Title: Clergy report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087305/00001
 Material Information
Title: Clergy report communication among the priests of the Archdiocese of New York
Physical Description: <30> v. : ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Catholic Church -- Archdiocese of New York (N.Y.)
Catholic Church -- Archdiocese of New York (N.Y.). -- Office of Pastoral Research
Publisher: Personnel Board, Office of Research of the Archdiocese of New York
Place of Publication: New York N.Y
Publication Date: 1971-<2000>
Frequency: irregular
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Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: No. 1 (Apr. 1971)-no. 6 (Nov. 1971) ; v. 1, no. 7 (Dec. 1971)-<v. 30, no. 3-4 (Oct./Nov. 2000)>
Numbering Peculiarities: Ten issues yearly, 1972-1989.
General Note: Last issue consulted: vol. 30, no. 3-4 (Oct./Nov. 2000)
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Bibliographic ID: UF00087305
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 61484484

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ONE AND MANY:
THE ETHNIC FACTOR IN CHURCH LIFE
Any suggestion that our ethnic and immigrant character is a
thing of the past is quickly dispelled when one looks at the
ethnic mix that continues to populate New York and the
figures for continuing migration. It is a safe estimate that one
half of the Catholics in the Archdiocese are Spanish-speaking.
According to one estimate, approximately 20,000 Italian
immigrants (legal and illegal) settle in the New York area each
year. The population of Chinatown has probably doubled in
the past five years. Some guesses put the number of Haitians in
the New York area at 150,000 to 200,000. It is clear, in other
words, that ethnic identity will continue to be significant for
the people of New York for some time and for those hoping to
serve these people. Table 1 gives some of the figures for
registered aliens in New York State.

If we add to the continuing immigration, which includes a
large percentage from Catholic countries, the still large
migration from Puerto Rico and the large migration of
American blacks from other parts of the country, we quickly
compose a picture of considerable ethnic diversity on a large
scale. It is to this phenomenon and its significance for the
church, as well as in response to the concerns of the
instruction Pastoralis Migratorum Cura, that Cardinal Cooke
asked the Office of Pastoral Research to devote some
attention. One major step in this effort was a working
conference "to explore the social dimensions of the church's
service to ethnic groups in the New York area," on March 1st.

In preparation for the conference, the Office of Pastoral
Research assembled some available data on the various ethnic
groups and asked people knowledgeable about some
twenty-five nationalities to prepare fact sheets on their
respective groups. Having received twelve such papers, the
Office distributed these to the participants at the conference
(see box) and conducted sessions that would sharpen our
understanding of a few central problems.

A Point of View
Among the factors that have made ethnic identity once
again an important context of group life have been:


1. the reaffirmation of black, brown and red identity
2. the new wave of immigration
3. the rediscovery of ethnicity among white blue-collar
workers.

What has emerged as a viewpoint, superseding the
"melting-pot" view has been the value of diversity. Simply put
we may say that the national motto, "e pluribus unum" is
being replaced by a view that says we are one and many.
Opening the conference, Cardinal Cooke acknowledged this
trend, which had suggested the theme for our conference,
when he quoted the words of Pastoralis Migratorum Cura:
"Migrating people carry with them their own mentality, their
own language, their own culture, their own religion. All of
these things are part of a certain spiritual heritage of opinions,
traditions and culture which will perdure outside the
homeland. Let it be prized everywhere." The cardinal went on
to remark, "In many ways, the direction taken in recent views
of the American enterprise parallels that taken in the religious
ecumenical movement. As in the work toward inter-church
unity, so in the American struggle, we have come to realize
that the truest unity is based on respect for our differences."
(See Documentation for the text of Cardinal Cooke's talk.)
TABLE 1
Aliens Who Reported Under the Alien Address
Program By State of Residence and Nationality
During 1970, New York State
Nationality Aliens


CHINESE
COLOMBIANS
CUBANS
CZECHS
DOMINICANS
ECUADORIANS
FILIPINOS
GERMANS
GREEKS
HAITIANS
HUNGARIANS
IRISH
ITALIANS
JAMAICANS
KOREANS
LITHUANIANS
POLES
PORTUGUESE
PUERTO RICANS
SCANDINAVIANS


19,499 (includes Taiwan)
23,221
47,482
3,416
49,489
14,763
3,476
35,221
19,779
15,761
4,713
20,842
94,962
35,509
1,891
1,685
25,520
4,238
U.S. Citizens
10,970*


*Danes 1,691
Finns 1,815
Norwegians 4,300
Swedes 3,164

TOTAL ALIENS REPORT ING.'1970
U.S. 4,247,377
N.Y. 717,222 ,
Source: 1970 Annual Report:" J
Immigration and Naturalization Service-Table 34





Conference Considerations


The conference, held at the Brotherhood in Action Building
in New York City, focused on three issues:

1. the current scope and problems of immigration,
including the problem of illegal aliens
2. efforts at ethnic community development and the access
of ethnic groups to public services
3. the language and cultural factor: programs for learning
English and services in the cultural forms and languages
of the newcomers.

Current Immigration

As one U.S.C.C. publication has described it current
immigration means that the equivalent of a full parish of new
Catholics is added to the country every four days. Table 2
gives a record of recent immigration into the country.


TABLE 2
Immigrants, By Country of Birth:
1960 to 1970
(For years ending June 30)


Country

All countries........
EuropeI ...................
Austria ................
Belgium ...........
Czechoslovakia ....
Denmark .............
Finland..............

France................
Germany.............
Greece................
Hungary..............
Ireland................

Italy...................
Netherlands.........
Norway...............
Poland ..............

Portugal...............
Rumania .............
Spain...................
Sweden..............

Switzerland .........
United Kingdom..
U.S.S.R ............
Yugoslavia...........

Asia.........................
2
China............
Hong Kong..........
India..... ...........
Japan...................
Jordan .............
Korea................
Philippines...........

North America .......
Canada .............
Mexico .............
West Indies..........
CubaI .............
Dominican
Republic......
Jamaica...........
Central America..


1960 1965


265,398
139,670
1,970
1,066
2,391
1,495
754

4,253
31,768
3,797
7,257
7,687

14,933
5,070
2,533
7,949

6,968
993
1,737
2,351

1,896
24,643
2,472
2,742

24,071
3,681
475
391
5,471
536
1,507
2,954

85,075
30,990
32,684
14,047
8,283

756
1,340
6,450


296,697
114,329
1,680
1,005
1,894
1,384
669

4,039
24,045
3,002
1,574
5,463

10,821
3,085
2,256
8,465

2,005
1,644
2,200
2,411

1,984
27,358
1,853
2,818

19,778
4,057
712
582
3,180
702
2,165
3,130

126,729
38,327
37,960
37,583
19,760

9,504
1,837
12,423


1969 1970


358,579
120,086
758
420
3,307
635
327

2,024
9,289
17,724
1,795
1,989

23,617
1,303
636
4,052

16,528
1,435
3,916
722

691
15,014
931
8,868

73,621
15,440
5,453
5,963
3,957
2,617
6,045
20,744

132,426
18,582
44,623
59,395
13,751

10,670
16,947
9,692


373,326
118,106
888
522
4,520
602
483

2,477
9,684
16,464
1,770
1,562

24,973
1,457
539
3,585

13,195
1,768
4,139
722

1,051
14,158
912
8,575
92,816
14,093
3,863
10,114
4,485
2,842
9,314
31,203

129,114
13,804
44,469
61,403
16,334

10,807
15,033
9,343


Country

South America .......
Argentina............
Brazil.................
Colombia.............
Ecuador...............

Africa......................
Australia and
New Zealand .......
Other countries........


1960 1965 1969 1970


13,048
2,878
1,399
2,989
1,576


30,962
6,124
2,869
10,885
4,392


23,928
3,938
1,713
7,627
5,086


21,973
3,433
1,919
6,724
4,410


2,319 3,383 5,876 8,115

912 1,066 1,878 2,280
303 450 764 922


1Includes countries not shown separately.
2 Includes Taiwan.
3Includes Arab Palestine.
Source: Dept. of Justice, Immigration and Naturalization Service: 1970
Annual Report, Table 133, and releases.

While all of these people do not settle in New York, it is
evident that New York remains a prime area of new
settlement.

Besides the continuing scale of immigration, it is important
to know what services are available for the problems of
immigrants. There are numerous public and private services,
though many of the private services charge high fees to handle
immigration problems. Many of the national groups maintain
their own offices to assist immigrants from their home
countries. These can be found in the telephone directories or
by contacting the Office of Pastoral Research and Cyril
Potocek of the Bishops' Resettlement Committee. In addition,
there is excellent service available at the U.S.C.C. Migration
and Refugee Services at 204 Park Avenue South, under the
direction of Edmund Cummings.

The problem of illegal aliens is a serious one of unknown
but large dimensions. Thousands of Haitians, Dominicans,
Colombians, Chinese, Italians and others illegally remain hete
or illegally take employment here. In national terms the most
serious problem is that of Mexican Americans who constitute
97 per cent of all those deported because of illegal status.
(Given the special character of the problem here, Philip
Mumion responded to an invitation to testify on the matter at
Congressional hearings conducted in New York. For this
testimony, see Documentation.) What emerged in the
conference is that this is an extremely complicated matter and
that exploitation of the problem by certain newspapers and
politicians does little to serve the alien or the poor American
who is unemployed. The U.S.C.C. is able to handle certain
"hardship cases" in which aliens may be able to regularize
their status. For problems of this kind, one may contact Mr.
Cummings at the Migration and Refugee Services (475-5400).

Community Development and
Social Service

Development has become the watchword for social progress
among the poor and the disadvantaged. Public and private
agencies must provide extensive services, but the demands of
human dignity require that people be given the opportunity to
help themselves. This was the tone of the second conference
session. The potential and problems of such development were
aired. (continued on page 4)
(continued on page 4)








CONFERENCE PARTICIPANTS


Attending the conference on migrant ethnic groups were
representatives from:
U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service
U.S.C.C. Migration and Refugee Services
U.S.C.C. Spanish-Speaking Office
N.Y.S. Division on Human Rights
Dioceses of Brooklyn, Rockville Centre and Newark
N.Y.C. Mayor's Office for Ethnic Affairs
Archdiocese of New York divisions:
Spanish-Speaking Apostolate
Italian Apostolate
Catholic Charities
Institute for Human Development
Adult Basic Education
Language Institute for Inter-Cultural Communication
Bishops' Resettlement Committee
Office for World Justice and Peace
Superintendent of Schools Office


And representatives of the following ethnic organizations:
American Fund for Slovak Refugees
Catholic Society of the Philippines
American Committee'for Italian Migration
German Society of the City of New York
St. Ansgar's Scandinavian Catholic League
Cuban Catholic Center
Comite Catolico Cubano
Armenian Apostolate, N.Y.
American Irish National Immigration Committee
Albanian Apostolate, N.Y.
Congress of Italian American Organizations
Hungarian Catholic League
and other churches devoted to specific national groups, including
the Chinese, Haitian, Croatian, Lithuanian, and other peoples.


DOCUMENTATION


Statement of his eminence, Terence Cardinal Cooke, at the
opening of the Migrant Conference sponsored by the Office of
Pastoral Research March 1st, 1972
At the very dawn of ancient Greek philosophy there stands the
towering figure of a wise man named Heraclites. We do not really know
so very much about him, but we know that he meditated long and hard
about the mystery of reality and found the secret of all being consisted
in the constant change he noted around him. All things are in flux -
was his motto and his teaching, and he would have been convinced
that he was correct if he lived in our times!
Today's world is truly a world in flux. Movement is the soul ot the
reality we see around us. All things are changing, moving, developing,
giving birth and dying. We have only to open our eyes to see the world
around us and we can be sure that it is marked by mobility that it is a
world filled with things and people on the move.
The Archdiocese of New York, which covers three of the five
boroughs of New York City and stretches into the suburban and rural
parts of New York State, is a place in which this mobility takes place in
an increasingly high degree. Neighborhoods change, dissolve and are
re-created, immigrant groups enter, change the ecological pattern of a
community and then either move on or change in a process of
adaptation and even assimilation.
How does the Church in New York best serve its people in the midst
of this demographic activity. Its two fold purpose is changeless it
exists to foster the relationship between God and man, and between man
and his neighbor. In the transitional patterns of community structure in
the Archdiocese and indeed beyond in the vast metropolitan area of
which it is a part how does the Church today serve the Lord and the
family of man He has gathered within this comer of His creation?
The Church has always been engaged in this problem of people on
the move and many documents of the modern Church have pointed to
it with great concern and clarity. A recent instruction on the Pastoral
Care of Migrant People quoted the Fathers of the Second Vatican
Coucil to this effect: "One cannot deny that there are many hazards
and difficulties which are often amplified by the great size of the
(present) migrations.... One should call to mind particularly the
tensions due to economic inequality, the conflicts proceeding from
differences of mentality and tradition, and, with respect to the
fundamental rights of the person, every type of discrimination, whether
social or cultural, whether based on sex, race, color, social condition,
language or origin, and finally historical prejudice and political or
ideological intolerance." (Instruction, No. 3)
The Church leaves no doubt where it stands with regard to the rights
of the migrants, as in another place, we find the clear message:
"Migrating people carry with them their own mentality, their own
language, their own culture, and their own religion. All of these things
are part of a certain spiritual heritage of opinions, traditions and culture
which will perdure outside the homeland. Let it be prized highly
everywhere. Not the least of its right to consideration is the mother
tongue of emigrant people, by which they express their mentality,
thoughts, culture and spiritual life." (Instruction, No. 11)
This conference meets here today to take a look at the world in


motion that is the area in which we live and work in 1972. Its
organizers have given it the designation One and Many because it is our
conviction that it is in a quest for unity and diversity that the solutions
of many of our present social problems will be found.
Our nation today remains enriched by a diversity whose heritage
proved too substantial to be washed away on the shores of immigration.
Numerous developments in recent years have furthermore made us
reflect on some of the underestimated qualities of our backgrounds.
The "new immigration" which brings thousands from every part of the
world to this country each year, the recovery of black, brown and red
identity, the resurgence of what has been called the "ethnic American,"
have led us to what one author has termed the "rediscovery of
diversity." In many ways, the direction taken in recent views of the
American enterprise parallels that taken in the religious ecumenical
movement. As in the work toward inter-church unity, so in the
American struggle, we' have come to realize that the truest unity is
based on respect for our differences.
We cannot delude ourselves, into the pursuit of unity that entails
destroying our distinctive traits, nor can we pursue our separate
interests without concern for the common good and the interests and
needs of others. We cannot simply impose on others our own styles and
fashions, nor can we ignore our interdependence in establishing a world
in which all peoples can live and grow.
In this sense, America has been attempting a union of peoples that is
not simply an assembly of delegates but a true community.
If this challenge to be both one and many is our commitment as a
people, surely New York bears a unique share of the burden because of
the unique complexity of this metropolitan area. We have come here to
seek help toward a better understanding of the situation and needs of
many of the ethnic groups who are still struggling to find their place in
the American scheme while retaining the best of their heritage.
Today you will address yourselves to the current scope and
problems of immigration, the prospects and difficulties of both
deriving support from your separate cultural organizations and gaining
access to the rights and services to which all are entitled, and to the
specific requirements for language services that will enable members to
learn English and at the same time to have certain services, especially
religious ones, in their own languages. Obviously, we cannot hope to
solve any one of these problems in such a short meeting, but I am
confident that many clearer concepts and worthwhile recommendations
will result from your discussions which will be helpful to us all.
I am grateful for all the help you have given us in our concern to
serve the people of New York better. I am also grateful for the presence
of representatives from the United States Catholic Conference and from
federal and local government agencies.
I welcome the presence of representatives from neighboring
Dioceses and of all the communities and associations who have joined us
here. United in the determination to serve the members of God's
human family in this part of the world more totally and more
effectively, may we with God's help be enlightened and strengthened
by one another through this day's conference and those to whicl it
gives rise in the future.


-3-






TESTIMONY BEFORE THE HEARINGS CONDUCTED
BY THE HOUSE SUBCOMMITTEE ON IMMIGRATION AND
NATIONALITY, COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY
*.X, OWEiW.YOR K, MARCH, 1 9, 972 w 'o "

Mr. Chairman, my name is Fatier Philip fMornigonianda i!am the
Executive Secretary of ith OQf.ki of Pdluall, Re.carih ofqTthe
Archdiocese of Nen York and 1irh Lio.p:ak to the iuc otl.llegal alien
on behalf of that olfice for ithlw rhdKiv.LSic. tplh ihe,' iafl lIt
pastoral concern of the Archdinoeee "nd the origin, uf our almost I o
million members in the kjies% of pat imniggr.nir \h' ',Iinle seeking
political and economic freedom make II imperllive IGi iir s- tpeAtk to
this issue. It was also becJaue ol our .on.erf for reopl wiiHili bl liable
home conditions thad wd aere led to eond ei a'cdrrferent- i-nS a 'rek
ago, under the auspi'es ol Cardinal (ooke, to conoder the'Church',
service to these people, includmg the tUegaliaens. iiiul to a.,w)

'Iruughou..hI rhe- radiocehe bui espeiitiUi tt hel!greaiter New York
Cit area our. pritetl nd .ilte s have ;oulthd the plight of those whose
ne-d ,nd insecure poillion bring them to ihe church in search of help.
Living in fear of discovery and exposed to all the risks that ensue from
having no legitimate status, so many of these people face the
alternatives of insecurity here or political and economical desperation
in their home countries. V -i T ,

yjl I Pqntihat 4in ty ptwaiseowaytA alarifyEthe extentof tile pitiblIti
-ej;Wiint Ne* York..Tioithermore. .tuoild urge iti.c te committee acrt t
h. oice..of reason,milhi entire matl n. Too many poout ar e dramati-
callj as.ertmg statisti itfor thioh-thoy can prorvid no ditoedmentatidn.
Some. like Assembl ymn .ndrew Stein ofNe"w Yorjk hale qnfortunate-
ly yielded to the temptpLiion 6f irre ponibiliti b) .rging llui illegal
lfen,' tknou~. increa-ir Ile 'osls df public. assisianci li Lhc fN'e\ York
tfl\yt'r I wouldd hopL tha this comnmilice \quld speak out g.muit
htbh t-'pdiitaion .f l'thi' i:ie. ande,,cntril- or fhe people qy.ojve ,
tVIll -, ag.minr ltnd r' rnPiJtJitmn 't, ut' tiie plight uf the illegal .alcn .si a
Bs'ap'rgoar for our f.dalurt to sole the problipm of' our o n Aaor(ii in
pdbr whote Ci.onopiiWb 'nd' octall nrirgiinilil will ri.:.1 be soled 'hen
t'he tinblhtm o1 the illegal alibn has 6een surcr-lsfull% d.Jal wilh.

sil fi o;: ,fjtiili rli'ui1'-'',)irr i -el:,fol :tow 'rf[ ;ni A .iirinLvom
Social.,Setrvie.I {f'wi tianedl '() o} *jmoa 'r/uri 5W sigsairic ns::jn .nA
Already recogni.'ng this dire'ion ror social popramming
ire the efforls o'.ir ou'n"Caiholic Cih titles nd Insttlut. p r
Human Deaeelopmerrt. as well aJ the natiinalconfetence -or
IBaiholil Charties and Oarnpaigph fbr -Human Development.
through these mechanisms,' already millions ,or do &4M~y,
been directed, to loajl community, development projects. In
recent year~srwbi~et te hnic ginups have followed the lead, of
bt gcks na4 g Ri." P (can groups in organinillg themselves, for
collectwe-self-development While thls'rrovwment contlains the
seedr 'of corflicr amorig tl.,ic- groups wid th h'e s4re problems
an* iptu astwima ll hope that such oigantzg efft)rts will
become the foundation Ifor coalitions'aknong'groups n'ov t1
tdd i wi-th each othlr It wa 'clear in the discussion that such
.oalittiqs ,ill not b' easily. o ~i. .d'land will i'equirq the tirelet
waord ofIani.peopll8!dediaated to promotion-of humane life
for atl: At one point a representative or the Mjaobr" Office For
Eltinid Arfairs rpmeiioied h. thL' ,th onl'' community.
orglnr.ationfito marnr ethnic groups s.the local dchurch.Iwhich
led'the participail-tL) suggetl wr'vV tdial'i e MaVo6r't f Office in
its concern for coinmnuri' development lund local c'fhurches
ol flli'fn(h flf- ni i- i-s. l vi cr uo' qri i! .EqiOf '1 o'1 Jt lulT) 0F. nIe I
. Acoess to puhlc.-services. re1uireTai iifuhi'etter avaTlabilir
o'p~H~onn'el' k'hb ch k peak the 0a fua .s 'dF the' lit tle: O'ne
effort that can be made b\ local groups, therefore is to
*J l I . > t .[- 911 *-" : ,
ayQ;.L'ae uckh, service ,p, te part of.publi ,agenpEfs and to
A~ganine v.'ulutnteergiwhoa.can powith thuse. needing service to
tu slkte fdr'them and'".ssls the'r in getting'the service thel
I- , , I . I I ', .. I
Iff'i- Y.1'l ;.' i-I ?"y iSt { j n JO+I Th I[ 0 ')f"[ ,(i 1
101 iui 'if 'jfl i .'J&h f'


Further, by way of prologue, may I urge this committee to stimulate
examination by this country and its corporate leaders on our
responsibility regarding the economic distress of countries in which
American business is reaping profit. This obviously is a complicated
matter also requiring intense study, but, as we have found with regard
to China, we cannot simply shut our doors on the struggle for life that
is taking place in other countries, particularly in our own hemisphere.

Specifically, then, Mr. Chairman, I wish to affirm our basic support
for present immigration law and acknowledge the current latitude
within administrative v6b'caleres for dealing with certain hardship cases
and instances where aliens have acquired what has been called equity in
our society. In this respect, we would recognize that steps must be
taken to avert a recurrence of the present situation in which people
from other countries have been led to believe that they can sidestep the
law with impunity and essentially undermine the orderly administration
of immigration policy.

Finally, I urge the committee to consider the enactment of
legislation or procedure which will

1. broaden the category of political refugee, as you yourself, Mr.
Chairman, propose in HR 1532
2. establish limited terms for amnesty for those aliens now residing
in thi, country and who do not enjoy the right to work but are
adt }lwmltingiAinsIainrtds where:
t" A. dA, have beeehere for some considerable time
B. members of theu immediate families are legally here
C. they contribute some skilled service to our society or
:d 'D. return homenwould entail serious political hardship

I reallre ihar such procedure,. whether enacted by law so that they
will be guaranteed as Father Bevilacqua has suggested or written into
adnministrmve procedures would have to be subject to some
'rtrminaridh 'date after which such exceptions to the strict
administration of the law would not be made.
r I 1ij- i- t i ini i
I am glatelul to you for permitting me to testify.
S i t U

wi, ,lii ') :i:,d' Language and Cultural Service

' About 20Oadults take part in some Adult Basic Education
programs sponsored by the Archdiocese each semester.
Prommnept in. these programs is the teaching of English as a
second language. Sister Mary Malone, coordinator for the
Archdiocese, noted that since these programs depend on
volunteer teachers, they cannot always provide teachers who
speak all the languages of the students. Further development
of such 'programs remains a need for the local boards of
education arid for the parishes in the Archdiocese. A list of
centers sponsored by the Archdiocese is available from Sister
iMary M.alone at 33 East 50th Street. A list of New York City
Boatd'i of' Education programs is available from The Adult
E'dica'iior 'Act, Office of Continuing Education, 130 Clinton
Street. Room 700, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (Tel.
596- A57 r
yidi oo LS,,' ip--

'In addition to English courses, however, there remains a
need' o0 services in the languages and respect for the cultural
heritage of the newcomers. Such services are needed not only
torillCaW folbeffective worship among the newcomers but also
as'amdijot resource during the difficult period of adjustment
fo!] i g,, trmigration. In the Archdiocese, there are 97
parishs~ies? vhereMass is offered regularly in Spanish and 29
parisfieiWhere':rgular participation in the Eucharist in Italian
isavailable, Whai remains necessary is a directory of all the
services, available in lhe.vajioum languages.
i I 'fo i t A J IF, ;4 ooio L *.'>Iii i 01 '",)i >,.lb






AREA ASSOCIATIONS


There is no permanent solution to the national parish
question. At the conference, Joseph Fitzpatrick, S.J. from
Fordham University noted the dilemma of national parishes.*
On the one hand people need a center of common life and
worship but on the other, we must avoid fragmentation and
recognize that population groups constantly shift throughout
the Archdiocese. Anthohy Bevilacqua of the Brooklyn Diocese
cited one parish in Astoria whose people speak 22 languages as
an indication of the impossibility of setting up a separate
parish for each language group. It was agreed at the
conference that whatever approach is taken, those who speak
some langauge other than English should have the opportunity
to assemble for worship and fraternity without being made to
feel that they are a marginal or inferior group within the
parish. Not only must there be services in their languages, but
the setting of the service and the manner of receiving these
people must reflect their place as an integral part of the parish.

The Work Ahead

Continuing efforts to recognize the distinct national groups
among the Spanish-speaking, to provide for the new wave of
Haitian immigrants, to ensure service to all the other ethnic
groups still immigrating into our area, and to make available
information relative to the services the newcomers need
remains the responsibility of the Archdiocese. This task will
apparently be with us as long as there is a New York and a
Catholic Church in New York.

*Excerpts from Joseph Fitzpatrick's comments on national parishes
and the Puerto Rican experience will appear in the May issue of Clergy
Report.



OFFICE OF CHRISTIAN AND
FAMILY DEVELOPMENT


In April we will begin visiting the parishes which have
requested the services of a Religious Education
Coordinator. These Coordinators have been interviewed,
tested and recommended.

Any Pastor interested in obtaining the services of a
Coordinator is invited to speak with us or to request a
Pastor's application. We ask every Pastor who has a
prospective Coordinator in mind to please refer him or her
to us for an interview and testing. This is done to insure the
quality of religious education; the level of professional
competence of the Coordinator and as a protection for the
parish. There is no cost to the parish for this service.

Contact: Sister Ita P. Devitt
33 East 50th Street
New York, N.Y. 10022
(212) 759-1400 Ext. 340


Confirmation

Minutes from the Area Associations' meetings indicate that
parishes are moving toward an older age for confirmation and
require some positive signs of Christian commitment and
maturity.

Northeast Bronx At the January meeting, the general
consensus was to favor reception of Confirmation at an older
age, and that every parish should delay its reception as far as is
practical.

Upper Manhattan February meeting included reports on
various programs. Incarnation works with seventh graders,
regards regular attendance at Sunday Mass an essential sign of
real maturity and preparation for Confirmation. Good
Shepherd holds a series of three meetings with parents to
involve them with youngsters and to up-date their own
understanding of the Sacrament. St. Rose plans social meetings
and uses as a criteria for readiness those who clearly value
the Eucharistic Liturgy. St. Jude's and St. Catherine's work
with parents using visual media.



Workshop on
PASTORAL MINISTRY
for Clergy, Religious and Laity


Sponsored by: The Sisters Council and the National
Assembly of Women Religious


Topics: Pastoral Ministry: Its Nature and Various
Forms
Philip Murion, Office of Pastoral
Research
Team Ministry in Action
Total Parish Religious Education
The Ministry of Prayer
Women and Ministry


When: Sunday, April 23, 1972
2-5 p.m.


Where: St. Philip Neri
3025 Grand Concourse (East 202nd Street)
Bronx, N.Y.


For information contact:
Sisters Communication Center
32 East 51st Street
(Tel. 759-1400 ext. 349)


National Parishes?






PARENTS AND BAPTISM ASCENSION PARISH


Ascension Parish is on Manhattan's upper west side with a growing
parish membership of Spanish-speaking people. James Flanagan, a priest
of the parish, describes the growth of this program for parental
preparation for the sacrament of Baptism. Since most of the requests
for Baptism come from the Spanish-speaking group, the classes are
conducted in Spanish. Baptisms are held every Saturday and at Sunday
Mass once a month.


For most members of the Church the final words of St.
Matthew's gospel, "Go, make disciples of all nations, and
baptize them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and
of the Holy Spirit," are very familiar ones that speak of the
basic mission of the Church. Christian instruction, and
preparation for baptism has always been a vital concern of the
Church's ministers in handing on to others and in nourishing
the faith they have received. We are familiar with the lengthy
catechumenate which took place in the early Church to
prepare candidates for baptism into the new life of faith at the
Easter service. Children too were baptized in the faith of the
community, proclaimed for them by their parents and
godparents. Throughout the early years of a child's life, it is
the faith of the parents that sustains the child and allows him
to share in the life of the Church. This role of the parents as
the ones who transmit their own faith to their children
through baptism encourages us to provide suitable preparation
for the parents before the celebration of the sacrament takes
place.


Like many parishes, Ascension has tried to accomplish this
task through a single preparatory class on the Friday night
before the baptism, under the direction of a lay catechist from
the parish. But one class or meeting on a busy Friday evening
cannot attempt to deal with as many aspects of Baptism as a
sacrament of initiation as we would like to. The set-up of the
class did not leave much room for personal introductions,
discussion, and casual conversation with the families; and so,
the atmosphere became more formal and business-like than
necessary. In the beginning of January, we began a series of
three conferences for the parents to help them prepare more
fully for the reception of the sacrament and the responsibility
that the baptism of their children brings with it. These
conferences are mandatory for all parents requesting baptism
for their children.


The series of conferences begins each Friday night with a
class for both parents that gives a general understanding of the
Christian life, the Scriptures, man's communication with God
through the Church and the sacraments, the role of each
Christian as a witness to Christ in the world, and the
obligations of each Christian. In many ways, this first meeting
with the parents helps to break the ice and establishes a good
rapport with the couples. The fear of coming to "classes" is
dispelled and a genuine interest begins stirring.


The following Wednesday evening, two Cenacle sisters,
involved in the pastoral effort of the parish, greet the parents
at the Ascension Retreat House, the former residence of the
Christian Brothers, for the second meeting. With the use of a
short but very impressive film, Baptism-The Sacrament of
Belonging*, we examine the human need all people feel for
belonging and acceptance in a community and the work of the
sacrament in providing such entrance into the community of
the Church. The setting of this session is a more informal and
relaxed one that resembles a gathering of friends in someone's
living room. With more opportunity for conversation, the
participants start to open up and begin to share ideas with one
another. The evening ends with coffee 'and cake and an
invitation to come back again.

When the parents, accompanied by the godparents, come
for the final class with one of the parish priests, they are ready
for a more immediate preparation for the sacrament itself. A

description of the different parts of the rite sometimess
illustrated with a filmstrip on Baptism*) is the central part of
this last meeting. It is also a forum for questions and answers,
further explanation of various ideas previously presented, and
private conversations with couples.


Begun in January, our expanded baptismal catechumenate
is showing itself rewarding and successful. The enthusiasm of
the parents at the entrance of their child into the family of the
Church and their own realization of their part in it attest to
this. Staying in touch with these families and maintaining
personal contact is, of course, the difficult task of the parish
priests.


It is our intention that these meetings will serve to remind
the parents that they are, in the words of the Second Vatican
Council, "the first and foremost educators of their children.
Their role as educators is so decisive that scarcely anything can
compensate for their failure in it." It is our hope that this
program will encourage a greater interest and enthusiasm not
just to keep the faith, but to spread it.

*Baptism The Sacrament ofBelonging, a Telecheticts film put out by
Franciscan Communications in Los Angeles, Calif
Baptism The Sacrament of Resurrection, Thomas S. Klise, Peoria,
Ill.
These films may also be obtained on loan from the CCD-Family Life
Office of the Archdiocese






PASTORAL LIFE


AN EVALUATION OF PROGRAMS

PASTORAL LIFE CONFERENCE QUESTIONNAIRE
Distribution of Responses

Years Ordained
1-5 5-10 10-20 20-30 30+ Total

Attended No Courses,
Study Weeks or 9 9 17 5 14 54
Study Seminars
Attended General Courses** 10 15 26 11 19 81
Study Seminar 0 1 3 0 3 7

Study Week 4 4 8 4 2 22

Pastors Course** 0 0 3 20 23 46
Clergy Conference 12 11 11 10 18 62
Total Responding* 21 25 47 28 45 166

*One did not indicate years ordained.
**Most attended in the last two years.

The above table represents the answers of the 167 priests
who replied to the recent questionnaire of the Pastoral Life
Conference sent to over 1,000 diocesan priests. The response
came from 60 Pastors, 77 Associate Pastors, 12 Teachers, and
16 in other work. (Two did not indicate their category).

In the specific comments regarding the various programs,
the Pastor's Course and the General Courses of Study were
considered helpful or very helpful by those who had attended
them. Many indicated a desire for increased emphasis on
liturgy, preaching, scripture and catechetics. There were
several requests for guidance in reading material. Among the
criticisms, some found the time unfavorable or the courses too
spread out.

The study weeks were also favorably received, especially by
those ordained under ten years or over thirty. The major
drawback expressed by many was that they found it hard to
be away from their parish for an entire week.

The Annual Clergy Conference received the greatest
diversity of opinions regarding its value. The numbers were
almost evenly divided among those who found it useful and
those who found it of little use. Recommendations included
making the topic more practical, more stress on liturgy,
catechetics and moral problems. Some saw ITV as a better way
to approach the Conference.

Regarding priestly spirituality, only a few of those
responding indicated that they thought a House of Prayer was
necessary. Almost all stressed the importance of the annual
retreat for priests with many desiring a greater variety of
formats for these retreats. A significant number would like to
see more use made of the Seminary for these retreats.


CONFERENCE


In the comments expressed on the whole system of
educational programs offered by the Pastoral Life Conference,
the general consensus was that these programs should
continue. Suggestions included: Study Days on a specific
pastoral topic; more practical courses with the parish priest in
mind; courses to update the average priest in recent
developments in fields of dogma, moral and scripture; more
courses in liturgy and preaching; more use of ITV; granting of
credits toward a degree. The most persistent negative comment
was that the time makes attendance difficult.

Charles S. Kelly


SOME RECENT BOOKS OF INTEREST

In reply to the questionnaire sent out by the Pastoral Life
Conference a number of priests requested guidance in the area
of selecting books which might be of help to them in their
parish ministry. In response to this desire a bibliography of
recent books favorably received by priests has been prepared.
An additional bibliography will be offered in the next issue of
Clergy Report.

Any recommendations of other books which you feel
would be of interest to your fellow priests would be
appreciated. Your suggestions may be directed to Rev. Charles
S. Kelly, 472 West 142nd St., N.Y., N.Y., 10031.

Books especially recommended are marked with an asterisk.

*Gregory Baum, Man Becoming: God in Secular Experience.
Herder and Herder, $6.95
*Gunther Bornkamm,Paul. Harper and Row, $7.50
*Raymond E. Brown, Priest and Bishop. Paulist Press, paper,
$1.50
James Coriden, Ed., The Once and Future Church. Alba
House, paper, $3.95
L. Harold De Wolff, Responsible Freedom: Guidelines for
Christian Action. Harper and Row, $10
Avery Dulles, SJ., A History of Apologetics. Corpus
Instrumentorum and Westminster Press, $9.95
Jacques Ellul, The Meaning of the City. William B. Eerdmans,
$5.95
Alvin Gouldner, Coming Crisis of Western Sociology. Avon,
paper, $3.95
James M. Gustafson, Christian Ethics and the Community.
Pilgrim Press, $7.95
Monika Hellwig, What Are The Theologians Sayings. Phflaum
Press, paper, $1.50
*John J. Kirvan, Ed., The Infallibility Debate. Paulist Press,
paper, $1.95
Hans Kung, Infallible, An Inquiry. Doubleday, $5.95
*Richard R. Niebuhr, Experimental Religion. Harper and
Row, $5.95
*Henri J.M. Nouwen, Creative Ministry. Doubleday, $4.95
(continued on page 8)






bibliography (continued)


- r I A 4 :


Robert Ochs, S.J., God Is More Present Than You Think.
RETKI A OR PRIESTS 1972
Paulist Press, paper, 754 RETOR PRIESTS 1972
Huub Oosterhuis, Prayers, Poems and Songs. Herder and ,. ..; ., i. 'j
Herder, $4.95 San l fonso Retreat House
Joseph Papin, Ed., The Dynamic In Christian Thought. 755 Ocean Avenue
Villanova University Press, paper, $595 '. We End. Long Branch
Permanent Deacons in the United States. United States (k, 0cr o1 eY, Jersey 07740
Catholic Conference, Washington, D.C., paper, 954 el: 201222-2731)
Karl Rahner, Do You Believe in God. Deus Books, paper, 954
*Joseph Ratzinger, Introduction to Christianity. Herder and Dates: May 8 11
Herder, $6.50 May 29 June 1
*T.M. Schoof, A Survey of Catholic Theology, 1800-1970, June 12 15
Paulist Press, paper, $4.95 June 19 22
*F.J. Sheed, What Difference Does God Make. Sheed, paper, Sept. 11 14
$2.95 Sept. 18 21
Philip Slater, Pursuit of Loneliness: American Culture at the Sept. 25 28
Breaking Point. Beacon Press, paper, $2.45 Oct. 2 5
*David M. Stanley, Faith and Religious Life, A New Oct. 23 26
Testament Perspective. Paulist Press, paper, $1.50
William Stringfellow and Anthony Towne, Suspect Tender- Each Retreat will engage
ness. Holt Rinehart, Winston, $5.95 one or more Retreat Masters.
Michael Taylor, S.J., Ed., Sex: Thoughts for Contemporary Retreats begin on Monday
Christians. Doubleday, $5.95 at 8:30 pm and end on the
following Thursday with lunch at noon.

Dr. Philip Cristantiello whose article "Human Factors Retreat offering: $60
Affecting Feedback" appeared in the March issue of Clergy
Report was incorrectly identified as consulting psychiatrist For reservations:
at Dunwoodie. Dr. Cristaniello is consulting psychologist at write or phone, The Retreat Director at
Dunwoodie. the above address.



Clergy Report is published by the Office of Pastoral Research of the Archdiocese of New York in order to provide a means of communication among
the priests of New York. Those wishing to share ideas and information about their experience in ministry (successful or not) are encouraged to contact
Philip J. Murnion, executive secretary, Office of Pastoral Research or Ruth T. Doyle, editor, Clergy Report, 453 Madison Avenue, New York, N.Y.
(212) 759-1400.


Application
to mai I at
2nd cia s
postage rates
is pcn ding at
New York, N.Y,




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