THE WHITE KITTEN PULLS SANTA'S BEARD.

in less than a wink Santa was
in his sleigh speeding away
over the housetops.




HOW BUN CAUGHT A BIRD.


HOW BUN CAUGHT A BIRD.


"SEE HERE," said cook to
Baby Bun one day, "would
you like to catch one of the


BUN'S SALT BAG.


little birds ye see hoppin' and
singin' out on the lawn there?"
"They always fly away from
me," said Baby Bun.
It must be because ye never
tried the salt," said cook.
" Look here now! She
showed Baby Bun a small
paper bag full of salt. "You
just put a pinch of salt on the


bird's tail, and then see if he
flies away."
Baby Bun went out on the
lawn. He looked about him
as he walked, and suddenly he
stopped.
He heard a little noise close
to his feet. He looked down
and there was a wee brown
bird fluttering in the grass.
Baby Bun took a pinch of
salt out of the bag with his fat,
fumbling little fingers. The
little bird had not yet flown
away. Hold still, birdie,"
said Baby Bun. "Hold still
while I put the salt on your
tail !"
Then a shout of delight
was heard. I've caught him!
I've caught him I put the
salt on his tail!"
Every one rushed to see




HOW BUN CAUGHT A BIRD.


what Baby Bun had caught.
It really was a little bird -
a baby sparrow. There it lay
in Baby Bun's hands, a throb-
bing little bunch of feathers,
with a pitiful "peep-peep."
The big brothers brought a
cage from the attic, and the
frightened birdie was put into
it. As he hopped about, one


brown wing trailed along the
bottom of the cage.
"Why, his wing is broken,"
said Auntie. "Poor Birdie!
No wonder he couldn't fly
away!"
"O, no, Auntie," said Baby
Bun, "that is not the reason!
I put salt on his tail!"
Auntie smiled.


WHEN BUN FELL INTO THE DUCK-POND.
(See page 49.)




BUN'S HAPPY EASTER.


BUN'S HAPPY EASTER.


day when Baby
get his good-
from mamma,
she pinned a
bunch of flow-
ers on his white
dress. "That's
for


Easter," said she.
At breakfast Bun found a
pretty card at his plate. It
was .a picture of a cunning
5(


LAST Easter
Bun went to
morning kiss


yellow chicken looking into an
empty egg-shell as if saying,
"/ Who could ever live in such
a little house as that ? "
The next surprise Bun found
in the library. "Baby, see!
Here's your Easter present
from grandmamma!" said Sis-
ter, as she gave him a box.
Bun took off the cover, and
there was a pretty white rabbit,
with long ears, pink eyes, and
a short tail! The rabbit felt
heavy as Bun lifted him from
the box, and something rattled.
"Oh! I know," said Bun; "he
is like my Santa Claus ele-
phant. There's candy in him!"
He pulled at Rabbit's head,
and soon off it came and
out rolled the candies. Bun
could only eat a very little
one just then; but after dinner




BUN'S HAPPY EASTER.


he had three more snow-white
candies.
In the afternoon Baby Bun
went to church for the first
time; and, as a plant was given
to every child in the church,
Bun, too, received one. His
plant was full of little pink


blossoms and buds. He car-
ried it home himself, and put
it in the nursery window.
The last thing tired happy
little Bun said that night was,
" Oh I like Easter and
flowers and rabbits and
everything!"




THE LOVABLE CHILD.


j, c [5Tli bIe ( child.
4

FRISKY as a lambkin,
Busy as a bee-
That's the kind of little girl
People like to see.
l Modest as a violet,
.'V .As a rosebud sweet-
SThat's the kind of little girl
People like to meet.
i Bright as is a diamond,
Pure as any pearl -
c Every one rejoices in
Such a little girl.
r Happy as a robin,
Gentle as a dove-
That's the kind of little girl
Every one will love.
Fly away and seek her, little song of mine,
For I choose that very girl as my Valentine.


",1




POLITENESS.


POLITENESS.

A BOY went out to walk one day,
And met a lady on his way;
His cap was quickly off his head:
"Good morning," pleasantly he said.


A little girl went walking too,
And met a lady whom she
knew;






With quick politeness then the
child
S"Good morning" said, and bowed and
smiled.

And thus should lads and lasses greet
SWhatever friends they chance to
meet,
If they would show politeness true.
Now, who'll remember this? Will
you?


~I




THE LITTLE READER.


I'VE had another birthday,
I'm very old indeed;
And father said this morning
I ought to learn to read.

So now I think I'll study-
No, Kitty, run away!
When folks are busy reading
They do not care to play.

When father comes this even-
ing,
And hears me read aloud,
Just like big brother Henry,
Won't he be pleased and
proud?


O Dot, please stop your sing-
ing!
Of course you didn't know;
But when I want to study
The noise disturbs me so.

It's strange about this reading-
It takes so very long.
I wonder what's the matter!
Perhaps the book is wrong.

And there's my doggie bark-
ing
And whining all about.
Poor fellow! he's so lonesome!
I surely must go out.


But when my dog is older,
And doesn't need me,-then
I'll stay in all the morning,
And study hard again.





THE LITTLE READER.


''lli




if



I ll


N


H! -


SII


'I'l


*.A.p~


-Tl


.,


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,\, ~ .. _




--- t -,- -
BI~J"-~ ti:4 i
t~t
i ? ~


"POOR FELLOW! HE'S SO LONESOME, I SURELY MUST GO OUT."
6


i4


f!'fmfa


9
1~




A LESSON IN NUMBERS.


LeSsoh inNumbei



I HAVE a little lesson
In numbers every day;
And, if you like, I'll tell you
The kind I have to say -
I call them play.


There was a little pigeon,
And when he said, "Coo-
coo! C
Another little pigeon
Close down beside him
flew.
Then there were Two.











...... ..
i-> j.' : '* "



-------- -= _- __---


DI
...... .


Two pretty ships were sailing,
As grandly as could be;
And "Ship ahoy!" another
Sailed out upon the sea.
Then there were THREE.


141-Vt
ltl




A LESSON IN NUMBERS.

I had a pretty rose-bush
That grew beside my door;
G L ThTree roses bloomed upon it,
And soon there came one
\ % Thmore.
Then there were FOUR.


Four bees a-gathering honey-
The busiest things alive;
And soon there came another
From out the crowded hive.
Then there were FIVE.

hose last were rather hard
ones-
The roses and the bees;
But my mamma says, "Num-
bers
Get harder by degrees;"
Harder than these!


L ~1/1~
Y




MAMMA'S GAME.


Mamma's Game..


'N


-=-1


As the day slips away,
Let me tell you what to play:


Leave your toys, girls and boys,
Come without a bit of noise.


Off with clothes Nursie knows
What's the costume I propose.
"All in white?" That is right!
Now the bedroom candles light.


T




MAMMA'S GAME.


Jump in here,-never fear,-
Play you are a sailor, dear.

In this boat you may float
Off to Slumberland remote.

Then wee Fred wisely said,
"Ho! your play means 'go to bed.'"




THE TOYS AT LIBERTY.


THE TOYS AT LIBERTY.


There was once
a Toy Closet
where a great
/ many Toys lived.
One night when
the clock struck
WHAT THE WOODEN
SOLDIER DID. twelve, click! went
the latch of the Toy Closet,
and out stepped a Wooden
Soldier.
"Aha!" said he with a chuckle,
"we are to have a holiday!"
Then he turned and climbed
nimbly (although you wouldn't
expect it of a Wooden Sol-
dier!) over the Toy Closet
shelves. As fast as he touched
the Toys they roused to life,
and came out, running and
jumping, rolling and tumbling,
till the Toy Closet was empty.
Once out in the nursery, the


Old Toys welcomed the New
Toys whom Santa Claus had
brought the night before, and
began to give them advice.
"You must be sure to break
whenever you have a chance,"
said they. "It is hard, but it
is the only way to teach chil-
dren to be careful."
"What!" shrieked the New
Toys in chorus, "break!"
"0, yes!" said a Jumping
Jack. He had only half a
head, one arm and no legs.
"Toys have their duty as well
as People. If children drop
us, or hit us, or play with us in
foolish, careless ways, we must
show them that it is wrong.
Some of us have to break, and
some of us who can't break
have to lose ourselves."




THE TOYS AT LIBERTY.


The Toys, new and old,
looked very solemn at this;
and the new Walking Doll
said mournfully, "Ah! then I
shall not live a day, for I am
very delicate."
"O, perhaps you will," said
the Bicycle Boy










encouragingly. The
children have learned
how easily I get out of
order, so I think they
will be likely to handle
you quite carefully."
"I'm glad I can't break," said
a Rubber Ball; "but I will run
away and hide! I like that!"
"Come, come, we've been
6


sober long enough," said the
Hoop, waltzing up. "Let's
have music and dancing."
"0, yes!" shouted all the
Toys. So the Music Box be-
gan to play and the whole com-
pany was soon dancing merrily.
But oh, dear! and oh, dear!
The Pendexter Baby woke up


JUST BEFORE THE BABY WOKE.


and began to cough; and the
Toys had just time to scramble
back into the Closet before the
nurse came past the door.


OR I




OUT AGAIN.


OUT AGAIN.


That was a
merry dance we
/ had the other
,' night." said an
THE TEN PIN AND THE old Ten Pin
WALKING DOLL.. to the Walk-
w,,,o "L. to the Walk-
ing Doll the next time the
Toys had a holiday.
0, yes! delightful," she
answered. Only the hurry at
the last was so agitating!
What if the nurse had caught
us!"
The Ten Pin looked grave.
"That would indeed have been
terrible," he said; "for we are
under the same laws as fairies
and must not be seen at our
sports. If we were once seen,
we should never get another
holiday."
How dreadful!" said the


Walking Doll, clutching her
pink parasol nervously; "but I
trust it will never happen. Do
we always sleep in the Toy
Closet ?"
Almost always," answered
a Battledore. Sometimes one
of us is left around the house,
and that is frightfully lonely.
And sometimes we are just
THROWN into the closet.
My Brother Battledore got a
bad hole in his face that way.
Still, we ought to be thankful.
Some poor Toys have no
Closet which they can call their
.own; and, worse than that,
some toys have to be played
with by children who don't care
if they do break them!"
A murmur of horror ran
through the company.




OUT AGAIN.


Yes; it is true," said the
Dump Cart. "I have heard
of such things. But the little
Pendexters are only thought-
less, not cruel."
- "What shall we play to-
night?" asked the Tambou-
rine, rolling up with a
soft jingling noise.
The Animal Toys


Elephant. The Paris Pig won.
He was a tremendous fellow,
as fat as a real pig, but so light
that the Pendexter baby could
lift him and toss him about.
After this the China Rab-
bit Mother and the Jumping


THE RACE BETWEEN THE PARIS PIG AND THE CANTON FLANNEL ELEPHANT.


have planned a circus," said
one of the Battledore Brothers.
"Yes--see! they are all ready.
Let's take our places."
The circus began. First
came a race between the Paris
Pig and the Canton Flannel


Frog had a leaping match.
Then the horses, led by
Black Prince, went through
some tricks; and after that
there were more races. And
then it was time for the Toys
to go back to their Closet




THE DOLL'S PLAN.


THE DOLL'S


"Attention! Or-
der!" shouted a
voice. It was the
Captain of the
SWooden Soldiers
A 0 who spoke. The
0o whole company of
Toys paused to
listen.
They had been
awakened by the
Rubber Ball, and
THE CAPTAIN. one and all were
assembled in the nursery.
I will introduce Miss Rosy,
who has a plan to propose,"
said the Captain, bowing to
Miss Rosy, a yellow-headed
dolly, the dearest and oldest
of all the dolls that the Pen-
dexter children owned.
Miss Rosy stepped forward.


PLAN.


She was blushing so that her
cheeks were quite pink, al-
though the paint had been
washed off them long ago.
You know I am often
down to tea in the schoolroom,"
said she. Last night the
children and their governess
told stories, and it was so de-
lightful. So quiet, too, that I
thought it would be just the
right sort of entertainment for
us to have on our holiday
nights. What think you?"
Oh! but dancing is such
fun! I am just longing for
another whirl," said the Top.
But there is a risk about
it. Some one might be awak-
ened by the music," said the
Box of Blocks. He was a
rather clumsy dancer.




THE DOLL'S PLAN.


Yes, and it's a good deal
like play, after all," added the
Jumping Jack. And since
we must play almost all day, I
should like a change at night."
Suppose we try it next
time, at any rate," said Rosy.


The other Toys looked at
Rosy admiringly, and the Bi-
cycle Boy said, What a wise
person you are, Miss Rosy."
But Rosy was not a bit
proud; she said, "Oh! if I
know anything, it is only be-


MISS ROSY PROPOSES A PLAN.


All the Toys agreed to this.
"But who shall tell the story?"
asked the Bicyle Boy.
"Oh! I know how we could
decide that," said Rosy. It
could be the one who hears the
clock strike."


cause I am in the schoolroom
so much. Is it agreed, then,
that the one who hears the
clock strike twelve shall tell us
a story next time?"
"Agreed! agreed!" said the
Toys.




THE PARIS PIG.


THE PARIS


The Paris
Pig had
waked first
', ?J.- this time; and
as soon as the
/ Toys had had
S. their fun talk-
THE PIG AND HIS MIS-
TRESS. ing together
he was called upon for his story.
I used to live in Paris,"
said he. "And when the Pen-
dexter children's Uncle Tom
was in Paris, he came into the
toyshop where I was. 'I must
take something home to the
children,' said Uncle Tom;
'and I should certainly take
that Pig if he were not such a
big fellow!' 'Oh!' said the
shopman, this Pig can travel
in your pocket, or in a very,
very small box. Let me show


you,' and the shop-keeper be-
gan fumbling at the back of my
neck.
The back of my neck is a
very sensitive place, I think;
for I always grow faint when
it is meddled with.
I gave one long, long
squeal, at which Uncle Tom and
the shop-keeper only laughed.
The shop-keeper stroked and
pinched and squeezed me, and
I grew smaller and smaller and
smaller. My tail lost its curl
my legs became flabby and I
could not stand, my head
shrunk, my sides collapsed,
and as my long-drawn squeal
ended in a faint 'wh' I was
nothing but a crumpled skin in
the shop-keeper's hand.
After that I knew nothing


PIG.




THE PARIS PIG.


for a long time. At last I
heard voices. Let's give him
a good blowing up for looking
like this,' said Uncle Tom;
and he put his lips to that
place at the back
of my neck. I

Alli














THE PARIS PIG

began to revive very quickly.
My sides swelled out, I held
up my head, my legs grew
stout again, and my tail soon
curled around as gracefully as


ever. Uncle Tom got very
red in the face, the children
said; but I am sure he did not
feel as if he had wasted his
breath, for I was as round and
plump and handsome as
I had been in the Paris
t. toy-shop. And the chil-















TELLS HIS STORY.

dren's welcome repaid me for
all I had suffered."
The Paris Pig then made a
modest bow, and the Toys
crowded around with thanks.
73 /




THE EGG THAT HATCHED BROWNIES.


THE EGG THAT HATCHED BROWNIES.


Tap, tap,
tap! Tap, tap!
The Brown-
ies were awake
and were try-
ing to open
the box in
which they
slept. They
soon had the
cover off; and,
as there were
PUSS-BACK.
four of them,
it took very little time to rouse
the rest of the Toys.
Brownies must have their
fun, though; so, instead of just
touching the Toys to waken
them, they gave little tweaks
and pinches; and, finally, all
four crept behind the Paris
Pig and gave him such a push


that it sent him flying down to
the floor, where he rolled over
and over. But he only smiled
and winked at the Brownies,
enjoying the joke as much as
they did.
The Brownie with the swal-
low-tailed coat was the one to
tell the story.
"You all know," he began,
"that we sleep in a box shaped
like a large egg. When this
egg was presented to the chil-
dren, they thought it must be a
box of candy.; but 'No,' said
the eldest boy, 'it is not heavy
enough.' Then they thought
it was empty; but No,' said
little Peggy, I hear something
rattle.' Then each child had
to take the egg and shake it, to
hear it rattle; and oh, dear




THE EGG THAT HATCHED BROWNIES.


me! what a shaking we did
get. Then they all tried to
open the egg, but they couldn't;
and their nurse tried and she
couldn't; and the governess
tried and she couldn't; and


At night, fortunately, we
awoke; and by prying and ham-
mering with all our might we
loosened the cover.
In the morning, when little
Peggy shook the egg, off came


THE EGG AND THE BROWNIES.


their mamma tried and she
couldn't; and their papa tried
and he couldn't.
So they were all discouraged
and left the egg standing on
the library table.


the top and out we all tumbled!
And little Peggy shouted,
'Oh! the egg has hatched
Brownies!'
"They never knew we had
loosened the cover ourselves."




THE BLACK HORSE TELLS A STORY.


THE BLACK HORSE TELLS A STORY.


S Than k
.w' ^ you very much
Sforwaking me
up first," said
the Black
LADY SNOW.
Horse, nod-
ding at the Nursery Clock. I
have a fine story to tell!
You probably do not know
that I was away from home
last night," he continued, turn-
ing to the Toys, "but I spent
the night at the stable-the
real stable, I mean. I was
very much frightened when I
found that little Roger had
gone away and left me there;
but I was glad afterwards, for
I had such a good time.
The animals treated me
very handsomely, and we be-
came very good friends. They


gave me some hay and oats"
here the Black Horse whin-
nied with delight --" and they
put me through my paces.
"I have so little practice that
I was afraid I should not
do well; but they said that I
trotted and cantered and gal-
loped as if I had the free use
of my legs every day.
They seemed to be a very
happy family. There were
Dick and Dandy, the old pair;
and Puck and Ariel, the new
pair; and Felix, the saddle:
horse; arid Tom-tom, the pony;;
and Barney, the donkey; and
Lady Snow.
"I must tell you about Lady
Snow. She is a pure white.
horse, but she says her snowy
suit is a great trouble to her.




THE BLACK HORSE TELLS A STORY.


She can't take a comfortable
roll without getting a scolding
from the groom for getting
dirty. And at night she has


This morning little Roger
came to the stable early, to get
me. I tried to look calm, but
he said, How your eyes shine,
-_ -*----^=--"=<


*'*." :-: "-,, '.-:'"i : I


--A




__ . '. .


BLACK PRINCE IN THE STABLE.

to wear trousers on all her legs Black Prince! Have you been
to keep them clean. She looks talking with the other horses?'
so funny! "Of course, I didn't tell!"

77




ALMOST CAUGHT!


ALMOST


The White Duck
was certainly a beauti-
ful creature.
THE BRIGHT
LIGHT. She was all white
except for a collar of dark green
feathers about her neck, and
her broad yellow beak, and her
yellow webbed feet.
At one time she was very
heavy; but after the children
found out the secret of her
left wing she rapidly lost
weight. Would you like to
know the secret?
The White Duck's left
wing could be lifted up, and
you could put your hand in
and pull out candy! But the
candy was all gone long ago,
of course.
The White Duck really felt
a little shy about telling a story,


CAUGHT!


though she was pleased to find
herself the first one awake.
She was paddling about in
a bowl of water which stood
on a small table opposite the
Nursery door.
The three Brownies were
sitting on the Paris Pig's back.
The China Rabbit Family sat
sedately under the dump cart.
The Bicyle Boy held the Rub-
ber Baby in his lap; and the
Captain of the Wooden Sol-
diers sat so close to the Walk-
ing Doll that his head was
under her pink parasol. The
other Toys were grouped
around, enjoying the freedom
of sitting or standing as they
liked.
"It is so seldom I get any
water to swim in," said the




ALMOST CAUGHT!


White Duck, "that I am sure
you will excuse my remaining
here while I tell my story."
Yes, indeed," the other
Toys said. They were glad
she could have the pleasure.
As the White Duck cleared
her throat and glanced about







THE FLIGHT TO THE CLOSET.

just ready to begin her story,
what was her horror to see a
bright light flashing in through
the crack of the door, and a
white-robed figure standing
there.
With a gasp of terror the
White Duck scrambled from
the bowl and fled to the Toy
Closet.
The other Toys did not


wait to see what had fright-
ened her, but followed in such
mad haste that they almost got
on the wrong shelves. The
clumsy Box of Blocks was the
last to get in his place, and he
had not time to fasten the door
before the Nurse walked into
the room.
How strange!"
said she, peering
about, I
really did



think I
heard some-
thing. I sup-
pose that my
toothache makes me nervous."
She then went into the other
rooms; and, finding the chil-
dren sleeping soundly, she
went back to bed.
But the Toys were too much
frightened to come out again.




THE FROG WHO WOULD A-HOPPING GO.


THE FROG WHO WOULD A-HOPPING GO.


After the
'"e Ii, dreadful fright
tihe e ith at
door. that the Toys
had on the
night when the
White Duck
was to tell her
story, there was
a long, long
time without a holiday.
At last, one night, something
hopped stealthily from the Toy
Closet to the nursery door.
It was the Green-and-Yellow
Frog who could hop about in
a very froggy and wonderful
manner in the daytime when
he was wound up, and in a
still more froggy and wonder-
ful manner at night without
being wound up. He listened
and listened as he sat there by


the nursery door. He could
hear the steady breathing which
showed that nurse and children
were all soundly sleeping. The
Frog hopped back to the Toy
Closet and soon had the other
Toys gathered about him to
hear his story.
When I first came here,"
said the Frog, "a Toy Frog
who could hop was a great
curiosity, and the children used
to keep me hopping most of
the time.
"One day Bella had just
wound me up when some one
called Bella!'
"'Oh! there's Helen Burr,'
said Bella; and, forgetting that
I must hop as soon as I got a
chance, she put me down on
the window-sill and flew to




THE FROG WHO WOULD A-HOPPING GO.


meet Helen. The window
was open. Out I hopped!
At last I alighted in some
grass as green as myself.
By this time Bella and
Helen had come out to play.
"'Oh! what is that hopping
in the grass ?'
said Helen. T- oy
Bella looked
where Helen
pointed. 'Oh!
oh! oh!' she
cried, 'it's my
precious little hopping frog. -
How did he get down
here ?'
"'Where did you leave
him ?' asked mamma, when
Bella took me in and told her
about finding me in the grass.
It was soon discovered that I
had been left by an open
window.
Every one was astonished
to find that I could hop as


well as ever.
not break all t
not tell; but
little dizzy frorr
in the air. It
me that I did
stone steps or
brick walk.


Why I did
o pieces I can
I merely felt a
Swirling about
was lucky for
not fall on the
the /


have survived
that, I am sure! -
"And that is
the most wonderful adventure
I ever had," concluded the
Frog; and ever since that
time the children have called
me The Frog Who Would
a-Hopping Go.'"




THE VOYAGE OF THE WATERLILY.


THE VOYAGE OF


My story
is a true one,"
said the toy ship
whose name
THE WATERLILY.
was Waterlily.
"A long time ago, when Henry
and Allan Pendexter were lit-
tle fellows, they used to take
me out nearly every fine day.
We went to one of the fountain
basins in the Public Garden.
At first they led me round
and round by a string. I used
to feel my sails puffing- out
with the wind, and how I
longed to get free.!
One day Uncle Tom came
along on the walk.
"' Ship ahoy!' said he.
' Heave away, there! The
Waterlily is not a cart to be
dragged about in that way! '


THE WATERLILY.


"So Uncle Tom took off
the string, set my rudder, and
away I went as proud and
happy as any real ship that
ever sailed the ocean.
"'Three cheers for the
Waterlily !' said Uncle Tom.
'That's the way for a boat to
sail.'
After that I never had to
submit to the string again.
One day the boys left all
my sails up when a strong
breeze was blowing. Besides,
the fountain was throwing out
more water than usual. I
tipped away over on my side
to show my young captains
that I had too much sail for
the strong wind. But they
only thought it more fun; and
the more I tipped, the more




THE VOYAGE OF THE WATERLILY.


they clapped their hands and
shouted.
Suddenly the wind struck
my sails so as to send me right
to the middle of the pond. I
keeled over on my side, and the
water from the fountain dashed


N
.7"
6


THE POLICEMAN TRIES T -
THE POLICEMAN TRIES T


down upon my sails, making
them too heavy for me to lift.
There I lay helpless.
Henry and Allan did not
know what to do. The Big
Policeman tried to reach me


with his club, but it wasn't half
long enough.
However, the Policeman
would not give it up. He
brought two of the Garden set-
tees and put them into the
pond. Then he walked out
on them, reached me with his
club, and dragged me to him.






-~~- -- ~j-L








So I was saved; and that's
the end of my story," concluded
the Waterlily.
Then away trooped the
Toys, and soon all was quiet
in the Nursery.




HOW THE WAX DOLL SAVED PEGGY.


HOW THE WAX DOLL SAVED PEGGY.


"Dear! dear!
Isn't any body
going to wake
up?" ticked
the Nursery
o Clock.
S Just then the
Wax Doll, rub-
THE WAX DOLL. bing her eyes,

peeped out of the Toy closet.
Time-is-go-ing Time-is-
go-ing !" ticked the Clock.
:' So it is!" said the Wax
Doll. "I must wake the other
Toys."
The Clock did not tick many
times before the Wax Doll's
audience was ready.
One day last winter little
Peggy and I had been out
sleigh-riding. When we came
in, Nurse took Peggy and set


her down in front of the nur-
sery fire to 'toast,' as she said.
"Then it was nap time; so
Peggy was put to bed and
Nurse went down to dinner.
Peggy had taken my things
off and left me lying on the
table. After she was in bed
she remembered me. Poor
Dolly!'` said Peggy; 'Dolly
must toast," too.' So the lit-
tle dear put me in her own
rocking chair. 'Mustn't play
wif fire,' she said solemnly; but
she dragged the high fender
away as she spoke. Then she
lifted the rocking chair and
toddled backward with it to-
ward the fire.
I began to get frightened.
If she kept on she would cer-
tainly fall into the blazing coals.




HOW THE WAX DOLL SAVED PEGGY.


How I wished I could scream!
What should I do ?
Suddenly the rocking chair
tilted a little to one side. I
seized the chance, and fell to
the. floor. Of course I was
badly hurt, but what did I care
for that?
Peggy dropped the chair
and picked me up. She cried
so loudly when she
found the great hole
in my head that her
mamma came run-
ning in to see what
was the matter.



THE WAY PEGGY WALKED B

( People said afterwards it
was a wonder that the child
had not fallen into the fire.
They did not know my part
in saving her, but I have
always been thankful that I


succeeded in it; and since
Peggy loves me as well as
ever, I do not mind the hole
in my head so very much."
This was the end of the
Wax Doll's story; and as the
Toys returned |,


BACKWARD TOWARD THE FIRE.


to the Toy Closet the Cap-
tain of the Wooden Soldiers
was heard saying to his men,
" That was a brave deed, my
men. Let us ever honor the
Wax Doll."




THE MOTHER EAGLE'S STORY.


THE MOTHER


THE EAGLE FAMILY.


A family of Eagles lived in
the Toy Closet. They had
charge of the children's Bank.
When pennies were put into
the Mother Eagle's bill, she
would lean forward and feed
them to the young Eagles.
They pretended to swallow the
pennies, but, instead, dropped
them into the Bank.
I do not wonder that I
heard the clock strike to-night,"
said the Mother Eagle to the
assembled Toys. This has
been such an exciting day!
Did you see Bella snatch me


EAGLE'S STORY.


from the closet and run off
with me ? "
"I did," said the Paris Pig;
for she knocked me over;
but go on with your story,
Mother Eagle."
Bella took me to the school-
room and the children crowded
around her saying, 'O, Bella!
is there enough ?'
"' The bank is heavy,' said
Bella, 'but a good paint box
costs a great deal.'
Then the children put pen-
nies into my bill one after an-
other, and I fed them to my
young ones. We always click
and gulp in a funny way as we
take the pennies, so that the
children shall enjoy feeding
us.
The doctor says it will be




THE MOTHER EAGLE'S STORY.


a whole year before Jimmy can
walk,' said Bella; a paint box
will be lovely for him, and his
mother is too poor to buy such
things.'
At this Allan came back
to the bank. He had only
given a little money before.
"' The old Eagle looks hun-


V-41


"' Look at the old Eagle,'
said Henry. 'How pleased
she is! '
Pleased I should think
I was. I should have liked
to scream with delight!
To think that the Bank was
full, and that the money we
had worked for was to give so


gry yet,' said he. Then he fed
me so fast from his purse that
I nearly choked. Halloo !
this nickel doesn't go down'!
The bank is full!'
And it really was Try
as we might we could not swal-
low another coin.


much joy to poor lame Jimmy."
Three cheers for the
Eagles," said the Wooden
Soldier.
And three cheers for the
children, bless their generous
hearts !" said the Mother
Eagle.


FEEDING THE EAGLE.





A JOLLY VISITOR.


SANTA CLAUS TOLD THEM ALL THE LATEST NEWS FROM TOY-LAND.


A JOLLY


I like to make a noise in
the world!" said the Drum;
" it is what I was made for.
But this is the first time I ever
had a chance to speak. Usu-
ally I can only say Rub-a-
dub-dub;' and not even that
unless some one beats me !"
Just as he was about to begin
his story, the Rocking Horse
said, "Excuse me, Mr. Drum,
but I have important news to


VISITOR.


tell. There is to be a visitor
in the Nursery to-night."
"A visitor! Dear me "
said the Walking Doll. Then
we must all hurry home, I
suppose.
No," said the Rocking
Horse; don't be frightened.
But guess who is coming?"
The Nurse ?" said the
White Duck, waddling toward
the Closet.




A JOLLY VISITOR.


No, not the Nurse."
The Doctor?" asked the
Wax Doll.
No," said the Rocking
Horse, tossing his head in
delight.
Bella walking in her sleep?"
said the Frog, jumping up to
the Rocking Horse's head as
he spoke.
All wrong !" said the
Horse, now prancing gaily
with the excitement of his
grand secret. Oh! can'tyou
guess ? Well, I'll tell the
Drum."
When the Drum heard the
whispered name he rolled over
and over with joy. Then,
standing on one of his heads,
he called out," Listen! Santa
Claus is coming! It is the
night before Christmas."
Oh! Of course!": said
Doll Rosy. "Why didn't I
remember!"


Yes, and there are the
stockings!" said a Brownie,
running to the fireplace.
Just then there was a rust-
ling in the chimney and down
came Santa Claus, plumper
and rosier and jollier than ever.
A merry time they had then,
I assure you. Santa Claus
told all the latest news from
Toy-land; and the Toys told
him about their delightful holi-
day nights, when they had told
stories to each other.
At last, Santa Claus said he
really must get to work; and
the Toys, bidding him good-
bye, went back to the Toy
Closet. They knew as well as
you and I do that Santa Claus
never likes any one about when
he is filling the stockings.







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