• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Poem
 Back Cover






Title: Our brownies' ABC
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087357/00001
 Material Information
Title: Our brownies' ABC together with Queerie queers
Alternate Title: Our brownies' A B C
Queerie queers
Physical Description: 83 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Cox, Palmer, 1840-1924
Monarch Book Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: Monarch Book Company
Place of Publication: Chicago
Philadelphia
Oakland, CA
Publication Date: c1898
 Subjects
Subject: Wit and humor, Juvenile -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Fairies -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Rhyme -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Alphabet books   ( lcsh )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1898   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre: Alphabet rhymes   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
United States -- California -- Oakland
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Palmer Cox.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087357
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223295
notis - ALG3544
oclc - 49057678

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Poem
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Back Cover
        Page 87
        Page 88
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OUR BROWNIES'


A B C
TOGETHER WITH

QUEERIE QUEERS
BY
PALMER COX








_----7,

COPYRIGHTED, 1898
PUBLISHED AND FOR SALE ONLY BY
MONARCH BOOK COMPANY
(FORMERLY L. P. MILLER & CO.)
HIICAGO PHILADELPHIA OAKLAND, CAL.































THE FROG AND THE RAT.


A frog and a rat were out traveling one day.
Kind sir," said the rat, "will you tell me, I pray,
Why are -all the people so civil to you,
But glare upon me as though death were my due?".

" My friend," said the frog, "now the reason lies here:
The water is cheap, but the grain it is dear.
If you lived on water, on mud and such stuff,
The people to you would be civil enough."






is for
With


ARCHERY; the Brownie's aim is fine,
swiftly flying arrows, they hit the bull's
eye every time.


C'.


I) 41


is a BASEBALL, hard and round, sent flying
by the bat, It hit a Brownie in the eye
S"/ and knocked him
'-. /\, almost flat.





































TALKING AND DOING.
"Mother, if we yon limb could reach,"
Said the young bears in boughs of the beech,
"Your apron full you'd quickly see."
She answered them, "Don't talk to me
About Ifs and Ands and Buts,
But let me see you shake down nuts."







SALion emerged from his lair
J r a short summer cut to his hair.
But the:Barber he wept;
'While-his customers slept
,As they waited their turn in the chain:


1VVWieritheBaraer ct a st shut his shop,
From?,the cloudS aBalclEaale clic drola
Fo purchase a totiorz,

__ T 12z-Ae the haiv o- -
or;Z is tolo.







THE FATE OF THE YAIN.


A turkey young, as he grew stout,
Grew vainer with each day.
"Ma, Ma," said he, "let me go out,
And my fine shape display."

"My son, my son," the mother said,
"I fear your shape's too fine;
The thought might come in Smither's head
On your fine shape to dine.


"So don't go out, my dearest boy,
Until Thanksgiving's past,
Or I may lose my pride and joy
And this walk be your last."







But his mother's counsel he forsook,
And soon was in the air;
The farmer saw him, liked his look,
And chased him, then and there.

I think he well deserved his fate,
Not doing as he ought;
For though he ran at rapid rate,
He very soon was caught.

When eaten, though his shapely form
Had highest praise, 'tis said,
It wasn't worth a fig to him-
It isn't, when you're dead!







THE RAT'S CHRISTMAS.
Oh, Mr. Rat, why do take
From us our one mince pie?
When the dear children find it gone
They'll all begin to cry."


"We Christmas have, as, well as you,"
; The rat replies, his paws
Still clinging to the pie, "and I
Am our home's Santa Claws."







is for CURLING, a game on the ice,

Which the impish Brownies think very nice.


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is for DUCK ON THE ROCK, the Brownies
play all night,
And when the morning comes they scamper out

of sight.


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MARRIED-MR. BRUIN AND MISS BEAR.











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THE FALL OF WING FO0.

6 T.LN SPITE of wife, and daughter, too,
The daring Mandarin, Wing Foo,
S Whene'er he wished to
take a ride,
Upon the balustrade A
would slide.

His loved ones gazed with greatest dread,
Fearing he'd, land upon his head,
Which could not bear to be thus whacked, \ .
For 'twas already badly cracked !

: But every day, as he grew older,
: '13i. Instead of wiser he grew bolder.
.. "Ha! ha!" quoth he, "the world I'll beat,
And slide the rail upon my feet!"








His wife and child, with almond eyes,
Look on in horrified surprise.


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While down the stairs like light he flies,
And soon, of course, as you surmise,
Bruised and sore on the floor he lies,
So hurt, indeed, he cannot rise.


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On pillows propped-a cruel tale-- "-'
He made his servants slide that rail; \ -- -
Some broke their crown, and some their shin,
To please this vengeful Mandarin!

"My my!" he laughed, in greatest glee,
"This is the finest sight to see;
It's far more fun to see them go,
Than 'tis to fall' yourself, you know!"





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TOO WARM A WELCOME.


Young Mr. Prim stepped in to see
The girl he thought he'd marry,


And while -she put up her back hair,
Did in the parlor tarry,
And there was entertained in style
By youngsters of that home;





is for EATING crackers and fish,
The Brownies think it a delicious dish.


is for FOOT BALL, in cities large and small,
The skill of the Brownie team is
known to all. ,


110 -, "






































GOING TO THE DINNER.

We are bound for a dinner, and here you may see
As jolly a party as ever could be.
The stork is delighted, so much so in fact,
He told all the children to jump on his back.
After they've traveled the country around,
Their Thanksgiving dinner they'll eat off the ground


~








THE FROG AFLOAT.


OH, a double life I lead;
And it's truly pleasure fine
To go sailing up and down
Like a sailor on the brine.


Though my boat is but a leaf,
And a barley-straw my oar,
I am never filled with fear
As I push away from shore.


Oh, my fingers I can snap
At a shipwreck; for, you see,
I am quite at home below,
And it's all the same to me I








THE LION AND APE.


One drop of gall will spoil the cup,
One tender corn make Croesus sad,
The greatest will in sorrow sup,
If just one upper tooth is bad.

There was a lion once, and he
Was called by all the king of beasts,
And one would think must happy be,
With palace caves and princely feast.

From mighty elephant to rat,
From sea to sea, from shore to shore,
To him all brutedom raised its hat,
And meekly trembled at his roar.

There was but one who did not fear
Nor own his wondrous majesty.
The monkey grinned from ear to ear,
Whene'er the king of beasts he'd see.

And when the king walked out in style,
In purple clad with golden crown,
The ape his very worst would smile,
Only to take his kingship down.

The lion ne'er could catch the sinner,
And so pretended not to see,








But this exasperating g-riancr
Took all the zest from majesty.


And so we find the grandest lot
Oft marred by one unsightly shape.
Where triumph is, content is not,
Because of one mean, grinning ape.


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is for GOLF, the fad of the season;
Only the swell Brownies know the reason.

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is for HIDE AND
dark
The Brownies come

rn--a


is an ICE BOAT, with
They sail along with a
pace.


SEEK; each evening after

out for a romp and a lark.


which the Brownies race,
merry song at a rapid


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(hey were happy and did laugh
then their friend, the big O(iraffe,
Said, I'll take you to the Tity,
in a tandem."
But their joy was turned to grief
tWhen their charger bit a leaf,
Never thinking how his sudden stop
would land 'em.









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NEGLECTING THEIR BUSINESS.

Three hens were after one poor bug,
'So very gaunt of limb,
So very thin was all his frame,
That you could see through him.


What foolish fowls! If
Divided among three,
This very thin bug, for
Scarcely a bite would


him they caught,

each of them,
be.


And if one hen just ate him all,
He was so very thin,
She would not know, when he was down,
Of anything within.


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What made this folly all the worse
(The truth must be confessed),


These three were setting hens, and each
Belonged upon her nest.







The chase went on, o'er hill and dale,
Past fences, streams and rocks,
When suddenly across their path
There loomed a wary fox.

And then, so changeable are hens,
They quickly changed their plan;
They cared no longer for thin bugs,
For home, sweet home, they ran.

The hunt was hot, but they escaped;
In home, sweet home, at rest,
At last each hen in quiet lay
Upon her egg-filled nest.

Quiet is not the word, I think-
Although it suits my verse;
They felt-the Rooster scolded so-
A fox could be no worse.


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THE DUCKS IN SCHOOL.


The ducks were such dunces that Dr. Drake thought
They really should reading- and writing be taught,
So he put on his spectacles, also his gown,
And wrote on his door
"The New School for Duck Town."


The ducks came. He placed them where all he could see,
But in vain tried to teach them their A, B and C.
So stupid were they that he sent them all back,
For he found they would answer himt
Nothing but "Quack!" ]





Sis for J U MPING, in weather cool,
The Brownies jump over a big toad stool.

















is a KITE, for the Brownies
to fly.
With a very long tail it sails
through the sky.,




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_.HISFIRS.T PAN TS.

HIS FIRST PANTS.







THE LATEST STYLE.


*Fox, wolf and bear, the shortest route,
Were off to town for a new suit,
Each quite resolved to buy none but
The very latest style of cut.
But when, rigged out, the wolf appeared,







Whoever saw him loudly jeered.
He'd got what no one else would use,
From cap part gone to matchless shoes,
(They did not match!) and, sad to tell,


All that they sold him was a sell.
Most shamefully he had been bit,
For not a single garment fit.
Every beast, from horse to monkey,


___ _


PA~~4rfi~CoX







Laughed and cried, "The wolf's a donkey."
And in the. hands of sharps the bear '-
No better than the wolf did fare.
His fits were bad, his watch was tin,


He, too, was sorely taken in.
They yell at him, as on he goes,
"Where, oh, where, did you get your clothes-
And, greeting him with mocking laugh,
"Ho, ha!" exclaim, "The bear's a calf."







1- The fox, as sharp as his sharp snout,
Knew just the place to get rigged out,
And soon appeared, a splendid swell,
Who caught the eye of every belle


















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And yet (how wicked people are)
His triumph, too, with jeers they mar,
(Who would suppose they'd be so rude?)
And after him they' all yell "Dude!"




is for LEAP FROG, with true Brownie knack,
Each Brownie leaps over another one's back.


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is for MUSIC by the Brownie band,
All who have heard them say it is grand.
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WE'S ALL GWINE SWIMMING.


WE'S ALL GWINE HOME.


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FORMIDABLE FRIENDS.

LION once was sick and weak,
His enemies all said,
"This is the very chance we seek,
We'll smash the lion's head."
They chose a moment when he dozed,
For once he took to flight;
He really \\as too indcispl:osed, "
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To be disposed to fight.
They followed him, thirsting for gore,
A river crossed his track,






An old rhinoceros near shore
Said, "Jump upon my back."
The lion quickly did so, then
His foes were left behind;
He grateful said, when safe again,
"I'll bear this deed in mind."


But to that angry company
It was exasperation;
SThey held a meeting near a tree,
To vent their indignation.
And resolutions then were framed,







As caustic as could be,
There the rhinoceros was named
A Public Enemy.
His character to shreds was torn,
gl Someone gave a thesis,
And proved, if caught at night
or morn,
He must be torn to pieces
'Twas long before they had their
wish,
And he on land did come;
He lingered with his friends, the fish,
The river seemed his home.
And when at last he came on shore,
Not knowing of their spite,
And they with screech and bark and roar
Gave the unequal fight.
The lion chanced to pass that way,
With half a roar, half laugh,
He, too, a part took in the
fray,
And scattered them like chaff.
In every place, they now
command,
No matter where they
loiter,







The lion is the boss on land,
The other in the water.


And thus these animals of sense
Combine to rule both elements.





is for NINE PINS, the best game of all.
A Brownie can knock them all down
with one ball. A


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is an OGRE, with
aspect most grim,
But the Brownies
are not a bit fright-
ened of him.











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A TALE OF WEAL AND WOE.

..- .. .-- ---. I have a tale of weal
"" -and woe;
L _! _-I_ Miss Bessie's ready, off
they go.
Was ever boy
could speed
so fast?
Were hedges e'er so
S quickly passed?


Was ever day so fine and breezy?
Did ever barrow run so easy?
No wonder that so gay they feel-
And now you have my tale of wheel.























But will the curve be safely passed?
Whoa! whoa! the pace is far too fast;
Upon that curve, while going round,
Miss Bessie's spilled upon the ground.

It is a very sudden stop;
They sadly pick the pieces up,
And homeward weeping see them go-
And now you have my tale of whoa


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A SLIP.


"Ye aged colored man be mine!"
The lion cried, "I do entreat."
The negro climbed that lengthy spine,
Not ready quite yet to be eat.

The former made a sudden grab,
But failed to seize what he designed;
But managed that thin tail to nab,
And like a comet sail behind.

But slipped the tail of that giraffe,
Sprawling lay the hungry rover-
























The darkey cried, with gleeful laugh,
"That's a slip that don't go over."




i is for POLE VAULTING, the object of which
Is to help little Brownies o'er fence, stump and
ditch. /i ,
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is for QUOITS, which are played on the lawn
By all the good Brownies each morning at dawn.


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THE LAZY PUSSY.

There lives a good-for-nothing cat,
So lazy, it appears,
That chirping birds can safely come
And light upon her ears.
The rats and mice can venture out
To nibble at he: toes,
Or climb around and pull her tail,
And boldly .scratch her nose.
Fine servants brush her silken coat
And give her cream for tea;-
Yet she's a good-for-nothing cat,
As all the world may see.


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A MOVING TALE,


N ELEPHANT so very big,
But all of him polite,
A donkey, too, so very small,
But all of him for fight,


Chanced to meet on a narrow bridge. "'.'
The elephant bowed low; '.' .'
"My friend," said he, "I plainly have 1
The right of way, you know; r. .
And that you cannot fail to see,
For I'm so far across."
"Because you're big, the donkey cried,
"You think you must be boss; "

But I'll not yield," and so with this
He boldly flapped his ears,
To show the elephant so great,
He had no craven fears.
The larger beast, quite patiently, ]
Tried reasoning with him.
The donkey only stiffer grew
In every stubborn limb.

"Ah! Mr. Elephant," he said,
"You think your case is proved;

































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But, don't you know, by argument

A donkey can't be moved?"







"Why, then," exclaimed the elephant,
"I something else will try."
He round the donkey wound his trunk
And threw the fool on high.


And thus the stubborn brute was moved,
He landed in a tree,
And hanging there until this day
His skeleton you'll see.







FULL MOON.


The Owl acts like one in a trance,
The Cricket can't lie still in bed,
The Daddies Long Legs wildly dance,


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And Mr. Frog has lost his head.
I'll tell the reason in my verse,
At full moon, lunatics are worse.




is for RACKET, by Brownies much played,
Although a most difficult game it is said.



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laugh with glee
Because one Brownie


BOARD,


was hit in the
you see.


the Brownies


eye


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THE ACCOMMODATING DONKEY.


Isn't this a cute little scene!

The goat is fond of leaves so green,

But cannot reach so high in air,

So stands the donkey patient there.

A lesson this for you, my man,

To do a kindness when you can.







THE FOREST BICYCLISTS.


OW for the race! The cycle rage
Has set the forest in a blaze.
Wolf, porcupine and bear so sage,
And all their friends have caught the craze.
When first they brought their wheels from town,
And tried the iron steeds to mount,
Such climbing up and tumbling down
Had almost turned them
inside out.
The bear said, mounting
with great care,
"I shall not fall, I will
be bound."
Another moment in the air, th a sc
Then prostrate he upon the ground.
The porcupine, with zest so keen,
Sprang on the wheel. "'Tis here I'll shine,"
He thought with pride, when that
Machine
Whirled round and round that
//' porcupine.
But thus the goal success we reach,
And though by many a trial
and fall,
The victory soon belonged to each,
As riders they are experts all.
Along they spin so easily,
And make such time when e'er
they try,







That e'en the birds you o'er them see,
Scarce travel faster as they fly.
Sometimes, e'en now, of course it's true,
When going fast and striking roots,


A rider feels a little blue,
As from the wheel he swiftly shoots.
But take the sport for all in all,
The animals have but one voice,
In spite of now and then a fall,
In bicycling they all rejoice.





































A DROP.

The bear in hammock swings in ease,
Reading the rise of meat in town.
Two monkeys play among the trees,
"Ha! ha!" they laugh, "bear meat is down."










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BEAR MEAT HAS A FALL.





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is for URCHIN,
who got in a rage.
To tame him, the Brownies
put him in a cage.


is a TANDEM, in racing attire,
The Brownies to break all records aspire.


































A FRIENDLY PAIR.
These two in company one day
Set out to hunt along the way.
The first remarked, "My part shall be
To chase whatever game may flee
For refuge to the river wide,
For swimming is my greatest pride l"
"And mine," replied the laughing bear,
"Shall be the part to chase whatever
For safety may ascend a tree,
For climbing is but fun for mel"

























SMALL DOG: "OH, HORRORS WHAT IS THAT?"


HE

L i


WHY 'THE BEAR GOT WELL.

bear was sick; an ugly pain
Had come and would not go.
Perhaps he had La Grippe, because
He ached from head to toe.


He called on Doctor Wolf to see
If he could get relief.
Of all the doctors in the land,
The Wolf was counted chief.
He felt old Mr. Bruin's pulse
With gravest kind of face,


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And said: "Your blood, my aged friend,
Goes at a frightful pace.
Had you not called me in, you'd be
Near to your latest breath;
With any other doctor here,


You soon would meet your death.
Some medicine with you I'll leave,
Just take it as I say,
'Twill ease your pain and make you well
Before the break of day."
But Doctor Wolf went off to tell







That morning would not fail
To find old Mr. -Bruin quite
As dead as a door nail.
Now all the animals around,
Knew that the rich old bear,
; ^______


Within his comfortable home,
Had lots of good things there;
So with the morning's dawning light,
They gathered at his door,
To carry each unto his home
Part of the dead bear's store.







Valises, bags and baskets big,
,And other things they brought-
Whatever could be made to hold
The prizes which they sought;
But when they gathered, everyone,
Bruin stuck out his head.
Said he: My friends, you may
perceive
I'm not so very dead!
I judge, of course, old Doctor Wolf
Did hasten round to tell
My doom was sealed; but yet,
you see,
I really am quite well.
I'm sorry 'tis not as you hoped,
And pity your regret;
But all my goodly winter stores
I'll need myself as yet. It

How did it come? When Doctor
Wolf
His visit here did make,
He judged my case, and left
with me
Some medicine to take."
The animals all (ried aloud:
"The greatest doctor he;
In all the world, like him
Another cannot be!"
"No, no," laughed Mr. Bruin, glad,
"I'm well in flesh and bone;
S:~ And this the reason surely is-
I _I left his stuff alone."





is a VOYAGE
in a yacht neat
and trim,


One Brownie
fell out, but they
soon rescued
him.


; ------~ --


is for WHEELING, the Brownies great pride
Is to make every day a century ride.












-4-4-
^Sa** ** .8*
:LA A*r t


~I3Yi "Ta


~idl











7\,







Sh e pretty blkck eyes of the little Field
molL5se.
Looked Far over the meadow one day,
And ke 5aic this sister Dont stay
in the house,
Let u.s travel." His sister said"Yea"
So they passed by white daisie5 and cardi-
nals red
Til they cime to the region of boss.
3 see that Rhis rass with brown tops5"
sister said.
TI lose are calE tal25 s5id one of the Frogs.
SHo! andI- a-l" auheJ the two lit-
tile mice,
Cats delis~t, in our innocent blood.
'i those really are ca tbils-kow aw-
Sfully nice ,
S \ ;All t}hoe cats must 'be stbc} in the mLrnd!








THE BEARS AND THE HONEY.


"Children," said the maternal bear,
"Our family are fond of honey,
But I wouldn't have you handle a hive,
Not for any amount of money.


In the depths of the woods, with no one near,
We love to eat the luscious comb,
But then, you know, all bees object
When bears set out to rob their home.


- L i --P







And when you think they're far away,
IAnd you can rest and take your ease,
"T Upon your track they're following fast,
The unrelenting, stinging bees.


And when you stop to lick your paw,
Or say that honey's just the thing,
They'll swarm around you like a cloud,
And then will come the awful sting;
I want you both to try right hard,
And never once be caught off guard."







The cubs replied: "0 mother, cease,
Your kind advice is all in vain,
This morning, had you said all this,
You might have saved a world of pain.

We got the hive, no doubt of that,
And started home so full of glee,
When all the air grew dark as night,
Beclouded by our enemy.

On nose and eyes and mouth and ears,
Each special foe did find a place;
Need we say more ?-just look at us,
And you will understand the case.

You might stand there from morn till eve,
And tell us what we shouldn't do;
A looking-glass, a running stream,
Could tell us that as well as you








A DINNER IN THE WOODS.


We are here in the woods, as you can see,
With turkey well roasted and Oolong tea.
Did ever rabbits enjoy such a treat?
And as a carver can Reynard be beat?


The bunnies and owl are as quiet as mice,
And the turtle, as hostess, is really quite nice.
But, alas! alas some farmer, we know,
Is weeping the loss of this turkey we show.


~?jl-L _







with wings .
and with
claws, which ,
carried the Brownies, to
see Esquimaux.





is YUCATAN,
a wonderful town,
Where, strange
to relate, all
the Brownies .
are brown.


Sis for ZANY, who ends my long rhyme
About little Brownies, who had such
a good time. a






























\-__






o i
UA-LL
__ L


- U _


~1~1


"T~P~S~S _C~~CII















CAUGHT BY A WHALE.


OD people in a country fair
Were harassed by a giant there;
He measured yards from side
to side,
And he was bad. as he was wide.
i Full twenty feet his height in all,
And he was mean as he was, tall;
He did not care a pinch of snuff,
Who starved to death, had he enough.
Where'er he went, the marks would be
Of his outrageous gluttony;
The skeletons of fish and beasts,
Remains of his stupendous feasts.
The farmers' corn was stacked with care,
The giant came, the field was bare;
They could not tell that any day
SHe would not come and bear away,







The fishermen would spread their net,
Then he rush in-not minding wet-


And striding off, with mighty limb,
Would take their precious catch with him.

'Twould take all night, were none omitted,
To tell the crimes that he committed.










From out the herd, the ox most fine,
On that and other things to dine;


'I,


: ;, ?


a4EIK


For this gigantic, heartless thief,
Had special liking for good beef.


~ 1-
rh" )
P
~L~F-~L I I
-ri.


*.


P/k ~--- ~i-








A shame it was, upon my soul,
He never worked, he only stole.

The only thing that was not vile
He ever did, was fish awhile.
He had his tackle quite complete,
And on a rock would take a seat.

And, though elsewhere impatient quite,
Quite patiently would wait a bite.
The fish that bit, he caught them all,
None were too large, and none too small.
"In fact," cried he, "within the sea
There is no fish can conquer me."
That sounded well, but there were yet
SFish in the sea he had not met.

While catching fish, he never thought
That by a fish he might be caught.
One day he felt a terrible tug,
And gave himself a quiet hug.

"Unless my sense of feeling lies,
This fish is one of monstrous size;
To get him safe on land will be
The greatest sport has come to me."

Upon his line there was a whale,
This time his judgment did not fail
Judgment regarding size, I mean,
But not regarding sport, I ween.







That bite, in spite of stalwart limb,
Proved anything but sport. for.him.


Another tug-"Ha, ha!" laughed he;
"" "He wants to pull me in the sea."

That was a joke with pleasant sound;
But catching whales no joke he found.











To make things sure, around his waist

He wound the line, in greatest haste.


-c=i~__
~__
._. ..;_s,
------- 1
t~---~--


The whale was off to distant seas,

And took the giant, too, with ease.


~

i~-k

---
--~s--







And gladly people watched them go,
And saw the last of their cruel foe.





050
-. ?*, -. -^ *s = ...!, .* i-!i. '_




























The giant roared. The whale the while
Enjoyed the fun and wore a smile.
/''ye th fu an oeasie







A DISAPPOINTED TENANT.

Seeking a home, a homeless bear
Went wand'ring here, went wand'ring there,


To find a house to let he meant,
And on a tree he found a rent







A hole so big, "'Tis quite the cheese,
This lonely bachelor to please,"
Did Bruin to himself remark.
"My home shall be behind that bark,
And there, as shielded by a charm,


Be free from fear and safe from harm.
And should a victim pass my way,
On whom I might dine well some day,
He'll not suspect my presence near,
Until I have him by the ear."








So in a trice he's in the tree,
And from the hole sharp watches he.
But sweetest joys may soon be past,
And fairest skies be overcast.
And so it proved was Bruin's fate,
Upon a hive of bees he sate.
It almost seemed like justice
grim,
Like retribution come
to him.
Of all the bears were
ever seen,
The greatest honey thief he'd
been.
By him stirred up-of course,
'tis plain-
These bees soon stirred him
up again.
And so, because of this
disaster,
,Through the hole he went
much faster;
Faster than he'd
clambered in,
SPoor, disappointed, angry
Bruin.








He ran as hard as he could go,
And yet his pace was far too slow;





"- r ,' . : .... .. ..... -. .
..,_~~~ ,'.' .< ..,l .+. ,r- (,. ,. l l~ -. ,? .! /
L ,, ,. 'I,., +. .. '







-. e7


'IIT
.l "n "Y' + nllm, LnN : n n~- -i ndi nn l .. -


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k++~Y .. _'




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.~ ) .,, .,
pP ..( : ,
,, ..r ,. .'.

,-+ '~ : ''?: 1
--u .. .... ,

'., i -.


.: -', . ; _.
L
_I__ ur" .,. .:: p,.


A thousand stings they gave in ire,
And Bruin felt as if on fire.


~







What made it worse, he caught a peep
Of a quintette of laughing sheep.












A BAD FIT.

-HE stork inherited some gold,
And thought it would be well
(Though friends might think
him rather bold)
To come out as a swell.

"A fine new suit I'll go and get-
A smaller bird than I
The swallow is, no doubt, and yet
A swallow tail I'll buy."

And so just as he said did he,
And made himself a fright,
The trowsers fitted him too free,
The coat was far too tight.

His* suit unto his friends he showed,
And said, "Just look on it,









This is the very latest mode,
I have a splendid fit."

They gazed on him with many a shout,













S /Vffj ~o i,







--






---2--. --^- *'-'A .... -----------



It really was too bad;
"You look, indeed," they all cried out,
"As if a Fit you've had."

























































A FRIENDLY VISIT.




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