• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Gerald and Geraldine
 Lucille and Lucilla
 Daisy Dalrymple's dog
 David Hickey's Christmas
 Queen Isabella
 Back Matter
 Back Cover






Title: Gerald and Geraldine
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087366/00001
 Material Information
Title: Gerald and Geraldine and other stories
Physical Description: 128 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Plympton, A. G ( Almira George ), b. 1852
DeWolfe, Fiske & Co. (Boston, Mass.) ( Publisher )
Niagara Lithograph Co ( Printer )
Publisher: De Wolfe, Fiske & Co.
Place of Publication: Boston
Manufacturer: Niagara Lithograph Co.
Publication Date: c1898
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1898   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre: Children's stories
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
United States -- New York -- Buffalo
 Notes
Subject: Gerald and Geraldine -- Lucille and Lucilla -- Daisy Dalrymple's dog -- David Hickey's Christmas -- Queen Isabella.
Statement of Responsibility: by A.G. Plympton.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087366
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224582
notis - ALG4848
oclc - 49457683

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Table of Contents
        Page 7
        Page 8
    List of Illustrations
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Gerald and Geraldine
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Lucille and Lucilla
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Daisy Dalrymple's dog
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
    David Hickey's Christmas
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
    Queen Isabella
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
    Back Matter
        Page 129
    Back Cover
        Page 130
        Page 131
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GERALD AND GERALDINE.



AND OTHER STORIES.









BY
A. G. PLYMPTON,
AUTHOR OF
"DEAR DAUGHTER DOROTHY," WANOLASSET," ETC., ETC.













BOSTON :
DE WOLFE, FISKE & CO.,
361 & 365 WASHINGTON STREET.


























































COPYRIGHTED 1898.
BY DE WOLFE, FISKE & CO.
BOSTON, MASS.


PRESS OF
NIAGARA LITHOGRAPH CO.
BUFFALO, N. Y.


























TABLE OF CONTENTS.



PAGE.
GERALD AND GERALDINE, 15
LUCILLE AND LUCILLA, 43
DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG, 61
DAVID HICKEY'S CHRISTMAS, .95
QUEEN ISABELLA, III
















LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


GERALDINE SINGING THE EASTER ARIA (Colored), Front
"SHE HAD DOLLS WITHOUT NUMBER" (Colored),
"GERALD OPENED HIS MOUTH AND GERALDINE PEERED
INTO IT,"
"LUCILLE WITH THE DOVES CIRCLING ABOUT HER HEAD"
(Colored), .
"HE KEPT POINTING TOWARD THE FIELDS,"
DAISY DALRYMPLE AND BRUNO (Colored),
HOWARD KIMBALL TORMENTING THE DOG WITH HIS
FATHER'S CANE (Colored),
"BRUNO SOLEMNLY SEATED HIMSELF ON THE WITNESS
STAND,"
"IN A SHAME-FACED WAY HE OPENED THE BOX" (Colored),
"THE MOST POPULAR BOY IN THE DEAF SCHOOL,"
"SHE HAD THE LATEST IMPROVEMENT IN WHEELS,"
" SHE WAS HUSTLED INTO THE WAGON, HER WHEEL
WITH HER,"


PAGE.
:ispiece.
25


29


45
53
63


73

87

99
105
II3


123



















GERALD AND GERALDINE.













GERALD AND GERALDINE.






GERALD and Geraldine, or Gerry and Dino as they were called,
had been standing by the window of Mrs. Blaney's little
parlor for more than an hour eagerly watching the passers by. Each
time they saw a man's figure approaching they would cry:
Here he is! Here he is! Surely this is our uncle at last."
And then as the gentleman passed on, they would look after him
and say with derision:
Pooh, our uncle is a far nicer and handsomer gentleman."
They were twins, and if they kept their eye-lids down, and if
Dino smoothed her red-gold locks, and Gerry ran his hands through
his, one face answered to the other like its image in the glass. But
let the eyes be seen, and all likeness seemed to vanish in an instant,
for Gerald looked at you with appealing, gentle, almost seraphic, blue
ones, with an expression that made you hope the world would not use
the little lad ill, while Geraldine gave you a mocking glance out of
her fearless black eyes, and you could not help laughing and think-
ing that she would be fully able to take care of herself.
The poor little things, it must be confessed, at ten years of age had









GERALD AND GERALDINE.

seen a good deal of the world. When two years old, as newly made
orphans, they had been brought from London to their mother's father,
who was a clergyman with a large parish in Chicago. When he died,
which happened three years later, they were passed on to an aunt, a
fashionable lady of New York, who perhaps was none too well pleased
at the course of events that left two young children to her care. But
she did the best she could for them according to her light, until she
married a rich but ill-tempered man, who made her give up the very
obvious duty of caring for them.
And then ? well then, the little creatures were put in the care of a
person who, for so much a week, undertook to stand in the place of a
mother to them. She was a widow and childless, and there was a
chance that at last the twins might find themselves in just such a niche
as they were made for, but they had occupied it hardly a twelve month,
when "circumstances arose" which compelled the widow "to give up
the dear children," the circumstances being a legacy that made life
possible to her without any effort on her own part to increase her
income.
And now they were waiting for the appearance of their uncle,
their father's brother, who having been .notified of the forlorn situa-
tion of his brother's children, was coming to carry them away to his
own home. They had never seen him or any of their father's
relatives, and were anxious to know what he would be like.
I think he will be big and fat, with a real red, jolly face, and a
loud laugh, and just plum full of stories," said Gerry. He will like you
best, but he'll like me too, I dare say."
"You are thinking of the man we saw in the park," said
:i6










GERALD AND GERALDINE.


Geraldine. Oh no he won't be that kind of a man. I dare say
he'll be thin and have dispepsia, like Uncle Harold, but I hope he
won't, for that is the worst kind; and I think you are wrong, Gerald,
about one thing. I think he will like you best. Its your turn you
know.
In truth the children had noticed in their divers guardians, that
one of them was sure to be preferred to the other, and for that reason
they had been constantly in danger of being separated. Gerald had
been his grandfather's favorite, and he had sometimes talked of send-
ing Gerldine to the aunt. When, after his death, they both went to her,
she had fancied the little girl the more, and had thought of sending
the boy to boarding school, and once when the widow Mrs. Blaney,
had been angry with Dino, she had declared that she would never
part with her brother, but that their aunt would be forced to find some
one else to take care of her. Yet these threats had never resulted
in anything, and the twins had never been separated a whole day in
their lives.
In spite of their vicissitudes, they were happy, healthy, and
courageous children, being, as it seemed, not in the least discouraged
by the way the world had used them. Nothing had seemed to shake
their childish trust in others, and they met every one as a new friend.
The uncle had written to Mrs. Blaney that he would come for the
twins at eleven o'clock on a certain morning. The day and hour had
come, but the uncle tarried.
"Lor," said the widow, I doubt if he turns up at all. What on
earth should he want of two young ones ? Mark my words, he'll
wriggle out of it. Its twelve o'clock already."
17










GERALD AND GERALDINE.

He's wriggling in it now," said Geraldine, "at least I 'spose so."
There was certainly some one coming up the outside steps. Some
one with a great shock of iron-gray hair that bushed out under a soft
hat. Some one with piercing dark eyes, and a strange, foreign face,
which at the present moment wore an unmistakable frown.
Oh Gerry I whispered Dino, "do you think that is our uncle ?"
There was a sharp ring at the bell, and through the open door
the children heard a voice ask :
Does Mrs. Blaney lif here ?"
The twins looked at each other, "well to be sure," they said.
Yes, that's our uncle."
For suddenly they remembered something that they had once
heard-that their father was German, and that their mother's family
had objected to him on that account. They had never half believed
it, but now they saw that it was true.
Geraldine took the card that the little maid servant brought in
and read:
Mr. Otto Kaufmann."
The new comer entered the room in a hurried manner. He said
he had been delayed, and that there was now but twenty minutes to
get to the depot, where he was to take the train.
There was no time to make acquaintance, and in an incredibly
few moments the children were ready, (Mrs. Blaney would not have
had them left any longer on her hands for anything under the sun,)
and were seated opposite the uncle in the carriage.
But the danger of being too late made any conversation impos-
sible, for Uncle Otto sat with his watch in one hand and the other on
18









GERALD AND GERALDINE.

the knob of the door, ready to spring out the moment that they
reached the station. The children sat close together delighting in
the hurry and excitement. They felt that there was plenty of time in
the future for making acquaintance. The little party reached the
train at just the last moment. Gerald climbing in like the agile
monkey that he was, and the uncle steadying Miss Geraldine.
The cars were crowded, Gerry sat with a fat woman with a baby,
Dino with an old Jew who slept peacefully behind a newspaper, and
Uncle Otto went into the smoking car. At last the two children had
a seat together, but although there was now room enough, Uncle
Otto did not come back into their car, and at the end of the journey
they felt that they knew him no better than at the start.
Somewhere in the vicinity of- street just beyond a church, there
is-or at least there was a few years ago--an iron gate with a brass
plate upon it bearing the inscription,
"Otto Kaufmann, Choir-master of the Church of St John the
Evangelist and Teacher of the Organ and Piano-forto."
Behind the gate was a small house, remodelled from a stable,
having below, one great apartment, used as a music room, parlor, and
sometimes even dining room and kitchen, while the second story was
divided into four sleeping rooms. This was the twins' new home.
It was a strange life, sure enough, for these mites, for Mr. Otto
Kaufmann's little house was frequented by all sorts and conditions of
people. He was fashionable, and ladies in their carriages came to
beg him to come to their entertainments, for he had composed an
opera which had been a success, and he was looked npon as a celeb-
rity. And young women tra-la-la'd in the room down stairs, where










GERALD AND GERALDINE.

he gave his lessons ; in the evening musicians and artists of all sorts
were always running in, and it was music, music, music all day and
pretty nearly all night. There was an old woman who came in every
day to put the house in order, but their meals were sent in from a
caterer's, except when, as sometimes happened, Uncle Otto took a
turn himself at cooking in which he always scored a great success, as
he did in everything else.
Geraldine thought that on account of her sex, she ought to have
a hand in these operations, but her uncle used to wave her away, with
a smile and a flowery speech that she did not know what to make of,
for though it sounded polite, she seemed to feel that there was some-
thing that was not so behind it.
De ladies, my dear, like leedle dolls must do noding," he would
say, and Dino would shriihk away abashed.
It had been plain from the first that Uncle Otto was not quite
pleased with Geraldine, not that he was not always kind and generous
to her-oh! dear, no-but his manner was so different from his man-
ner to Gerald. He was a quiet man, but he would draw the little
fellow on his knee and talk with him for hours. He would tell him
about his father, and how as boys they had loved each other, and
many a story he told him too of Germany, his fatherland. But it
seemed to Geraldine that if she drew near and dared take a place by
his side, his tongue lagged and after a while he would remind himself
of some appointment and go away.
What pride and joy he had when he first heard Gerald sing. It
was an old Christmas anthem that he had learned long ago, a childish
thing that they used to sing at school:









GERALD AND GERALDINE.

We three kings of Orient are,
Bearing gifts, we come from afar,
By field and fountain, moor and mountain,
Following yonder star; "
But Gerald's voice was lovely, as sweet and true as an angel's.
His uncle made him sing it over and over again, and the other pieces
also, and every one who came in that evening had to hear him sing.
Once Gerald said-" But Uncle Otto, Geraldine can sing too.
Don't you wan't to hear Geraldine sing ?"
Uncle Otto shook his head.
Ach Gott, no, de leedle girls are like de doll.. Dey must do
noding but look pretty, and Geraldine she do that very well."
In truth his little nephew appealed to the really warm heart of
the old organist, as no one had ever done, but his brother, the little
lad's father, and sometimes as he talked and played with him he
almost fancied he had his Heinrich -back again. His brother had
been much younger than himself, and he had had for him that same
tender sense of protectorship, and the desire to save him from all
hardship and pain that he now had for Gerry. Only in Heinrich's
case he had been poor and struggling and not able to do what he
wished for him, but now he was rich, and could give Gerald all that he
needed and more. He began to be very happy. There was one
thing that troubled him-and that was Geraldine. There was no
place for her in his life and plans. Her little figure hovering about
Gerald, disturbed that pleasant fancy in which he relieved his old life
with his brother. Besides-he knew nothing of girls, all his troubles
had come through that sex. It was a girl, and Geraldine's mother,
21









GERALD AND GERALDINE.

that had stolen Heinrich from him, no! no! He would find some
good woman to bring up the girl, and he himself would take care of
Gerald.
One day he called the children to him. They were at play in
the little enclosure in front of the house, but when they heard his
voice, they came in, hand in hand, with their eyes full of happiness
and little suspecting what they were going to hear. Gerald went up
to his uncle and pressed against his knees, and Geraldine stood by,
shuffling on her feet, unable from mere happiness to keep quiet.
Now children, be goot and quiet vilst I talk to you," Uncle
Otto began, patting Gerald's hand. I haf been considering what is
the best for you, and I haf made up my mind dat my house ish no
goot place for a leedle girl."
Oh! said Geraldine, and she stood quite still now.
I know noding about leedle girls, and I tink I must find some
goot vomans dat vill take petter care of Geraldine as I can."
Where will Gerald be? asked Geraldine faintly, "will he go
too ? "
Gerald ? oh no, he vill shtay wit me. Dat vill be de petter vay,
eh? I can pring up a poy very goot. Ach Gott. I know veil de
poys. Vy, Gerald. Vot's de matter? "
For Gerald had gone to Geraldine and thrown his arms around
her, and his face was very red in his efforts not to cry.
I think it will be horrid," he said. Geraldine is my twin,
and we have always been together, and girls aren't so very different
from boys either. Oh! Oh! I wish we were back again at Mrs.
Blaney's. I do indeed."









GERALD AND GERALDINE.

Poor Gerald did not dream how he cut his uncle's heart when he
uttered these words, but he could not have said anything that would
have made him put from him this plan so quickly.
"Veil, vell, I vill do noding at present. I haf only thought that
Geraldine would pe petter off mit some goot and kind vomans. Vot
does leedle Geraldine tink of eet? Eh?"
Oh," said Dino, who was crying with her face on Gerry's neck.
" I think it would be cruel."
Veil den, you shall not go," said Uncle Otto.
And that ended the matter for that time, but the knowledge that
he had thought of sending Geraldine away and that he might event-
ually think best to part them, was a sharp thorn in the twins' flesh.
They could never forget it and the fear made them cling to each other
more closely than ever.
And Uncle Otto would look at them, and shake his head, and say
to himself:
"' Tis always so, 'tis always so. Some pretty leedle girl does
always make de vorld go wrong mit Otto Kaufmann."
It has been mentioned that Uncle Otto was the choir master of St.
John the Evangelist's. The church was very near the little house
behind the iron gate, and sometimes of a week-day, when he went in
to rehearse the music for the following Sunday, the children would
go too and listen. The choir was of boys' voices, and the most beau-
tiful in the city. The twins were of a deeply musical nature, and
they would sit there spell bound, until'Uncle Otto would come from
the organ and take them home.
One day as the children walked before him, he heard Geraldine say:










GERALD AND GERALDINE.

Oh brother, if I could only sing in the choir, I would be happy."
Leedle girls do'not sing in dot choir," said Uncle Otto.
Yes, yes, I know," said Geraldine drearily. "Leedle girls
must do noding, but look pretty."
Uncle Otto laughed, but he turned to Gerald.
Vot do you say, mein poy ? "
I think as Dino does, that it would be beautiful. Oh, Uncle
Otto could I? he cried.
Vell, yes, I vas long thinking of dat."
Gerald began to caper up and down on the pavement, and
Geraldine was capering too, in her generous sympathy, but her eyes
were wistful and she murmured once more:
Leedle girls can do noding."
Then Gerald's training began. Each day he had long tiresome
exercises to go through, for Uncle Otto would spare no pains. In-
deed, because he was ambitious for the boy, he was all the harder
master, and sometimes poor Gerald would say privately to Geraldine,
that he would rather never sing at all than toil so, and Geraldine
would always answer:
Pooh, I would work as hard and harder too for music. I love
it, I love it, I love it! Oh, Gerald dear, if I could only change places
with you "
But however tired Gerald was, he never complained to Uncle
Otto. He could not, for he knew if he should not become a musician
it would break his uncle's heart.
So, because of his love and gratitude to his uncle; and constantly
encouraged by Geraldine, he kept on, and he made good progress,










GERALD AND GERALDINE.

and at last (it was Sunday) Gerald's voice rang out in the church,
bearing its part sweetly above the lower voices of the others, and
Geraldine in her place below in the pew sat with rapture in her heart
and her eyes full of tears.
As for Uncle Otto, it was easy to see that he was daily growing
more fond of, more proud of, and more ambitious for Gerald, and that
Geraldine was nothing to him.
Yet it must not be thought that he was unkind to the child. He
saw that she had every thing she needed. Geraldine wore the
prettiest clothes, went to the best school and had everything that
money could buy. Her room was furnished for her according to her
own taste. She had dolls without number.
SOne day, when her uncle and brother were away, the fancy took
her to place them all in a row, and they reached clear across the floor
of the big music room. Then she sat down at the end of the row
with her legs and arms hanging stiff, and a simper on her face.
Ach Gott," said Uncle Otto, coming suddenly in the room and
seeing her. Vot ails you mein child ?"
"We are all dolls," answered Geraldine gravely, "we can do
noding," and then she burst into tears.
Certainly 'his Geraldine is a very odd little girl," thought
Uncle Otto.
Sometimes when left alone Geraldine would go to the organ (a
great instrument which Uncle Otto had built into the room) and try
to bring forth music from it, and sometimes she would dress the dolls
in little white surplices and herself in another, and then she would
stand very straight, with her head thrown back, and sing.
27










GERALD AND GERALDINE.

How she would sing! Scales and exercises and anthems and
chants, and at last the aria that Gerald was learning and which he
was to sing on Easter Sunday.
If the truth be told, she had learned it sooner than Gerald had
learned it, being quicker and more persevering than her brother. When
Gerald took his lessons poor Dino always sat in a corner of the sofa
and drank in every word her uncle said, and then when she was alone
she would practice the piece just as he had told her brother to prac-
tice it. No it was not only because she was more persevering and
quicker than her brother, it was also because of the 'deep love of
music in her heart.
Well, when she finished singing she would turn to the dolls
and say:
Isn't it glorious ? Isn't it heavenly, and pray why, why, why
must leedle girls do noding ? "
Though he was not so quick as his sister, Gerald learned his
aria in good time.
Sweet and pure as the notes of a flute his voice fell on the ear.
In the still church, with the scent of the flowers, and the sunshine
pouring through the stained glass windows, it would be beautiful
Geraldine thought, she hoped it would not make her cry.
It was a week before Easter. Spring was coming, but the air
was damp and the weather dull.
Geraldine noticed that Gerald swallowed his breakfast with wry
faces that morning, and after their uncle had gone out he began to cry.
He seldom demeaned himself in this fashion and Geraldine was
alarmed.










































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GERALD AND GERALDINE.

It hurts so," he said at last in reply to her entreaties to tell her
the cause of his tears. "Its my throat, and its ached and ached this
ever so long, and I can't stand it any longer. Oh Geraldine I don't
see how I can go and sing tonight, but I will."
Of course you can't," said Geraldine. You must have some-
thing to take, but I don't know what, and Uncle Otto has gone. Oh
dear Oh dear! Why couldn't it have been my throat? How does it
feel? "
It feels as if there were lumps in it. See here Dino, look down
and see."
Gerald opened his mouth and Geraldine peered into it, and after
much squinting on her part and various maneuvers of Gerald's
tongue, she cried out excitedly:
Lumps ? Oh my there is an awful big one wagging right
in the middle! You poor poor boy, I should think it would hurt you.
You must go to bed and have the doctor."
Of course, Geraldine had seen the soft palate, but her advice
was good, nevertheless, and Gerald, much frightened, made no
objection.
The doctor's diagnosis was different from Geraldine's but he kept
the patient in bed and watched him closely.
He told Uncle Otto that the boy had not a bad throat, but if he
was to sing on Easter Sunday, he had best take every precaution
against catching more cold. He said that Gerald would probably be
well by Friday.
The doctor's directions were carefully followed, and Thursday
morning, Gerry felt as well as ever and it was thought safe for him to get









GERALD AND GERALDINE.


up,and even to go out of doors for a half an hour in the middle of the day.
It was a beautiful morning, the air was soft and warm. The
grass in the parks was quite green and a blue sky hung overhead.
But" there were little clouds blowing up from the horizon, and before
Gerald and Geraldine had emerged from the iron gate, the air had a
sharpness in it, and Gerry was soon shivering. So they went home
again, and that night he confessed to Dino that his throat was worse.
He used his gargles faithfully, and made her promise to say nothing
to her uncle.
He has worked so hard over me and he is so good to us Dino,"
he said, I should feel awfully to disappoint him. You know there is
no one else that has learned the aria."
r-no, of course not," said Dino, adding to herself, Leedle
girls don't count. Oh dear Oh dear what a pity it is that its not
my throat that's sore instead of yours."
Well it would be good if it could be yours just for Easter morn-
ing," Gerald admitted. But no matter, don't let's worry for I shall
probably be well tomorrow for that was the day the doctor set. Friday,
you know he said, and this is only Thursday.
This thought comforted Gerry, but Geraldine felt anxious.
Their uncle being out that evening, Mrs. Riley their good
natured housekeeper sat with Gerald, who soon fell asleep. But
though Geraldine went to bed, for a long time she could only toss
from side to side with wide open eyes and her brain filled with the
strangest thoughts, and her heart beating like a trip-hammer.
I can't do it. I can't, I can't," she would say to herself, and
then in a moment, Yes, I can do it and I will." It was like two
32










GERALD AND GERALDINE.

voices each trying to drown the other; and in the end "I can't"
yielded and I will" won the day.
Friday morning found Gerald worse. His throat ached badly,
his head was hot and he was hoarse as a crow.
It is no use," he said in answer to Geraldine's anxious enquiries.
I shan't be well enough to sing, and I am going to tell Uncle Otto so,
as soon as he comes in."
"Hush," cried Dino in a warning whisper. Don't you do
anything 'of the kind. You come and get into my bed, and I will
manage everything."
Her cheeks were red, and her eyes sparkled. Geraldine usually
gave up to Gerald, but sometimes a peculiar look would come into
her eyes and her chin would lengthen, and when she looked like this,
she would have her own way. She looked so now.
Gerald got up and sat on the edge of the bed and watched her, as
she hastily dressed herself in his clothes. She made her hair smooth
and dropped her eyelids over her eyes and said :
Come Geraldine, you'll catch cold, you must go right back to
your room and go to bed-I'm all right this morning and now you
see its your turn."
".Oh! said Gerald, I begin to catch on. We are going to
change places, but what good will it do ?"
I'm going to sing on Easter Sunday," she said, now Gerry,
quick, put on this night dress in place of yours, and then go back to
bed."
What a girl you are said Gerald laughing. But you know
you can't do it."










GERALD AND GERALDINE.

Nevertheless he let her put him into her own bed, laughing all
the time, to see how much at ease she seemed to feel in knicker-
bockers, and watched her as she flew about making the necessary
changes.
They were just made, when Uncle Otto tapped at the door.
Where's Gerald," he was saying; but as he opened the door his
eyes fell upon Dino and he went on. Oh here you are. Ach Gott
you are petter, ist it not so? "
I'm all right," answered Geraldine, the patient is in here now.
It's no more than fair, is it? "'
Vell," said Uncle Otto, "if eet must be von, the leedle girl-"
he ended with a shrug and outspread hands, and gave a little laugh.
Kom here, mein poy. I vant to look at you. I vant to see eef
de throat is vell." He held out his hand to Geraldine, and Gerry
smothered his chuckles in the pillows.
"She never will have the face to do it," he said to himself, but
the audacious Geraldine, after a moment's hesitation, had tilted back
her head and opened her.mouth, in which position, luckily for the
success of her bold scheme, her black eyes were not visible.
Vere goot, vere goot. I tink you are veil sure enough," said
Uncle Otto. And de doctor vill haf anoder patient, eh, Geraldine?
I vill go now to get him, and you, mein poy, go tell Mrs. Riley she
most get some breakfast ready soon."
So off he went, and with a look at Gerry, Dino followed him.
After breakfast Geraldine came back for a moment to whisper:
Uncle Otto is going to have me sing the aria. Shall I leave
the door open so that you can hear, Gerry ?''










GERALD AND GERALDINE.

And Gerry said yes. In vain he strained his ears for sounds of
music. The house was very quiet, and presently Geraldine came
back to say that a gentleman had come and taken their uncle away
with him. Some friend of his was in trouble, and he had been called
upon to help him, and there was no knowing when he would be back.
Ah well," said Gerry, who had been thinking the situation over
during her absence, it's a great deal better that you didn't have the
chance to sing to him. He would discover the trick in a moment
and very likely it would make him angry. I say Dino, you can't
sing that aria, you know."
But Dino would not be discouraged. She was sure she could
take her brother's place and to prove it began to sing the aria, and
Gerry soon found that she had not overrated her ability.
But then, you know," he said finally, "it wouldn't be the thing
at all for you, a girl, to go there in my place in the choir, you can't do
that."
Nobody will know it isn't you," persisted Geraldine. How
can they? I have only to keep my eyes closed."
How silly you'll look," Gerry went on. I won't have a silly
looking lackadaisical thing like that palmed off for me."
And Uncle Otto will not be disappointed, "she continued in her
turn. I shall enjoy it and I think I might have the chance for
once. Come, don't be so selfish."
Gerry gave up then. He felt tired and if every one else was
satisfied there was no reason why be should object. His responsi-
bilities slipped off. He made himself comfortable and went to sleep.
His own part was easy.










GERALD AND GERALDINE.

The path of deception was never smoother than Geraldine found
it. To begin with, Uncle Otto was constantly away from home and
there was no chance for a rehearsal. The doctor reported his patient
as not at all seriously ill only needing rest and quiet. He left orders
for her to be kept warm in bed until the hoarseness disappeared, and
said that he should not call again unless sent for.
Saturday he was better again, but still hoarse. There was no
possible chance that he would -be able to sing on Sunday.
At last Sunday morning came. Geraldine had breakfast with
Gerald in his, or rather her, room. Both children were a little ex-
cited, but Geraldine would not admit that she was afraid.. 'She did
not believe that anyone would discover that it was herself and not
Gerald that sang the aria.
"But I think your voice is different from mine," croaked Gerry.
Aren't twins' voices always the same? Certainly they are,"
she insisted. I don't think there is any difference, but if there is,
it will be set down to the sore throat."
"What a girl you are! said Gerald, for the hundredth time.
"Well I would give anything- to be there to see and hear you. But
you will be sure to give yourself away. The boys will find you out."
When the bells began to ring, Uncle Otto camern for Gerald,
and the two set out for the church, Uncle Otto kept his hand on the
child's shoulder. He looked down upon the little impostor with a
fond and proud smile.
"Ve are two goot cronies, is eet not so? he said pleasantly.
" Vot makes you so quiet, lately, mein child? Ees it the throat vot
aches ?"










GERALD AND GERALDINE.

Geraldine could only shake her head. She could not trust her-
self to answer, and she dared not raise her black eyes to him, who
looked so expectantly to meet a pair of sweet, soft, blue ones. She
began to wonder if he would be angry if he knew all. This seemed
hard, for it was for his sake alter all that she was going to sing.
But when they got into the church, she became excited and bold
again. Her cheeks grewx red, her eyes glowed.
She found the vestry, and put on Gerald's surplice with a little
chuckle of delight, all the time chaffing and playing with the boys
in Gerald's manner, but she did not look one of them in the face, and
none suspected her.
.Then the procession of boys passed into the church Geraldine in
Gerald's place no one noticing the change.
The service began and Dino's voice chimed with the others in
anthem and hymn. The church was fragrant with Easter flowers
and the organ notes pealed grandly along the vault of the great
cathedral dome.
It is glorious, it is heavenly," thought the child. Presently
she realized that the moment had come. It was time for the aria.
For an instant the candle lights flickered and the church whirled
around. She seemed to hear a voice she knew say :
Leedle girls can do noding."
Then she began. The first notes were faint and tremulous, then
Dino forgot everything but the music. She raised her head and the
music just poured out of her mouth. She was no longer little
Geraldine, who by stealth stood in another's place. She was trans-
ported. Her eyes shone like stars, the lids raised, and her cheeks pale.










GERALD AND GERALDINE.

The boys nuged each other and smiled, many of them had seen
Geraldine and they now recognized her.
As for Uncle Otto, he was saying to himself : Ach Gott dish
voice is not Gerald's. He vill nefer sing like dat in all dish vorld.
His voice ish ein goot voice-but dis. Ach Gott! Vot a voice "
But the last note now died away upon the stillness of the church,
and a sudden darkness blotted the whole scene from Dino's eyes.
Then an arm stole around her and she felt herself borne gently away.
When Geraldine opened her eyes, they looked full into a pair
that were shining upon her with the tenderest anxiety.
Ach Gott!" said a voice, "she is mooch petter now. I tink
she vill soon pe vell. Mein leedle Dino. Vy, vy haf you not told
me vot a voice you haf? Ach Gott. Vot a heavenly voice."
Yes, Gerry," said Dino having tried to give her brother an
account of the whole wonderful morning. You were right in think-
ing that I would be found out, but after all it was lovely and Uncle
Otto was not vexed, and I think-yes I think now he is going to
teach me music as well as you."
From this time, Geraldine shared equally with Gerald in the
singing lessons and in the affection of their uncle, and never after-
wards was he heard to say:
Leedle girls can do noding."



















LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.














LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.







LUCILLE was a picture as she stood in the dusky shadows of the
barn with the doves circling about her head, and Lucilla perched
upon her shoulder.
She was an unusually pretty child with soft hazel eyes, and a
dazzle of golden hair, and when as now, she was pleased and excited
and her cheeks were pink, she was bewitching.
The only remarkable thing about her was an unusual fondness for
animals and the power she had over them. It really seemed as if there
was some special relationship between this little girl and the various
orders of the animal kingdom, different from that between them, and
other human beings. Even the shy inhabitants of the green woods
seemed to feel that she was nearer akin to themselves than to the
ugly object with a gun that was their traditional enemy. They
taught her their calls, and when with soft footsteps she came into the
wood, they seemed to say joyfully:
It's Lucille, dear Lucille. She will do us no harm."
To be sure, she had her favorites among them. Though she loved
them all. ,She loved the birds better than the toads and the beetles,










LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.

and she liked what she called the woolly worms better than the
slippery ones; but that was only as you might say you liked choco-
late candy better than peppermint, meaning no disrespect to the
latter.
Even the crickets and grasshoppers seemed to feel the bond, for
she could keep one by her all day, and perhaps, when evening came
and her mother would say :
What became of the cricket you had this morning ? "
Lucille would find it for her in a fold of her dress.
But of course the domestic animals were her chief playmates,
and of these there was no lack on the fine old farm where Lucille
lived. The dogs had a warm corner of her heart. One was a big,
lean, awkward, foolish, greyhound pup, and the other a wise old fat
little spaniel. There was also a dear and faithful collie that slept in
the barn, who was different from either. But however the dogs may
have differed in other respects they were alike in their affection for
Lucille. As for the cats, there were enough of them to make a very
respectable cat show, black, yellow, tiger, white and gray. And there
were horses and cows, and pigs and hens, each being a personal friend
to Lucille.
The little girl never gave herself any airs of superiority to her
playmates, however humble they might be. Indeed she often amused
herself by imagining that she was one of themselves. With the dogs
she would leap about with her tongue banging out of her mouth, and
just as easily she could fancy herself one of the cats, when she would
hunch up her back and hiss, or else curl herself up for a nap, with
her head cuddled into the rest of her; and it was the drollest thing to









LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.

see her stand stock still in the pasture, like some old placid cow. Just
stand there and swallow an imaginary cud.
The cows would look at her out of the corner of their great mild
eyes and seem to say:
The idea of that little snipe fancying herself one of us "
I wonder if she ever thought it a little hard that in their turn
the animals would not sometimes pretend to be a little girl.
But the doves were Lucille's true brothers and sisters. What a
whirring of feathery wings there was when the soft whistle of
Lucille was heard in the dovecote, and the dainty things,
purple, and white, and clouded grey, as softly as the flitting shad-
ows gathered about her. Of all the doves, however, the little
maidenly Lucilla was the gentlest and the sweetest.
She was of a light-soft grey, with an arching neck of beautiful
iridescent colors. Lucilla was of a timid nature even for a dove, and
always flew away from her perch on Lucilles' shoulder at the first ap-
proach of any other person, even the familiar figure of Adolphus who
took care of the dove-cote, and a certain way she had at such times of
seeking another perch over Lucille's head, and sending down to her
cooing assurances of her love, was wonderfully pretty.
Having filled a measure with corn, Lucille went out into the
open, to scatter it on the ground for the doves. But Lucilla ate only
out of Lucille's hand-the gentle little hand that had never yet hurt
living creatures.
So rare and perfect a companion as Lucille, certainly deserved a
playmate of her own race; and that very morning, before she had
come out to feed the doves, she had been introduced to a little brother.









LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.


It must be said that Baby boy, as he was called, did not seem upon
that first inspection a very promising companion. First he made a
horrible face at her, and turned purple; then he doubled up his fists
as if he were a born prize fighter, and finally opened his mouth and
screamed. But Lucille was no cold critic. She watched these feats
with sympathetic interest, and aimably declared that he was as sweet
as he could be; and when he fell asleep, and was laid in his dainty
bassinet, all made of lace and blue ribbons, she stood by his side ad-
miring his small round head, his tiny features, and little pink
hands.
And so, she was so happy, when she went out to feed the doves,
that she did not notice that Lucilla wore a drooping air, that she ate
but a few kernels of corn, and her voice was more plaintive than
usual.
Lucilla you will love the little brother as well as you love
me she prattled. You will never be afraid of him but cuddle in
his arms as you do in mine."
Coo, coo," answered Lucilla very soft and sad and low.
It was a beautiful May morning, and to Lucille the world was
made of blue sky, of apple blossoms, of cooing doves, and sweet little
baby brothers; but all at once, Lucilla spread her wings and flew
away.
She had seen Donald and Dexter, the boys of a neighbor, com-
ing down the lane, and Lucilla knew that their appearance was the
signal for trouble. They scorned poor little Lucille as a playmate,
but sometimes they amused themselves by teasing her.
Usually she was none too well pleased to see them; but to-day it









LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.


was different. She was glad of the opportunity to tell the good news.
Coo, coo, coo," warned Lucilla, but Lucille would not heed her.
With her little face shining with happiness she ran forward to meet
them.
Oh Donald, she cried, oh Dexter what do you think ? I have a
dear little baby brother. What do you think of that ?"
"Think of it ? Why, you needn't be so pleased said Donald.
No, you needn't be so pleased added Dexter.
"He will grow up to be just like me," said Donald with a grim-
ace.
Oh he will grow up to be just like me," said Dexter.
Lucille looked first at one, and then at the other, and shook her
head.
"Oh, no, no. He is very pretty and good."
We were pretty and good when we were only a day old "-they
laughed, and Donald said :
He'll tease you dreadfully. He'll put burs in your curls, hide
your doll babies, and fling stones at the doves.'"
Never never cried Lucille looking up to Lucilla on the ap-
ple bough. He will love them as I do."
Coo," answered Lucilla, gently.
Just then a little green snake slipped out of the stone wall be-
hind the apple tree.
There's a snake, let us kill him," cried Dexter, picking up a
stick.
Oh, no, no, he is so pretty and happy," pleaded Lucille catch-
ing hold of his arm-"Don't kill it."









LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.

"Well, then, I will let you kill him," said Donald, winking at
Dexter. And then he got on one side of her and Dexter on the other,
and they assured her that to kill a little snake in, the spring always
brought good luck. Donald said he had killed one, and Dexter had
killed one and this one she ought to kill herself.
Of course, it seemed strange to her, but she was told a great
many things that seemed strange. It might be just as true as that
" crusts will make the hair curl," for all she knew, but all the same
she shook her head till her curls danced.
Oh no," she would never kill the snake.
"Then you will have bad luck-Your baby brother will grow
ugly and deformed and sick and wicked," Donald said, and Dexter ad-
ded :
Or very likely he will never grow up at all."
Then they put the stick into poor Lucille's little hand, and in the
great horror she felt at the picture they drew, and hardly knowing
what she did Lucille ran after the snake that was now gracefully glid-
ing through the grass, and struck it.
Lucille has killed a snake. Lucille has killed a snake," shout-
ed Donald and Dexter, and being satisfied with the mischief they had
done, ran away laughing up the lane, and all the world seemed to
echo Lucille has killed a snake."
Only Lucilla was perfectly quiet up in the apple tree.
And Lucille tried in vain to wake up the little snake and to make
him glide again through the fragrant grass, and to enjoy the beautiful
morning, as she thought it had done before she struck that cruel blow.
Oh why had it been so very easy to kill it. So very easy. And










LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.

why could she not give it back its life ? But no, its happy harmless
life was over. It was quite dead, and the collie came and sniffed at it.
Don't" sighed Lucille, and burst into tears.
At last needing comfort, and conscious that Lucilla had ceased to
utter her tender love note, she called her; but for the first time the
dove refused to obey her voice. Then Lucille stretched out her hand,
thinking that as usual Lucilla would come rushing down.and alight
on it. But instead of that, she fluttered uneasily on her perch and
then flew away.
At night fall when Lucille called the doves for their supper, and
with swift wings they came whirring down, myriads of them, white,
and purple, and twilight grey, one was missing.
Greatly grieving, Lucille sent Adolphus up to the nests, but Lu-
cilla was not there, and she looked and looked for her, and all the
evening she wandered sadly about the place calling:
Lucilla, Lucilla."
But there was no answering note. Bitter tears she wept for her'
dear grey dove, and whatever one might say in well-meant consolation
she could only believe that when she struck the poor green snake
she also killed her tender Lucilla. "The dove," she said, had hid-
den itself and died of a broken heart."
Lucille buried the little snake under the apple tree, but the dead
body of the dove could not be found. For as much as a week she
could not go near the dovecote; for she said that she was ashamed to
look the doves in the face, for they knew that she had killed Lucilla.
Indeed, her old delight in her dumb friends was gone. They seemed
to look at her with reproach. The dogs came less willingly when she










LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.

called, the cats hid under the furniture. If she went into the woods,
the squirrels scolded her from the tree tops. The birds flew away at
her approach.
But if this were really so and not the child's foolish fancy, there
was consolation in the society of Boy baby. He, at least, looked at
her with no reproach in his glance. Lucille was the first person he
ever noticed, holding out his little wavering arms to her the moment
he caught sight of her yellow curls. He grew in beauty like the rose.
His complexion changed from red to white, his little head was covered
with rings of gold, and his eyes became big and blue. Having noth-
ing else to do he grew, and grew, and grew-handsome, healthy and
good.
So a year passed. It was the baby's first birthday, and Lucille
was sitting on the porch to enjoy the morning which was as lovely as
that one on which she had killed the snake. To make amends for
this cruel act she meant to teach Baby boy to be kind to all living
creatures, and it seemed to her that already he had a natural
love for them in his little heart. She knew he would always love the
dogs, the horses, and the birds; but she feared that when he was as
big as Donald and Dexter, he might fling stones at the frogs, and kill
harmless snakes.
Presently, nurse brought Baby boy onto the porch for Lucille to
amuse for a while. He had on a big hat with rosettes over the ears,
and he kept pointing with his little fat fore finger toward the fields.
Lucille took his hand and walked with him up and down in front
of the porch; but that was not what Baby boy meant at all. He had
investigated everything on the gravel walk many times, and he want-















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I ua ,a
"r.-a fi ""- -- -.
Lr










-t h f





^^ iY iJ -/"


He k p p i n o w' t f d


' *';'
' ^'r?










LUCILLE AND LCCILLA.

ed to go off to the great Faraway. So Lucille started with him for a
little journey in the world. They did not go very fast for every few
steps Baby boy, who was walking independently by himself, sat down
unexpectedly in the grass. Then he would look up with great sur-
prised and indignant eyes at Lucille, and just as she would think he
was going to cry he would begin to gurgle and laugh. And then he
must pick every flower that he saw and look at every bird or bee or
insect that crossed his path, so that it was a long time before they
reached the orchard; and before going on they sat down upon the edge
of it to rest.
And now who should come upon the scene but those mischievous
urchins who a year ago had caused so much trouble.
They had found a poor little woodcock that had been shot. One
wing was gone so that though, when they put it on the ground, it
could hop about it could not fly away.
Donald said that they were going to have some fun with it, and
knowing very well what that would mean to the woodcock, Lucille
begged them to give it to her, and in her pity, followed them a long
way offering first one and then another among her treasures in ex-
change for the bird. And when having at last got possession of it
and set it free in the woods, she returned to the spot where she had
left Baby boy, he was no where to be seen.
Frantic with fear, she ran hither and thither, seeking him in im-
possible places, and calling his name as loud as she could. She was
answered only by the soft coo of a dove in the old apple tree by the
stone wall.
It was Lucilla.










LUCILLE AND LUCILLA.

Rushing forward, she beheld beneath the tree, the little figure of
Baby boy creeping through the grass and laughing with delight over
a new and strange play fellow.
Lucille stooping down beside him saw that it was a tiny green
snake.



















DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.














DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.







ALMOST everybody in Bay View knew Daisy Dalrymple and
Bruno. In fact it was impossible to know one without knowing
the other; for they were always together.
Daisy was a lily of a girl with white skin and fair hair, but her
eyes were a soft brown. Though she looked so gentle, she was a
lively sprite, and if any mischief were going on she liked to have a
hand in it.
Bruno was of the opinion that without himself for a protector,
Daisy would speedily come to some bad end and therefore he never
dared leave her very long at a time.
Bruno of course was a dog, a huge, handsome mastiff with a
fine head and real doggy eyes, soft, faithful, and pathetic with the
thoughts that he longed in vain to share with his human friends. His
silky coat can best be described as a tawny grey, a lovely color, and
he stood nine hands high. But Bruno was even more remarkable
for his intelligence than for his beauty. There was no end to the
tales his friends told of his wonderful doings by which it appeared
that he was a dog of far more than ordinary sagacity. Although his
61
*4









DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

disposition was winning and sweet, and he had hosts of friends, he
was not a dog to be trampled on, and above all he was not a dog to
allow any one to trample upon Daisy Dalrymple.
One morning Daisy was walking up and down the garden path
with Bruno at her heels. It was in the spring and the daffodils were
in blossom and the shrubs were covered with masses of white or red
or yellow flowers. As Daisy walked she sang snatches of songs,
sentimental love lorn, old fashioned songs mostly that Miss Evange-
line Miller had taught her and which were droll enough as coming
from her childish lips.
At one moment it would be:
The weary day to me
Goes sad and mournfully
And when the night comes darkly deep
No joy, no joy it brings,
But sadness on its wings,
No balmy sleep, Alone I weep."
Then again the red lips would trail out yet more dismally:
"While hollow burst the rushing winds,
And heavy beats the shower,
This anxious aching bosom finds
No comfort in its power.
For ah my love it little knows
What thy hard fate may be,
What bitter storm of fortune blows,
What tempests trouble thee.










DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

But whatsoe'er may be our doom,
The lot is cast for me
For in the world, or in the tomb
My heart is fix'd on thee."

Or, sometimes the words would be:

Be hushed, be hushed, ye bitter winds !
Ye pelting rains, a little rest;
Lie still, lie still, ye busy thoughts
That wring with grief my aching breast.

Oh cruel was my faithless love,
To triumph o'er an artless maid ;
Oh! cruel was my faithles love,
To leave the girl by him betrayed."

On the outside of the fence the people were tripping along the
pavement to the ferry, and hearing the love-sick songs would look
over and smile at little Daisy Dalrymple, who was the merriest of
mortal children and perhaps some one would say:
Well now Daisy. Is it so bad with you as that then? If I
were a pretty girl like you, I would'nt wear the willow for any man."
Then Daisy would explain that she hadn't any lover at all, and
didn't want any she was sure, since they seemed to make one so very
uncomfortable, so the listener on the other side of the fence would
pretend to look relieved and pass on.
Sometimes some intimate friend would ask her for a flower or a










DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

kiss, and sometimes a little girl or boy would stop to tell her some im-
portant bit of news such as that there were two girls and a boy in the
family that was going to move into the new house on Sycamore street;
or that Jerry Watterson had stopped going to the kindergarten and was
coming to school; or that Jack Barker's father had bought him a new
bicycle.
While the conversation was going on, Bruno always stood by
Daisy's side with his watchful eyes on her companion. He had of
course his own preferences among Daisy's friends and thought it no
more than honest to let a.person know just how much regard he had
for him-for alas he was no diplomat.
Among Daisy's friends there were none Bruno approved of so
highly as a certain young gentleman who was an old and ardent ad-
mirer of hers.
He was a tall and handsome youth with a wonderfully pleasant
voice and a twinkle in his blue eyes. On his way to the ferry he
stopped every pleasant morning for a word with Daisy Dalrymple, and
Daisy would always enquire with a great deal of interest if business
was getting better, or if he had had any luck.
For he had started in his profession that year, and was a young
lawyer without any clients.
Daisy had heard her father say that he didn't believe John Lor-
ton had made ten dollars the whole year; but as an absolute fact he
hadn't made ten cents. In truth the young fellow made no secret of
his bad luck, but joked continually over his want of success, and no
one but Daisy and Bruno suspected his real discouragement.
A law suit had been brought against a neighbor of the Dal-
66









DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

rymples that winter, and Daisy had hoped that Mr. Whitlaw would
put his case into Lorton's hands. She had teased her father into pro-
posing it to him, but Mr. Whitlaw had replied, that John Lorton was
young and inexperienced and nobody knew how he would manage a
case, and so he gave it to another lawyer who had already made some
reputation, and as John said, could earn enough to pay his car fares
to and from his office."
Then there had been a neighbor's quarrel that year between the
Porters and the Andersons, the Andersons complaining that the
Porter children were always playing on their lawn and Mr. Anderson
had threatened to take the matter into court. Daisy had pricked up
her ears at this report thinking that this might be an opportunity for
John, but Mr. Anderson was after all a peacable sort of man, born
to be trampled and spit upon," as Daisy Dalrymple said and would
not take legal proceedings.
As young Lawton came down the street that pleasant May morn-
ing, he could not go by without a word with Daisy and also a word
with Bruno, who performed his great feat of shaking hands between
the pickets of the fence with a great wagging and waving of his tail.
His method of accosting such as displeased his fancy being one gruff
growl of disapproval and glance of hostility through the apertures of
the fence.
It was in this way he greeted Master Howard Kimball and to tell
the truth Daisy never welcomed him much more warmly, for he was
the sort of boy that found pleasure in the misery of others, and a lit-
tle girl and a dumb dog often served him for victims. In truth there
had been a long-standing grudge between these parties- which Bruno
67










DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

often longed to square off.
On the day of Daisy's lawn party the boy had squeezed him into
his little sister Nell's old gown tying her little white sun-bonnet over
his head. Bruno had too much good sense to show himself in this
ignominious costume and hid himself behind the barn, but Howard
had no notion of seeing his mean trick so defeated, and armed with a
stick went to look for him, and Bruno's first appearance on the scene
was in chasing his tormentor screaming wildly over the lawn, where
the gay party was assembled so the ignominy was shared equally be-
tween them.
This is a mere sample of the way hostilities were conducted, and
the minds of all three were hot for revenge.
John Lorton came down the street humming a pleasant air, the
sky was not more serene than his own blue eyes and he seemed as
blithe as the beautiful May morning.
"How is the distressed fair one this morning?" he asked on
seeing Daisy whose fair head was thrown back while she sang:

For cold and dead he lies,
And far in yonder skies
The joys that once were mine now dwell,
My grief, my grief is vain.
I'll see him nee'r again,
I may not quell my bosom's swell,
I may not quell my bosom's swell."

Oh, I am as merry as a grigg this lovely day," said Daisy.
How is business? "









DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

"Why," said John," I am as busy as I can be from morning till
night, busy trying to think of something to do. If this rush goes on
I shall give up the law and perhaps drive the baker's cart. I had an
opportunity to do that the other day."
John's face wore still its humorous expression, but Daisy's was
clouded with gloom. She was thinking how she had scorned the pre-
dictions of the ill-disposed that John Lorton would never succeed
in the law.
"And to think you have never had one case yet," she said dis-
mally, to show them what a good lawyer you would be."
Never mind, never mind," replied John, advantages bring ter-
rible responsibilities. If I only had the longed-for opportunity, I should
be under the necessity of proving what a clever fellow I am, and that's
often uncommonly inconvenient, and j ist think too how free from
carking care is the baker's boy. I say, Daisy dear, would you be too
proud to ride in the baker's cart with me ?"
Why no," answered Daisy, her brown eyes looking dreamily
into the distance. I am very fond of chocolate cake and I could
have plenty of it then." And so the bad news was treated as a joke.
Just as John was starting off he drew two tickets from his pocket,
and asked her if she would like to go to the dog show.
Daisy did not understand how it was that John never had any
business. He had always tickets or some trifle to give away. The
truth was that John was very popular and people were always glad to
give him anything but cases, which was what he most wanted.
Of course I should be delighted to go," answered Daisy, shield-
ing her lips from Bruno's searching eyes.
69










DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

Oh dear, how stupid of me to speak before him," said John, un-
derstanding the movement at once. Of course Bruno -will be wild
to go too."
"Yes, he knows every thing, every thing," said Daisy, and I
do so hate to deceive him, but Mamma would never go if Bruno is
with us and he must be left behind."
She uttered these last words in John's ear and hoped that for
once Bruno's suspicions had not been aroused.
John returned home having left it at that time to give the tickets
to Daisy. Shortly after he left her, her mother came into the garden
and after much coaxing, Bruno was decoyed into the shed.
Any dog would enjoy a promenade with so charming a lady and
so pretty a child. Bruno honestly believed that Mrs. Dalrymple was
the belle of the town, and as for Daisy there could not be two opinions
about her. They walked on hard-heartedly while Bruno watched
them with his mournful brown eyes from the window of the shed.
They walked down Centre street from which point they would
turn either to the right or to the left-to the right if they wanted to
take the train to the city, to the left if they were to cross the ferry.
As a matter of fact they went by the train.
In five minutes after their departure Bruno succeeded in making
his escape from the shed. The clever 'dog waited until there were no
longer footsteps near his prison house, then he calmly raised the
latch of the door with his nose and stepped boldly out. He cast a
look of supreme pity at Susan who was hanging out the clothes, and
who had said in answer to Daisy's inquiries:
Law no, Miss, no need of tying him for no dog could ever get










DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

out of that place.'
Then he, too, went down Centre street. At the turning point
he hesitated just for an instant, then tore down the street that led
to the station. He was just a moment too late, and experienced that
sense of exasperation induced in man or dog by the spectacle of his
train just puffing off in the distance.
In a moment he had turned around and was running at full
speed in the direction of the ferry remembering there was still a
chance left. Unlucky Bruno! The boat was just moving off. He
sprang to catch it and by a splendid feat clung for a moment with
his fore paws onto the deck and his hind ones on the side of the boat.
A shout went up from the passengers, most of whom knew the
dog.
Oh, ho! Little Mistress Daisy must be on the boat," said one
of them, and I'll trust the dog not to be left behind."
He is a splendid brute," said another. "Did you ever hear
how, when the Dalrymples came here from St. Paul, this same dog,
then a little pup, and had been given to a neighbor before starting,
followed them, how no one knows, but no doubt stealing many a ride
on the trains, for he reached here in time to partake of the first fam-
ily breakfast ? "
I never heard that," said a short stout red faced man, but I re-
member how it was by his sagacity that those sly burglars who gave
the police so much trouble last autumn were eventually captured. I
also remember," and here the little red faced man's voice began to get
husky, "how he succeeded in rescuing two little kids that contrived
to fall off the landing at places some two hundred feet distant from
71










DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

each other. And gentlemen, one of those little kids was my kid,"
added the red faced man with an air of importance as if the rescue of
his kid was a much more heroic achievement than the rescue of any
other child.
He is a brave dog," exclaimed another man who had seemed to
be reading a newspaper. "Once I saw him successfully defending
his little mestress against five young scamps, who were determined to
have Miss Daisy's hat for a foot-ball."
Poh poh! What a fuss over a cur said an individual who
happened to be the father of that malicious little imp, Howard Kim-
ball; and he got up in disgust and walked to the other end of the
boat.
Bruno meanwhile had scrambled to a place of safety, but only to
be met by his old enemy Howard, with hate in his heart and his
father's cane in his hand, a combination fatal to Bruno.
In a lively skirmish Howard succeeded in pushing the dog off
the deck of the boat. He fell plump into the water, and disappeared
from view but immediately reappeared and pursued the'boat.
It must be remembered that owing to Howard's attack upon him
Bruno had not had an opportunity to look for Daisy, for which reason
he continued to follow the boat instead of going back to the landing.
He was a big dog, and being powerful, made rapid progress
through the water.
The sailors who had watched the adventure being his friends-
for he often went in the boat with his mistress-threw him a rope, and
helped him on board.
Howard having disappeared during the loud hurrahs sent up by










DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

the passengers, Bruno now took the opportunity to make a search for
Daisy.
But neither fore or aft, on deck or in the cabin was she to be
found. His plan, although no one knew it, was to stay on board un-
til Daisy, or at least Mr. Dalrymple who always went home- by the
ferry, should return.
Bruno roamed disconsolately around the boat, consenting to allow
his head to be patted by many a condescending hand, and at last flung
himself down with a sigh at the feet of John Lorton who had watched
the proceedings with an interested eye.
Bruno was asleep and dreaming that he was chasing Daisy
through the streets of the city. Now and then his paws would twitch
and he would pant in the excitement of the chase.
At length on a crowded street he caught sight of the object of his
search. He ran this way and that in his frantic fear of losing her
again.
With straining sinews he sped on until stopped by a boy who
obstructed the way with a. cane. Let him leap as high as he would
he could not jump over that barrier.
Suddenly he was conscious of numbers of voices around him, and
the sound of a child screaming and some one seizing him by the col-
lar and saying: He is a vicious brute and not a safe dog to be at
large." Then slowly be realized that he had jumped up and bitten
Howard who had been tormenting him in his sleep with his father's
cane.
"He is a noble animal," said John Lorton in whose voice was
more anger than usual, and I doubt if your son is much hurt."
75










DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

I leave it to these gentlemen who are fathers," said Mr. Kim-
ball, "whether they wish their children left to the mercy of such a
dog."
Alas public opinion is always fickle. These gentlemen eyed
poor Bruno somewhat dubiously, standing with his tail between his
legs and conscious that he was under a ban. He slunk away and
hid himself knowing the boat was nearing the landing.
Mr. Kimball examined his son's wound while the other passen-
gers buttoned up their overcoats in readiness to go on shore.
Bruno spent the rest of the day monotonously crossing from
shore to shore in the ferry-boat, finally going home with his master.
Having passed the day pleasantly in town, Daisy and her mother
returned as they had gone, by train.
Being fond of dogs, Daisy was enthusiastic over the dog show,
but she declared there was not an animal there that for wisdom and
beauty could compare with their Bruno.
During the subsequent shopping expedition she followed a cus-
tom which her mother often practiced when Daisy herself was left at
home and bought a little present for him, a gorgeous yellow satin
bow to be tied on his collar, for which she knew in her secret heart he
would not care a whit, but she knew also that it would show finely on
his silky coat.
In the evening John Lorton dropped in at the Dalrymples and
reported what had taken place on the boat. He said Mr. Kim-
ball had behaved like an idiot, that he talked rank heresy about the
dog and made a muff of his son.
He has spoiled his boy until he has not a virtue left save his
76










DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

pretty Fauntleroy suits. They are very pretty but they do not make
one forget the expression of his face which is that of a spoiled and
spiteful child."
John further said that Mr. Kimball had nursed his indignation
until it was very lively and hot. There were rumors about the town
that he meant to take the matter into court. He represented Howard's
injuries that were on his leg as of a very serious character, but
the boy had been seen playing hop-scotch that day without any dif-
ficulty, although when he found himself observed he stopped at once
and went limping home.
Mr. Kimball had been heard to say many times that the dog
ought to be killed, but he had had no medical advice except Dr.
Saunders, the boy's grandfather.
Well," said Mr. Dalrymple turning red, let him take it to
court. I can fight it as long as he can."
Poh exclaimed Daisy, every body knows it would be a sin'
to shoot Bruno. It was not his fault but Howard's, and besides
Bruno's life is valuable and Howard's is not, and I guess if all his
good deeds were put against Howard's he would be let off quick
enough," and she went on, I hope and pray he will carry it into
court and we will have Mr. John for our lawyer, and then everybody
will see what a good lawyer Mr. John is and what a good dog Bruno
is. He shall wear his new yellow satin bow and make a great sensa-
tion."
Bless my soul, child, bless my soul," said Mr. Dalrymple when.
John had gone. If that idiot of a Kimball does carry the matter into
court I'll take your advice, Daisy, and put the case into John's hands."










DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

Much to his surprise, however, Mr. Kimball did carry the mat-
ter into court. He was an irascible little man and had argued him-
self into the belief that he had justice on his side. He refused to see
that Howard had been at all in fault, and loudly and angrily de-
clared that poor Bruno was a ferocious beast whose savage humor was
a constant menace to the children of the neighborhood.
Alas, poor Bruno! the faithful guardian of little children and be-
loved by all -the babies. Somehow he seemed to know that danger of
some sort threatened him. He would go from one to another and
nestle his nose in their lap, and seemed to say:
You know what a worthy creature I am, and have not deserved
such obloquy. But I have plenty of friends, haven't I ? And there is
no need of worrying."
The thought would sometimes steal into Daisy's mind, that per-
haps there was something to worry about. It had been explained to
her just how Bruno's trial would be carried on, for so strong was his
personality that it was always called Bruno's case rather than Mr.
Dalrymple's.
But Bruno's lawyer assured her of success. You just wait now,"
he said in consolation to Daisy, and you will see what a good charac-
ter people will give him. Besides to despair shows little confidence
in me in whose ability you have always professed to have so much
faith."
But then it was always John Lorton's nature to look hopefully at
things, and it was true that Bruno had bitten his adversary.
But the suspense of long waiting was not added to their troubles
The case was called for trial during the last of May, about two










DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

weeks after Bruno had turned on his persecutor. The weather was
warm as summer and brought the leaves on the trees well forward. The
apple trees were like large bouquets of blossoms, and the earth was
at its loveliest.
The thought of Bruno's possible sentence was especially sad to
soft-hearted Daisy. The forfeit of a life could be more easily paid
on some dull churlish day," she thought. She would throw her arms
around his neck and tell him there were not half a dozen men in the
town whose lives would in beauty equal his own; and she was not far
wrong, for faithful love and unconquerable loyalty, for dauntless
courage and unpretending self-sacrifice Bruno would bear comparison
with many human heroes.
As has been said, the trial took place in the last week of May-
to be accurate, it was on the last day of the month. Bruno's party set
forth with all the'courage given by a righteous cause.
Mr. Kimball was very much in earnest in this matter and had
secured the services of one of the most prominent lawyers of the
neighboring city. As an actual fact he was of such repute that, as an
antagonist, it brought poor unknown John Lorton into what he him-
self designated a ridiculous prominence. Nevertheless John did not
think he should lose his nerve.
He had secured a large number of witnesses. First on the list
were Mr. Dalrymple and Daisy. Then there were the gentlemen who
had spoken in Bruno's favor on the boat, a tall maiden lady with a
bird of paradise on her hat, and many others.
Mr. Kimball on his part had but a few witnesses and these with
the exception of Howard and Dr. Saunders looked as if they had come











DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

more for love of fifty cents than from love of a cause. Howard was
of course present in his prettiest Fauntleroy suit, the appearance of
which was much marred by the conspicuous bandages on his leg.
The trouble had excited-a great deal of interest in the neighbor-
hood and the court room was unusually crowded.
After the case had been called by the clerk, the witnesses were
seated and Mr. Kimball's attorney began his opening speech, when
an unsummoned witness suddenly appeared and after calmly looking
around the court room took a seat beside Daisy Dalrymple. He was
a magnificent brute, with affectionate eyes, that is when looking at
certain persons, the little maiden at his side for instance, and with a
stupendous yellow satin bow rakishly arranged under one ear.
There was a broad smile on most faces and a soft clapping of
hands. Then Mr. Kimball leaned over and whispered something to
his lawyer who immediately objected to the appearance of the dog in
the court room. But John Lorton instantly arose declaring that the
dog, being the cause of the litigation his presence was necessary, for
he saw at once that Bruno was not a dog to injure his own case.
The judge it so happened was a great lover of dogs-and who
that loves dogs would not love Bruno ?-and Bruno, having listened
politely to the speech of the other side, now rolled his eyes over to
the bench as if to say: Now for a sensible decision from the judge,"
which no doubt had its effect on that dignitary, for he immediately
said with a slight bow:
The objection of the plaintiff is overruled." So John Lorton
had scored his first triumph.
The trial went on after the usual manner, the ,chief interest be-
80










DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

ing the absurdly appropriate conduct of the dog. Mr. Kimball was
the first to take the witness stand, and he labored long to prove how
great were the injuries the dog had inflicted on his son, after which
Dr. Saunders corroborated all that he had said.
John Lorton here interposed that the witness was the child's
grandfather and suggested that, the boy being in court, they should
have ocular proof of these terrible injuries they had heard so much of.
At this point Bruno's tail was heard to thump the floor. He un-
doubtedly approved of John's suggestion. The spectators who had
been watching the dog with admiration laughed audibly.
Mr. Bryant, Mr. Kimball's lawyer, then, called Howard to the
stand. It must be confessed he looked rather picturesque and made
a favorable impression. On his cross-examination, notwithstanding
the constant interruption of Mr. Bryant, John Lorton drew from him
the admission that he had been tormenting the dog at the time he was
bitten, and also that on leaving the boat he had been able to walk
from the ferry boat up to the place where -the circus tents were
pitched.
I suppose your pleasure was entirely spoiled by your physical
sufferings-by the bite on your leg, you know," suggested John.
Oh yes, you'd better believe it," answered Howard emphatically.
Here the opposing lawyer. interposed, objecting that these re-
marks were beside the question, but after some sparring between the
attorneys the cross-examination was allowed to go on.
Was the clown a good one ? asked John innocently.
Oh just ripping," replied Howard enthusiastically.
"You did not feel the acute pain in your leg perhaps at that
81










DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

time," said John with a significant smile. And Bruno gave two de-
lighted yaps, or at least they sounded so.
Did you come out before the performance was over ? continued
John.
No," answered Howard with a hang-dog air.
I think, Your Honor," said John addressing the Judge, I must
ask that this witness be required to show to the jury the injuries he
claims the dog has inflicted on him."
Oh! cried Howard, who was certainly a chip of the old block
" It will hurt me to have the bandages taken off. I won't! I can't!"
At the request of Mr. Bryant, Howard was temporarily dismissed
from the witness box, and Dr. Saunders recalled. Whereupon Bruno
cocked up one ear, Mr. Kimball rubbed his hands and smiled blandly,
while Dr. Saunders in rather a hesitating way, took the stand.
He was an old gentleman, and he looked at his son-in-law, How-
ard's papa, in an appealing sort of way, as if he were afraid more was
going to be demanded of him than he felt disposed to admit. How-
ever, he testified that his grand-son's injuries were of a serious char-
acter and that the dog was dangerous to the community and ought to
be shot.
The attention of all was now again drawn to the accused, who
feeling himself the centre of attraction turned his head, and put on
that air of sublime indifference which dogs sometimes assume.
Is it your opinion, Doctor, that it would injure the boy to have
the bandages herewith removed ? asked John.
"Decidedly," the doctor promptly responded, and this witness
was then dismissed.










DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

The witnesses that were to prove the good character of the dog
were next called. The testimony of such of them as had been on the
boat proved that the boy had badgered Bruno into biting him, and
that the punishment was no more than the boy deserved. Each was
eager to give the dog a good character.
The first witness was Mr. Greene, who related the incident of
Bruno's saving the children who had fallen from the landing-into the
bay. But Mr. Greene's sympathies had been so excited by the grief
of Daisy, as well as by the critical situation of Bruno, that although
the main facts did not differ it seemed like another tale.
He was very dramatic, first he described the two little children
sporting on the banks, then how each one came to fall simultaneously
irv' the water though at a distance of fifteen feet from each other.
His movements were quite infantile and you could almost see the
oddling steps of the little innocents and hear their shouts of baby glee.
He waved his great pudgy red hands with childish grace as he
showed how they tripped over the grass, and you almost held your
breath as they came down to the edge of the water.
Just as vividly could you see their mammas as with pretty ma-
ternal cries they ran after their offspring and wrung their hands as
the little figures dropped into the water. Then like a true hero comes
Bruno to the rescue.
The construction of the human frame forbade Mr. Greene quite
reproducing the exact appearance of Bruno, as with his tongue pro-
truding and ears pricking up, he dashed into the water and succeeded
in dragging both children to the shore. The story created a great
sensation and Bruno was more popular than before.
83










DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

The next witness was a tall, lank maiden lady, with a bird of
paradise on her hat.
"What is your name? asked John.
Evangeline Miller," answered the lady, with a graceful dip of her
head, which made every feather quiver.
"Occupation ?"
Milliner," was the reply.
"Did you see Mr. Dalrymple's dog bite Master Howard Kim-
ball ?"
Miss Evangeline turned around for a moment for a glance at
Daisy and answered hesitatingly:
Well I don't know that I can say he bit him."
What do I understand you to mean "
"Well, it looked as if he did," answered the witness.
"Did you see him tormenting the dog? "
Certainly I did," replied Miss Evangeline, without any hesita-
tion at all.
Or else it looked as if he did," sneered Mr. Bryant.
Did you try to protect the dog from the boy's persecutions ?"
asked Lorton, resuming his examination.
Yes, I did, replied Miss Evangeline, and I hid him behind
my dress. But after a while Master Howard came poking along with
his stick and routed him out. He is always at him. I never saw
any thing like it in my life. This warn't any new thing, the little
rascal has had a grudge against him a long time. I can tell you
about that. You see it began by Miss Daisy's planting my garden with
pansies and violets and some other flowers, and she tended them her-
84









DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

self a good deal, knowing I hadn't much time for it. She worked real
hard on them and I did lot on having them plants blossom."
Here Mr. Bryant interrupted, strongly objecting to the witness
being allowed to go on with her rigmarole, as he called it, which he
declared was entirely foreign to the case.
But by this time it was clearly evident on which side were the
judge's sympathies, for again the objection was overruled, and with
another wave of the bird of paradise Miss Evangeline continued.
Well, though some of the plants were already budded, there
were never any blossoms on them, and Daisy and me, we wondered
and wondered what could be the reason of it. At. last one night
when one of the pansies was just ready to burst into flower Miss
Daisy had Bruno tied to the apple tree on the edge of the garden.
'There now,' says she, 'we'll be likely to find out.' And we did.
It was in the morning very early that Bruno began to bark,
and instantly I was at the window in time to behold that little
scamp," motioning to Master Howard, "bending down over my
pansies. Well I couldn't get out in time to catch him," said Miss
Evangeline blushing. But when I went out to my plants I found
every bud was stripped off of them.
After that Master Howard began to torment Daisy Dalrymple
and when he couldn't torment her he tormented Bruno, and that's
the Gospel truth."
On the whole Miss Evangeline's testimony had made a favorable
impression for Bruno upon the jury.
Just at this moment the strains of a band of music broke upon
the air, which apparently heralded the approach of a procession of
85










DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

some sort, and which caught the ear of Master Howard. Immedi-
ately he climbed over the benches onto the window-sill from which
point he had a view of the street.
The spectators though they had no view of the procession, had
a very distinct one of Master Howard, and a smile went around the
court room, as the fact became evident that in his eager scramble he
had displaced the bandages, the removal of which was supposed to
give him so much pain.
Miss Evangeline's testimony having been concluded Lorton
pointed out to the court the obvious fact that a convenient time had
arrived to examine Master Howard's injuries.
This time Howard's protestations were of no avail, though he
screamed and kicked and proved himself to have anything but the
temper of an angel.
As he was put upon t4e stand Daisy Dalrymple broke out into
an audible giggle and Bruno left his place by her side and took
up his position in front of the witness box, held his head on one side
and assumed a most judicial and critical air.
Well, I declare, I never saw the beat of that dog! whispered
one of the jurymen slyly to another, he was a kindly old countryman
who was fond of animals. I like a dog of that breed."
Howard was standing sulkily in the witness box, his leg, from
which the bandages had now been entirely removed, displayed a scar
which bore very insignificant proportion to the bandage. It was evi-
dent that the boy had been bitten but not seriously. The taking of
testimony was closed.
When Howard had resumed his seat by his father's side, Bruno
86






















-- .~ z-


" Bruno solemnly seated himself on the witness stand."










DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

feeling perhaps that it might be some high place of honor which
he alone had not been invited to occupy solemnly seated himself on the
witness stand. A king of, dogs on trial for his life! His aspect was
that of a trusting and loyal friend; it had no meanness in it. There
he sat while the two attorneys made their pleas and when at last the
judge having charged the jury, they filed out to decide his fate.
Then there arose a hum of voices in the good dog's praise.
He's a blooming friendly dog," said an old rowdy by the door.
" I'll be blest if he didn't want to go right along with them jurymen
when they went out. I bet they aren't going to bring any verdict
against him. I seen 'em look at him and laugh a hundred times."
Another man said, and this was a gentleman, I'd stake my life
the splendid creature would be the safest playmate any child could
have. If he isn't killed I'm going to try to buy him."
The verdict was a foregone conclusion, and was that which the
friends of Bruno desired.
The case brought John Lorton into notice and his luck took a
sudden turn, finally placing him on a high peak of prosperity; but he
always said that his success was entirely due to Bruno.
Bruno took no airs unto himself, he did not presume upon the
good turn he had done his friend, nor expect favors in return. Yet
he appreciated the honors that were paid him, and perhaps vaguely
wondered why his path in life was strewn with so many more roses
than that of any other dog he knew.
It has been said that John Lorton always gave Bruno the credit
of all that was fortunate in his career; but the time came when he
basely maintained that what he had always meant was that he owed it










DAISY DALRYMPLE'S DOG.

to Daisy, who had given him his first case. If Bruno's feelings were
hurt by this transfer of gratitude from himself to his mistress he never
let it so appear. In fact it would be so uncharacteristic of this high-mind-
ed and unselfish animal that the idea is herewith dismissed with con-
tempt. At all events among Daisy's suitors he gave preference in the
most decided and unmistakable dog language to John Lorton, and
finally became a happy and honored inmate of his home.


















DAVID HICKEY'S CHRISTMAS.














DAVID HICKEY'S CHRISTMAS.







E VERY body at the Deaf School called David Hickey a clod.
Miss Brown-the pretty Miss Brown, for there were two of that
name among the corps of teachers-said that he was like all the peo-
ple from that section of Maine, where the Hickey's lived (She had
spent three weeks there, one summer, camping out in the lumber dis-
trict) and that he was stolid and quite devoid of sensitive feeling.
With his rather vacant grey eyes, and his half opened mouth,
and his slow apathetic manner, poor David did not give one the im-
pression of being keenly alive to his own misfortune, or to the sadness
of the necessary separation it caused from his home, which was usual-
ly the case with such children and made it pathetic.
There was one sweet young girl in the school with soft, pleading
brown eyes and sad curved lips, who would look in your face, and say
in the metallic, jerky way of a deaf mute.
I am deaf, I am deaf, I cannot hear. Are you sad that I am
deaf ? "
And the tears would gather in her sweet eyes, and in yours also
unless you had a heart of stone.










DAVID HICKEY'S CHRISTMAS.

Then there was a manly boy of David's age, who in the friendli-
est way would draw up to you, and tell you, by his painfully acquired
speech, and many signs, about his home, and those that he had left
there and all his sorrow at being forced to leave them as he must, if
he were ever to learn to speak and understand the speech of others.
But David did not appeal to one's sympathy any more than some
stunted plant.
It is not to be supposed that the pretty Miss Brown, or any of
the teachers were unkind to David, but kindness from a sense of duty
is a cold thing, and David must indeed have been a clod if he did not
feel the difference between the teachers' manner toward himself, and
toward Louis Alden-and the pretty pathetic brown-eyed girl.
It was in the autumn that David had been brought to the deaf
school, and it was already in the early winter. It was within a few
weeks of Christmas.
There was an unusually large number of children at the school
that year, and of course of all sorts and temperaments. Some of
them, because of their misfortune, had been indulged and spoiled by
their friends until they were disagreeable to everyone, and others too,
w0ho had learned that they were to be mere bystanders in the busy
world, some of these were gentle, patient creatures, but by far the
greater part of them had not the temper of the angels, which, taking
everything into consideration is not to be wondered at. One little
girl did nothing but cry, and one of the boys could express his home-
sickness only by kicking and screaming, and another would fly into
a passion at the least hint of opposition. This was the boy, who










DAVID HICKEY'S CHRISTMAS.

angry with the pretty Miss Brown, dropped this letter (a love letter
she laughingly called it) into her desk.
Miss Brown-Hate!
Toad, pig, bug, snake.
Hatchet-kill,
Miss Brown very sad,
Glad, glad, glad."
And since you may not be able to translate this singular com-
position I will put it in plain English for you.
Miss Brown was hateful. She was a toad, pig, bug, snake, every-
thing he loathed most. He would like to kill her with a hatchet.
Then she would be punished and he would be glad.
But of all the children there was not one so unpopular as David.
Deaf children are not so unlike others that they do not take a joy-
ous interest in Christmas. There was to be a vacation of a week, and
they were going home. All of them except the very little ones were
collecting their gifts. The girl with the brown eyes, had made hers,
dainty little things such as a deft-fingered girl can make. Louis
Alden had bought his with money that he had earned. Beautiful gifts
for his parents and brothers and sisters of whom he talked so much.
There were many opportunities for the boys at the deaf -school to
make money. Some of the older ones had regular employment out-
side. One worked for a photographer, one did odd jobs in carpenter-
ing, and they could chop wood, or shovel snow, and sometimes they
were sent on errands by the teachers. But David was not often chosen.
The brighter boys out bid him, and then it was thought that he was
too stupid to know what to do with money.
97











DAVID HICKEY'S CHRISTMAS.

None of the boys made so much money as Louis, and none
showed such enthusiasm over his preparations for Christmas. One of
his sisters was to be married that year, and Miss Brown had helped
him choose a present for her. It was a silver berry spoon, and very
pretty. He showed all his presents to the other pupils. He showed
them to David who looked a long time at them.
Louis explained that the spoon was real silver, and not like those
that were bought at the ten cent store, and he said that it would be a
an heirloom in his sister's family.
Some one had told him that, and it pleased him immensely.
He talked continually and with all his happy animation of
manner about those for whom his gifts were bought. The teachers
felt that they almost knew Louis' friends, and they sympathized with
his fondness for them.
David alone, seemed to make no preparations. He had never
tried to tell any one of his home, or those that he had left there. Ap-
parently he had felt no sorrow at leaving them, and now had no joy
at the thought of seeing them again.
Yes, he must be a mere clod-A soulless clod.
The children were to be away a week, but they were not allowed
to carry home their trunks. Most of them came from poor and igno-
rant families that did not appreciate the advantage of the school train-
ing, and if the children did not wish to return would not oblige them
to do so. So the trunks were held back.
When the pupils were ready for their trains, David came into the
room of the principal where the teachers were assembled to carry lit-
tle squads of children to the stations. He carried the big valise that
98




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