• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Introduction
 Table of Contents
 List of Figures
 List of Tables
 Urban design element
 Future land use element
 Academic facilities element
 Support/clinical facilities...
 Housing element
 Restoration and open space...
 Conservation element
 Transportation element
 General infrastructure element
 Utilities element
 Public safety element
 Facilities maintenance element
 Capital improvements element
 Intergovernmental coordination...
 Implementation element
 Fort Lauderdale Research and Education...
 Mid-Florida Research and Education...






Title: University of Florida campus master plan, 2005-2015
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Title: University of Florida campus master plan, 2005-2015
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Facilities Planning & Construction, University of Florida
Publisher: Facilities Planning & Construction
Publication Date: 2006
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Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
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Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Table of Contents
    Introduction
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    Table of Contents
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    List of Figures
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    List of Tables
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    Urban design element
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    Future land use element
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    Academic facilities element
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    Support/clinical facilities element
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    Housing element
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    Restoration and open space element
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    Conservation element
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    Transportation element
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    General infrastructure element
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    Utilities element
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    Public safety element
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    Facilities maintenance element
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    Capital improvements element
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    Implementation element
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    Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center element
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Full Text





INTRODUCTION







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INTRODUCTION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015


I. Campus Master Plan Public Participation

In November 2004, a public meeting was held to initiate the development of the University of
Florida's campus master plan for the period 2005-2015. At this time, the University had formed
three committees to guide the process. These committees included the Conservation Study
Committee, Transportation Study Committee and Master Plan Steering Committee. Membership
on the committees totaled 87 individuals, including forty-four faculty, sixteen students, twenty-
five staff and administrators, and two community representatives. Noteworthy, some members
representing administration are also faculty members with appointments in administrative offices.
The two community members represented the planning departments of the City of Gainesville
and Alachua County. For one year, these committees met in open, advertised meetings to
develop plan maps and policies. Altogether, the committees met forty-eight times during 2004-
2005 for approximately 100 hours of deliberation. All meeting notices, agendas and minutes
were posted to the website http://www.masterplan.ufl.edu/20052015.htm. The website also
contained master plan requirements, history, technical reports, plan document drafts and
presentations.

An email distribution list was maintained throughout the process and used to notify interested
parties when important draft documents were posted to the website and when public forums were
scheduled. The list was derived from a previous list maintained for the 2000-2010 campus master
plan process with additions of people that attended a series of university visioning workshops in
2003 and anyone that requested to be added through a link on the webpage. In November 2005,
this email distribution list contained 121 individuals plus additions made to the list based on sign-
in sheets at public forums.

On November 16, 2005 an informal public information session was held at Emerson Alumni Hall
following a published notice in the Gainesville Sun, Orlando Sentinel and Fort Lauderdale Sun
Sentinel. Noticed public hearings on December 14, 2005 and March 29, 2006 complete the
statutory requirements for public participation forums.


II. Visioning Process

During 2003 and early 2004, the University of Florida engaged in a visioning process using
workshops, online surveys and other methods of obtaining input about the desired future of the
campus. In particular, this visioning workshop focused on campus facilities and environments
although feedback covered operational topics including work environment, operating policies and
"campus culture". Over 90 individuals including staff, faculty, students, neighborhood residents,
local business people and community leaders participated in a series of six workshops in early
2003. The workshops were open to everyone and were broadly advertised electronically
(multiple list serves and websites) and through community press releases. In January 2004, a
sample of students responded to an online survey asking their opinions about campus facilities,
infrastructure, transportation and open space. The insights gleaned from this visioning process
were used to shape the 2005-2015 Campus Master Plan.







PAGE i-1
March 2006







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INTRODUCTION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015


III. Campus Master Plan Vision Statement

The following Vision Statement for the Campus Master Plan was adopted to describe an ideal
campus environment. This vision statement guides the campus master plan by identifying the
outcome that policies and recommendations should help to affect.

The University of Florida is committed to academic excellence as demonstrated by its
history of innovation, pursuit of diverse viewpoints, and sustained service to the people of
Florida. Its built and natural environments enhanced by its historic heritage, make it a
safe, sustainable and attractive place to learn, work and live. Its culture is one that
encourages collaboration, facilitates open exchange of ideas, and opens the doors of
opportunity to all. Its leadership provides clarity and commitment to reinforce this vision.


IV. Campus Master Plan Value Statement

The following Value Statement was adopted as an overriding standard to guide the campus
master plan process.

The University of Florida Campus Master Plan shall be maintained in an open and
inclusive process with emphasis placed on values of academic excellence, sustainability
and community partnership.

Academic excellence and the means to achieve it are defined in the university's Strategic
Academic Plan. Academic excellence can be defined as fostering and providing programs in
research, education, and service that are recognized for their excellence worldwide. These
programs should be designed to enhance discovery, scholarship, cultural enrichment and the
economic and social well-being of the citizens of Florida, the nation, and the world and to be
recognized as a world leader in these endeavors.

As defined by the University of Florida Ad-Hoc Committee on Sustainability, sustainability
means "providing for the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future
generations to provide for themselves. Decision-making at a sustainable university integrates the
pursuit of environmental, social and economic welfare across campus and within the broader
community."

The University is committed to community partnerships as applied to the master planning process
emphasizing cooperation among the university community, residential neighborhoods, business
community, Context Area, host local governments, governmental agencies and the community at-
large.


V. Campus Master Plan Guiding Principles for Policies and Recommendations

The following Guiding Principles were adopted by the master planning committees to guide the
campus master plan by identifying the philosophical approach for master plan policies and
recommendations. These guiding principles are intended to be broad and outcome-oriented,
serving to justify goals, objectives, policies and projects as applicable.


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March 2006







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INTRODUCTION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015

A. New Building Locations shall:
1. Avoid identified natural and man-made constraints to the extent feasible;
2. Provide proximity and density that promote -I,,lki:,. especially between
interrelated land uses;
3. Provide appropriate buffers to non-university properties and conservation
areas;
4. Protect historic buildings, views and context;
5. Concentrate in ,, ing or transcitioning activity centers rather than in sparse
low-density suburban patterns;
6. Create urban environments with buildings that define important exterior
spaces and street fronts;
7. Protect outdoor teaching and research land resources;
8. Focus facilities with frequent general-public interaction in accessible
locations near the campus perimeter.
9. Comply with building and site plan criteria to be developed that will address
issues such as intensity and density restrictions, parking requirements,
building height and open space; and
10. Comply with architectural design and compatibility standards to be
developed.

B. Future Land Use designations shall:
1. Include subclasses of active recreation, passive recreation and
academic/research;
2. Protect natural resources,
3. Locate activities that are compatible and complementary in close proximity;
and
4. Separate and/or buffer incompatible activities.

C. Capital Investments shall:
1. Support the Academic Strategic Plan;
2. Serve demonstrable need;
3. Consider adaptive reuse/renovation, co-location, and multi-disciplinary
approaches,
4. Consider life-cycle cnii,,i
5. Consider utility and infrastructure capacities;
6. Eliminate temporary buildings;
7. Employ new technologies for teaching, research and service delivery; and
8. Emphasize maintenance and preservation of \,,isng assets while
considering physical plant expansions.

D. Transportation approaches shall:
1. Encourage and safely accommodate non-motorized travel (bicycle and
pedestrian);
2. Locate new facilities with densities and proximities that provide walkability;
3. Reduce parking and vehicular access in the auto-free zone;
4. Provide parking in the campus perimeter near developing activity centers
with good transit service;
5. Provide appropriate transit service in the auto-free zone and between
activity centers with facilities including shelters and transfer hubs;


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INTRODUCTION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015

6. Discourage single-occupant vehicle access into and around campus ;l~, i ,gh
physical modifications and parking policy such as pricing and vehicle
storage;
7. Modify the campus roadway system to provide safe and adequate access to
activity centers and parking facilities with appropriate roadway designs that
include traffic calming, intersection modifications and transit-oriented
design; and
8. Address parking policies including pricing and decal programs.

E. Management of outdoor spaces on the campus, designated as
Conservation, Urban Park and Green Buffer land uses, shall:
1. Protect i..'iiifl ,,11t environmental resources and habitats including wetlands,
water bodies, rare plants, heritage trees, and Federal or State listed species;
2. Pursue a policy of zero net loss ofbiodiversity;
3. Provide, at a minimum, zero net loss of campus-wide conservation acreage
from that designated in the 2000-2010 campus master plan;
4. Provide opportunities for people to access and experience conservation
areas, green buffers and urban parks adjacent to already developed areas of
campus;
5. Provide opportunities for conservation areas, green buffers and urban parks
to be utilized for teaching and research purposes;
6. Provide appropriate places for people to congregate or move ;lh, ,,gli
7. Provide buffers or other transitional features between conservation areas
and built environments; and
8. Be consistent with conservation land management strategies that are
appropriate to each area's resources and location.
9. Address policies for the appropriate allowance of utility conveyances and
stormwaterfacilities.



























PAGE i-4
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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INTRODUCTION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015


VI. Campus Master Plan Organization

A. Plan Adoption and Amendment Process

Campus master plans are required by Section 1013.30 Florida Statutes. The purpose of this
statute is to "authorize state and local officials to cooperate in establishing and maintaining
educational plants that will provide for public educational needs throughout the state." It is
intended to foster communication between universities and their host local governments while
encouraging joint infrastructure planning for concurrency purposes. Although the University of
Florida has been preparing campus master plans since its inception in 1905, the campus master
plan for 1995-2005 was the first to be prepared under this statutory requirement. A subsequent
five-year update amendment for the period 2000-2010 was also prepared. The campus master for
2005-2015 is the first major rewrite since the 1995 effort.

The University of Florida campus master plan process is governed by an Operating Memorandum
adopted by the UF-Board of Trustees on March 28, 2003. This memorandum is consistent with
Section 1013.30 Florida Statutes and Chapter 6C-21, Part II, Florida Administrative Code, which
contain the basic requirements and process for campus master plans. In 2002, the adoption
authority for the campus master plan was transferred from the former Board of Regents to the
university boards of trustees.

Per the Florida Statute, a campus master plan must be updated at least once every five years and
cover a planning horizon often to twenty years. The master plan must address concurrency needs
for public facilities and services, and result in a development agreement with the host local
government. The campus development agreement must address mitigation if any public facilities
and services are found to be deficient for university growth. The statute also provides three
threshold tests, which if met, require state agency review and formal board of trustee adoption.
The UF Operating Memorandum distinguishes "Major" and "Minor" master plan amendments
based upon this threshold test. The cumulative impact of minor amendments is also measured
against the statutory thresholds. The Memorandum provides for review of all amendments by the
University Land Use and Facilities Planning Committee including representatives of the City of
Gainesville and Alachua County. Minor amendments are brought to the UF Board of
Trustees/Facilities Committee for information, and major amendments are adopted by the UF
Board of Trustees. There have not been any major amendments to the Campus Master Plan,
2000-2010. An amendment to master plan policy in 2004 introduced a requirement for a public
workshop to be held any time that a plan amendment adds additional property to the campus
master plan jurisdiction.

B. Jurisdiction

The Campus Master Plan is organized into Elements covering the required topics and several
optional topics as specified in Chapter 1013.30 Florida Statutes. The plan jurisdiction includes
the main campus in Gainesville, Florida and several satellite properties. Separate data and
analysis reports support the recommendations contained herein.

The main campus includes several non-contiguous properties and some properties that are owned
by Direct Support Organizations (such as the Athletic Association and University of Florida
Foundation) or other university-affiliates (such as fraternities and sororities bound by deed to
university rules and regulations). These properties are as follows:


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INTRODUCTION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015


1. University golf course (UF buildings 821, 674, 678);
2. Tanglewood Apartments located at 2701 SW 13th Street ( UF buildings 527-540);
3. Sorority Row
4. Delta Phi Epsilon sorority (UF building 657)
5. Sorority Row "Natural Area" used for passive recreation located east of SW 11th St;
6. Institutes of Black Culture located at 1510 W. University Avenue (UF building 874)
and Hispanic/Latino Cultures located at 1504 W. University Ave. (UF building 880);
7. Development and Alumni Affairs buildings and parking lots located at 2012 W.
University Avenue (UF building 253 and 153;
8. University Arboretum located at the northwest comer of University Avenue and NW
23rd Street;
9. Health Sciences Center Administrative Services building and parking facilities
located at 1329 SW 16th Street;
10. Collegiate Living Organization located at 117 NW 15th Street (UF building 896, 897
and 900);
11. State University System Presses located at 15 NW 15th Street (UF building 36 and
37);
12. Hope Lodge located at 2121 SW 16th Street;
13. PK Yonge Developmental Laboratory School located on Depot Avenue;
14. Coastal Engineering Laboratory located at 1300 SW 6th Street;
15. Emerson Alumni Hall located at 1938 W. University Ave. ( UF building 261)
16. 105 Classroom Building located at 105 NW 16th Street (UF building 105);
17. UFF Bates House located at 113 NW 20th Terrace (UF building 1032 and 1033); and
18. Ronald McDonald House located at 1600 SW 14th Street.

The Alachua County Satellite Properties include the following:

1. Lake Wauburg Recreation Area
2. Austin Cary Memorial Forest
3. Beef Research Unit
4. Dairy Research Unit Hague
5. WRUF Tower
6. Newnan's Lake
7. WUFT Tower
8. Millhopper Road Horticulture Unit
9. TREEO Training Center
10. Wall Farm / Horse Teaching Unit
11. Santa Fe Ranch Beef Unit/ Boston Farm
12. UF Libraries Remote Services located at 2715 NE 39th Avenue
13. UF Eastside Campus located at 2006 NE Waldo Road

Master Plan properties outside of Alachua County include the Fort Lauderdale Research and
Education Center and the Mid-Florida Research and Education Center in Apopka.

C. Plan Horizon and Analysis

The Campus Master Plan for 2005-2015 has a ten year plan horizon and will be revisited for
updates every five years. However, a much longer planning horizon was considered in the
development of this plan. Current decisions about placement of physical features and other
treatment of the built or natural environment have been considered in the context of long-term

PAGE i-6
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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INTRODUCTION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015

impacts. Therefore, the plan contains images and suggestions for a planning horizon of twenty-
years and beyond. Any recommendations beyond the ten-year horizon are for the purpose of
guidance and to demonstrate a long-term potential built-out scenario for the campus. In this way,
an evaluation of carrying capacity and sustainability can illustrate the compatibility of today's
decisions with the long-term needs of the campus and community. To this end, the campus
master plan contains analysis of natural features, open spaces and linkages to ensure preservation
of significant resources. At the same time, it seeks to identify appropriate locations for infill
development and creation of potentially new or intensified clusters of development. Corridors for
access, utility systems and infrastructure must also be preserved to serve development into the
future. This planning process requires balancing needs, priority-setting and compromise. This
difficult task could not be achieved without the time and effort of many individuals, and the
application of vision, values and guiding principles to the process. Even still, planning is an
iterative process subject to societal changes and factors which cannot be anticipated beyond a ten-
year horizon. For this reason, the plan will be revisited for updates once every five years. The
Campus Master Plan, 2005-2015 will be a foundation for subsequent planning efforts to refine.


VII. Definitions

Affected Local Government: A unit of local government that provides public services to or is
responsible for maintaining facilities within a campus of an institution in the State University
System or is directly affected by development that is proposed for a campus.

Affected Person: A host local government; an affected local government; any state, regional or
federal agency; or a person who resides, owns property, or owns or operates a business within the
boundaries of a host local government or affected local government. In order to qualify under
this definition, each person, other than a host or affected local government, must have submitted
oral or written comments, recommendations, or objections to the university during the period of
time beginning with the advertisement of the first public hearing under Chapter 1013.30 and
ending with the adoption of the campus master plan or plan amendment.

Agriculture: The use of land predominantly for the cultivation of crops and livestock including:
cropland, pastureland, orchards, vineyards, nurseries, ornamental horticulture areas, groves,
confined feeding operations, specialty farms, and Silviculture

Amendment: Any change to an adopted campus master plan except corrections, updates and
modifications of the capital improvements element concerning costs, revenue sources, acceptance
of facilities or facility construction dates consistent with the plan, and corrections, updates or
modifications of current costs in other elements.

Aquifer: A geologic formation, group of formations, or part of a formation that contains
sufficient saturated permeable material to yield significant quantities of water to wells and
springs. (See Floridian Aquifer System; Intermediate Aquifer System; and Surficial Aquifer
System.)

Aquifer Recharge: The replenishment of groundwater in an aquifer occurring primarily as result
of infiltration of rainfall, and secondarily by the movement of water from adjacent aquifers or
surface water bodies.




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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INTRODUCTION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015

Available /Availability: Relates to the provision of public facilities and services concurrent with
the impacts of development, means that at a minimum the facilities and services will be provided
in accordance with Chapter 163.3180, Florida Statutes.

Adverse Impact (upon a natural resource): Direct contamination, alteration, or destruction, or
that which contributes to the contamination, alteration, or destruction of a natural resource, or
portion thereof, to the degree that its environmental benefits are or will be eliminated, reduced or
impaired.

Best Management Practices (BMPs): A series of guidelines or minimum standards adopted for
area wide application, typically associated with agricultural, silvicultural, golf course, and similar
operations, designed primarily to prevent soil erosion and water pollution, and to protect certain
wildlife habitat values in riparian and wetland areas.

Bikeway: Any road, path, or way which in some manner is specifically designated as being open
to bicycle travel regardless of whether such facilities are designated for the exclusive use of
bicycles or are to be shared with other transportation modes. This includes bike lanes, wide curb
lanes, sidewalks, and local streets.

Biodiversity (Biological Diversity): The variety, distribution and abundance of living organisms
in an ecosystem. Maintaining biodiversity is believed to promote stability, sustainability and
resilience of ecosystems.

Branch Campus: An instructional and administrative unit of a university that offers students
upper-division and graduate programs as well as a wide range of support services.

Buffer: An area of planted or natural vegetation or open space maintained for various purposes,
including reduction of erosion and siltation along surface waters and wetlands, reduction of
poaching and wind erosion along roads and field edges, and provision of wildlife travel corridors
and habitat.

Campus: The main campus of the University and any branch campuses.

Capital Improvements: Physical assets constructed or purchased to provide, improve or replace
a public facility and which are large scale and high in cost. The cost of a capital improvement is
generally non-recurring and may require multi-year financing. For the purposes of definition,
physical assets which have been identified as existing or projected needs in the individual campus
master plan elements shall be considered capital improvements.

Circulation Facilities: Roadways, sidewalks or other surfaces designated for pedestrian, non-
vehicular, o r vehicular movement.

Cone of Influence: An area around one or more major water wells, the boundary of which is
determined by the government agency having specific statutory authority to make such a
determination based on groundwater travel or drawdown depth.

Confined Aquifer: An aquifer that is bounded above and below by impermeable beds or by beds
of distinctly lower permeability than that of the aquifer itself.

Context Area: An area surrounding the university, within which on-campus development may
impact local public facilities and services and natural resources, and within which off-campus

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INTRODUCTION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015

development may impact university resources and facilities. The size of the context area may be
defined by natural or man-made functional or visual boundaries, such as areas of concentration of
off-campus student-oriented housing and commercial establishments, stormwater basins, habitat
range, or other natural features

Detention: The collection and temporary storage of stormwater in such a manner as to provide
for treatment through physical, chemical or biological processes with subsequent gradual release
of stormwater.

Development /Development Project /Development Activity: Any dredging, filling, excavation,
construction of new structures, expansion of existing structures ,installation of utilities, roads,
personal wireless service facilities, stormwater management systems, septic tanks, bulk heading,
land clearing, tree cutting, mechanized vegetation removal and the disposal of solid or liquid
waste.

Depression Basins: Natural depression watershed areas which have no positive outfall for
surface water runoff except by infiltration as evapotranspiration.

Development Agreement: An agreement between the particular University campus and each of
its affected local governments as defined in Chapter 163.3192 F.S..

Drainage Basin: A subdivision of a watershed.

Ecosystem: A community of all plants and animals and their physical environment, functioning
together as an interdependent unit.

Endangered Species: Species in danger of extinction if the deleterious factors affecting their
populations continue to operate. These are forms whose numbers have already declined to such a
critically low level or whose habitats have been so seriously reduced or degraded that without
active assistance, their survival in Florida is questionable.

Environmental Quality: The character or degree of excellence or degradation in the total
essential natural resources of the area as measured by the findings and standards of the physical,
natural, and social sciences, the arts and technology, and the quantitative guidelines of federal,
state and county governments.

Extraction: The removal of soil, sand, mineral, etc. from the earth through mining or excavation
(borrow) activities.

Fill: Raising the surface level of the land with suitable soil material.

Flood Plain: Any land area susceptible to being inundated by water from a storm of a specified
frequency of occurrence.

Flood Plain, 100-year: Areas subject to inundation by a flood having a one-percent (1%)
probability of occurrence in any given year. The 100-year flood elevation is the highest elevation
of flood waters during the 100-year storm event and is calculated or estimated from the best
available information.

Floridan Aquifer System: The thick carbonate sequence which includes all or part of the
Paleocene to early Miocene Series and functions regionally as a water-yielding hydraulic unit.

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INTRODUCTION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015

Where overlaid by either the intermediate aquifer system or the intermediate confining unit, the
Floridan contains water under confined conditions. Where overlaid directly by the surficial
aquifer system, the Floridan may or may not contain water under confined conditions, depending
on the extent of low permeability materials in the surficial aquifer system. Where the carbonate
rocks crop out, the Floridan generally contains water under unconfined conditions near the top of
the aquifer system; but, because of vertical variations in permeability, deeper zones may contain
water under confined conditions.

Functional Open Space: Exterior areas of buildings that perform a function by virtue of their
design and amenities that provide seating, shading, views, and other such features that facilitate
human occupation and enjoyment. Also may be referred to as "Outdoor Rooms".

Goal: The long-term end toward which programs or activities are ultimately directed.

Greenway: A corridor of protected open space that is managed for conservation, recreation
purposes. Greenways follow natural land or water features or abandoned railroad corridors or
canals, and link natural reserves, parks, cultural and historic sites.

Groundwater: Water occurring beneath the surface of the ground, whether or not flowing
through known or definite channels.

Guaranteed Ride Home Program: A program whereby an employer provides emergency
transportation home for employees who participate in selected transportation demand
management programs, such as carpooling or incentives for use of transit, walking and bicycling.
Such emergency transportation may be provided by taxi service or employer-provided drivers in
the case that an employee has an emergency and needs to leave work but does not have access to
a personal automobile because he/she is participating in an employer's transportation demand
management program. A Guaranteed Ride Home Program is one of several incentive programs
that may complement an employer's transportation demand management program.

Habitat: The natural abode of a plant or animal that contains the arrangement of food, water,
cover and space required to meet the biological needs of a given species. Different species have
different requirements, and these requirements vary over the course of a year.

Habitat Corridors: A band of natural vegetation cover that serves to link two patches of habitat.
The corridor boundary is defined by virtue of its surroundings, which are assumed to be either
inferior habitat or non-habitat for the species in question. The corridor may include one or
several habitat types.

Hazardous Waste: A solid waste or combination of sold wastes which, because of its quantity,
concentration, or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics, may cause or significantly
contribute to, an increase in mortality or an increase in serious irreversible or incapacitating
reversible illness or may pose a substantial present or potential hazard to human health or the
environment when improperly stored, transported, disposed of, treated, or otherwise managed.

Historic Resources: All areas, districts or sites containing properties listed on the Florida Master
Site File, the National Register of Historic Places, or designated by a university as historically,
architecturally or archaeologically significant, and those properties eligible for inclusion on the
National Register of Historic Places based on its being at least 50-years of age and having
received a review from the State Division of Historical Resources documenting its historical
significance.

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Host Local Government: A local government within the jurisdiction of which all or part of a
campus of an institution is located, but does not include a county if no part of an institution is
located within its unincorporated area.

Infrastructure: Those man-made structures which serve the common needs of the population,
such as roadways, stormwater management facilities, potable water facilities, sanitary sewer
facilities, and solid waste facilities.

Heritage Trees: Champion Trees: Those trees that have been identified by the Florida Division
of Forestry as being the largest of their species within the State of Florida or by the American
Forestry Association as the largest of their species in the United States. The current list of
champion trees in Gainesville and Alachua County is on file in the codes enforcement office. This
list is subject to revision and will be updated yearly.

High Aquifer Recharge Areas: Areas where stream-to-sink surface water basins occur, and
areas where the Floridan aquifer system is designated as unconfined or semi confined in Florida
Geological Survey Open File Report 21, "Geologic Interpretation of the Aquifer Pollution
Potential in Alachua County, Florida,"

Historic Property: Any building or site that is included or eligible for inclusion on the National
Register of Historic Places.

Host Local Government: A local government within the jurisdiction of which all or part of a
campus of an institution is located, but does not include a county if no part of an institution is
located within its unincorporated area.

Injection Well: A well into which fluids are drained, either by gravity flow or under pressure.
The terms deep well and shallow well injection has no real significance relative to the actual
depth of a well.

Invasive Species: Imported plant or animal species that are widespread in Florida and have the
established potential to invade and disrupt native communities; are localized but have a rapidly
expanding population or have shown a potential to invade and disrupt native species in other
areas or other countries with climates similar to Florida.

Isolated Wetland: Any wetland without a direct hydrologic connection to a lake, stream, estuary
or marine water.

Karst Topography: The relief of an area underlain by limestone that dissolves in differing
degrees, thus forming numerous depressions or small basins.

Landscape: A geographical mosaic composed of interacting ecosystems resulting from the
influence of geological, topographical, soil, climatic, biotic and human interactions in a given
area.

Levels of Service: An indicator of the extent or degree of service provided by, or proposed to be
provided by a facility based on and related to the operational characteristics of the facility. Level
of service shall indicate the capacity per unit of demand for each public facility.

Light Pollution: Any adverse effect of manmade light.

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INTRODUCTION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015


Light Trespass: Light falling where it is not wanted or needed, typically across property
boundaries.

Listed Species: Those species of plants and animals listed as endangered, threatened, rare, or
species of special concern by an official state or federal plant or wildlife agency, or the Florida
Natural Areas Inventory (FNAI, includes species ranked as S1, S2, or S3). These species are
targeted for protection for a number of reasons, e.g. they are in imminent danger of extinction, are
rapidly declining in number or habitat, or have an inherent vulnerability to habitat modification,
environmental alteration, or human disturbance which puts them at risk of extinction.

Littoral Zone: In reference to stormwater management systems, that portion which is designed to
contain rooted aquatic plants.

Main Campus: The focal point of university educational and administrative activities, authorized
by Chapter 240.2011, F.S.

Management Plan: A plan prepared to address preservation/restoration and management of
natural resources. The plan consists of a set of documents, including maps, that describes and
depicts the location of areas and natural resources to be preserved, including any protective
buffers. The plan identifies specific implementation activities, schedules, and assignments of
responsibilities.

Mitigation: An action or series of actions that offsets adverse environmental impacts. Mitigation
may consist of any one or a combination of monetary compensation, or acquisition, restoration,
enhancement, or preservation of wetlands, other surface waters or uplands.

Multi-Modal Transportation: Providing significant transportation options so that people can
have a wide choice, including bicycle, pedestrian, automobile, transit, etc.

Native Species: Plants and animals that, based on current knowledge, are known to have been
present regionally before the time of documented European contact (-1500 A.D.).

Native Vegetative Communities: Areas where vegetation consists primarily of species
indigenous to the Southeastern U.S. and/or Florida or a portion of Florida.

Natural Drainage Features: The naturally occurring features of an area which accommodate the
flow of stormwater, such as streams, rivers, lakes and wetlands.
Nature Park A conservation area on campus that's primary function is the maintenance of
biological diversity of plants, animals and natural communities while providing passive
recreational opportunities for faculty, students and staff. The Nature Park management approach
is where public use is encouraged and physical improvements will be targeted to enhance the
visitation experience. Examples of Conservation Areas that fit into the Nature Park category are
McCarty Woods, Bartram-Carr Woods and Reitz Ravines.

Net Academic Space Need: The usable, assignable, building area designated for classroom use,
required to meet the University's student enrollment.

Non-native Species: Plants and animals that are not native regionally.



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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INTRODUCTION
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Non-point Source Pollution: Contamination arising from the discharge of wastes to water bodies
or to the atmosphere from dispersed sources.

Occupied Structure: A structure that is intended for occupancy by humans for extended or
temporal periods.

Open Space: Any natural, recreational, or common open areas, where built structures are
incidental as opposed to the primary object.

Objective: A specific, measurable, intermediate end that is achievable and marks progress toward
a goal.

Parking Cash-Out: A program whereby an employer reimburses an employee for all or part of
an employer-paid parking benefit in exchange for that employee not driving a private automobile
and not using that parking benefit. A Parking Cash-Out Program is one of several incentive
programs that may complement an employer's transportation demand management program.

Percolation: The downward movement of water through the soil or geologic features.

Permeability: The quality of the soil that enables water to move downward through the profile.
Permeability is measured as the number of inches per hour that water moves downward through
the saturated soil.

Pesticide: A pesticide is any substance or mixture of substances intended for: preventing,
destroying, repelling, or mitigating any pest. Though often misunderstood to refer only to
insecticides, the term pesticide also applies to herbicides, fungicides, and various other substances
used to control pests.

Under United States law, a pesticide is also any substance or mixture of substances intended for
use as a plant regulator, defoliant, or desiccant.

Point Source Pollution: Contamination arising from direct discharge of wastes to water bodies
or to the atmosphere through a pipe, ditch, channel, or other concentrated means.

Policy: The way in which programs and activities are conducted to achieve an identified goal.

Potable Water Facility: A system of structures designed to collect, treat or distribute potable
water, and includes water wells, treatment plants, reservoirs, and distribution mains.

Present Parking Ratio: The ratio between the number of parking spaces designated for a
particular user group, and the number of persons in that user group. Ratios are expressed as
spaces per (student, faculty, etc.).

Public Buildings and Grounds: Structures or lands that are owned, leased, or operated by a
government entity, such as civic and community centers, hospitals, libraries, police and fire
stations, and government administration buildings.

Public Facility: Transportation systems or facilities, sewer systems or facilities, solid waste
systems or facilities, drainage systems or facilities, potable water systems or facilities,
educational systems or facilities, parks and recreation systems and facilities, and public health
systems and facilities.

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INTRODUCTION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015


Recreation Facility: A component of a recreation site, such as a trail, court, athletic field or
swimming pool.

Research Support: Those activities, facilities or services that support research activities such as
equipment storage, laboratory storage, research animal housing, medical clinics and laboratory
schools.

Residential Use: Activities within land areas used predominantly for housing.

Retention: The prevention of the discharge of a given volume of stormwater runoff by complete
on-site storage.

Reuse: The planned activity or activities that are intended for the land excavation or filling area
and/or abutting land after the excavation or filling ceases and reclamation is completed.

Roadway Functional Classification: The assignment of roads into categories according to the
character of the service they provide in relation to the total road network. Basic functional
categories include limited access facilities, arterial roads and collector roads, which may
subcategorized into principal, major or minor levels.

Runoff: The precipitation discharged into stream channels from an area. The water that flows off
the surface of the land without sinking into the soil is called surface runoff Water that enters the
soil before reaching surface streams is called groundwater runoff or seepage flow from
groundwater.

Seepage: The movement of water through the soil.

Sanitary Sewer Facilities: Structures or systems designed for the collection, transmission,
treatment, or disposal of sewage, and includes trunk mains, interceptors, treatment plants and
disposal systems.

Services: The programs and employees determined necessary to provide adequate operation and
maintenance of public facilities and infrastructure.

Sheet Flow: The pattern of water movement where large quantities of water move in broad-
spread, shallow layers across the ground's surface. This is typical in wetlands, marshes,
grasslands, pine flatwoods, and prairies such as Payne's Prairie and the Everglades.

Solid Waste Facilities: Structures or systems designed for the collection, processing or disposal
of solid wastes, including hazardous wastes, and includes transfer stations, processing plants,
recycling plants, and disposal systems.

Source Separation: The separation of the components of solid waste (glass, metal, paper,
chemicals, plastic, kitchen wastes, etc.) at the source of generation before disposal to allow for
alternative waste management practices such as reuse, recycling, and energy recovery.

Species of Special Concern Species that do not clearly fit into the endangered, threatened or
rare categories, yet warrant special attention. Included in this category are: (1) species that,
although they are perhaps presently relatively abundant and widespread in the State, are
especially vulnerable to certain types of exploitation or environmental changes and have

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INTRODUCTION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015

experienced long-term population declines; and (2) species whose status in Florida has a potential
impact on endangered or threatened populations in the same or other species outside the State.

Specimen Tree: A tree which has been identified by the University to be of notable interest or
high value because of its age, size, species, condition, historic association, or uniqueness.

State Water Quality Standards: Numerical and narrative standards that limit the amount of
pollutants that are allowed in waters of the state, as defined by Chapter 62-302, Florida
Administrative Code.

Steep Slope: Any topography having a slope of greater than or equal to 5%.

Stormwater: The flow of water which results from, and which occurs immediately following a
rainfall event.

Stormwater Management Facility: A system of man-made structures designed to collect,
convey, hold, divert or discharge stormwater, and includes stormwater sewers, canals, detention
structures, and retention structures.

Structure: Anything constructed or erected, the use of which requires permanent location on the
ground or attachment to something having a permanent location on the ground as well as a mobile
home.

Support Documents: Any surveys, studies, inventory maps, data, inventories, listings, or
analyses used for or in developing the campus master plan.

Surface Waters (Water Bodies): Rivers, streams, creeks, springs, lakes, ponds, inundated
sinkholes, intermittent water courses and associated wetlands that hold or transport water on the
ground surface.

Surficial Aquifer System: The permeable hydro geologic unit contiguous with land surface that
is comprised principally of unconsolidated to poorly indurate plastic deposits. It also includes
well-inundated carbonate rocks, other than those of the Floridan aquifer system where the
Floridan is at or near land surface. Rocks making up the surficial aquifer system belong to all or
part of the upper Miocene to Holocene Series.
It contains the water table and water within it is under mainly unconfined conditions; but beds of
low permeability may cause semi-confined or locally confined conditions to prevail in its deeper
parts. The lower limit of the surficial aquifer system coincides with the top of laterally extensive
and vertically persistent beds of much lower permeability. Within the surficial aquifer system,
one or more aquifers may be designated based on lateral or vertical variations in water-bearing
properties.

Sustainable /Sustainability: Processes, procedures, policies and practices that provide for the
needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to provide for
themselves.

Temporary Building: A structure that is delivered in whole or in sections, placed on minimal
foundations with self-contained heating and air conditioning, or otherwise does not meet
university construction standards.



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TAZ: Traffic Analysis Zones used by the affected local government to analyze traffic movement
within the community.
Traffic circulation model" means a computer-generated simulation of existing and/or proposed
traffic movement.

Traffic Calming: Engineering design techniques for use in the roadway environment for the
purpose of slowing or diverting motorized vehicle travel. Examples include speed humps,
diverters, neck-downs, bulb-outs and other changes in vertical or horizontal road alignment.

Transit-Oriented Design: Transportation system and land use patterns that provide dense
development with concentrations of people that can easily access transit services by using
connected sidewalk systems, bus shelters and other such convenient and safe transit facilities.

Transportation Demand Management: Strategies and techniques that can be used to increase
the efficiency of transportation system. Demand management focuses on ways of influencing the
amount and demand for transportation by encouraging alternatives to the automobile and altering
local peak hour travel demand. These strategies may include, but not be limited to, ridesharing
programs, flexible work hours, telecommuting, shuttle services and parking management.

Transportation System: A multi-modal system of transportation facilities designed for the
movement of people and goods.

Transportation System Management: Improving roads, intersections, and other related
facilities to make the existing transportation system operate more efficiently. Transportation
system management techniques include demand management strategies, incident management
strategies, and other actions that increase the efficiency of the transportation system.

Unoccupied Structure: A structure used for the purpose of storage or shelter of equipment,
livestock or other animals, plant material, or other materials and supplies but is not intended for
human occupation and typically does not have electricity or running water. Examples include
equipment sheds, livestock run-in pole barns, boat houses and plant frames.

Vegetative Communities: Ecological communities, such as coastal strands, oak hammocks and
cypress swamps, which are classified based on the presence of certain soils, vegetation and
animals.

Wetlands: Those areas that are inundated or saturated by surface water or ground water at a
frequency and duration sufficient to support, and, under normal conditions do support, a
prevalence of vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soils. Soils present in wetlands
generally are classified as hydric. As defined in Florida Statutes Chapter 373.

Xeriscape Landscaping: Landscape methods that conserve water and protect the environment
through the use of native, drought-tolerant plants and planting techniques.










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University of Florida Campus Master Plan, 2005-2015

Table of Contents

March 2006


i. Introduction

Campus Master Plan Public Participation
Visioning Process
Campus Master Plan Vision Statement
Campus Master Plan Value Statement
Campus Master Plan Guiding Principles for Policies and Recommendations
Campus Master Plan Organization
Definitions

1. Urban Design Element

2. Future Land Use Element

3. Academic Facilities Element

4. Support / Clinical Facilities Element

5. Housing Element

6. Recreation and Open Space Element

7. Conservation Element

8. Transportation Element

9. General Infrastructure Element

10. Utilities Element

11. Public Safety Element

12. Facilities Maintenance Element

13. Capital Improvements Element

14. Intergovernmental Coordination Element

15. Implementation Element

16. Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center Element

Future Land Use Sub-Element
Housing Sub-Element
Recreation and Open Space Sub-Element
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015
TABLE OF CONTENTS PLAN ELEMENT










General Infrastructure Stormwater Sub-Element
General Infrastructure Potable Water Sub-Element
General Infrastructure Sanitary Sewer Sub-Element
General Infrastructure Solid Waste Sub-Element
Utilities Steam and Chilled Water Sub-Element
Utilities Electrical Power and Other Fuels Sub-Element
Utilities Telecommunications Sub-Element
Conservation Sub-Element

17. Mid-Florida Research and Education Center Element

Future Land Use Sub-Element
Housing Sub-Element
Recreation and Open Space Sub-Element
General Infrastructure Stormwater Sub-Element
General Infrastructure Potable Water Sub-Element
General Infrastructure Sanitary Sewer Sub-Element
General Infrastructure Solid Waste Sub-Element
Conservation Sub-Element


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015
TABLE OF CONTENTS PLAN ELEMENT










University of Florida Campus Master Plan, 2005-2015

List of Figures Plan Elements
March 2006


1. Urban Design Element
1-1 Planning Sector Boundaries
1-2 Historic District Area of Impact
1-3 Conservation, Green Space Buffers and Urban Parks
1-4 Open Space Connections
1-5 Open Space Enhancement Priorities
1-6 Urban Design Connections
1-7 Urban Design Composite (Maps 1-7.a through 1-7.1 for Planning Sectors A-L)
1-8 Urban Design Concept Plan Cultural Plaza
1-9 Urban Design Concept Plan Eastside Campus

2. Future Land Use Element
2-1 Future Land Use Map 2005-2015
2-1.a Future Land Use Austin Cary Memorial Forest
2-1.b Future Land Use Beef Research Unit
2-1.c Future Land Use Dairy Research Unit
2-1.d Future Land Use Eastside Campus
2-1.e Future Land Use Lake Wauburg
2-1.f Future Land Use Libraries Remote Services
2-1.g Future Land Use Millhopper Horticulture Unit
2-1.h Future Land Use Newnan's Lake
2-1.i Future Land Use Santa Fe Beef Ranch
2-1 .j Future Land Use TREEO Center
2-1.k Future Land Use Wall Farm
2-1.1 Future Land Use WRUF Tower
2-1.m Future Land Use WUFT Tower
2-2 Future Building Sites by Future Land Use 2005-2015
2-3 Natural and Man-Made Composite Constraints

3. Academic Facilities Element
3-1 Future and Existing Academic/ Research Areas
3-2 Future and Existing Academic/ Research Outdoor

4. Support / Clinical Facilities Element
4-1 Future and Existing Support Areas
4-2 Future and Existing Cultural Areas

5. Housing Element
5-1 Future and Existing Housing Areas

6. Recreation and Open Space Element

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015
LIST OF FIGURES PLAN ELEMENT










6-1 Future and Existing Active Recreation Areas
6-1.a Future and Existing Recreation Areas Lake Wauburg (South)
6-2 Future and Existing Outdoor Active Recreation Areas
6-3 Design Concept Plan Lake Wauburg (South)

7. Conservation Element
7-1 Conservation Areas Main Campus
7-1.a Conservation Areas Austin Cary Memorial Forest
7-1.b Conservation Areas Beef Research Unit
7-1.c Conservation Areas Dairy Research Unit
7-1.d Conservation Areas Lake Wauburg
7-1.e Conservation Areas Millhopper Horticulture Unit
7-1.f Conservation Areas Newnans Lake
7-1.g Conservation Areas Santa Fe River Ranch
7-2 Natural Communities Main Campus
7-3 Water Resources Main Campus
7-4 Soils Main Campus

8. Transportation Element
8-1 Roadway Hierarchy
8-2 Recommended Bicycle Circulation Plan
8-3 University of Florida Context Area Recommended Bicycle Circulation Plan
8-4 Existing Pedestrian Circulation
8-5 Recommended Pedestrian Facilities
8-6 Existing Campus and City Transit Routes
8-7 Campus Transit Routes Recommended Circulation
8-8 University of Florida Context Area Recommended Transit Circulation
8-9 Parking Garage Location Priorities
8-10 Roadway Resurfacing Priorities
8-11 Roadway Reconstruction Priorities
8-12 Transportation System Management Priorities
8-13 New Construction Priorities
8-14 Campus Lighting Improvement Priorities

9. General Infrastructure Element
9-1 Potential Future Stormwater Improvements
9-1.a Eastside Campus Future Stormwater Improvements

10. Utilities Element
10-1 Heating and Cooling Facility Improvements
10-2 Electric Substation Locations
10-3 Future Telecommunications Infrastructure Network Improvements
10-4 Telecommunications Wireless Coverage
10-5 Eastside Campus Future Utility Infrastructure Improvements

11. Capital Improvements Element
13-1 Future Buildings Sites, 2005-2015
13-1.a Eastside Campus Future Building Sites

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015
LIST OF FIGURES PLAN ELEMENT










13-1.b Future Building Sites, Lake Wauburg (South)
13-2 Future Building Renovations, Remodeling and Rehabilitation, 2005-2015
13-3 Temporary Buildings
13-4 Potential Building Removal

12. Intergovernmental Coordination Element
14-1 Context Area
14-2 Campus Master Plan: Alachua County Satellite Properties

13. Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center Element
16-1 Future Land Use Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center
16-2 Water Resources and Soils Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center

14. Mid-Florida Research and Education Center Element
17-1 Future Land Use Mid-Florida Research and Education Center
17-2 Water Resources and Soils Mid-Florida Research and Education Center
17-3 Future Buildings Mid-Florida Research and Education Centert


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015
LIST OF FIGURES PLAN ELEMENT









University of Florida Campus Master Plan, 2005-2015

List of Tables Plan Elements
March 2006


2. Future Land Use Element


2-1 Proposed Capital Projects by Land Use, 2005-2015
2-2 Comparison of Future Land Use Main Campus, 2005-2015
2-3 Future Land Use Change Main Campus, 2004 to 2015

8. Transportation Element
8-1 Roadway Resurfacing Priorities
8-2 Roadway Reconstruction Priorities
8-3 Intersection and Transportation System Management Priorities
8-4 Roadway New Construction Priorities
8-5 Independent Pedestrian Project Priorities
8-6 Independent Bicycle Project Priorities
8-7 Bicycle/Pedestrian Grade Separation Project Priorities
8-8 City Transit Route Proposed Modifications in the UF Context Area
8-9 Campus Transit Route Proposed Modifications
8-10 Campus Bus Shelter Priorities

13. Capital Improvements Element


Ten-Year Capital Projects List, 2005-2015

Intergovernmental Coordination Element
Land Use Compatibility Matrix


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015
LIST OF TABLES PLAN ELEMENT


13-1

14.
14-1








1.
URBAN DESIGN ELEMENT






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA URBAN DESIGN
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

Introduction

This Urban Design Element includes Goals, Objectives and Policies (GOP) that apply to the main
campus. Unless specifically noted, these policies do not affect the other twelve Alachua County
Satellite Properties since many urban design considerations for main campus such as pedestrian
access, gateway features and streetscaping do not apply on remote satellite sites. These policies
supplement the University of Florida Design and Construction Standards, and address design
considerations for buildings and the open spaces between buildings. The University of Florida
strives to maintain a coherent and pleasant campus that is conducive to learning. It must be both
functional and attractive. Due to its central location in the larger community, the University of
Florida main campus is also an integral part of the City of Gainesville and Alachua County. As
such, the community gateways, campus entry features, perimeter appearance and overall urban
form of the campus is of vital community importance.

The University of Florida campus in Gainesville was established in 1905 with a consistent
architectural character under the leadership of architect William Augustus Edwards. The campus
was originally conceived with a master plan based on symmetrical ellipses and functional open
spaces framed by significant buildings. Over the following decades, the campus architects who
followed Mr. Edwards worked to maintain a coherent architectural language while responding to
changing times and building construction standards. Campus master plans also evolved with time to
incorporate grid layouts and, later, sweeping open space connections.

The end result of this evolution is a campus with visual unity that is noteworthy among large public
universities. The campus buildings and campus plans have expressed national and international
developments of each era, while preserving compatibility and harmony. This consistency is not
only in individual buildings, but in visual linkages of built and natural environments. The
original campus core is protected as a Historic District on the National Register of Historic Places
along with twenty-one individually registered historic buildings. A Historic Impact Area (Figure
1-2) has also been defined around the Historic District to include significant buildings that are
now turning fifty years old and becoming eligible for national registration.

Campus growth continued to expand to the south and west away from the historic core with the
addition of facilities such as the Holland Hall (College of Law), Health Science Center / Shands
Hospital, and various facilities of the Institute for Food and Agricultural Sciences. New student
residential complexes, recreation facilities, cultural centers and parking services also added to the
landscape of campus expansion.

The Urban Design plan presented in this element envisions clusters of new development around
existing facilities such as Fifield Hall, Genetics/Cancer Institute, Orthopaedic and Sports
Medicine Institute, Veterinary Medicine and the Cultural Plaza. A new cluster of development is
also anticipated for the area north of Radio Road near SW 34th Street, although it is not
anticipated to develop significantly during the ten-year horizon of this master plan. These
clusters should create walkable centers with multiple buildings of related functions that achieve a
critical mass to support transit and protect open spaces between centers. In addition to these
centers of development, sensitive infill sites are also identified in the Historic Impact Area and
around the Health Science Center.

Constraints to development (e.g. wetlands, floodplains, archaeological sites, etc.) were analyzed
to identify potential building sites and areas that should be protected from development.
Assessment of these natural and man-made constraints was a critical step in formulating the urban
design plan presented herein. The results of the composite constraints analysis are presented in

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA URBAN DESIGN
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

Figure 2-3 of the Future Land Use Element. Figure 1-3 of this element depicts the land uses of
Conservation, Urban Park and Green Space Buffer that were identified for preservation as open
space. Other analyses identified important open space linkages that serve environmental, visual,
bicycle and/or pedestrian connectivity. These are presented in Figures 1-4 and 1-6 to depict
corridors that should be reserved as open space although they may cross multiple land use
classifications. Figure 1-5, Open Space Enhancement Priorities, presents significant open spaces
on campus that are recommended for landscaping and pedestrian amenity improvements. Lastly,
the concept of a roadway hierarchy and campus gateways is introduced in the Transportation
Element and on Figure 1-6 of this element. The roadway hierarchy can be used to define typical
cross sections and streetscape standards appropriate to the different types of roadways present on
campus. Similarly, the gateways are conceived as entry features that provide access, orientation
and amenities through design features such as signage and intersection treatments. Other figures
in this Element include Planning Sector Boundaries on Figure 1-1 that identify contiguous areas
with similar urban form or function. These Sectors are also presented in detailed composite urban
design plans for each Sector in Figures 1-7.a through 1-7.1. This map series for Figure 1-7
presents a main campus urban design plan that includes future land use, open space connections,
road hierarchy, gateways and future building sites on one map. Finally, an urban design sketch is
presented for the Cultural Plaza area in Figure 1-8. While this sketch is conceptual in nature, it is
consistent with the future building sites, future land use, open space connections, gateways and
road hierarchies presented in the campus master plan. Similarly, an urban design concept plan is
presented for the Eastside Campus on Waldo Road in Figure 1-12.



Goal 1: Maintain a Coherent, Compatible and Aesthetically Pleasing Campus
Environment that is Conducive to Learning.


Objective 1.1: Utilize design standards for the construction, renovation and rehabilitation
of campus buildings and landscaping.

Policy 1.1.1: Continue to implement and update as necessary the University of Florida Design and
Construction Standards. This document applies to all university construction projects including
those performed or managed by Physical Plant Division, Facilities Planning and Construction
Division, IFAS Facilities and Operations Division, Department of Housing and Residence
Education, and on-campus Sororities and Fraternities. It includes standards for landscaping, lighting,
roads, parking, bicycle and pedestrian facilities, interior/exterior signage, irrigation, earthwork,
stormwater, utilities and building construction components. A procedure for revising the UF Design
and Construction Standards is incorporated into the document.

Policy 1.1.2: The University shall develop a campus design guideline document that supplements
the University of Florida Design and Construction Standards to provide detailed guidance about
such issues as plant selection, functional open space, street furniture, building orientation, stormwater
low-impact development, LEED considerations, and compatibility with historic and natural
resources.

Policy 1.1.3: Negotiations with other institutions will include the discussion of design parameters
for any satellite facilities occupying sites on campuses that are not part of the State University
System. This information and any applicable design or construction standards will be provided to


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA URBAN DESIGN
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the design team at the initiation of the project for incorporation into the programming and design
development process of these facilities.


Objective 1.2: Utilize urban design features to welcome and orient campus users, and
assist them in navigating the campus through coherent visual cues.

Policy 1.2.1: Continue to improve campus gateways as identified in Figures 1-6 and 1-7. Major
gateways shall be designed to enhance access for motor vehicles, pedestrians and bicyclists and
include significant entry features and signage. Minor access gateways shall be designed to enhance
access for motor vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles with specific, adjacent destinations rather than as
a primary entry point for the entire campus. Signage and entry features at minor access gateways
should be less dramatic than for major gateways and may indicate the specific destinations that are
accessed from this point. Bicycle-pedestrian gateways shall emphasize safe and convenient non-auto
access. Emerging gateways shall be enhanced as proximate building development occurs.

Policy 1.2.2: Roadway design and streetscaping standards should be developed and implemented to
correspond to the roadway hierarchy identified on Figures 1-6 and 1-7, and discussed in the
Transportation Element. In this hierarchy, Primary Connector Roads should provide the highest
levels of access and guide campus visitors.

Policy 1.2.3: The University shall work with the City of Gainesville, Alachua County and the
Florida Department of Transportation to improve access and aesthetics on Gateway Roads identified
on Figures 1-6 and 1-7 through university participation on the Metropolitan Transportation Planning
Organization and its committees, the College Park/University Heights Advisory Board, and any
special interest groups or local government committees as may be created to address such issues.

Policy 1.2.4: Open space connections as identified on Figure 1-4, shall be maintained and enhanced
to provide bicycle and pedestrian access.

Policy 1.2.5: Explore the development of wayfinding signage to assist visitors on the main campus,
including Shands Teaching Hospital and associated on-campus clinics. Such a signage program
should be developed to minimize sign clutter, provide consistent and unified communication, reduce
on-campus travel, and be aesthetically pleasing.


Objective 1.3.: Utilize building construction, renovation and rehabilitation to enhance the
campus environment

Policy 1.3.1: New buildings or building additions shall strive to maintain a consistent build-to line
along roadway frontages as follows and shall not exceed historic building set-backs where
applicable:
Stadium Road from Gale Lemerand Drive to Buckman Drive shall conform to historic set-
backs of Weil Hall, the Hub and Florida Gym.
University Avenue from Gale Lemerand to SW 13th Street shall conform to historic set-
backs of Keene-Flint, Anderson and Matherly Halls. Any infill development occurring
along this roadway frontage shall reflect an urban character with an orientation toward the
street, and surface parking areas fronting University Avenue shall be minimized in order to


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA URBAN DESIGN
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create an enhanced pedestrian environment and a more seamless interface with the
surrounding city mixed-use areas.
The west side of SW 13th Street from Archer Road to University Avenue shall conform to
the setback of Tigert Hall and the Fine Arts Complex. Any infill development occurring
along this roadway frontage shall reflect an urban character with an orientation toward the
street.
Center Drive from Archer Road to Museum Road shall conform to the setback of the New
Engineering Buildings and begin to create an urban orientation of building facades
addressing the roadway.
Museum Road from west of Center Drive to SW 13th Street shall conform to the setback of
Frazier-Rogers and Dickinson Halls, and reinforce an urban orientation of building facades
addressing the roadway.
New development on Archer Road and SW 16th Avenue shall create an urban orientation of
building facades addressing the roadway.
New clusters of development at the Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Institute, Cultural
Plaza, Southwest Recreation and Fifield Hall areas shall create an urban orientation of
building facades addressing the roadway.
New development on the north side of Radio Road shall create an urban orientation of
building facades that address the roadway, and screen existing warehouses and other
utilitarian facilities.
All other development shall be evaluated on a case-by-case basis within the context of
adjacent or proximate existing structures.

Policy 1.3.2: New buildings or building additions shall preserve or satisfactorily realign pedestrian
connections and future shared use path alignments that are identified on Figures 1-4 and 1-6.

Policy 1.3.3: New buildings or building additions shall be oriented to create functional open
spaces (e.g. plazas and courtyards) and, where applicable, frame areas identified in the Urban
Park land use classification.

Policy 1.3.4: New buildings or building additions shall be developed as infill in currently
developed areas or in transitioning centers of development around the Orthopaedic and Sports
Medicine Institute, Cultural Plaza, Fifield Hall, Genetics/Cancer Institute and at the Radio Road
commuter parking lot. Such transitioning centers of development shall strive to achieve a critical
mass of functionally-related facilities that can support transit. Site designs shall incorporate
pedestrian circulation, bicycle access and functional open space. Buildings shall be a minimum
of three stories in height in these transitioning centers of development, except where unique
building programs dictate lower height structures and recommended for approval is obtained from
the Land Use and Facilities Planning Committee.

Policy 1.3.5: New buildings or building additions along Archer Road and SW 16th Avenue
between the convergence of these roads and SW 13th Street shall define a new urban character
reflecting the strategic significance of the Health Science Center and related interdisciplinary
programs along with the community's economic development vision for this gateway to downtown
and SW 13th Street. This character shall project the image of a major, urban medical complex and



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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA URBAN DESIGN
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health research park including multi-story and high-rise buildings with an orientation toward the
street emphasizing transit, bicycle and pedestrian circulation.

Policy 1.3.6: New buildings or building additions in Planning Sector "G" (depicted on Figure 1-1)
shall project an urban character as described in Policy 3.5, with a minimum of five-story building
height except for areas adjacent to or south of the Veterinary Medicine Hospital which shall
transition to one- and two-story structures as existing in Planning Sector "K" before ultimately giving
way to pasture, agricultural and conservation uses. Utility uses within Planning Sector "G" are also
exempt from this minimum building height requirement.

Policy 1.3.7: New buildings or building additions in the Historic Impact Area shall be between two
and five stories tall, not to exceed the height of existing historically significant buildings in close
proximity to the development site. (The Historic Impact Area and historically significant buildings
are depicted in Figure 1-2.) Building heights in the Historic Impact Area shall be approved by the
Preservation of Historic Buildings and Sites Committee, and the Land Use and Facilities Planning
Committee.

Policy 1.3.8: Building heights for new buildings or building additions in Planning Sector "H",
depicted on Figure 1-1 and including the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School shall be evaluated on a
case-by case basis in consultation with the Land Use and Facilities Planning Committee.

Policy 1.3.9: In the remaining parts of campus not addressed in Policies 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7 and 3.8,
new buildings or building additions shall be a minimum of three stories in height, except where
unique building programs dictate lower heights and recommended for approval is obtained from
the Land Use and Facilities Planning Committee.

Policy 1.3.10: New buildings, building additions or building renovations on the Eastside Campus
shall be consistent with the overall site layout depicted in Figure 1-12, and shall incorporate
landscaping, pedestrian circulation, transit and bicycle access, and functional open space. New
structures shall be two to five stories in height except where unique building programs dictate
lower heights and approval is obtained from the Land Use and Facilities Planning Committee.
Building skin materials shall include Gainesville-range brick and project the image of a satellite
campus comparable to the main campus.

Policy 1.3.11: New buildings and building additions shall integrate with natural topographic and
other physical features in order to develop University property in harmony with its natural
environment.

Policy 1.3.12: New buildings and building additions shall be located in comparable location and
footprint size as the building sites identified in Figure 1-7 of this Element, and Figure 13-1 of the
Capital Improvements Element. The building footprints on these figures are illustrative;
however, they represent the approximate extent and orientation of acceptable footprints in
relation to natural features, utility corridors, pedestrian connections, shared-use paths, historic
structure compatibility and other constraints. Exact building footprints will be developed during
project programming and design with a review by the Land use and Facilities Planning
Committee. This Committee may recommend additional building footprints; however, project
sponsors are encouraged to utilize the locations identified on these figures to site new buildings.





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Objective 1.4: Utilize landscaping and tree preservation to enhance the campus
environment

Policy 1.4.1: Use trees and other plant materials, exterior furniture, paving materials and walls to
help reinforce the spatial organization of the campus creating "outdoor rooms" in functional open
space (e.g. plazas and courtyards) adjacent to buildings, within the Urban Park future land use
classification, and along roadways, pedestrian connections and shared-use paths depicted in Figure 1-
4.

Policy 1.4.2: Implement appropriate landscape, hardscape, pedestrian, and/or bicycle improvements
in areas identified as Open Space Enhancement Priorities in Figure 1-5. These improvements may
be implemented as part of a building construction project or as independent projects funded through
the Physical Plant Division, other administrative sources, grants or private donors. Such projects
shall also reinforce the pedestrian connections and shared-use path corridors identified in Figure 1-4.
These high-visibility open space enhancements shall be recommended for approval by the Lakes,
Vegetation and Landscaping Committee.

Policy 1.4.3: Continue to improve the appearance of campus perimeters along Gateway Roads
identified on Figures 1-6 and 1-7. Landscaping, pedestrian amenities and other features shall be
compatible with the urban design goals of the adjacent local government jurisdiction. All perimeter
landscaping or beautification projects shall be reviewed by the Lakes, Vegetation and Landscaping
Committee, Transportation and Parking Committee, Preservation of Historic Buildings and Sites
Committee (when applicable), and Land Use and Facilities Planning Committee, thereby affording
an opportunity for review by the local government representatives on the committee. General design
approaches for each Gateway Road are as follows:

Northeastern edge: W. University Avenue (SW 2nd Avenue to SW 13th Street) Enhance
the collegiate/urban character of the University along West University Avenue by
incrementally reducing existing surface parking areas as replacement facilities become
available in the vicinity. The enhancements should also open up views of historic buildings,
and add appropriate new buildings of a similar height and scale to present development.
Landscaping, hardscaping, entry signage and pedestrian facilities are appropriate features for
this street frontage.

Northwestern edge: SW 2nd Avenue (SW 34h Street to W. University Avenue) Maintain
the collegiate/landscaped character of the University along SW 13th Street by providing a
landscaped setback with any new development that includes appropriate entry signage and
accommodation for bicyclists and pedestrians while respecting the single-family residential
scale of this boundary.

Eastern edge: SW 13th Street (Archer Road to W. University Avenue) Maintain the
collegiate/landscaped character of the University along SW 13th Street by providing a
landscaped setback with any new development that includes appropriate entry signage and
accommodation for bicyclists and pedestrians.

Southeastern edge: Archer Road (SW 16th Avenue to SW 13th Street) Develop an urban
streetscape character with tall buildings oriented toward the street, street trees, facilities for
transit, bicyclists and pedestrians, entry signage and reduced through-traffic.



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Western edge: SW 34th Street (SW 19th Avenue to Radio Road) Develop a landscaped
setback including street trees and entry features with views of significant Urban Park land
uses and landmark buildings that invite visitors to the University's clinical, conference and
cultural resources.

Policy 1.4.4: Implement streetscape improvements on Fletcher Drive and Union Road between
Fletcher Drive and Buckman Drive that emphasize pedestrian access, reduce vehicular through-
traffic, and feature the historic buildings that frame these corridors.

Policy 1.4.5: Consider the reduction of excessive hardscape areas across campus, and particularly as
pavement removal and landscape screening of the existing surface parking at the University's
symbolic main entrance at SW 13th Street and SW 2nd Avenue when alternative parking is identified.

Policy 1.4.6: Amend the University of Florida Design and Construction Standards, Division 11170
to require screening of service/loading areas from public view and locating such uses away from
significant open spaces and greenways.

Policy 1.4.7: Continue to maintain and expand its inventories of trees (particularly National
Champion and Heritage Specimens) and rare plants (both ornamental and naturally-occurring) on the
main campus. These inventories are maintained by the Facilities Planning and Construction Division
in collaboration with the Physical Plant Division, School of Forest Resources and Conservation and
Department of Botany.

Policy 1.4.8: The University of Florida Design and Construction Standards, Division 02900 shall
continue to specify procedures for the protection and replacement of existing trees and vegetation.
These standards are available online at http://www.facilities.ufl.edu/dcs/index.htm.

Policy 1.4.9: Development projects that impact or necessitate the removal of existing trees and
vegetation shall be addressed according to the University of Florida Design and Construction
Standards. When required, tree mitigation or relocation shall be approved by the Lakes, Vegetation
and Landscaping Committee. Tree mitigation strategies shall assume a minimum two-for-one
replacement of trees larger than three-inch DBH (diameter at breast/4.5" height), although the LVL
committee may request additional mitigation for the loss of large specimen trees. Off-site mitigation
and alternative approaches, such as Conservation Area enhancements, may also be negotiated by the
LVL committee in lieu of and at a comparable cost of two-for-one tree replacement.

Policy 1.4.10: Consistent with the University ofFlorida Design and Construction Standards, special
protection is afforded to national Champion and Heritage Specimen trees that are numbered and
tagged as part of the University's "Tree Walk" maintained by the UF School of Forest Resources and
Conservation. These tagged trees are for teaching purposes and require special protection during any
construction activity that may disturb soil near these trees.

Policy 1.4.11: The Physical Plant Division is responsible for planting, maintenance and removal of
trees throughout the main campus and Eastside Campus. The Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences (IFAS) assumes this responsibility in agricultural and range areas within the area of their
academic responsibility.

Policy 1.4.12: No living tree on the University of Florida main campus or Alachua County Satellite
properties shall be removed or relocated without the approval of the Lakes, Vegetation and
Landscaping Committee except under the following conditions:
The tree is dead.

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA URBAN DESIGN
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The tree is an immediate safety hazard to people, domestic animals, buildings or other
structures, or motor, bicycle or pedestrian traffic, and no responsible correction is available
other than tree removal.
The tree is infested with harmful insects or fungi that cannot be controlled, are not normally
present on trees of the species, and may reasonable be expected to spread to other trees not
so infested.
The tree or trees were planted specifically for purposes of research, and were intended to be
removed upon completion or as part of such research.
A record of such removals is kept and forwarded monthly to the Lakes, Vegetation and
Landscaping Committee.
Trees of less than three inches in diameter (nine inches in circumference) may be removed
when deemed necessary for maintenance or operations.

Policy 1.4.13: The University of Florida Design and Construction Standards, Division 02900 shall
continue to identify appropriate tree, shrub, groundcover and lawn specifications including standards
for use of native and drought-tolerant plants. Landscaping requirements for parking lots and building
construction projects shall also be maintained in these standards. UF Design and Construction
Standards are available online at http://www.facilities.ufl.edu/dcs/index.htm.

Policy 1.4.14: Landscaping required as part of any building new construction, renovation, addition,
or remodeling shall be installed during the appropriate phase of construction, and shall not be
delayed beyond substantial completion of the project.

Policy 1.4.15: The Lakes, Vegetation and Landscaping Committee shall approve landscape plans
and plant selection for construction projects subject to committee review as specified in Policies 1.1,
1.2 and 1.3 of the Implementation Element.


Objective 1.5: Utilize urban design concept site planning to evaluate site opportunities,
constraints and preferences for distinct campus areas.

Policy 1.5.1: Urban Design Concept Plans, such as those presented in Figure 1-8 shall guide future
development in distinct campus areas. While these concept plans are not intended to present the
exact final implementation, they are a guide for the orientation of future buildings, internal
circulation, service areas, parking, landscape features and other site components that must work
together to successfully develop the site over the long term. All projects installed on these sites
should strive to incrementally implement the urban design concept plan, and remain consistent with
the overall design intent when new site information may lead to deviations from the specific plan
presented.

Policy 1.5.2: The Facilities Planning and Construction Division shall work with site occupants,
future user groups, and other stakeholders to develop additional urban design concept plans for
distinct campus areas, including but not limited to Sector "H" for the P. K. Yonge Developmental
Laboratory School. These concept plans shall incorporate the best available information regarding
future facility needs and building programs.







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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA URBAN DESIGN
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Objective 1.6: Utilize public art to add visual interest and educational opportunity to the
campus landscape.

Policy 1.6.1: Continue to implement the Art in State Buildings program specified in Chapter
255.043, Florida Statutes and coordinated through the School of Art and Art History.

Policy 1.6.2: Exterior public art projects, including memorials, should be incorporated in new
construction and open space enhancement projects where feasible. These projects may be
accomplished through collaborations with the Art in State Buildings program, the College of Fine
Arts, the Samuel P. Ham Museum of Art, private donors, grants and public art programs of the City
of Gainesville and Alachua County.

Policy 1.6.3: All public art projects, including memorials, that are visible on the exterior of buildings
shall be reviewed and recommended for approval by the Lakes, Vegetation and Landscaping
Committee (LVLC), and the Land Use and Facilities Planning Committee (LUFPC).

Policy 1.6.4: All public art projects within the Historic District Impact Area shown in Figure 1-2
shall be reviewed by the University's Preservation of Historic Buildings and Sites Committee
(PHBSC), and at the direction of this committee or the university administration, may be forwarded
to the Florida Division of Historical Resources (DHR) for review in accordance with the University's
Programmatic Memorandum of Agreement with the DHR.

Policy 1.6.5: As appropriate, public art that also constitutes the memorial of a person or event shall
be reviewed and approved by the Honorary Degrees, Distinguished Alumnus Awards and Memorials
Committee, a Faculty Senate standing committee.

Policy 1.6.6: The University shall create a public art and memorials committee, including but not
limited to representation from the PHBSC, LVLC, LUFPC, and College of Fine Arts, for the purpose
of reviewing public art and memorials that are not part of the Art in State Buildings program.

Policy 1.6.7: Public art projects that are part of the Art in State Buildings program per Chapter
255.043 F.S., shall be administered by the College of Fine Arts in collaboration with the Facilities
Planning and Construction Division.


Objective 1.7: Protect and enhance the historic and archaeological resources of the
University.

Policy 1.7.1: Continue to identify, designate and protect the university's historic and
archaeological resources by complying with the provisions set forth in the programmatic
memorandum of agreement with the State Division of Historic Resources pursuant to Section
267.061(2) Florida Statutes regarding new construction, earthwork and landscaping activities.

Policy 1.7.2: The Physical Plant Division, Facilities Planning and Construction Division, and
College of Design, Construction and Planning shall continue to collaborate on development of a
historic preservation plan for the main campus to include inventories of character-defining
features and best practices for rehabilitation and new construction specific to the University of
Florida campus.


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URBAN DESIGN
ELEMENT


Objective 1.8: Ensure equal access to university facilities, services and resources for
individuals regardless ofphysical disabilities.

Policy 1.8.1: Continue to require the provision of accessibility improvements for disabled
persons as part of all new construction and renovation projects in compliance with the University
of Florida Design and Construction Standards, the Florida Building Code, Chapter 11 (Florida
Accessibility Code for Building Construction, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the
Florida Americans with Disability Accessibility Implementation Act.

Policy 1.8.2: The University's ADA Compliance Office shall provide review and approval of all
ADA accessibility features.

Policy 1.8.3: The University's ADA Compliance Office shall continue to assess existing
facilities for ADA accessibility, and initiate special projects to correct any deficiencies.


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2.
FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA FUTURE LAND USE
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

Introduction

This Future Land Use Element includes Goals, Objectives and Policies (GOP) that apply to the
main campus and Alachua County Satellite Properties. The Future Land Use map (Figure 2-1) is
provided to identify locations where general building use types and activities are appropriate.
These use types include the following future land use classifications: Academic/Research,
Academic/Research Outdoor, Active Recreation, Active Recreation Outdoor, Green Space
Buffer, Conservation, Cultural, Housing, Parking, Support/Clinical, Urban Park and Utility.
Definitions for these land use types are provided in the following policies and describe the
allowable activities within each classification.

Future land use classifications are assigned to campus areas for the purpose of describing the
highest and best use of the land resource. These designations are determined by considering
cultural and natural resources, physical constraints to development, proximity to existing
facilities, accessibility, adjacent land uses, development patterns and facility needs by use type.
Future building sites are mapped for the purpose of identifying the approximate location of future
buildings. These sites are not intended to represent final building footprint design, but rather, the
general location and size of a potential building. An analysis of natural and man-made
constraints to development is presented in Figure 2-3, which supports the land use classifications
and future building sites within those areas. Through this and other analyses, future building sites
were identified capable of doubling the square footage of the University's main campus physical
plant while protecting wetlands, floodplains, habitat, historical/archaeological sites, geological
features and other natural and man-made resources. Although the University does not foresee the
need or ability to increase its size that dramatically, these building locations are identified of
varying sizes in order to demonstrate that all foreseeable building activity can be accommodated
in these areas without impacting natural resources, building on inappropriate sites or violating
significant historic resources, pedestrian connectivity and view sheds. The Future Building Sites
by Future Land Use map (Figure 2-2) should be considered a plan for ultimate build-out of the
University, which could take another 100 years to double its size.

Within Figure 2-2, specific locations are identified for probable development within the 10-year
horizon of this plan. Table 2-1, Proposed Capital Projects by Land Use, presents buildings
anticipated for construction during 2005 to 2015 by land use classification. Additional detail
regarding these projects is contained in the Capital Improvement Element and Figure 13-1 of that
Element. The exact timing and funding of projects is highly variable at the University where
state budgets, capital campaign benefactors, grants, bonding and other finance opportunities can
impact the predictability of capital project funds. Recently, the University constructed
approximately 2,580,000 gross square feet of net new space on the main campus during the 10-
year period, 1995 through 2004. Another 841,000 gross square feet of net new space if
programmed through the 2005/06 fiscal year. Only a modest percentage of this new physical
plant was funded from state dollars.












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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
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FUTURE LAND USE
ELEMENT


Table 2-1: Proposed Capital Projects by Land Use, 2005-2015

Land Use Classification Total New Building GSF
Academic/Research & Academic/Research-Outdoor 2,104,856
Support / Clinical (including Shands&UF) 712,262
Cultural 290,456
Housing 284,502
Active Recreation & Active Recreation-Outdoor 342,760
Utility 19,500
Total 3,754,336

The Future Land Use allocations presented in Figure 2-1 represent the highest and best use of the
university's land resources over the period of this plan horizon and beyond. Some changes to
existing land uses as presented in this figure may not be realized for twenty years or more. The
land use definitions have been modified from the previous plan documents; however comparisons
of these allocations are provided in the tables below.

Table 2-2: Comparison of Future Land Use Main Campus, 2005-2015
Future Land Use Future Land Use
Land Use 2005-2015 2000-2010 Future Land Use 2000-2010
Classification (Proposed) (as Amended 2004) (as Originally Adopted)
Academic 275 573 574
Academic Outdoor 325 na na
Active Recreation 72 271 273
Active Recreation -
Outdoor 198 na na
Green Space Buffer 23 na na
Conservation 447 328 327
Cultural 20 11 11
Housing 159 131 131
Parking 93 138 134
Passive Recreation na 215 217
Support / Clinical 167 122 121
Urban Park 68 na na
Utility 24 20 22
Roads 84 46 46
OTAL 1955 1855 1855
NOTE: The additional 100 acres reported in the Campus Master Plan for 2005-2015 is the result of
correcting previous mapping errors in the campus boundary and in accounting for roads and water.


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
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FUTURE LAND USE
ELEMENT


Table 2-3: Future Land Use Change Main Campus, 2004 to 2015


Change from 2004 Amended
Land Use Classification CMP to 2015 Proposed CMP

Academic and Academic-Outdoor 32

Active Recreation and Active
Recreation-Outdoor -1
Buffer and Urban Park
(formerly Passive Recreation) -124
Conservation 115
Cultural 9
Housing 28
Parking -45
Support / Clinical 45
Utility 4
Roads 38
Total 100
* The increase in total acreage is due to mapping errors in the original 2000 base year data primarily
accounting for water and roads. The net gain in Conservation acreage includes the addition of open water
bodies, without which, the net gain in Conservation is 56 acres. Water acreage adds a total of 68 +/- acres
to the total campus acreage that was not previously counted in a land use classification.


Goal 1: To Encourage the Orderly, Harmonious and Judicious Use of University
Resources in the Development of University Land


Objective 1.1: Make available future building sites that provide a range of future land use
activities to support the academic mission of the University meeting the needs of the present and
allowing for rational, sustainable growth that does not compromise the potential for future
development and protection of valuable natural and cultural resources.

Policy 1.1.1: The University's adopted Campus Master Plan shall be used to make decisions
regarding future land use, development and land management on the main campus and satellite
properties under the jurisdiction of the plan. Administrative interpretation of the plan maps,
goals, objectives and policies shall be done consistent with the provisions of Chapter 1013.30,
Florida Statutes and the review procedures outlined in the Implementation Element.

Policy 1.1.2: Land use classifications shall be defined as follows:
*Academic/Research: The Academic/Research land use classification identifies those areas
on the campus that are appropriate for academic and research building development.
Adjacent land use and proximity to other Academic/Research uses are primary location
criteria for Academic/Research in order to consolidate these functions into convenient,
walkable clusters of development. Extension functions are included in the

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Academic/Research land use classification and are encouraged to be located on the campus
perimeter or satellite properties if they require frequent visitor access. Ancillary uses
associated with an academic/research facility, such as utilities, service drives, user and
disabled parking, and functional open space are allowed within the Academic/Research land
use classification. Development densities, heights and patterns in the Academic/Research
land use shall respect pedestrian connections, historic context (where applicable), adjacencies
to other land uses and creation of functional open space while maximizing the efficient use of
building footprints to the extent feasible within construction budgets and program
requirements.
* Academic/Research Outdoor: The Academic/Research Outdoor land use classification
identifies those areas on the campus that are appropriate for agriculture and livestock
activities providing teaching, research and extension that require close proximity to other
main campus resources or are located on satellite properties away from the main campus.
Allowable structure development shall typically include greenhouses, pole barns, equipment
storage sheds, and other support buildings associated with an agricultural, silviculture,
aquaculture or livestock use. Office and laboratory structures shall be allowable on
conditions that their size, scope and function are related to and compatible with agriculture
and livestock activities. Ancillary uses associated with an academic/research outdoor
activity, such as utilities, service drives, user and disabled parking, and functional open space
are allowed within the Academic/Research Outdoor land use classification.
* Active Recreation: The Active Recreation land use classification identifies those areas on
the campus that are appropriate for recreation sports and athletics building development.
Accessibility of the site to its customers (general public, students, etc.) is a primary location
criterion for Active Recreation land use. Proximity to other recreational uses, housing and
parking are also important location criteria aimed at integrating recreation areas into the
campus development pattern. Ancillary uses associated with an active recreation facility,
such as utilities, service drives, user and disabled parking, and functional open space are
allowed within the Active Recreation land use classification. Development densities, heights
and patterns in the Active Recreation land use shall respect pedestrian connections, historic
context (where applicable), adjacencies to other land uses and creation of functional open
space while maximizing the efficient use of building footprints to the extent feasible within
construction budgets and program requirements.
* Active Recreation Outdoor: The Active Recreation Outdoor land use classification
identifies those areas on the campus that are appropriate for recreation sports and athletics
facility development such as sports fields, courts and swimming pools. Accessibility of the
site to its customers (general public, students, etc.) is a primary location criterion for Active
Recreation Outdoor land use. Proximity to other recreational uses, housing, parking and open
spaces are also important location criteria aimed at integrating recreation areas into the
campus development pattern. Allowable structure development shall be limited to locker
rooms, ticket booths, rest rooms, equipment storage sheds, outdoor seating and other support
structures associated with an active recreation use on conditions that their size, scope and
function are related to and compatible with outdoor active recreation activities. Ancillary
uses associated with an active recreation facility, such as utilities, service drives, user and
disabled parking, and functional open space are allowed within the Active Recreation
Outdoor land use classification. Development densities, heights and patterns in the Active
Recreation Outdoor land use shall respect pedestrian connections, historic context (where
applicable), adjacencies to other land uses and creation of functional open space while
maximizing the efficient use of building footprints to the extent feasible within construction
budgets and program requirements.

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA FUTURE LAND USE
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

* Conservation: The Conservation land use classification identifies areas on campus that shall
be preserved and managed to protect natural features including topography, soil conditions,
archaeological sites, plant and animal species, wildlife habitats, heritage trees and wetlands.
The preservation and management of natural features in Conservation shall be conducted in
accordance with a Conservation Land Management Plan and policies of the Campus Master
Plan. Allowable uses in Conservation areas include natural habitat preservation, water
resource protection, teaching and research activities related to the natural resource and nature
parks. Stormwater facilities and utility conveyances shall be allowable on conditions of
minimizing and mitigating any impacts with due consideration of the conservation intent of
the Conservation land use.
* Cultural: The Cultural land use classification identifies those areas on the campus that are
appropriate for cultural uses, including museums, fine art galleries, performing arts and
related student organization and faculty support facilities. Accessibility of the site to its
customers (general public, students, etc.) is a primary location criterion for Cultural land use.
Adjacent land use and proximity to other Cultural uses are also important location criteria
aimed at consolidating these functions into convenient, walkable clusters. Ancillary uses
associated with a cultural facility, such as utilities, service drives, user and disabled parking,
food vending, and functional open space are allowed within the Cultural land use
classification. Development densities, heights and patterns in the Cultural land use shall
respect pedestrian connections, historic context (where applicable), adjacencies to other land
uses and creation of functional open space while maximizing the efficient use of building
footprints to the extent feasible within construction budgets and program requirements.
* Green Space Buffer: The Green Space Buffer land use classification identifies areas on
campus that shall be maintained in open space as buffers to provide set-back, vegetative
screening, fencing and/or other means of separating adjacent land uses in accordance with
policies of the Campus Master Plan. Such buffers may be designated adjacent to non-
university properties, designated Conservation Areas, roadways or major utility
infrastructure. Stormwater facilities and underground utility conveyances shall be allowable
within a Green Space Buffer on conditions of minimizing and mitigating any impacts with
due consideration of the buffering intent of the Green Space Buffer land use.
* Housing: The Housing land use classification identifies those areas on campus that are
appropriate for housing development. Proximity to academic, student services and student
recreation facilities are primary location criteria for Housing land use. Allowable uses in
Housing areas include residence halls, graduate/family village communities and medical
resident complexes. Academic support, student service and student recreation facilities shall
be allowed and encouraged within the Housing land use classification on conditions that their
size, scope and function are related to and compatible with student housing. Development
densities, heights and patterns in the Housing land use shall respect pedestrian connections,
historic context (where applicable), adjacencies to other land uses and creation of functional
open space while maximizing the efficient use of building footprints to the extent feasible
within construction budgets and program requirements. Ancillary uses associated with a
housing facility, such as utilities, service drives, user and disabled parking, and functional
open space are allowed within the Housing land use classification.
* Parking: The Parking land use classification identifies those areas on campus that are
appropriate for general parking in surface lots or garage structures. Accessibility, proximity
and adjacent land uses are primary location criteria for Parking in order to direct traffic to
appropriate perimeter intercept locations on roadways capable of accommodating associated
traffic and avoiding impacts in areas with high volume pedestrian activity. Stormwater
facilities and utility conveyance systems are allowed within the Parking land use. Parking

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA FUTURE LAND USE
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

structures are encouraged to include liner buildings containing non-parking land uses. Where
this occurs, the application of land use classification boundaries shall be flexible to promote
co-location of uses. Parking facility development in the Parking land use shall respect
pedestrian connections, historic context (where applicable) and adjacencies to other land uses
to minimize or mitigate any negative impacts of noise, air quality or appearance.
* Support/Clinical: The Support/Clinical land use classification identifies those areas on
campus that are appropriate for support building development. Accessibility of the site to its
customers (general public, students, etc.) is a primary location criterion for Support/Clinical
land use. Allowable uses in Support/Clinical areas include administrative, student services,
research support, medical clinics, office and similar non-instructional activities. Clinical,
research support and office functions that require frequent visitor access are encouraged to
locate on the campus perimeter or satellite properties. Ancillary uses associated with a
support facility, such as utilities, service drives, user and disabled parking, and functional
open space are allowed within the Support/Clinical land use classification. Development
densities, heights and patterns in the Support/Clinical land use shall respect pedestrian
connections, historic context (where applicable), adjacencies to other land uses and creation
of functional open space while maximizing the efficient use of building footprints to the
extent feasible within construction budgets and program requirements.
* Urban Park: The Urban Park land use classification identifies areas on campus that shall be
maintained in open space as Urban Park resources to provide vital green spaces within built
areas and connections between built areas in accordance with policies of the Campus Master
Plan. Urban Park land use shall be designated for significant existing or proposed gardens,
greenways, lawns and plazas. Stormwater facilities and underground utility conveyances
shall be allowable within Urban Parks on conditions of minimizing and mitigating any
impacts with due consideration of the passive recreational park intent of the Urban Park land
use. Additional open space connections shall be protected by identifying Pedestrian
Connections that may occur in any land use classification.
* Utility: The Utility land use classification identifies those areas on campus that are
appropriate for utility structure development. Proximity of the site to existing utility
structures, distribution systems and end-users is a primary location criterion for Utility land
use. Allowable uses in utility areas include all utility infrastructure necessary to support the
University's electrical, stormwater, sanitary sewer, potable water, chilled water, steam,
natural gas, telecommunication and solid waste systems. User and disabled parking and
service drives are also allowed within the Utility land use classification. Infrastructure
development in the Utility land use shall respect pedestrian connections, historic context
(where applicable) and adjacencies to other land uses to minimize or mitigate any negative
impacts of noise, odor or appearance.
* Vacant/Undeveloped: This land use classification identifies existing vacant or undeveloped
sites that are appropriate for future development due to physical site properties, adjacent land
use, proximity, accessibility, and development patterns. An amendment to the Campus
Master Plan establishing one of the above future land use classifications is necessary before
development can occur on any vacant sites not identified in the future land use plan for
development.

Policy 1.1.3: The following densities and intensities of land use are identified for each Future Land Use
classification for the purposes of evaluating the criteria set forth in Chapter 1013.30 (9)(a), F.S:




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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015


FUTURE LAND USE
ELEMENT


Future Land Use Ground Area Coverage (GAC) Floor Area Ratio (FAR)
(building footprint / land acreage) (building GSF / land acreage)
Academic/Research 0.25 0.45 0.65 2.50
Academic/Research Outdoor 0.00 0.05 0.01 0.30
Active Recreation 0.01 0.25 0.01 0.70
Active Recreation Outdoor 0.01 0.02 0.01 0.03
Conservation 0.00 0.01 0.00 0.01
Cultural 0.20 0.40 0.30 1.25
Green Space Buffer 0.00 0.01 0.00 0.01
Housing 0.15 -0.20 0.40 0.55 (with a recommended
average 88 d.u./acre for residence
halls and 20 d.u./acre for village
communities)
Parking 0.15 1.00 (for surface parking) 1.50 8.00 (for structured parking
with intensity/density addressed
primarily by evaluation of
parking space capacity)
Support/Clinical 0.25 0.35 0.58- 1.05
Urban Park 0.00 0.01 0.00 0.01
Utility 0.25 0.33 0.05 1.50

Policy 1.1.4: The Future Land Use map and Future Building Sites map shall be used to identify
available land and redevelopment sites suitable for development on the main campus to
accommodate future growth, define future infill opportunities and conserve existing resources.
Future Land Use maps shall identify available land for development on university satellite
properties consistent with the list of projects in Table 13-1 and the Capital Improvements
Element. This inventory of available sites shall be updated on a periodic basis, no less than once
every five years, to reflect changes in status.

Policy 1.1.5: The selection of building sites, refinement of future building site footprints and
design of associated site improvements within designated future land use areas shall:
Conform to the Future Land Use definition in Policy 1.1, Future Land Use Element;
Preserve or satisfactorily realign pedestrian connections and future shared use path
alignments that appear on the Urban Design Connections Map in the Urban Design
Element;
Create functional compatibility between adjacent facilities within the contiguous future
land use area and along the boundaries between different future land use classifications,
particularly when a new structure is adjacent to a Conservation land use as addressed in
the Conservation Element, Policy 1.3;
Create building groupings that frame functional open space when encouraged by the
Future Land Use definition;
Provide compatibility of size, scale, orientation and materials with existing structures in
the Registered Historic District and its impact area as presented on the Historic District
Area of Impact Map in the Urban Design Element;
Group similar or associated programs in close proximity to one another in order to
facilitate interaction between the facility occupants, particularly in support of
interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary teaching and research;


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA FUTURE LAND USE
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

Concentrate buildings in centers of development to accommodate convenient pedestrian
access between buildings, provide a critical mass that facilitates associated support
activities (parking, transit, food service, etc.) and retain open spaces; and
Avoid locations of undesirable soils or topography by conducting appropriate soil and
geotechnical evaluations during site selection and design.

Policy 1.1.6: The University shall recognize that some development projects appearing on the
Future Building Sites map will displace existing facilities and convert existing land uses to
different use classifications as presented on the Future Land Use map. Such development
projects will create a financial impact for replacement and/or relocation of existing uses. To
address this impact, the University shall seek to strategically vacate those impacted facilities in
conjunction with funded projects either prior to or at the time of use conversion.

Policy 1.1.7: Capital projects, including new construction and major renovations, that are not
consistent with the future land use definitions in Policy 1.2 of this Element shall not be allowed
without an amendment to the Campus Master Plan unless it is demonstrated to the satisfaction of
the Future Land Use and Facilities Planning Committee that such investments are short-term in
nature and will not impede future develop of the site in conformance with the Future Land Use
designation on Figure 2-1. Facilities that exist at the time of Plan adoption, but are inconsistent
with the Future Land Use map should continue to be utilized and maintained until such time as
replacement facilities are provided or the facilities become obsolete.

Policy 1.1.8: The Future Land Use definitions may be interpreted to allow a variety of mixed-use
buildings, including parking structures with other uses provided in liner buildings, or buildings
that contain ground-floor or below-grade parking levels except in the Pedestrian Enhancement
Zone identified in Figure 8.5 of the Transportation Element. Such mixed-use interpretations shall
be recommended for approval by the University Land Use and Facilities Planning Committee.


Objective 1.2: Minimize deviations from the adopted Future Land Use map and classifications.

Policy 1.2.1: Modification of future land use classifications shown in the most recently adopted
Future Land Use Map (Figure 2-1), require an amendment to the Campus Master Plan to be
processed consistent with Chapter 1013.30, Florida Statutes and applicable University of Florida
Operating Memorandum.

Policy 1.2.2: Future Land Use amendments that modify the boundaries of a designated
Conservation Area must analyze and document alternative site evaluations, environmental impact
assessments and solutions that minimize the impact to the Conservation Area. When these
analyses confirm the necessity of the Future Land Use modification, impacts in the Conservation
Area shall be mitigated as required by Policy 4.11 of the Conservation Element.

Policy 1.2.3: Future Land Use amendments that modify the boundaries of a designated
Academic/Research-Outdoor Area must analyze and document alternative site evaluations,
teaching and research impact assessment, and solutions that minimize the impact to the
Academic/Research-Outdoor Area. If these analyses confirm the necessity of the Future Land
Use modification, steps must be taken to address the replacement and/or relocation of the outdoor
teaching and research laboratory resulting from conversion of use.



PAGE 2-8
MARCH 2006








3.
ACADEMIC FACILITIES ELEMENT







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA ACADEMIC FACILITIES
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

Introduction

This Academic Facilities Element includes Goals, Objectives and Policies (GOP) that apply to the
main campus and satellite properties included in the campus master plan. The Capital
Improvements Element identifies capital projects identified to address academic and research
space deficiencies.

The focus of the Academic Facilities Element is to assess the ability of the University, through its
capital outlay, to provide sufficient space in a variety of academic and research categories that are
supported by the University's Academic Strategic Plan. In the University of Florida Space Files and
Educational Plant Survey, the analysis of indoor academic space is based on a calculation of net
assignable square feet (NASF) of facilities that serve academic functions. In the Space Files and
analysis formula, ten space categories are recognized plus a category of "other". The ten
categories include:

Instructional Academic Support Institutional Support
Classroom Facilities Study Facilities Student Academic Support
Teaching Laboratory Facilities Instructional Media Facilities Office/Computer Facilities
Research Laboratory Facilities Auditorium/Exhibition Facilities Campus Support Facilities
Teaching Gymnasium Facilities


The Educational Plant Survey for June 2004 through June 2009 identified an unmet need of 319,344
NASF of instructional space and another 502,491 NASF of unmet need in the categories of study
facilities and instructional media (i.e. these classifications largely represent library space and similar
functions). The Capital Improvements Element identifies 2,104,856 gross square feet of net new
construction anticipated in the Academic/Research and Academic/Research-Outdoor future land uses
over the next ten years through 2015.

In terms of the campus master plan future land use classifications, a facility within the
Academic/Research land use category will have a preponderance of Instructional space; however,
Academic Support and Institutional Support space will typically be in the same building. Within
the Space Files, libraries include study facilities and instructional media that are classified within
the Academic Support space type but are identified in the Academic/Research land use
classification of the campus master plan.

Existing and future academic facilities are located within the Academic/Research and
Academic/Research-Outdoor land use classifications on the Future Land Use map, Figure 2-1 of
the Future Land Use Element. The definition of these land use classifications is as follows:


*Academic/Research: The Academic/Research land use classification identifies those areas
on the campus that are appropriate for academic and research building development.
Adjacent land use and proximity to other A,,, i/,,L R I'. %,, ii./h uses are primary location
criteria for Academic/Research in order to consolidate these functions into convenient,
walkable clusters of development. Extension functions are included in the
Academic/Research land use classification and are encouraged to be located on the campus
perimeter or satellite properties if they require frequent visitor access. Ancillary uses
associated with an academic/research facility, such as utilities, service drives, user and
disabled parking, and functional open space are allowed within the Academic/Research land
use classification. Development densities, heights and patterns in the AL,, ii /?L A' I, ii /

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA ACADEMIC FACILITIES
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

land use shall respect pedestrian connections, historic context (where applicable),
adjacencies to other land uses and creation of functional open space while maximizing the
efficient use of building footprints to the extent feasible within construction budgets and
program requirements.
*Academic/Research Outdoor: The Academic/Research Outdoor land use classification
identifies those areas on the campus that are appropriate for agriculture and livestock
activities providing teaching, research and extension that require close proximity to other
main campus resources or are located on satellite properties away from the main campus.
Allowable structure development shall typically include greenhouses, pole barns, equipment
storage sheds, and other support buildings associated with an agriculture, silviculture,
aquaculture or livestock use. Office and laboratory structures shall be allowable on
conditions that their size, scope and function are related to and compatible with agriculture
and livestock activities. Ancillary uses associated with an academic/research outdoor
activity, such as utilities, service drives, user and disabled parking, and functional open
space are allowed within the Academic/Research Outdoor land use classification.



Goal 1: Provide Sufficient Facilities for Academic and Research Endeavors Across
All Colleges and Consistent with the University's Academic Strategic Plan.

Objective 1.1: To monitor and manage academic and research facilities to maximize
efficiency and productivity.

Policy 1.1.1: The Facilities Planning and Construction Division shall maintain a current inventory of
academic space, and evaluate space utilization and occupancy consistent with the Educational Plant
Survey requirements of Chapter 1013.31, Florida Statutes.

Policy 1.1.2: The Facilities Planning & Construction Division shall provide space inventory,
utilization and adequacy information to the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, the
Senior Vice President for Health Affairs, the Senior Vice President for the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences and the Faculty Senate Chairperson for use in determining academic space
deficiencies and corrective actions to implement through the Office of the Vice President for
Finance and Administration.

Policy 1.1.3: Identify and pursue opportunities to gain academic and research space in existing
campus buildings by reassigning non-academic activities out of academic/research buildings or,
in some cases, moving non-academic units to off-campus locations.

Policy 1.1.4: Explore opportunities to consolidate and relocate research facilities from the Civil
and Coastal Engineering facilities on SW 6th Street to the Eastside Campus on Waldo Road.

Policy 1.1.5: Explore opportunities to consolidate and relocate research facilities from the Surge
Area on Surge Area Drive to the Health Science Center facilities along Archer Road.

Policy 1.1.6: Provide suitable and adequate land resources for programs requiring outdoor
teaching and research activities, in accordance with Figure 3-2 of this Element.





PAGE 3-2
MARCH 2006







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015


ACADEMIC FACILITIES
ELEMENT


Policy 1.1.7: The University of Florida Board of Trustees shall continue to monitor progress
toward implementation of the university's Academic Strategic Plan that sets a target to achieve
ranking in the top ten public universities, and amend the Academic Strategic Plan as appropriate.

Policy 1.1.8: Facilitate collaboration between university academics and operations to use the
campus as a living laboratory and educational opportunity, particularly as a model of
sustainability-related application, research and teaching.


Objective 1.2: To increase academic and research facilities to eliminate deficiencies and
support the university's Academic Strategic Plan.

Policy 1.2.1: Utilize the Educational Plant Survey to identify deficiencies in libraries, classrooms,
teaching and research facilities.

Policy 1.2.2: Utilize the university's Educational Plant Survey, Academic Strategic Plan,
departmental accreditation reviews, enrollment trends and research productivity to set priorities
for new, expanded or remodeled academic and research space through the annual Capital
Improvement Program update process, and amend the campus master plan Capital Improvement
Element as necessary.

Policy 1.2.3: Locate new academic/research facilities in proximity to existing academic/research
facilities or in concentrated areas of new academic/research facilities near the
Genetics/Cancer/Biotech Pavilion building and Fifield Hall as identified in Figures 3-1 and 3-2 of
this Element.


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MARCH 2006








4.
SUPPORT / CLINICAL FACILITIES
ELEMENT






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA SUPPORT / CLINICAL FACILITIES
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

Introduction

This Support/Clinical Facilities Element includes Goals, Objectives and Policies (GOP) that
apply to the main campus and satellite properties included in the campus master plan. The
Capital Improvements Element identifies capital projects identified to address academic and
research space deficiencies.

The focus of the Support/Clinical Facilities Element is to assess the ability of the University, through
its capital outlay, to provide sufficient space in a variety of support categories that are non-
instructional or administrative in nature. In the University of Florida Space Files and Educational
Plant Survey, the analysis of indoor support space is based on a calculation of net assignable square
feet (NASF) of facilities that support academic functions. In the Space Files and analysis formula,
ten space categories are recognized plus a category of "other". The ten categories include:

Instructional Academic Support Institutional Support
Classroom Facilities Study Facilities Student Academic Support
Teaching Laboratory Facilities Instructional Media Facilities Office/Computer Facilities
Research Laboratory Facilities Auditorium/Exhibition Facilities Campus Support Facilities
Teaching Gymnasium Facilities

Based upon space definitions and formulas in the Educational Plant Survey, additional space is
needed in a variety of Support/Clinical and Cultural land use categories during a five-year period
to 2009. These spaces serve various administrative, academic support and exhibition space.
Specifically, the Educational Plant Survey identified an unmet space need for 292,396 NASF of
Institutional Support, 23,998 NASF of Auditorium/Exhibition, 61,638 NASF of Teaching
Gymnasium, and 502,491 NASF of Study and Instructional Media facilities. These space needs
are only through the year 2009, and do not include functions that are unique to the University of
Florida when compared to other State University System schools such as medical clinics, state
museums and a developmental research K-12 school.

In relation to the Campus Master Plan future land use categories, these indoor support space types
are somewhat problematic because the space types are typically present in buildings along with
other use types. A facility within the Academic/Research land use category will have a
preponderance of Instructional space; however, Academic Support and Institutional Support
space will typically be in the same building. Similarly, the auditorium/exhibition space type is
typically identified within the Cultural land use classification. In prior campus planning efforts,
recreation facilities have also been considered within the Support Element, however, those
facilities are now exclusively addressed in the Recreation and Open Space Element. Within the
Space Files, libraries include study facilities and instructional media that are classified within the
Academic Support space type. However, the campus master plan places libraries within the
Academic Land Use classification due to their direct role in teaching and investigation.

Specifically, support space includes a variety of campus facilities such as computer laboratories,
physical plant operations and maintenance facilities, mail and documents services, administrative
offices, storage facilities, dining halls, child day care facilities, academic advising, student
services and student health centers. In terms of the campus master plan land use classifications,
facilities with a preponderance of Academic Support, Institutional Support, or "other" space are
placed in the Support land use classification. Additionally, support spaces such as research
animal care facilities, medical clinics and the P.K. Yonge Developmental Laboratory School are
also placed in the Support land use classification because they support teaching and investigation,


PAGE 4-1
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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA SUPPORT / CLINICAL FACILITIES
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

but are not purely academic or research. These are just a sampling of the array of university
activities that support academic functions and are consistent with the support space type and land
use classification. They are critical to the university's mission and cover a broad spectrum of
functions, and therefore, include a significant amount of the campus' physical facilities.

Table 13-1, Ten-Year Capital Projects List includes 712,262 gross square feet of net new space to
be constructed within the Support/Clinical Land Use during in the 10-year plan horizon.
Additionally, it projects another 290,456 gross square feet of net new space with the Cultural
Land Use classification.


Goal 1: To Provide Sufficient Facilities for Student Services, Administrative,
Physical Plant, Clinical, Auxiliary and Other Non-Instructional Functions that
Support the University's Teaching, Research and Extension Mission.

Objective 1.0: Provide support facilities consistent with the academic support needs of
the University and in accordance with applicable space standards and customer
expectations.

Policy 1.1.1: The Facilities Planning and Construction Division shall maintain a current inventory of
support space, and evaluate space utilization and occupancy consistent with the Educational Plant
Survey requirements of Chapter 1013.31, Florida Statutes.

Policy 1.1.2: The location of support facilities shall be consistent with the Future Land Use map,
Figure 2-1 and Future Building Sites map, Figure 13-1.

Policy 1.1.3: Support facilities that serve primarily students shall be conveniently located in
proximity to academic areas, student housing and transit facilities to maximize accessibility.

Policy 1.1.4: Support facilities that attract the general public and/or have minimal interaction with
students should locate on the campus perimeter adjacent to parking and transit facilities, or in off-
campus locations, or at the Eastside Campus on Waldo Road to maximize accessibility.

Policy 1.1.5: Patient clinics shall be designed to effectively and efficiently treat patients in
environments that adapt to changing patient care technologies and promote healing through
innovative design utilizing natural light, comfortable furnishings and appropriate colors.

Policy 1.1.6: Begin to develop a student support services cluster north of Radio Road and east of
SW 34th Street consistent with the Future Land Use map, and convenient to student housing and
recreation facilities.

Policy 1.1.7: P. K. Yonge Developmental Laboratory School shall examine its space needs and
develop a program and funding plan for building renovation and replacement necessary to maintain
K-12 space requirements.

Policy 1.1.8: The Physical Plant Division shall initiate a study to explore opportunities to increase
space efficiency within the compound area north of Radio Road and to decentralize some functions
elsewhere on- or off-campus.



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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015


SUPPORT / CLINICAL FACILITIES
ELEMENT


Policy 1.1.9: The University shall explore the potential to relocate and consolidate facilities from the
Civil and Coastal Engineering site on SW 6th Street to the Eastside Campus on Waldo Road thus
creating the opportunity to re-establish this SW 6th Street area in a support land use.


PAGE 4-3
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5.
HOUSING ELEMENT







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA HOUSING
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

Introduction

This Housing Element includes Goals, Objectives and Policies (GOP) that apply to the main
campus in Gainesville. The Alachua County Satellite Properties and statewide Research and
Education Center (REC) facilities do not provide general-purpose student housing. Any housing
located off the main campus is provided specifically for students and/or employees who are
actively involved in research or management at the site. Such housing is not managed by the
university's Department of Housing and Residence Education. Housing at those locations is
addressed in the Capital Improvement Element and the Fort Lauderdale REC Element.

The Department of Housing and Residence Education has prepared a Housing Master Plan for the
years 2005-2012, updating a previous plan that included a timeframe through 2010. The Housing
Element and Data & Analysis Report for the Campus Master Plan borrow heavily from this
document. The Housing Master Plan was developed by Department staff and utilizes several guiding
principles to give a framework for decision-making.

The Department's mission is to provide well-maintained, community-oriented facilities where
residents and staff are empowered to learn, innovate, and succeed. The Department of Housing and
Residence Education is a self-supporting auxiliary operation that generates income from student
rents and receives no state funding. Therefore, the Department must minimize the time periods that
buildings are taken off-line for renovations, and must manage its supply and demand to avoid vacant
units. The Department also relies on its unique advantages of academic collaboration, amenities,
convenience, staffing, security, educational programming and affordability to successfully compete
with the private market housing.

On-campus housing has been a part of the University of Florida since the establishment of the
Gainesville campus. Currently, on-campus housing is available for approximately 22% of the main
campus student population. In order to maintain this ratio of housing to main campus enrollment, the
University will need to construct approximately 800 new units between 2005 and 2015. Most, or all,
of these units are anticipated to serve family and graduate student housing needs since this is the
sector of enrollment expected to increase. On-campus housing includes all housing under the
University Department of Housing and Residence Education, as well as those fraternity and sorority
houses located on University property and/or subject to university rules and regulations through
property deed restrictions. Undergraduate student housing is predominantly provided by single-
student residence halls, fraternities and sororities. Village Communities serve graduate students and
family housing for students with dependents.

The Future Land Use Element defines the housing land use classification as follows:
Housing: The Housing land use classification identifies those areas on campus that are
appropriate for housing development. Proximity to academic, student services and
student recreation facilities are primary location criteria for Housing land use.
Allowable uses in Housing areas include residence halls, graduate/family village
communities and medical resident complexes. Academic support, student service and
student recreation facilities shall be allowed and encouraged within the Housing land use
classification on conditions that their size, scope and function are related to and
compatible with student housing. Development densities, heights and patterns in the
Housing land use shall respect pedestrian connections, historic context (where
applicable), adjacencies to other land uses and creation offunctional open space while
maximizing the efficient use of building footprints to the extent feasible within
construction budgets and program requirements. Ancillary uses associated with a


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA HOUSING
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

housing facility, such as utilities, service drives, user and disabled parking, and
functional open space are allowed within the Housing land use classification.


Goal 1: Provide Adequate On-Campus Housing That is Well-Maintained and
Community-Oriented Where Residents and Staff are Empowered to Learn,
Innovate and Succeed.

Objective 1.1: To provide on-campus housing that meets demand and focuses on those students
who will benefit most from the academic and community benefits of on-campus housing.

Policy 1.1.1: Continue to reserve a large percentage of residence hall spaces for first-time enrolled
students such that all housing requests by these students can be accommodated.

Policy 1.1.2: Continue to monitor housing demand and enrollment trends to provide an on-campus
housing supply according to the following procedures and priorities:
maintain capacity for a minimum of 22% of the main campus headcount enrollment;
provide housing to all first-time freshmen students desiring to live on-campus; and
ensure consistency with the occupancy management policies, financial parameters and other
provisions of the Housing Master Plan prepared by the Department of Housing and
Residence Education.

Policy 1.1.3: Review the potential for additional privately developed on-campus housing
(sororities and fraternities) in the limited areas available and appropriate for development.

Objective 1.2: To manage campus housing with appropriate maintenance, enhanced academic
technologies, social and academic programs, and accessibility at an affordable price.

Policy 1.2.1: The Department of Housing and Residence Education will continue to enhance
communications and involve students and faculty in decisions about housing through active
involvement in various housing-related committees.

Policy 1.2.2: Integrate academic initiatives into the residential setting by adding residentially-based
academic communities in partnership with faculty and staff from academic units. Such initiatives
include the Honors Residential College at Hume Hall, Fine Arts Living/Learning Center in Reid Hall
and the Engineering Living/Learning Center in East Hall.

Policy 1.2.3: Continue to increase efficiency and productivity of both residents and housing staff
through enhanced technologies, web-based services and data protocols.

Policy 1.2.4: The Department of Housing and Residence Education shall engage in ongoing
assessments, evaluations and benchmarking to determine the levels of satisfaction with various
facility and program services.

Policy 1.2.5: The Department of Housing and Residence Education shall continue to maintain
historic dormitory facilities in coordination with the Preservation of Historic Buildings and Sites
Committee and the university's programmatic memorandum of agreement with the State Division of
Historical Resources. Such historic facilities include those currently on the National Register of
Historic Places and those identified as significant and eligible for inclusion on the Register as
depicted in the Urban Design Element, Figure 1-2, Historic District Area of Impact.

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA HOUSING
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT


Policy 1.2.6: Continue collaboration and communication to determine ways in which the
Department of Housing and Residence Education can be involved in facility management of
Greek housing facilities.

Policy 1.2.7: The Department of Housing and Residence Education shall continue to provide
accessible housing to meet the demand for disabled student housing, and shall continue to assess
facilities to determine necessary adaptations in accordance with the Florida Building Code.

Policy 1.2.8: The Department of Housing and Residence Education shall annually review the need
for rent increases to fund rises in operating expenditures such as utilities, salaries and insurance while
balancing the demand for amenities and remaining competitive with off-campus housing rates.

Objective 1.3: To expand on-campus housing in proximity to support services and transportation
corridors.

Policy 1.3.1: Future housing facilities shall be located in proximity to student services, recreation
and academic facilities as depicted in Figure 2-1, Future Land Use Map with new undergraduate
residence halls in proximity to existing residence halls and new village community housing
located along Radio Road in proximity to other village communities.

Policy 1.3.2: New or reconstructed on campus housing shall strive to increase land use efficiency
by increasing residential building heights and housing unit density per acre.

Policy 1.3.3: The Department of Housing and Residence Education shall update its Housing
Master Plan at least once every five years coinciding with the update of the Campus Master Plan
to evaluate financial projections, enrollment projections, facility conditions inventories, facility
demand and occupancy management policies.


Goal 2: Support Community Aspirations to Locate Off-Campus, Private Student
Housing in Targeted Areas Near the Main Campus That Minimize Negative
Impacts to Viable Single-Family Neighborhoods.

Objective 2.1: To monitor off-campus housing trends and collaborate with local governments,
neighborhood associations and private business interests for mutual benefit.

Policy 2.1.1: University officials shall work with the City of Gainesville, Alachua County and the
Community Redevelopment Agency toward establishing the conditions (zoning, infrastructure,
approval process, etc.) that can encourage provision of sufficient housing for students, faculty and
staff in close proximity to main campus within the redevelopment districts east and north of campus,
and the "SW 20th Avenue Student Village" area west of campus (approximately coincides with the
Alachua County SW 34th Street Activity Center Special Area Study).

Policy 2.1.2: University officials shall work with the City of Gainesville and Alachua County toward
establishing the conditions (zoning, infrastructure, approval process, code enforcement, etc) within
the university heritage neighborhoods (i.e. single-family neighborhoods near campus) and other
neighborhoods in the Context Area that can encourage the provision of housing for faculty and staff.




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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015


HOUSING
ELEMENT


Policy 2.1.3: The University Police Department, Division of Student Affairs, Dean of Students
Office, University Athletic Association, and Office of Finance and Administration shall continue to
coordinate with the appropriate City and County offices and neighborhood associations to address
off-campus housing issues including the impact of the University on the quality of life in university
heritage neighborhoods (i.e. single-family neighborhoods near campus) and other neighborhoods in
the Context Area. To this end, the University shall continue to monitor implementation of
recommendations contained in the Town/Gown Task Force report of September 2002, and update
those recommendations as warranted.

Policy 2.1.4: The Department of Housing and Residence Education, along with other units of the
Office of Student Affairs, shall continue to enhance efforts in providing information to incoming
students, parents, and on-campus residents about the responsibilities of off-campus living.

Policy 2.1.5: The Office of Finance and Administration and UF Student Government shall
collaborate with the Gainesville Regional Transit System, City of Gainesville, Alachua County and
Santa Fe Community College to ensure convenient transit access from off-campus student housing
concentrations to the university main campus.


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6.
RECREATION AND
OPEN SPACE ELEMENT






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA RECREATION AND OPEN SPACE
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

Introduction

This Recreation and Open Space Element includes Goals, Objectives and Policies (GOP) that
apply to the main campus in Gainesville and the Lake Wauburg Recreation complex in Alachua
County. The balance of Alachua County Satellite Properties and statewide Research and
Education Center (REC) facilities do not provide general-purpose recreation facilities.

The Department of Recreational Sports is a department of the Division of Student Affairs. Their
mission is to provide an extensive array of leisure and recreational opportunities for students,
faculty and staff. Emphasis is placed on providing a safe environment while enhancing quality of
life through activities that promote physical fitness, sportsmanship, leadership opportunities and
the development of a life-long pattern of recreational activity. By providing opportunities
through structured activities for leadership, socialization, self-actualization and enjoyment, the
Department contributes to the educational mission of the University and strives to enhance the
quality of life for each student. In this contribution, the department also coordinates closely with
the College of Health and Human Performance to provide use of facilities for teaching purposes
and to provide employment, internships and other work experience to students seeking careers in
sports and leisure activities. The Department of Recreational Sports is overseen by a Board of
Directors consisting of students, faculty and staff

The Department of Recreational Sports operates approximately 143,000 gross square feet of
indoor recreation facilities including seven basketball courts, one indoor soccer court, and
fourteen racquetball courts plus eight athletic fields, seven outdoor lighted basketball courts,
eleven volleyball courts, thirty-two lighted tennis courts, a softball complex with four fields, four
outdoor racquetball courts, one roller hockey court, an archery range, a skateboard park, ropes
course, climbing wall, and two waterfront parks. These facilities are available for casual use and
also to the hundreds of intramural and club sports that the Department manages. In addition, two
swimming pools (one outdoor and one indoor) are jointly managed for shared use among the
Department of Recreational Sports, O'Connell Center and College of Health and Human
Performance. The Florida Gym, Florida Pool and O'Connell Center swimming pool and weight
rooms are used for both recreation and teaching. Funding for construction of recreation facilities
comes from tuition fees that are released through the Capital Improvement Trust Fund.
Recreation programs and facility operation and maintenance are funded through a variety of
sources including student Activity and Services fees as well as other user fees.

The University Athletic Association, Inc. (UAA) also provides and operates facilities on campus that
are associated with sports and recreation. The UAA exists to advance the University of Florida's
teaching, research and service missions, and is responsible for the intercollegiate athletics
program at the University of Florida. The Athletics Director, Jeremy Foley, reports directly to the
President of the University, Dr. Bernie Machen, and retains overall responsibility for the health
and stability of the program. In addition, the UAA is governed by a Board of Directors that
provides guidance and direction through approval of policies, procedures and the budget. The
UAA has developed a mission statement that was adopted by the Board of Directors to provide
goals and objectives in the development and delivery of the athletics program at the University of
Florida. This "vision" provides the road map for the University's commitment to be second to
none in the area of intercollegiate athletics. In addition to operating intercollegiate athletics
programs, UAA provides sports camps for youth and adults in twelve sports. The UAA also
supports the university's education mission by financial support of academic programs and
facilities. Between 1990 and 2005, the UAA has contributed more than $34.6 million to the
University to fund academic endeavors. Additionally, the UAA supported development of the


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA RECREATION AND OPEN SPACE
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

university's academic advising center and contributed toward renovations of the O'Connell
Center, which also serves as a physical education teaching facility.

University employees are permitted to use the casual outdoor recreation facilities, such as tennis
courts and basketball courts on a space available basis when the facility is not reserved for organized
teams or events. For a minimal fee, employees can join the Living Well program operated through
the College of Health and Human performance. Living Well members may use the recreation and
exercise facilities of Florida Gym and Florida Pool. Employee's spouses and retired employees are
also eligible to join Living Well. The facilities of Lake Wauburg and Lake Wauburg South are
available to employees and their guests free of charge. The indoor swimming pool, track and weight
rooms at the O'Connell Center are available to employees and their families during designated open
recreation hours. The University Golf Course is also available to all students, faculty, staff, alumni
and their guests with fees typical of other public or private courses.

Open spaces on the main campus include lands placed in the Conservation, Green Space Buffer and
Urban Park land use classifications on the Future Land Use map. These areas provide opportunities
for quiet study and passive recreation including hiking, picnicking, Frisbee, bird-watching and
reading. Linear trail connections between and through these open spaces, as depicted in Figure 1-4
"Open Space Connections", may also facilitate jogging, bicycling and inline skating. Consistent
with the terms and conditions included in the Florida Administration Commission Final Order
Number AC-98-012, the University has designated the site northwest of Lake Alice and south of
the private Golf View neighborhood as "Urban Park" and "Green Space Buffer" to maintain the
area in open space for passive recreational use including retention of the bat house and student
gardens in their existing locations. The function and management of the open space areas are
detailed in the Urban Design Element, Future Land Use Element and Conservation Element.

Active recreation areas on campus may include built environments such as gymnasiums and
recreation centers as well as open facilities such as soccer fields. The Future Land Use Element
defines two types of active recreation facilities to distinguish between those that are part of the built
environment and those that are part of the open space fabric of the campus.

The Future Land Use Element defines the recreation land use classification as follows:
* Active Recreation: The Active Recreation land use classification identifies those areas on the
campus that are appropriate for recreation sports and athletics building development.
Accessibility of the site to its customers .. i,,, public, students, etc.) is a primary location
criterion for Active Recreation land use. Proximity to other recreational uses, housing and
parking are also important location criteria aimed at integrating recreation areas into the
campus development pattern. Ancillary uses associated with an active recreation facility,
such as utilities, service drives, user and disabled parking, and functional open space are
allowed within the Active Recreation land use classification. Development densities, heights
and patterns in the Active Recreation land use shall respect pedestrian connections, historic
context (where applicable), adjacencies to other land uses and creation of functional open
space while maximizing the efficient use of building footprints to the extent feasible within
construction budgets and program requirements.
* Active Recreation Outdoor: The Active Recreation Outdoor land use classification identifies
those areas on the campus that are appropriate for recreation sports and athletics facility
development such as sports fields, courts and swimming pools. Accessibility of the site to its
customers (general public, students, etc.) is a primary location criterion for Active
Recreation Outdoor land use. Proximity to other recreational uses, housing, parking and
open spaces are also important location criteria aimed at integrating recreation areas into

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA RECREATION AND OPEN SPACE
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

the campus development pattern. Allowable structure development shall be limited to locker
rooms, ticket booths, rest rooms, equipment storage sheds, outdoor iing and other support
structures associated with an active recreation use on conditions that their size, scope and
function are related to and compatible with outdoor active recreation activities. Ancillary
uses associated with an active recreation facility, such as utilities, service drives, user and
disabled parking, and functional open space are allowed within the Active Recreation
Outdoor land use classification. Development densities, heights and patterns in the Active
Recreation Outdoor land use shall respect pedestrian connections, historic context (where
applicable), adjacencies to other land uses and creation of functional open space while
maximizing the efficient use of building footprints to the extent feasible within construction
budgets and program requirements.

The University recognizes that its active recreation facilities and open space resources provide
benefits for both University programs as well as the community at large. Shared use of facilities
by the community is limited due to funding, operation and security concerns on the campus.
However, recreation facilities may be made available to the public through special programs such
as community leisure studies courses or youth sports camps. In addition, the University's open
campus policies allow the public to experience its open space resources so long as that access
does not interfere with the enjoyment and safety of the campus community. To the extent that
university faculty, staff and students comprise a large percentage of community residents, these
individuals are granted more extensive access to the university's recreational resources.
However, there are no university-owned recreation facilities that are incorporated in the host local
governments' comprehensive plans. The University recognizes the deficiency in public
recreation amenities within its host community and University Context Area. Therefore, the
University commits to expanding its recreation resources to serve its constituencies and lessen the
burden of campus populations on community recreation resources.

Goal 1: Provide Recreation and Open Space Facilities In Close Proximity to the
University Population to Support Healthy Lifestyles, and Adequately and Efficiently
Serve the Instructional, Active and Passive Recreation Needs of the University
Population.

Objective 1.1: To maintain existing recreation facilities that are safe, modern, functional
and minimize deferred maintenance.

Policy 1.1.1: The Department of Recreational Sports and University Athletic Association, Inc.
shall provide ongoing maintenance surveys, preventive maintenance programs and corrective
actions as needed to ensure the safe operating condition of the facilities under their organization's
purview. Such corrective actions shall include those necessary to provide life, safety and ADA
code compliance.

Policy 1.1.2: The Department of Recreational Sports and University Athletic Association, Inc.
shall provide proper maintenance of athletic fields including restoration, rotating or restricting use
as needed.

Policy 1.1.3: The Division of Student Affairs shall explore opportunities to increase coordination
in recreation facility development, operation and maintenance of recreational facilities provided
within campus housing sites. Until such time as these responsibilities may be combined, if at all,
the Division of Housing and Residence Education shall continue to maintain and operate
recreational facilities within campus housing sites.

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA RECREATION AND OPEN SPACE
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT


Policy 1.1.4: The Department of Recreational Sports, O'Connell Center, College of Health and
Human Performance and Physical Plant Division shall continue to collaborate in the operation,
maintenance and scheduling of Florida Pool and the O'Connell Center pool.

Objective 1.2: To efficiently utilize and expand existing recreation facilities to meet the
needs of the university population.

Policy 1.2.1: New recreation facilities shall be provided consistent with the Future Land Use
Element, Capital Improvement Program Element and other policies of the master plan and
depicted on Figures 6-1, 6-1.a and 6-2 of this Element.

Policy 1.2.2: Student recreation facilities shall be provided to meet existing and future
enrollment that are equal or better than national comparative data and address the needs of
students, faculty and staff considering different cultures, diversities and social interests.

Policy 1.2.3: The Department of Recreational Sports shall continuously engage its Board of
Directors, student and employee groups, and academic departments to determine needs, interests
and the adequacy of existing facilities and programs.

Policy 1.2.4: The UAA shall continuously engage its Board of Directors, the NCAA and other
stakeholders to determine needs and the adequacy of existing facilities and programs.

Policy 1.2.5: The Department of Recreational Sports shall pursue expansion of recreation
facilities at Lake Wauburg that make efficient use of the land resource, yet are compatible with
the environmental setting of the lake area and its natural resources.

Policy 1.2.6: The Department of Recreational Sports shall coordinate with the appropriate
federal, state and local governmental agencies as well as related academic departments to monitor
the success of the existing eagles nest at Lake Wauburg South.

Policy 1.2.7: The University shall seek to enhance areas designated in the Urban Park Future
Land Use classification, particularly those identified on Figure 1-5 of the Urban Design Element,
for the purpose of ensuring adequate areas for passive recreational pursuits.

Policy 1.2.8: The University shall continue to explore opportunities to maximize facility
utilization through partnerships between the Department of Recreational Sports, Division of
Housing and Residence Education, UAA, O'Connell Center and College of Health and Human
Performance such that shared use of facilities is provided without compromising the
programmatic needs of one entity over another.

Policy 1.2.9: The University shall encourage and educate its faculty, staff and students about
healthy lifestyles including physical activity, and shall increase availability of recreational
resources to faculty and staff.

Policy 1.2.10: The University reserves the right to monitor the use of University facilities to
ensure that the University population is given preference in the use of its facilities at all times.





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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA RECREATION AND OPEN SPACE
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

Objective 1.3: To ensure accessibility of recreation resources, particularly by non-
automobile transportation modes.

Policy 1.3.1: New recreation facilities shall be provided consistent with the Future Land Use
Element and as depicted on Figures 6-1, 6-1.a and 6-2 of this Element, which strives to locate
active recreation facilities in proximity to student housing, adjacent to academic land uses for
those recreation facilities that support academic programming, and near the campus perimeter to
be accessible to students living off-campus both to the west/southwest and east/northeast of
campus.

Policy 1.3.2: The University shall continue to work with RTS to ensure continued transit service
to Lake Wauburg and Lake Wauburg South with schedules and routing that maximizes student
accessibility.

Policy 1.3.3: Recreation facility locations and site design shall seek to take advantage of access
provided by bicycle and pedestrian facilities, both existing and proposed, and shall seek to
enhance those facilities whenever feasible. These bicycle and pedestrian facilities are depicted in
Figures 8-2, 8-3, 8-4 and 8-5 of the Transportation Element including both on campus and off-
campus linkages.


Objective 1.4: To engage the City of Gainesville, Alachua County, School Board of
Alachua County and other community partners for mutual benefit to address the
recreational needs of the campus and community.

Policy 1.4.1: The University shall consider cooperative agreements, when appropriate, on a case-
by-case basis, with public, semi-private, private and non-profit entities to provide recreation and
open space facilities, programs and/or maintenance.

Policy 1.4.2: The University shall work with Alachua County, City of Gainesville and the School
Board of Alachua County to identify off-campus sports fields and other outdoor active recreation
non-instructional sites that may be appropriate for joint active and/or passive recreation programs
and facilities. The University shall actively pursue interlocal agreements and memoranda of
understanding as needed to provide for the joint use of identified sites, facilities and programs.

Policy 1.4.3: The University's inventory of existing park and open space facilities located on the
campus and in the University Context Area shall be maintained and updated on a periodic basis.
This inventory shall be used to help coordinate and monitor the provision of recreation and open
space facilities with these entities.

Policy 1.4.4: The University shall meet with the City of Gainesville, Alachua County and any
pertinent committees or interest groups as needed to discuss and coordinate on issues related to
the provision of recreation and open space facilities and services.

Policy 1.4.5: The University shall continue to work with the City of Gainesville and Alachua
County to mitigate adverse effects of special events, including sporting events, on the
surrounding community.




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7.
CONSERVATION ELEMENT






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CONSERVATION ELEMENT
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2010

Introduction

This Conservation Element includes Goals, Objectives and Policies (GOP) that apply to the main campus and
Alachua County Satellite Properties including lands in all land use categories. Polices under Objective 4 apply
only to lands with the Conservation land use designation as identified herein. Conservation Areas within the
University of Florida campus boundaries were determined from information provided by the University faculty
and staff, aerial photo-interpretation, Soil and Conservation Service (SCS) Soil Survey for Alachua County,
National Wetland Inventory maps, the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC) and the approved Stormwater Management Master Plan (2000).

To ensure the viability and health of the Conservation Areas on campus, particular attention should be paid to
preserve the functional and natural linkages between these systems. The lands designated as Conservation in this
plan were used as the base layer to which all other future land uses were drawn. Future changes to the plan should
follow the same philosophy and shape the pattern of future growth on campus by respecting Conservation Areas.
Shown in maps contained in this element, Conservation Areas are identified along with other important open
space connections. Additionally, the following satellite properties also contain Conservation land use
designations, which is mapped in the Future Land Use Element of this plan: Austin Cary Memorial Forest, Beef
Research Unit, Dairy Research Unit, Millhopper Horticultural Unit, Newnans Lake and Santa Fe River Beef
Research Unit.

The Conservation land use definition is defined as follows: The Conservation land use classification identifies
areas on campus that shall be preserved and managed to protect natural features including topography, soil
conditions, archaeological sites, plant and animal species, wildlife habitats and wetlands. The preservation and
management of natural features in Conservation shall be conducted in accordance with a Conservation Land
Management Plan and policies of the Campus Master Plan. Allowable uses in Conservation areas include natural
habitat preservation, water resource protection, resource-based teaching and research activities and nature parks.
Stormwater facilities and utility conveyances shall be allowable on conditions of minimizing and mitigating any
impacts with due consideration of the conservation intent of the Conservation Area.

Goal 1: To Preserve, Enhance, Manage and Appropriately Use Wetlands, Water Bodies, Wildlife
Habitat, and Other Natural Resources.

Objective 1.1: To preserve and enhance native vegetation communities and wildlife habitat on or
adjacent to the main campus or satellite properties.

Policy 1.1.1: Where feasible the University shall remove non-native invasive plants (whether grasses, shrubs or
trees) which are identified on any of the following lists: The IFAS Assessment of Non-Native Plants in Florida's
Natural Areas, the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services's "Noxious Weed List" (Rule 5B-57.007,
F.A.C), the Department of Environmental Protection's "Prohibited Aquatic Plant List" (Rule 62C-52.011, F.A.C.)
and the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council's "Florida's Most Invasive Species List" from the campus grounds. As these
species are located on campus, the University shall coordinate with the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection and other appropriate governmental entities to ensure the proper removal and disposal of these exotic
species. Exceptions to this policy (e.g., use of invasive non-native plants in academic research) must be approved and
conditioned by the Lakes, Vegetation and Landscaping Committee.

Policy 1.1.2: University faculty and student groups with the necessary expertise shall be encouraged to assist in
prioritizing exotic invasive plant removal and developing revegetation plans to reduce the possibility of reinvasion by
exotic non-native species.

Policy 1.1.3: It is the intent of the University to remove non-native, nuisance animals where feasible.


PAGE 7-1
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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CONSERVATION ELEMENT
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2010


Policy 1.1.4: Any proposed development adjacent to a designated Conservation Area shall be carefully sited and
integrated into the existing landscape to have a minimal visual impact on the area. Landscape treatments shall
preserve significant existing native vegetation, e.g. listed species and heritage trees, to allow a graduated transition
from developed areas to Conservation Areas. The existing native vegetation shall serve to essentially buffer proposed
development in order to maintain the natural and undeveloped character of the area.

Objective 1.2: To protect and conserve the natural functions of creeks, lakes, ponds, sinkholes,
floodplains and wetlands on or adjacent to the main campus or satellite properties.

Policy 1.2.1: Encroachments into jurisdictional wetlands shall be required to receive prior permit approval from
federal and state regulatory agencies. Wetlands, as defined in subsection 373.019(17) of the Florida Statutes and
Chapter 62-340.200(19) of the Florida Administrative Code (FAC) include those areas that are inundated or
saturated by surface water or ground water at a frequency or duration sufficient to support vegetation typically
adapted for life in hydric or alluvial soils. The wetland limits shall be delineated utilizing the methodology
described in Chapter 62-340.300, FAC. Impacts include any activity which may negatively affect the vegetative
composition, water quality, water quantity, hydrologic regime, soil composition or substrate of defined wetlands.
All mitigation shall be in conformance with an approved permit from the appropriate Federal and State agencies
(including agencies of the State).

Policy 1.2.2: An average of 50 feet and minimum of 35 feet upland buffer shall be identified and protected
around all wetlands/water bodies that are not within a Conservation Area prior to construction of any buildings.
Where a buffer cannot be provided, mitigation of the buffer deficiencies shall be required and reviewed by the
Lakes, Vegetation and Landscaping Committee.

Policy 1.2.3: No development shall be permitted within the required upland buffer, unless appropriate
minimization of impact and mitigation is approved by the Lakes, Vegetation and Landscaping Committee.

Policy 1.2.4: All ornamental landscaping improvements within required upland buffers shall use only native
plants in a naturalistic way and shall be approved by Lakes, Vegetation and Landscaping Committee.

Policy 1.2.5: All proposed development projects within 50 feet of a wetland shall be submitted to the appropriate
Water Management District for review in the design phase of the project.

Policy 1.2.6: New Development within the 100-year floodplain, as mapped for the University's current Master
Stormwater Permit is discouraged and shall be prohibited unless it can be demonstrated that such development
has elevated base floor elevations at least 1 foot above the 100-year floodplain, preferably two feet, and has
provided for compensating storage elsewhere on the proposed building area site. If compensating storage is not
necessary to protect other structures, the development may mitigate by funding stormwater enhancements that
help address problems within the floodplain. Examples include, in-stream erosion control measures and low
impact development techniques as addressed in the Stormwater Element of this Master Plan. For 100-year
floodplains not mapped in the University's current Master Stormwater permit, the Federal Emergency
Management Agency's (FEMA) 100-year floodplain mapping shall be used as best available data.

Objective 1.3: To restrict University activities known to threaten the habitat and survival of endangered
and threatened species on or adjacent to the main campus or satellite properties.

Policy 1.3.1: The University shall continue to protect and conserve endangered and threatened species of plants and
wildlife, and species of special concern, as required by the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, Chapter



PAGE 7-2
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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CONSERVATION ELEMENT
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2010

372, F.S., Chapter 39, F.A.C., and federal and state management policies relating to the protection of threatened and
endangered species and species of special concern.

Policy 1.3.2: During the initial planning phase of any physical changes to the campus, the University shall perform
an analysis of wildlife and plants in the area to be affected. All plants (Chapter 5B-40, F.A.C.) and animals (Rule
Chapter 68A-27 F.A.C.) identified as threatened and endangered species and species of special concern by Federal
and State agencies shall be noted. Protection plans for these listed species, if documented on site, shall be formulated
that are consistent with those of the appropriate local, state and federal agencies.

Policy 1.3.3: University personnel shall follow procedures and seek consultation with the appropriate agencies as
identified in the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's Wildlife Methodology Guidelines (January
15, 1988) when any land alterations are proposed for a site where a listed species is likely or known to occur.

Objective 4: To preserve, enhance, manage and appropriately use wetlands and uplands, wildlife
habitat, and water resources, while also enabling outdoor teaching and research opportunities on all
of the University's designated Conservation Areas (the following policies under this Objective are
only applicable within Conservation Areas, as identified on the Future Land Use Map, unless
otherwise stated within the policy).

Policy 1.4.1: Conservation Area Land Management (CALM) Plan, including specific plans for each designated
Conservation Area(s), shall be reviewed, updated and approved on an annual basis by the Lakes, Vegetation and
Landscaping Committee.

Policy 1.4.2: CALM plans will be developed within one year of adoption of this Master Plan for each Campus
Master Plan Alachua County Satellite property that contains Conservation land use designations. Such
management plans shall address measures to reduce the potential for or impacts of wildfires as applicable.

Policy 1.4.3: Preserve and restore natural habitat functions on all campus Conservation Areas as identified in
each area's management plan.

Policy 1.4.4: The University shall seek funding to implement the recommendations contained in the
Conservation Area Land Management Plan.

Policy 1.4.5: Maintain hydrologic function and improve water quality, utilizing innovative best management
practices (BMPs) in line with the University's teaching mission.

Policy 1.4.6: Support the University's teaching and research mission by coordinating with departments involved
in ecological research.

Policy 1.4.7: Improve appearance, security and controlled access in all campus Conservation Areas.

Policy 1.4.8: New exterior lighting installations within Conservation Areas shall be discouraged. Exceptions
must be evaluated and approved by the University's Lakes, Vegetation, and Landscaping Committee.

Policy 1.4.9: All new utilities in Conservation Areas shall evaluate alternatives, demonstrate necessity,
minimize impacts and be placed underground, unless it is deemed that underground placement will create undo
hardship or disturb habitat for listed species. A utility installation plan must be submitted to and approved by the
University's Lakes, Vegetation and Landscaping Committee for any utility installation in a Conservation Area.




PAGE 7-3
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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2010


CONSERVATION ELEMENT


Policy 1.4.10: All Stormwater improvement projects within Conservation Areas shall conform to the intent of
being in a conservation area. This means that these improvements will emphasize wildlife habitat, use native
vegetation and be designed to blend in with the natural environment. All new or expanded stormwater
improvements that do not relate to on-going maintenance shall be reviewed by the Lakes, Vegetation and
Landscaping Committee for approval.

Policy 1.4.11: Development activity that necessitates a land use change reducing the size of a designated
Conservation Area and that is inconsistent with that area's management plan is strongly discouraged. Such
development activity must meet the requirements of State and Federal agencies, and provide the evaluation of
alternatives and impact minimization strategies as specified in the Future Land Use Element. However, if such
development is deemed necessary following these evaluations, then mitigation for Conservation Areas shall be
required. The mitigation shall be approved by the Lakes Vegetation and Landscaping Committee, and may be in
the form of either: 1) designation of land in the Conservation land use classification with similar function and
value; 2) acquisition and preservation of property in Alachua County with similar function and value at a 10:1
(acquired land: impacted land) ratio with preference for acquisition of conservation land adjacent to other
Preservation Areas (as identified in the Alachua County Comprehensive Plan); and/or 3) fund the enhancement
and restoration of designated Conservation Areas equal to the monetary value of land acquisition described in the
previous option.


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8.
TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA TRANSPORTATION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

Introduction

This Transportation Element includes Goals, Objectives and Policies (GOP) that apply to the
main campus and Alachua County Satellite Properties. The policies address automobile, transit,
bicycle, and pedestrian access as well as parking. Traffic safety and traffic operations are also
addressed within these policies. Facility and service recommendations for sidewalks, greenways,
transit shelters, transit routes, roadways and intersections are included in the Transportation
Element. The accompanying Data & Analysis Report contains the information on recent
transportation trends that support the policy, facility and service recommendations herein.

Major parking locations such as commuter parking lots and parking garages are included in the
Future Land Use classification for parking. Not included in the parking land use designation are
smaller, more localized parking facilities that support adjacent destinations by providing parking
for disabled, service, delivery and other building-specific patrons. These smaller parking lots are
allowed within the other land use classifications by definition when they support the underlying
land use. The definition of the Parking Land Use category is as follows: The Parking land use
classification identifies those areas on campus that are appropriate for general parking in
surface lots or garage structures. Accessibility, proximity and adjacent land uses are primary
location criteria for Parking in order to direct traffic to appropriate perimeter intercept locations
on roadways capable of accommodating associated traffic and avoiding impacts in areas with
high volume pedestrian activity. Stormwater facilities and utility conveyance systems are allowed
within the Parking land use. Parking structures are encouraged to include liner buildings
containing non-parking land uses. Where this occurs, the application of land use classification
boundaries shall be flexible to promote co-location of uses. Parking facility development in the
Parking land use shall respect pedestrian connections, historic context (where applicable) and
adjacencies to other land uses to minimize or mitiglit any i,,~gi' impacts of noise, air quality
or appearance.

Campus roads are identified on the Future Land Use map to include the entire roadway corridor
inclusive of pavement, medians, bus shelters, bus pull-out bays, adjacent sidewalks and buffer
strips between sidewalks and pavement. These roadway corridors do not overlap any other land
use classification. New roadway corridors that are recommended with this Element will require a
study to be performed to identify the preferred alignment. Service drives, sidewalks, greenway
trails and other such transportation facilities are not contained within a unique land use allocation,
and they may traverse land use category boundaries.

The transportation components of the campus master plan strive to serve the various land uses,
existing and future facilities, and provide connections between different modes of travel.
Funding for transportation improvements may come from PECO allocations including
infrastructure/utilities, other capital project monies, user fees, grants, demonstration projects and
other state and federal allocations.


Goal 1: Coordinate With the City of Gainesville, Alachua County and the
Metropolitan Transportation Planning Organization (MTPO) To Develop and
Maintain a Balanced Transportation System in the University Context Area and
Alachua County that Provides Campus Access and Expanded Transportation
Choice for University Students, Faculty, Staff, Visitors and the Surrounding
Community, Without Adversely Affecting Quality of Life.



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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA TRANSPORTATION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

Objective 1.1: To participate in joint decision-making and appropriate financial
support that enables the development, maintenance and operation of a multi-modal
transportation system

Policy 1.1.1: The University shall cooperate with the City of Gainesville, Alachua County, the
Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) and the MTPO in the planning, implementation
and updating of multi-modal strategies and projects outlined in the updated 2025 Long Range
Transportation Plan, both on campus and within the context area.

Policy 1.1.2: The University shall cooperate and coordinate with the City of Gainesville,
Alachua County, the FDOT, and MTPO during any scheduled multi-modal transportation studies
of major arterial roadways, transportation facilities and transit services surrounding the University
campus. Specifically, the University shall participate in studies of the Archer Road and SW 16th
Avenue area to identify potential improvements and funding sources that address the circulation
of automobiles, transit vehicles, bicycles, and pedestrians while enhancing the natural and
physical campus environment. The adopted Campus Master Plan shall be amended as needed to
incorporate the results and recommendations from such studies.

Policy 1.1.3: The Vice President for Finance and Administration shall continue to serve on the
MTPO board, with university representatives also serving on the MTPO Technical Advisory
Committee from Transportation and Parking Services Division, and Facilities Planning and
Construction Division.

Policy 1.1.4: The University shall continue to work with the City, County, and MTPO to ensure
that transportation system improvements do not direct non-university related trips onto campus
roads.

Policy 1.1.5: The University shall cooperate and coordinate with the City of Gainesville,
Alachua County, the FDOT, and MTPO to identify and implement means to alleviate conflicts
between vehicular and non-vehicular traffic along corridors adjacent to the University campus.
These means shall include, but not be limited to, the construction of pedestrian bridges and
bicycle overpasses over major roadways along the perimeter of the campus. Any or all of the UF
Board of Trustees' "fair share" of the costs of necessary improvements (as identified in the
campus development agreement) may be used to fund these improvements.

Policy 1.1.6: The University shall cooperate and coordinate with the City of Gainesville,
Alachua County, FDOT and the MTPO to identify and implement means to improve transit
services within the context area including those depicted on Figure 8-8. Any, or all of the UF
Board of Trustees' "fair share" of the costs of necessary improvements (as identified in the
campus development agreement) may be used to fund these improvements.

Policy 1.1.7: The University shall cooperate and coordinate with the City of Gainesville,
Alachua County, FDOT and the MTPO to identify and implement means to improve bicycle
facilities within the context area including those depicted on Figure 8-3. Any, or all of the UF
Board of Trustees' "fair share" of the costs of necessary improvements (as identified in the
campus development agreement) may be used to fund these improvements.

Policy 1.1.8: The University shall continue to work with the City of Gainesville to monitor and
modify, as needed, the neighborhood parking decal system and other public parking facilities as



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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA TRANSPORTATION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

may be developed to ensure adequate parking for area residents and businesses adjacent to
campus.

Policy 1.1.9: The University shall work with the City of Gainesville, Regional Transit System,
Alachua County, FDOT, and any intelligent transportation systems (ITS) consortium to be
organized for the purpose of implementing ITS projects on-campus or in the Context Area. ITS
projects include, but are not limited to, the Gainesville Transportation Management System
(TMS) and Regional Transit System ITS initiatives.

Objective 1.2: To mitigate the impacts of future University development on roadways
and mass transit within the context area of the University.

Policy 1.2.1: The University shall renew and update the Campus Development Agreement
with City of Gainesville and Alachua County for the adequate mitigation of impacts on the
transportation system, including roadways and mass transit, caused by future on-campus
development. This agreement shall be established in a timely manner following adoption of the
Master Plan in 2005 and include any UF Board of Trustees' "fair share" costs of necessary
mitigations, consistent with Chapter 1013.30, Florida Statutes.

Policy 1.2.2: The University shall conduct a traffic engineering study for each proposed
structured parking facility or any surface parking facility larger than 300 spaces prior to
construction. Such studies shall include, but not be limited to, an analysis of the following:
The impact of the facility on adjacent roadways within /4 mile of the proposed facility;
The existing traffic conditions at signalized intersections within /4 mile of the proposed
facility;
Conditions at the same signalized intersections at full development;
Roadway capacity and traffic signalization during the peak hour;
The impact of the facility on bicycle, pedestrian, and transit access; and
Recommendations to mitigate any adverse impacts identified by the study that should be
implemented and amended into the campus master plan Transportation Element and Capital
Improvement Element.

Policy 1.2.3: The results of the parking studies described in Policy 2.2 above shall be provided to
the City, County and MTPO Technical Advisory Committee for review and comment. The
University shall coordinate with appropriate City and County officials to identify any
transportation system improvements necessary to maintain adopted level of service standards or
to otherwise provide safe travel for transit users, bicyclists or pedestrians affected by the
construction of the proposed parking facility.

Policy 1.2.4: The campus development agreement described in Policy 2.1 above shall be based
upon the best available assessments of off-campus impacts. In the event that more relevant and
appropriate data and analysis become available after execution of the campus development
agreement (e.g., updated transportation or parking studies such as those described in Policy 2.2
above), the University shall amend the Capital Improvements Element and the campus
development agreement as needed, to reflect the results of the new data and analysis and to
identify the UF Board of Trustees' "fair share" of the costs of any additional improvements. Any
such proposed amendments shall be coordinated with the appropriate local government pursuant
to the Implementation and Intergovernmental Coordination Elements.




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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA TRANSPORTATION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

Objective 1.3: To reduce the dependence on single-occupant vehicles as a primary
mode of travel to campus and to encourage transportation modal choice within the
Context Area.

Policy 1.3.1: The University administration and Student Government shall participate with the
City of Gainesville, Alachua County, MTPO, FDOT and Regional Transit System (RTS) to
examine the feasibility of park & ride facility development (including regional facilities outside
the congested areas of the Gainesville Urbanized Area) and expanded transit service including
longer span of service, Sunday service, express service, increased bus frequency and greater
service area coverage. In particular, the feasibility of new City transit routes accessing campus
shall be explored as presented in Figure 8-8.

Policy 1.3.2: The University administration and Student Government shall participate with the
City of Gainesville, Alachua County, MTPO, FDOT and Regional Transit System (RTS) to
improve bicycle and pedestrian safety through educational programs, safety awareness campaigns
and facility improvements including intersection modifications, traffic signal equipment upgrades
(e.g. count-down and audible signal heads) shared-use paths, overpasses/underpasses. In
particular, the development of facilities presented in Figure 8-3 shall be encouraged.

Policy 1.3.3: The University shall participate with the City of Gainesville, Alachua County,
Gainesville Community Redevelopment Agency and private business interests to encourage
development of student and faculty housing adjacent to the university campus, and particularly in
the SW 20th Avenue Student Village Area, with accessibility provided by bicycle, pedestrian and
transit facilities and services.

Policy 1.3.4: The University shall participate with the City of Gainesville, Alachua County,
Gainesville Community Redevelopment Agency and private business interests to explore
opportunities for shared public pay parking adjacent to the university campus where feasible and
mutually beneficial with accessibility provided by bicycle, pedestrian and transit facilities and
services.

Policy 1.3.5: The University shall encourage the City of Gainesville and Alachua County to also
promote transportation mode choice within the Context Area by providing appropriate facilities
and programs, with incentives (such as carpool programs) and disincentives (such as paid
employee parking) comparable to those programs for University employees.


Goal 2: Preserve, Maintain and Expand the On-Campus Transportation System to
Meet the Needs of Students, Faculty, Staff and Visitors that is Convenient, Safe,
Sustainable and Encourages Non-Auto Travel Choices.


Objective 2.1: To provide a roadway network that safely and efficiently accommodates
all modes in a comfortable and aesthetically pleasing-environment.

Policy 2.1.1: Utilize the roadway hierarchy classification depicted in Figure 8-1 to develop
typical design, landscaping, traffic calming techniques, gateway signage and construction
guidelines consistent with the following general descriptions:



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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA TRANSPORTATION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

Core Campus roads are within or immediately proximate to the University's Pedestrian
Enhancement Zone. These roads are also within the University's Historic Impact Area.
Their primary function is to provide access for bicyclists and pedestrians, with limited
daytime access for service, delivery and emergency vehicles or vehicles accessing
disabled and gated parking areas. Transit vehicles are allowed on core campus roads
where necessary to provide convenient access to this core academic area. Slow speeds
and priority for pedestrians and bicyclists are emphasized on all core campus roadways.
Local Connector roads provide access to campus facilities that are more internally
focused with less emphasis on providing public access or through movement. They are
low-volume roadways that are located in more isolated areas of campus and do not
provide direct access to any primary destinations. Due to their low-volume of vehicles,
bicycle access can be provided in bicycle lanes, wide-curb lanes or general shared-use
pavements (with or without lane striping). Sidewalks may be provided on one side of the
street only. Campus transit routes may run on local connector roads, but are discouraged
when conflicting with bicycle and pedestrian access. Transportation planning should
strive to maintain these roadways in low-volume use. Appropriate traffic calming
techniques are compatible on local connectors where necessary to maintain low volumes
and low speeds.
Secondary Connector roads provide internal circulation, but also serve primary
destinations and or gateways. They carry moderate vehicle volumes and should
accommodate bicycles and pedestrians with bicycle lanes and sidewalks on both sides.
When vehicle volumes are higher or a major gateway is served, access management to
restrict turning vehicles and limited development on the road frontage are appropriate
techniques to maintain traffic flow without the turn lanes and medians that would be
expected on a Primary Connector. Campus and City transit routes may be present on
these roadways. Appropriate traffic calming techniques are compatible on secondary
connectors where feasible with designs that do not create hazards for transit or bicycle
users.
Primary Connector roads provide access into and through the campus. They serve
primary destinations and gateways including critical intersections with state arterial
roadways. They carry the highest vehicular volumes on campus and high volume transit
routes including City and Campus routes. Transit service should be accommodated with
bus shelters and bus pull-out bays where appropriate. Bicycles should be accommodated
on bicycle lanes and, in some cases, additional shared-use paths that are located on
parallel or alternate alignments. Pedestrians should be provided with sidewalks on both
sides of the road, high-visibility crosswalks and other means of identifying conflict points
with vehicles. Appropriate traffic calming techniques are compatible on primary
connectors where feasible with designs that do not create hazards for transit or bicycle
users. Traffic calming and transportation system management techniques should strive to
maintain low speeds, smooth traffic flow and provide safe integration of multiple travel
modes. Landscaped medians with turn lanes should be included in a standard divided
roadway design unless access management and limited development allow smooth traffic
flow on a more narrow travel way.
Gateway Roads are state arterials that form the perimeter of the campus. They provide
primary regional access to the university while also accommodating regional through-
traffic on the state highway system. As these major throughways pass by the university,
their design and intent must create a pleasing and safe environment that enhances the
campus experience and accommodates safe movement of pedestrians and bicyclists.
These roadways should not form barriers between the university campus and the

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA TRANSPORTATION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

community of apartments, neighborhoods, shops and restaurants that serve the campus
population.

Policy 2.1.2: Utilize highway level of service standard "E" for analysis purposes on campus
roads, and evaluate the multi-modal level of service conditions for campus roads to determine an
appropriate level of service standard for non-auto modes, if feasible.

Policy 2.1.3: Initiate a routine traffic counting program to include autos, bicycles and pedestrians
in coordination with traffic counting programs conducted by FDOT, the City of Gainesville,
Alachua County and the MTPO to gather data no less than once every five years.

Policy 2.1.4: Continue to designate speed limits of 20 miles per hour on all campus roadways.

Policy 2.1.5: Implement entry signage, landscaping, decorative lighting and intersection
improvements at campus gateways focusing first on Major Gateways as depicted in Figure 8-1
and Priority Open Space Enhancement locations identified in Figure 1-5.

Policy 2.1.6: Provide a comprehensive system of directional signage from major campus
gateways to parking areas, medical services, museums, performance venues and the University
Welcome Center.

Policy 2.1.7: Implement roadway modifications that emphasize pedestrian, bicycle and transit
access in the existing Pedestrian Enhancement Zone, particularly in the areas around Newell and
Dauer Halls, Newell Drive at Turlington Plaza and the Hub Transit Super Stop as well as other
congested pedestrian areas including Newell Drive near the Brain Institute, the intersection of
Mowry Drive and Gale-Lemerand Drive near the Genetics-Cancer Institute, and in the Cultural
Plaza.

Policy 2.1.8: Pursue programming, design and implementation of roadway resurfacing,
reconstruction and transportation system management projects as depicted in Figures 8-10 (Table
8-1), Figure 8-11 (Table 8-2) and Figure 8-12 (Table8-3), respectively.

Policy 2.1.9: Conduct corridor alignment studies, develop preferred design concepts and pursue
implementation of new road connections as depicted in Figure 8-13 (Table 8-4) as feasible.


Objective 2.2: To provide pedestrian and bicycle facilities that safely and efficiently
accommodate walking and bicycling in a comfortable and aesthetically-pleasing
environment.

Policy 2.2.1: Pursue programming, design and implementation of new sidewalk connections as
depicted in Figure 8-5 (Table 8-5) and streetscape improvements identified as Priority Open
Space Enhancements in Figure 1-5 of the Urban Design Element.

Policy 2.2.2: Pursue programming, design and implementation of bicycle lanes and shared-use
paths as depicted in Figure 8-2 (Table 8-6).

Policy 2.2.3: Pursue programming, design and implementation of pedestrian and roadway
lighting improvements as depicted in Figure 8-14, and continue to review exterior lighting



PAGE 8-6
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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA TRANSPORTATION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

standards in the University of Florida Design and Construction Standards for amendment as
needed to provide adequate lighting levels and energy efficiency.

Policy 2.2.4: As funding is identified, the University shall participate in design studies to
determine the feasibility and pursue implementation of pedestrian/bicycle grade-separated road
crossings as depicted in Figures 8-2 and 8-5 (Table 8-7).

Policy 2.2.5: New building construction or reconstruction shall respect Pedestrian Connections
and Shared-Use Paths identified on Figure 1-5 and strive to enhance these pedestrian and bicycle
corridors through building orientation, landscaping and pedestrian amenities.

Policy 2.2.6: Monitor usage and adequacy of existing bicycle parking facilities in terms of
quantity, design, lighting, location, security and covering, and install new or upgraded bicycle
parking facilities to correct observed deficiencies.

Policy 2.2.7: Retain and adhere to bicycle parking requirements in the University of Florida
Design and Construction Standards for bicycle parking to serve new building construction, and
amend these standards to address lighting and covering of bicycle parking facilities.

Policy 2.2.8: The University Police Department and Physical Plant Division shall strive to
expedite the removal of abandoned bicycles in bicycle parking racks by increasing the frequency
of inspections and increasing storage capacity as needed.

Policy 2.2.9: Maintain sidewalks and shared-use paths that meet ADA standards with a smooth,
debris-free surface and minimal vertical separation or cracking.

Policy 2.2.10: Retain University of Florida Design and Construction Standards for bicycle and
pedestrian facilities consistent with the most recent applicable publications of the Florida
Department of Transportation and the American Association of State Highway Transportation
Officials.

Policy 2.2.11: Corrective measures shall be identified and implemented in areas that experience
bicycle and pedestrian conflicts. Such measures may include designated bicycle dismount zones,
re-routing of bicycle traffic, and facilities that separate bicycle and pedestrian traffic or require
bicyclists to slow down.

Policy 2.2.12: The Pedestrian Enhancement Zone, as depicted in Figure 8-5, shall be improved
to provide primary access to pedestrians, bicyclists, transit vehicles, emergency, service, delivery
and disabled parking decal vehicles by reducing other parking availability, re-designing streets to
favor pedestrian access, re-designing other Open Spaces as identified in Figure 1-5, and
implementing other modifications as depicted in Figures 8-5 (Table 8-5) and 8-12 (Table 8-3).

Policy 2.2.13: New construction or renovation shall include hot water showers and lockers,
whenever feasible, to support bicycle commuting and LEED certification.

Objective 2.3: To provide transit facilities and services that are convenient, safe and
responsive to the needs of the campus community.

Policy 2.3.1: The University administration and Student Government shall continue to work with
RTS to maintain and enhance service for on-campus routes and off-campus student-oriented


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MARCH 2006







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA TRANSPORTATION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

residential concentrations as depicted in Figure 8-7 (Table 8-9) and Figure 8-8 (Table 8-8)
respectively and subject to ongoing system performance monitoring.

Policy 2.3.2: Pursue programming, design and implementation of bus shelters at high-use
campus transit stops as depicted in Table 8-10 with additional sites to be identified through on-
going monitoring.

Policy 2.3.3: The University and Shands Healthcare shall coordinate to provide transit service to
medical and related parking facilities including the Veterinary Medicine area.

Policy 2.3.4: The University shall maintain and enhance on-campus transit transfer stations at
Gale-Lemerand Commuter Lot, Rawlings Hall, McCarty Drive, the Hub and Center Drive at
HPNP.

Policy 2.3.5: On-campus bus stops shall be ADA accessible and shall continuously be evaluated
for necessary upgrades including shelters, lighting, benches, bicycle parking and trash/recycling
receptacles. Identified deficiencies in design or amenities shall be corrected.

Policy 2.3.6: The University shall continue to work with RTS to explore the feasibility of
alternative transit vehicles including alternative fuel and electric buses, fixed-route / people-
mover vehicles, and different vehicle types for use in the Pedestrian Enhancement Zone such as
trams or shuttles.

Policy 2.3.7: The University shall assist RTS in providing transit promotions and incentives,
particularly with a focus to encourage employees to use for transit access to campus and around
campus.

Policy 2.3.8: The University shall work with RTS with the intent to increase transit availability
to areas with residential concentrations of university employees, and between main campus and
the Eastside Campus by increasing transit service area coverage, span of service and frequency of
service including those enhancements indicated on Figure 8-8 as feasible.

Policy 2.3.9: On-campus transit shall primarily provide service between perimeter parking areas,
centers of campus development and campus residential areas.

Policy 2.3.10: On-campus transit shall continue to be provided on a pre-paid basis so that all
users, including students, staff, and faculty, may use the service without paying at the fare box.

Policy 2.3.11: The University shall work with RTS to explore the feasibility of incorporating
transit features into existing and potential new development of parking structures within the
University of Florida campus.

Policy 2.3.12: The University shall work with RTS to explore potential locations for a major
transfer center on the University of Florida campus.

Objective 2.4: To manage on-campus parking in order to encourage non-auto access
to campus, particularly for students, faculty and staff

Policy 2.4.1: The University shall continue to manage student parking to restrict the location of
parking based on seniority and/or on-campus residency, and to restrict parking availability overall


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA TRANSPORTATION
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

for lower division students combined with incentives and opportunity for transit use as an
alternative to driving.

Policy 2.4.2: The University shall continue to monitor parking utilization and maintain standards
for the provision of parking decal designations based on the number of permits allocated to
students and faculty/staff

Policy 2.4.3: Gate and access control technology shall be utilized where feasible to limit access
to parking facilities. Vehicular access to the Pedestrian Enhancement Zone shall be limited
during peak hours, and all visitors shall be directed to visitor parking outside of the Pedestrian
Enhancement Zone.

Policy 2.4.4: The Vice President for Finance and Administration, the Transportation and Parking
Division, and the Transportation and Parking Committee shall review the parking decal system to
determine any changes necessary to increase the effectiveness of the carpool program and
implement any other goals, objectives or policies of the campus master plan.

Policy 2.4.5: The Vice President for Finance and Administration, the Transportation and Parking
Division, and the Transportation and Parking Committee shall review incentive programs, such as
parking cash-out, carpool incentives and expanded guaranteed-ride-home programs that may
discourage employees from driving automobiles to campus and decrease the burden on the
university to provide parking facilities.

Policy 2.4.6: The Vice President for Finance and Administration, Transportation and Parking
Division, and Transportation and Parking Committee shall evaluate and recommend on the
potential to extend the hours of parking enforcement.

Policy 2.4.7: The Vice President for Finance and Administration, the Transportation and Parking
Division, and the Transportation and Parking Committee shall review the parking decal cost
structure and make recommendations for university rule changes that increase parking cost in
order to:
change behavior and discourage driving to campus;
more accurately reflect the true value of providing parking; and
include mechanisms that will preserve fairness for employees of differing income levels.
Such mechanisms may include parking costs pro-rated to income, parking costs assigned
according to proximity to the Pedestrian Enhancement Zone or Health Science Center, daily-paid
parking options, parking cash out opportunities and transit service alternatives.

Policy 2.4.8: The Vice President for Finance and Administration, the Transportation and Parking
Division, and the Transportation and Parking Committee shall review parking policies for state
vehicles and initiate more effective state vehicle lease or shuttle services in order to discourage
use of state vehicles for on-campus travel, to reduce the allocation of parking for state vehicles
(particularly in interior campus areas), and to assess a charge to provide these parking spaces for
university vehicles.

Policy 2.4.9: Visitors to campus shall be directed to designated parking areas in the Welcome
Center/Garage 12, Cultural Plaza parking area, Orthopaedic/Ambulatory Surgery Center lots, and
Shands Hospital area garages including parking spaces that may be shifted from those existing
garages to new off-campus parking areas south of Archer Road.



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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA TRANSPORTATION
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Policy 2.4.10: The special parking needs of disabled persons shall be accommodated by
compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Florida Americans with Disabilities
Act Implementation Act, with the cooperation of the University Transportation and Parking
Office and the ADA Compliance Office.

Policy 2.4.11: The special parking needs of emergency, service, vendor and delivery vehicles
shall be accommodated by providing and meeting standards for adequate controlled parking
spaces for such uses adjacent to all buildings and service areas.

Policy 2.4.12: The Physical Plant Division shall work with the Transportation and Parking
Division to examine protocols and physical modifications in targeted campus areas to discourage
parking on lawn areas. The Transportation and Parking Committee and Lakes, Vegetation and
Landscaping Committee shall be consulted to identify and prioritize locations where lawn parking
is most problematic.

Policy 2.4.13: The University shall maintain and support its parking enforcement effort.


Objective 2.5: To provide on-campus parking that meets the needs of students, faculty,
staff and visitors without creating undue traffic congestion, safety concerns for
bicyclists and pedestrians or unrealistic expectations with regard to parking cost or
availability.

Policy 2.5.1: New parking facilities shall be provided on the main campus as warranted and
feasible with a target of maintaining a ratio of 0.30 decal-only parking spaces per main campus
headcount enrollment, but shall not exceed a maximum of 2,000 net new parking spaces between
2005 and 2015 on the property identified within the campus master plan jurisdiction. Any new
parking that may be provided on university-affiliated properties outside of the campus master
plan jurisdiction may be included in the campus parking decal system and accounted for either
through applicable local government development review processes or amendment to the campus
master plan as described in Policies 3.4 through 3.13 of the Intergovernmental Coordination
Element.

Policy 2.5.2: Major new parking facilities shall be provided on the main campus as multi-story
parking garage structures designed to efficiently use campus land resources. These structures
shall be provided consistent with the Figure 2-1, Future Land Use map and Figure 13-1, Future
Building Sites map with priority consideration for the locations depicted on Figure 8-9. Parking
structures shall be encouraged to include non-parking liner building uses, and the Future Land
Use designations shall be interpreted to provide flexibility that encourages this mixed-use
approach to structured parking.

Policy 2.5.3: The University shall continue to maintain and improve requirements in the
University of Florida Design and Construction Standards that dictate design strategies for
parking facilities that reduce conflicts between vehicular and non-vehicular traffic, and provide
adequate lighting and landscaping.

Policy 2.5.4: Campus parking shall be located primarily in perimeter areas of campus such as the
vicinity of Hull Road, SW 34th Street, Radio Road, University Avenue, SW 13th Street, SW 16th
Avenue and Archer Road with transit connections to interior campus locations.



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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA TRANSPORTATION
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Policy 2.5.5: The University shall seek locations to expand motorcycle, moped and scooter
parking as needed including within the Pedestrian Enhancement Zone.

Policy 2.5.6: University parking shall be provided on satellite properties to serve only the
intensity and type of use on each individual site. Parking expansion is anticipated at Lake
Wauburg South and the Eastside Campus as listed in the Capital Improvements Element to serve
facility expansions on those sites.

Objective 2.6: To fund and implement transportation and parking infrastructure and
programs in coordination with user groups.

Policy 2.6.1: The Vice President for Finance and Administration shall coordinate all campus
transportation services and oversee implementation, monitoring and benchmarking of the campus
master plan Transportation Element policies in consultation with the Transportation and Parking
Committee, the Health Science Center Parking and Transportation Task Force, the Land Use and
Facilities Planning Committee, and Student Government.

Policy 2.6.2: The University shall employ a certified traffic engineer on staff and/or as an annual
services contractor to evaluate, recommend and oversee implementation of routine traffic counts
and modifications of traffic circulation, pedestrian and bicycle facilities, traffic signals, signs,
markings and other such traffic issues.

Policy 2.6.3: The University shall work with Student Government and the student body in
general to maintain the transportation fee that is used to subsidize regional transit services in
exchange for universal transit access, and may be used to fund transportation improvements
including transit, bicycle and pedestrian services and facilities or other transportation facilities
identified in this Element.

Policy 2.6.4: The University shall ensure that costs of the transportation system are supported by
user fees to include costs of construction, maintenance, permitting, safety and enforcement,
operations, bus service, special events and other related transportation programs.

Policy 2.6.5: Building construction projects shall provide adequate parking to meet the special
needs of disabled persons, service and delivery vehicles and shall mitigate any significant loss of
existing parking as a result of building construction. Such parking loss mitigations shall be
negotiated in consultation with the Transportation and Parking Committee and the Land Use and
Facilities Planning Committee.

Policy 2.6.6: The University shall pursue opportunities to increase funding for transportation
infrastructure through grants, research demonstration projects, building construction budgets,
private sources and other non-traditional methods.

Policy 2.6.7: The University shall utilize the maps and tables presented in this element as a guide
for facility priorities. These priorities are subject to ongoing monitoring and evaluation of system
performance and travel behavior. The University shall exercise flexibility to implement projects
when funding opportunities become available even if those opportunities dictate that a project
may be funded before another project ranked with a higher priority. In this way, the University
will have the ability to respond to creative funding opportunities such as those identified in Policy
6.6.



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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015


TRANSPORTATION
ELEMENT


Policy 2.6.8: The University shall develop a comprehensive awareness and encouragement
program to support faculty, staff and student travel by bicycle, pedestrian, transit and carpool
modes. Such a program may include educational and promotional materials developed in
coordination with the Transportation and Parking Committee and the Committee on
Sustainability.

Objective 2.7: To maintain or improve outdoor air quality and reduce fuel
consumption.

Policy 2.7.1: The University shall pursue an innovative state-of-the-art green fleet policy to
encourage purchase of vehicles that are highly fuel-efficient, use alternative fuels or are non-
motorized (e.g. bicycles or Segways).

Policy 2.7.2: The University shall pursue an innovative state-of-the-art green fleet policy to
explore the feasibility and encourage the use of alternative fuels including bio-diesel in lieu of
petro-diesel.

Policy 2.7.3: The University shall evaluate the use of telecommuting and flexible schedules to
reduce the peak hour travel demand and its impact on roads and parking.

Policy 2.7.4: The University shall continue to expand, where appropriate, distance learning and
evening class offerings to reduce the peak hour travel demand and its impact on roads and
parking.

Policy 2.7.5: The University shall strive to increase the use of bicycling, walking and transit to
access campus and to move within campus by implementing the policies and projects contained
in the campus master plan.


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015


TRANSPORTATION
ELEMENT


Table 8-1, University of Florida Roadway Resurfacing Priorities, 2005

Priority Roadway From/To Description Length Cost
(L.F.)

RS-1 Newell Drive Museum Rd. to Union Rd. Resurface 1,800 $180,000

Gale Lemerand Dr. to
RS-2 Stadium Road Gal meran Dr to Resurface 1,550 $175,000
Buckman Dr.
Resurface and
RS-3 Museum Road Center Dr. to Newell Dr. restripe to lengthen 1,100 $110,000
EBL at Newell Dr.
Stadium Rd. to W.
RS-4 Buckman Drive Stadium Rd. to W. Resurface 1,150 $115,000
University Ave.
RS-5 Radio Road SW 34th St. to Museum Rd. Resurface 2,550 $ 255,000

RS-6 Newell Drive Archer Rd. to Museum Rd. Resurface 2,100 $210,000

TOTAL COST 10,250 $ 1,025,000
Note: Cost estimates for planning purposes only source: Physical Plant Division (unit prices consistent w/
"2004 Transportation Costs", FDOT Office of Policy Planning, March 2005)

Table 8-2, University of Florida Roadway Reconstruction Priorities, 2005

Length
Priority Roadway From/To Description (L.F.) Cost
(L.F.)
Reconstruct as 2-lane divided
Gale Lemerand ith turn lanes including WBR
Gale Lemerand
RC-1 Mowry Road t at G-L Dr., sidewalk both sides 1,400 $ 1,096,200
bicycle lanes, & evaluation of a
dedicated SBL turn lane at G-L
Reconstruct sub-base and
RC-2 Museum Road Radio Rd. to resurface as existing with new 1,715 $1,119,895
Village Dr. bicycle lanes at Village Drive
intersection
Reconstruct as 2-lane divided
SW 23rd Dr. to with turn lanes, curb & gutter,
RC-3 Mowry Road Gale Lemerand landscaped median, sidewalk 2,810 $2,200,230
Dr. both sides, bicycle lanes and
min. 10' wide bicycle path
Reconstruct as 2-lane divided
d o 2-L ith turn lanes, curb & gutter,
End of 2-Lane
RC-4 Hull Road Section to landscaped media 3,050 $ 2,388,150
Mowr R. both sides, bicycle lanes and
Mowry Rd.
min. 10' wide bicycle path
southside
Reconstruct as a 2-lane road
RC-5 No Name Road Museum Rd. to with bicycle lanes and a
RC-5 No Name Road 2,340 $ 1,296,360
Hull Rd. sidewalk on one side (rural
section with swale)
rR Areconstruct to raise above
RC-6 urArea Archer Road t flood level and modify drainage 200 $60,000
Road north of culvert
cuIverts


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015


TOTAL COST


TRANSPORTATION
ELEMENT


Length
Description (L) Cost
(L.F.)11,515 $8,160,835
11,515 $ 8,160,835


Note: Cost estimates for planning purposes only reference: "2004 Transportation Costs", FDOT Office
of Policy Planning, March 2005 with input from The Corradino Group, Inc. and UF Physical Plant Division.

Table 8-3, University of Florida Intersection and
Transportation System Management Priorities, 2005

Length
Priority Roadway At Description (L.F.) Cost
(L.F.)
TS-1 Museum Rd. Newell Dr. Lengthen EBL lane by restriping 100 $1,000
center lane

TS-2 Center Dr. Museum Rd. Lengthen NBL lane by restriping 100 $1,000

TS-3 Village Dr. SW 2nd Ave. Lengthen NBL lane by restriping 100 $1,000

Gale Lemerand Construct pedestrian refuge
Gale Lemerand
TS-4 Mowry Dr. Dr island in existing striped area for NA $ 4,000
WB pedestrians
TS-5 Campusi Five signalized Traffic Signal Equipment 270,
TS-5 Cam de intersections Upgrade and Timing Study
Gale Lemerand
TS-6 Museum Rd. Gale mend Construct WBR lane 300 $40,000
Drive

TS-7 Museum Rd. Radio Rd. Construct roundabout NA $ 450,000

Restripe NBR lane and bicycle
TS-8 Museum Rd Gale Lemerand lane; and install NB right-turn
Drive arrow (assumes mast arm will
bear weight of signal head)

TS-9 Museum Rd. Village Drive Construct roundabout NA $450,000

O'Connell Construct NBLlane, SBR lane,
TS-10 Center Parking and reconstruct EBR lane with 200 $ 30,000
Lot Entrance pedestrian refuge
Reconfigure two stop-controlled
rain ntitt intersections into one 3-way stop
Brain Institute
TS-11 Newell Dr. and ARB (includes restriping and NA $ 20,000
modifications to curb ramp
locations)
Construct pedestrian and service
TS-12 Union Rd. and Newell Hall to access improvements (includes NA $45,000
Fletcher Dr. Dauer Hall removal of some on-street
parking)
Hustler Hall to
TS-13 Fletcher Dr. Hall to Construct pedestrian access
TS-13 Fletcher Dr. Yardley NA $ 45,000
Courtyards improvements
Courtyards
Construct WBR lane and provide
Gale Lemerand a dedicated SBL turn lane as
.TS-14 Mowry Dr. feasible (can be accomplished in 300 $ 50000
____ road reconstruction project)_


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015


TRANSPORTATION
ELEMENT


Length
Priority Roadway At Description (L.F.) Cost

TS-15 Museum Rd. Hull Rd. Construct roundabout NA $450,000

TS-16 Hull Rd. Mowry Rd. Construct roundabout (or interim NA $450,000
southbound right turn lane) __

TOTAL COST NA $ 2,317,000
Note: Cost estimates for planning purposes only reference: "2004 Transportation Costs", FDOT Office
of Policy Planning, March 2005 with input from The Corradino Group, Inc.

Table 8-4, University of Florida Roadway New Construction Priorities, 2005

Length
Priority Roadway From/To Description (L.F.) Cost
(L.F.)
Construct with bicycle lanes and
.NC-1 Shealy Drive SW 16th Ave. to sidewalks both sides on a new 640 $701,570
Extension Archer Rd. alignment to intersect at Gale
Lemerand Drive (urban section)
SW23rd Construct as 2-lane with turn
NC-2 Terc Archer Rd. to lanes where needed, sidewalk 1,740 $ 3,254,380
NC-2 Terrace 1,740 $ 3,254,380
Hull Rd. both sides and paved shoulder
Extension
bicycle lanes (rural section)
Reconstruct existing service
N3 Med Plaza Archer Rd. to drive as a 2-lane road with 710 $
NC-3 710 $ 555,930
service drive Mowry Rd. sidewalk on one side and new
entrance at Archer Road
Construct as 2-lane divided with
Radio Road Hull Rd. to SW turn lanes, landscaped median, 2,160 $
Extension 34th St. sidewalk both sides and bicycle
lanes (urban section)
Construct with turn lanes where
needed, bicycle lanes and
Newell Dr. to sidewalks both sides on a new 1,870
NC-5 Diamond Road SW 13th St. alignment north and west of $1,757,100
existing, but with current termini
(urban section)

TOTAL COST 6,410 $11,156,061
Note: Cost estimates for planning purposes only reference: "2004 Transportation Costs", FDOT Office
of Policy Planning, March 2005. Estimates for N-2 and N-4 provided by The Corradino Group, Inc.

Table 8-5, Independent Pedestrian Project Priorities, 2005
Priority Facility From To Description Length Cost
O'Connell
Center West Gale North side and
SW-1 Parking Lot entrance Lemerand south side at Gale 790 $ 26,860
Central road Dr. Lemerand Dr.
Drive
Diamond
SW-2 Newell Dr. Garage I Diamond East side 165 $ 5,610
Road
Museum Woodlawn
SW-3 Museum Village Dr. ooawn North side 1,470 $ 49,980
Road Dr.

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015


TRANSPORTATION
ELEMENT


Priority Facility From To Description Length Cost
W.
Fraternity Museum
SW-4 Rd. Fraternity West side 1,070 $ 36,380
Dr.
W.
Village SW 2nd
SW-5 vae Fraternity A n West side 890 $ 30,260
Drive p Ave.
Dr.
6 Radio Bledsoe Lakeside South side and
SW-6 641 $ 21,794
Road Dr. Residence partial north side
Bledsoe
SW-7 Bledsoe Hull Rd. Radio Rd Both sides 1,660 $112,880
Drive
Rhines Hall Gale
Rhines Materials leWest and south
SW-8 Service Lemerand 710 $ 24,140
Drive Eng. Bldg. Dr.side
Drive Dr.
W.
Village Museum W.
SW9 Drive Rd. Fraternity East side 1,080 $ 36,720
Drive Rd.
Dr.
Museum
SW-10 Museum Hull Rd. Radio Rd West side 1,700 $ 57,800
Road
North side and
Radio SW 34th Museum
SW-11 Rad t south side at SW 2,630 $ 89,420
Road St. Rd.34th St.
34th St.
SW-12 SW23rd Dr. Archer Rd. Mowry Rd. Both sides 1,422 $96,700
Reconstruct east
Gale Rhines S m sidewalk in
Stadium
SW-13 Lemerand service Rd. conjunction with 970 $29,580
Dr. drive Bldg. #183
reconstruction
SW-14 Surge Area Archer Rd. Natural West side 2,080 $ 70,720
Drive Area Dr.
Equine
SW-15 Shealy Dr. Equine Archer Rd. East side 1,650 $56,100
Hospital
TOTAL 18,928 $744,944
Note: Cost estimates for planning purposes only reference: "2004 Transportation Costs", FDOT Office
of Policy Planning, March 2005

Table 8-6, Independent Bicycle Project Priorities, 2005

Priority Facility From To Description Length Cost
Bicycle lanes (remove
Village Museum parking, resurface & re-
BK-1 Dr. Rd. SW 2nd Ave. stripe) 1,970 $ 246,250
Gale
Shared- Lemerand Upgrade existing path
BK-2 Use Path Dr. Museum Rd. west of Black Hall 2,100 $ 262,500
Construct new and
Particle upgrade existing shared-
Shared- Science use path following
BK-3 Use Path Bldg. Diamond Rd. existing creek 1,560 $ 195,000
Shared- Museum Construct shared-use
BK-4 Use Path Rd. Newell Dr. path through Reitz Lawn 2,560 $ 320,000



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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015


TRANSPORTATION
ELEMENT


Priority Facility From To Description Length Cost
Genetics/
Hull Road Western Cancer/
Shared- campus Biotech
BK-5 Use Path boundary Pavilion Site Construct on south side 5,910 $ 738,750
Hume Hall &
Shared- Mowry Gale Construct new shared-
BK-6 Use Path Rd. Lemerand Dr. use path 3,940 $ 492,500
Shared- Physics Construct new shared-
BK-7 Use Path Bldg. Newell Dr. use path 2,016 $ 252,000
Gale Construct new shared-
Shared- Lemerand use path behind Hume
BK-8 Use Path Dr. Museum Rd. Hall 1,440 $ 180,000
Construct new and
Shared- Hume upgrade existing shared-
BK-9 Use Path Hall Band Shell use path 732 $ 91,500
Construct new and
upgrade existing shared-
use path around
Shared- Graham Graham Woods
BK-10 Use Path Hall Stadium RD. perimeter 1,600 $ 200,000
Construct new shared-
use path east of creek
Shared- Diamond and west of Beaty
BK-11 Use Path Rd. Museum Rd. Towers 1,520 $ 190,000
Construct paved service
road from SW 23rd Terr.
at Bee Unit to Ritchie
Road with gated motor
Service SW23rd vehicle access allowing
BK-12 Road Terrace Ritchie Road bicycle through-access 1,640 $ 205,000
Construct new shared-
use path in conjunction
Shared- Mowry with new building
BK-13 Use Path Rd. Archer Rd. construction 1,120 $ 140,000
Reconstruct roadway to
provide bicycle lanes
End of &/or wide sidewalk in
Center Bicycle conjunction with new
BK-14 Drive Lanes Museum Rd. building construction 330 $ 258,390
Construct new shared-
use path in conjunction
with new road and
Shared- Diamond Norman building construction
BK-15 Use Path Rd. Tunnel near SW 13th St. 2,568 $ 321,000
Construct new shared-
use path in conjunction
Shared- Diamond with new building
BK-16 Use Path Rd. Archer Rd. construction 617 $ 77,125

TOTAL ____31,623 $4,170,015
Note: Cost estimates for planning purposes only reference: "2004 Transportation Costs", FDOT Office
of Policy Planning, March 2005



PAGE 8-17
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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015


TRANSPORTATION
ELEMENT


Table 8-7, Bicycle / Pedestrian Grade-Separation Project Priorities, 2005
Priority Facility From To Description Length Cost
Attractive bridge on the
Cultural south side of Hull Rd/SW
Plaza 34 St. intersection
GS-1
Pedestrian/ integrated with building
Bicycle Hilton Cultural sites and shared-use path
Overpass Hotel Plaza alignment 450 TBD
Overpass or underpass
(depending upon utilities
and site design
Reitz Union considerations) providing
Pedestrian/ a north-south crossing of
Bicycle the west side of the
Overpass or Phelps intersection of Museum
Underpass Lab Reitz Union Rd/Reitz Union driveway 350 TBD
Wilmot Overpass utilizing
Gardens Genetics/ existing grade change on
GS-3 Pedestrian/ Cancer/ the south side of the
Bicycle Wilmot Biotech intersection of Mowry
Overpass Gardens Pavilion Rd/Gale-Lemerand Drive 375 TBD
Underpass (depending
upon utilities and site
design considerations)
GS-4 providing a north-south
Museum crossing of Museum
Road Beaty Broward Road at existing midblock
Underpass Towers Recreation crossing 350 TBD

Table 8-8, City Transit Route Proposed Modifications in the University of Florida
Context Area, 2005

Priority Route From/To Description Cost

Do n Divert the route on its westbound trip to enter
Y-1 Roue 301 Lxington campus at SW 23rd Drive and continue on
MCT uingt Mowry Rd. to Center Dr. (current route stays No change
ACrossngrcher Rd. to Center Dr.)
DColol V e Divert the route to travel Village Dr. to W.
Fraternity Dr. to Stadium Rd. (current route
CTY-2 Route 34 Countryside to takes Woodlawn Dr. from SW2 nd Ave. to No change
Buckman Drive Stam
Stadium Rd.)
Extend the route from its current terminus from
Butler Plaza to the Fire Station on SW 20th Ave. to continue on
CTY-3 Route 21 McCarty Hall SW 43rd St through Windmeadows Blvd, SW No change
35th Blvd. and SW 37th Blvd. (30 min. HDWY)
$425,799
Health Science New route following Center Drive, Archer Rd, $425,79
Center to Airport Gale Lemerand Dr, Museum Rd, Newell Dr, (0
CTY-4 New Route 25 d th $283,866
via Eastside Union Rd, SW2nd Ave, Waldo Rd, NE 39th Ave. $283,866
Campus (30 min. HDWY)


PAGE 8-18
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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015


TRANSPORTATION
ELEMENT


Priority Route From/To Description Cost

Health Science New route following Archer Road, Center Dr,
Center to Hunters Museum Rd, SW 13t St, NW 23rd Ave/23rd $337,091
CTY-5 New Route 44 th th (45 mi.)
CTY-5 ew Route 44 Crossing via Glen Blvd/Glen Springs Rd, NW 34th St, NW 39th (45 min.)
Springs Rd. Ave. and NW 43rd St. (45 min. HDWY)
New route following Center Dr, Museum Rd,
Helth Science SW 13th St, University Ave. to downtown plaza, $153,760
CTY-6 New Route 46 Centerto S. Main St, SW 16th Ave, SW 6th St, Depot Ave, (30 min.)
Downtown Loop th
Downtown Loop SW 9th Rd. and Archer Rd. (30 min. HDWY)
New Route starting at the Oaks Mall via 62n
CTY-7 New Route 62 Oaks Mall to Blvd. to 43rd Street to Butler Plaza (20 min. $
Butler Plaza HDVY) (20 min.)

TOTAL COST $ 1,398,783*
* Assumes 30 minute headways for proposed new Route 25. Total equals $1,256,850 if new Route 25 has
45 minute headways.


Table 8-9, University of Florida Campus Transit Route Proposed Modifications,
2005

Priority Route From/To Description Cost

University Village Divert the route on its westbound trip to go
Sast-West ut t r south on Center Dr, west on Mowry Rd. and No change
Circulator n north on Gale Lemerand Dr. (current route
stays on Museum Rd.)
University Villa Divert the route to pass by University Village
South (rather than circle in parking lot) and
CMP-2 Family Housing South to extend route to the SW 34th St. Park & Ride 2 No change
Buckman Drive
Lot
Route 128 Lake
CP-3 Wauburg Main Campus to Divert the route to circle through Fraternity
(Saturday Lake Wauburg Drive and Stadium Drive on main campus
service only)


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015


TRANSPORTATION
ELEMENT


Table 8-10, Campus Bus Shelter Priorities, 2005
Priority Roadway Location Description
PHASE TWO
SH-1 Center Drive Across from Psychology Shelter 5A standard
(Southbound) aluminum
H-2 Fraternity Drive South end Shelter 19 -standard
SH-2 Fraternity Drivealuminum
H-3 M m R Across from Hume Hall Shelter 10 standard
SH-3 Museum Roadaluminum
CS enter Drive Near Greenhouse Shelter 5 standard
SH-4
(Northbound) aluminum
S Across from Graham Shelter 9 standard
SH-5 Gale Lemerand Drive
Hall aluminum
Across from Dickinson Shelter 4 standard
SH-6 Museum Road Hall aluminum with a bus pull-out
bay
Commuter Lot Shelter 8 replace existing
with standard aluminum
SH-7 North/South Drive double including covered
bicycle parking or bicycle
lockers
Across from Brain Shelter 3 standard
SH-8 Newell Drive Institute aluminum with a bus pull-out
bay
SNAcross from Police Shelter 2 standard
SH-9 Newell Drive
Station at Dickinson Hall aluminum
Near Microbiology/Cell Shelter 14 standard
SH-10 Museum Road
Science aluminum
PHASE THREE
Near Kindercare Shelter 11 standard
SH-11 Museum Road aluminum an move crosswalk
to bus stop
Near Softball Fields Shelter 16 standard
SH-12 Bledsoe Road aluminum and move bus stop
away from corner
SH-13 SW 12h Street Behind Norman Hall Shelter 20 City/CRA
(CPUH) standard shelter
SH-14 SW 8th Avenue Near Norman Field Shelter 21 City/CRA (CPUH)
standard shelter
SH-15 Hl Rd In front of Fifield Hall Shelter 18 standard
SH-15 Hull Roadaluminum
aluminum
Near HPNP Shelter 6 replace existing
SH-16 Center Drive with standard aluminum
double


PAGE 8-20
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9.
GENERAL INFRASTRUCTURE ELEMENT






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GENERAL INFRASTRUCTURE
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

Introduction

The general infrastructure element includes goals, objectives and policies that apply to the University's main
campus and, where applicable, to the University's satellite properties. This element focuses on the University's
existing infrastructure and procedures for improving existing deficiencies, while providing guidance on future
additions and improvements. Sub-elements included within this element are stormwater, potable water,
wastewater and solid waste. Additionally, reclaimed water usage is addressed in both the potable water section
and in the wastewater section. The University's commitment to using reclaimed water for irrigation serves as a
major component of the main campus's sustainable water conservation practices. The Physical Plant Division is
responsible for permitting, maintenance and expansion of all of these general infrastructures on the main campus.
The satellite properties are handled individually with each property handling its own infrastructural permits,
maintenance and improvements.

The Physical Plant Division obtains permits for stormwater and consumptive use of water from the St. Johns
River Water Management District (SJRWMD). The consumptive use permit covers both the secondary use of
potable water (drinking water) that the University receives from Gainesville Regional Utilities (GRU) (GRU
includes the University's use in its permit to the SJRWMD) and covers the University's wells. Wastewater is
treated in on-campus facilities and handled under a permit from the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection (the use of reclaimed water is also covered by the SJRWMD permit). The University's main campus
solid waste is handled under an annual purchase agreement with Alachua County, which in turn transfers the non-
recycled waste to the New River landfill in Duval County. Recycled waste accounts for approximately 40% of
the total waste generated on campus. University personnel are continually exploring ways to increase this
percentage on an on-going basis.

Stormwater Sub-Element

Goal 1: To Design, Construct and Maintain a Safe, Sustainable, Economical and
Environmentally Sound Stormwater Management System that Reduces the Potential of Flooding,
Protects Natural Drainage Features, and Preserves and Enhances Desirable Water Quality
Conditions.

Objective 1.1: Meet or exceed all applicable federal and state regulatory requirements for stormwater
management and water quality protection. Additionally, the University shall coordinate with the City and the
County on all projects outside of the Lake Alice basin and UF depressional basins 1-3 and 5-9.

Policy 1.1.1: The University shall continue to comply with the regulations set forth in the Clean Water Act,
Title 40 CFR as applicable.

Policy 1.1.2: The University shall maintain water quality standards for stormwater quantity and quality that are
consistent with the St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD), Suwannee River Water
Management District and Department of Environmental Protection standards for stormwater management
systems as outlined in Section 120.373 and Chapter 403, Florida Statutes and Chapters 62-3, 62-25, 62-40, 40B-
1, 40B-2, 40B-4, 40C-1, 40C-4, 40C-8 and 40C-40 through 40C-44, of the Florida Administrative Code.

Policy 1.1.3: The University shall obtain a Standard General or Individual Environmental Resource permit from
the appropriate water management district for construction that is located outside of the Lake Alice Basin and UF
Depressional Basins 1-3 and 5-9.




PAGE 9-1
MARCH 2006







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GENERAL INFRASTRUCTURE
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

Policy 1.1.4: The University shall provide stormwater management facility capacity and the capital
improvements required to meet future service demands on campus.

Policy 1.1.5: The University shall abide by all requirements and conditions of the current Master Stormwater
Permit by the SJRWMD and shall seek renewal of the permit in 2010. Those conditions include reporting water
levels in monitoring wells quarterly and submission of groundwater and surface water monitoring tests to the
water management district.

Policy 1.1.6: The University shall submit an annual report to the SJRWMD that includes details of specific
construction projects and update the proposed construction plan with changes in impervious surface by basin
within the Lake Alice Basin and depressional basins 1-3 and 5-9. Additionally, the University shall provide as-
built plans or certification by a Florida Registered Engineer that all facilities have been constructed in accordance
with the design approved by the water management district. Plans for any construction on the main campus
within 50 feet of jurisdictional wetland shall be submitted to the SJRWMD for review and approval.

Objective 2.1: Maintain existing stormwater management infrastructure and provide sufficient infrastructure
capacity to meet the future needs of the University.

Policy 1.2.1: Stormwater management facility improvements shall be implemented based on the following
ranked priorities:

1. Eliminating existing system deficiencies and deferred maintenance, particularly those that may affect
life safety and property protection;
2. Maintaining the existing system through routine preventive maintenance activities; and
3. Expanding the system to accommodate new stormwater management needs.

Policy 1.2.2: The Physical Plant Division shall appropriately size stormwater facilities to meet anticipated
future demand (based on the 10-year capital improvement list) when doing routine upgrades, replacements or
new installations including provisions to account for anticipated landscaping that could displace function and
consider the addition of stormwater pretreatment systems within the Lake Alice basin, where feasible.

Policy 1.2.3: The Physical Plant Division shall be charged with reviewing all proposed development projects to
ensure that increases in impervious surface can be accommodated in the capacity of the existing and/or
committed drainage system. Any proposed increase in campus impervious surfaces shall be implemented only
upon a finding by the Physical Plant Division that existing facility capacity is already on-line to accommodate the
increased need, or that additional capacity will be funded and on-line at the time of need.

Policy 1.2.4: In general, the configuration of retention facilities shall be natural and curvilinear in outline.
Rectilinear and pure geometric forms are discouraged. Wherever possible, side slopes shall vary and provide
smooth transitions to existing grades. Gentle landforms around the lake shall reinforce the "natural" context.
Additionally, landscape treatment for retention and other drainage elements shall appear naturalistic and
"non-engineered".

Policy 1.2.5: Landscape treatment for retention facilities shall respect maintenance and access setbacks but
otherwise be set into a natural, existing vegetative context or planted with native material.

Policy 1.2.6: Implement infrastructure improvement projects to reduce stormwater erosion identified in
Figure 9-1 based on priorities established in 2.1 as feasible.


PAGE 9-2
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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GENERAL INFRASTRUCTURE
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

Policy 1.2.7: Implement stormwater facility projects to reduce the quantity and improve the quality of
stormwater discharge in locations identified in Figure 9 -1 as feasible.

Policy 1.2.8: The University shall work with the City of Gainesville and Florida Department of
Transportation to ensure that stormwater issues that can include; water quality, trash, erosion, and flooding
are controlled at points where off-campus stormwater is accepted into the University's stormwater system and
water bodies or when the University's stormwater system adversely impacts the stormwater systems and
water bodies under control of the City of Gainesville or the Florida Department of Transportation.

Objective 1.3: Protect the natural functions of hydrological areas, maintain water quality and control
sedimentation.

Policy 1.3.1: The University shall not allow stormwater discharge to cause or contribute to a violation of water
quality standards in Waters of the State.

Policy 1.3.2: The University shall continue to mitigate University generated stormwater and to minimize
stormwater borne pollutants in new and existing facilities through implementation of Best Management Practices
(BMPs) that includes, but is not limited to:

Incorporating stormwater management retention and detention features into the design of parks, trails,
commons and open spaces, where such features do not detract from the recreational or aesthetic value of
a site.
Using slow release fertilizers and/or carefully managed fertilizer applications timed to ensure maximum
root uptake and minimal surface water runoff or leaching to groundwater.
Conducting regular training for maintenance personnel about issues such as motor vehicle maintenance
in order to prevent leakage of oil, grease and other fluids, collection and proper disposal of yard debris,
disposal of paint and cleaning products (including their empty containers) and collection of suitable
recyclable materials.
Avoiding the widespread application of broad spectrum pesticides by involving only purposeful and
minimal application of pesticides, aimed at identified targeted species.
Coordinating pesticide application with irrigation practices to reduce runoff and leaching.
Using pervious materials to minimize impervious surface area.
Incorporating features into the design of fertilizer and pesticide storage, mixing and loading areas that
are designed to prevent/minimize spillage.
Using vegetative management (e.g., planted buffers and minimal mowing).


Policy 1.3.3: The University shall require appropriate methods of controlling soil erosion and sedimentation to
help minimize the destruction of soil resources used or disturbed during site development as outlined in NPDES
Phase II requirements. Such methods shall include, but not be limited to:

Phasing and limiting the removal of vegetation;
Minimizing the amount of land area that is cleared;
Limiting the amount of time bare land is exposed to rainfall;
Using temporary ground cover on cleared areas if construction is not imminent;


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GENERAL INFRASTRUCTURE
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Using silt fencing, hay bales, or other appropriate sediment barriers adjacent to water bodies, wetlands
and areas of slope; and
Maintaining vegetative cover on areas of high soil erosion potential (i.e., banks of streams, steep or long
slopes, stormwater conveyances, etc.), where feasible.

Policy 1.3.4: The University shall implement the latest advances in agricultural BMPs in all campus agricultural
areas, unless the BMPs directly interfere with the research being done at the site. These BMPs shall include, but
are not limited to, the use of buffer strips, soil erosion control measures, fertilizer recommendations based on
research and soil sampling, efficient manure management, barnyard and/or feedlot runoff control, water
diversions, fencing, grade stabilization structures, grass waterways, and ponds/sediment basins.

Policy 1.3.5: The University shall provide the City of Gainesville the opportunity to review and comment on
proposed development and construction projects within the Hogtown Creek Drainage Basin. The University
shall ensure that any potential adverse impacts to the Hogtown Creek Drainage Basin are identified and that any
increase in volume of runoff over the pre-development volume for a 72-hour period shall be accommodated in
the site design for the development.

Policy 1.3.6: The University shall cooperate with the City of Gainesville and Alachua County on efforts to
restore the natural functions of Tumblin Creek prior to its discharge into Bivens Arm Lake.

Policy 1.3.7: The University shall continue to monitor Lake Alice and other surface water bodies for
compliance with existing standards for water quality in order to meet Class III water quality standards and report
findings to the Lakes, Vegetation and Landscape committee annually.

Objective 1.4: Implement sustainable stormwater practices in all campus site development incorporating Low
Impact Development techniques where physically, economically, and practically possible.

Policy 1.4.1: The University shall strive to incorporate stormwater improvements into all new building sites and
into modification of existing sites. These improvements include, but are not limited to, rain gardens, roof-top
gardens, porous soil amendments, hardscape storage, pervious pavement and other innovative stormwater
techniques.

Policy 1.4.2: The University shall identify opportunities for retrofitting existing open space (i.e. land use
classifications of Buffer, Urban Park and Conservation) to incorporate rain gardens and other multi-use detention
practices that maintain the primary use, but with the added benefit of slowing water discharges into the
stormwater system. Examples include: lowered flower beds (i.e. instead of raised beds), curb openings (i.e. brick
and other hardscape removal in edging and seat wall footings) that allow water to enter vegetated areas, use of
lawn areas for incorporating slight depressions that retain rainfall, and elevating storm drains where water
detention is acceptable so that they are not at the lowest elevation.

Policy 1.4.3: All proposed stormwater projects on campus that involve the use of designated open space (land
use classifications of Buffer, Urban Park and Conservation) shall seek approval from the Lakes, Vegetation and
Landscape committee, during the design phase. These projects must be in conformance with the primary function
of the open space.

Objective 1.5: Inform faculty, staff students and visitors on stormwater issues through outreach and
demonstration projects.




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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN. 2005-2015


GENERAL INFRASTRUCTURE
ELEMENT


Policy 1.5.1: The University shall strive where practicable to include interpretive information and
educational opportunities that go along with the University's efforts to integrate innovative structural
stormwater design and BMP concepts.

Policy 1.5.2: The University shall maintain financial and personnel support of stormwater related education
and awareness programs for the campus community.

Policy 1.5.3: The University shall pursue grants and other opportunities to fund implementation, outreach and
study of stormwater best management practices on campus.


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GENERAL INFRASTRUCTURE
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

Potable Water Sub-Element

GOAL 2: To Provide a Reliable, Sustainable, Safe, and Efficient Potable Water System to Meet
the Current and Future Demands of the University.

Objective 2.1: Coordinate with the provider ofpotable water service to ensure that adequate capacity
and levels of service are maintained to meet current and future demands of the University.

Policy 2.1.1: The potable water distribution system shall be designed to provide for at least one hundred percent
(100%) of the combined maximum daily demand rate and required fire flow for said rate, or peak hour demand,
whichever is greater.

Policy 2.1.2: Flow demands for housing development shall be designed and calculated based on full or
projected ultimate development. Flow demands for public or special developments shall be based upon the type
of development, with calculations submitted to the University for approval prior to final system design.

Policy 2.1.3: Water distribution facilities shall be designed to provide an average daily level of service (LOS)
of 70 gallons per capital per day.

Policy 2.1.4: Line sizes shall accommodate simultaneously the peak hour demand plus one fire flow event.

Policy 2.1.5: Potable water infrastructure improvements shall be implemented in accordance with the following
priorities:

1. Elimination of existing system deficiencies;
2. Maintaining the existing system; and
3. Expanding the system to accommodate new potable water demands.

Policy 2.1.6: The University shall construct new potable water facilities as needed. The timing and phasing
requirements for these improvements shall be established in the Capital Improvements Element.

Policy 2.1.7: Design criteria for potable water facilities and level of service standards shall be consistent with
those outlined in the Florida Administrative Code, Chapters 62-550 and 62-555.

Policy 2.1.8: The University shall coordinate with the Gainesville Regional Utilites (GRU) to ensure that
adequate water service will be available for any proposed development connecting to the GRU system consistent
with the University's Consumptive Use permit issued by the St. Johns River Water Management District. The
University shall update as necessary, memoranda of understanding or interlocal agreements to ensure that potable
water will be supplied to the campus to meet the future needs of the University.

Policy 2.1.9: The Physical Plant Division shall appropriately size water infrastructure to meet anticipated
future demand (based on the 10-year capital improvement list) when doing routine upgrades, replacements or
new installations.

Policy 2.1.10: The Physical Plant Division shall be charged with reviewing all proposed development projects
to ensure that adequate potable water capacity is available.




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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GENERAL INFRASTRUCTURE
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

Policy 2.1.11: Proposed increases in consumptive use of potable water shall be approved only upon a
determination that adequate potable water treatment and distribution facility capacity is already on-line to
accommodate the increased demand, or that additional capacity will be funded and on-line concurrent with
demand.

Objective 2.2: Protect and conserve the potable water supply and sources.

Policy 2.2.1: The University shall maintain a water protection and conservation program for the main campus
and satellite facilities in Alachua County through the St. Johns Water Management District, Suwannee River
Water Management District and the Gainesville Regional Utility, which outlines various procedures on how to
protect and conserve the potable water supply and source. This program shall include measures designed to:

Ensure compliance with water management district conservation program requirements;
Irrigate in compliance with conditions of the University's consumptive use permit from the Water
Management District(s);
Use treated wastewater effluent for an expanded campus irrigation system;
Use automated timers and other irrigation flow monitoring equipment;
Use low water demand procedures for new building construction and common areas.
Retrofit existing buildings with water-conserving plumbing fixtures, where feasible


Policy 2.2.2: There shall be no physical connection between the public or University potable water supply and a
sewer or appurtenance, which would permit the passage of any sewage or polluted water supply into the potable
water supply system.

Policy 2.2.3: The University shall require that backflow prevention devices be installed in all lines where the
possibility exists of water entering from any other source into the potable water supply infrastructure.

Policy 2.2.4: The University shall continue to comply with the potable water regulations and requirements set
forth in the Florida Administrative Code, Chapters 62-3, 62-40, 62-550 and 62-555.

Policy 2.2.5: The University shall not undertake activities on campus that could contaminate groundwater
sources or designated recharge areas, unless provisions have been made to prevent such contamination.

Policy 2.2.6: The University shall conserve water resources through the use of low water demand design
principles, including:

Use of drought tolerant and site-appropriate native plant material to the maximum degree possible;
Use of ultra-low volume irrigation delivery fixtures except where reclaimed water is being used;
Separation of turf and non-turf irrigation zones;
Soil moisture sensors and rain shut-off switches;
Use of drought tolerant ground cover;
Use of canopy trees; and
Use of soil enhancers and mulch to enable soils to retain moisture.


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GENERAL INFRASTRUCTURE
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

Sanitary Sewer Sub-Element

GOAL 3: To Provide a Reliable, Sustainable, Safe, Efficient, and Environmentally Sound
Sanitary Sewer System and Wastewater Treatment Facility to Meet the Current and Future
Demands of the University.

Objective 3.1: Ensure that adequate sanitary sewage treatment and capacity is available to meet the
current andfuture needs of the University.

Policy 3.1.1: New sanitary sewer systems shall be designed to implement the performance standards contained
in chapters 62-600, 601, 602, 604, 610, 620 of the Florida Administrative Code and other policies of this master
plan.

Policy 3.1.2: Design criteria for sanitary sewer facilities shall be implemented by evaluating system capacities
against projected demand in accordance with the applicable standards set forth in the Florida Administrative
Code, Chapter 62-600.

Policy 3.1.3: Flow demands for commercial or high demand developments shall be based upon the type of
development, with calculations submitted to the University for approval prior to design.

Policy 3.1.4: The leakage into or out of the sanitary sewer shall be determined through a comprehensive
engineering assessment of infiltration rates on a regular basis. These assessments shall include recommendations
for any repairs or corrections needed to minimize infiltration or exfiltration rates in accordance with accepted
industry standards.

Policy 3.1.5: All wastewater force mains shall be designed to accommodate full development peak flow and
shall maintain a minimum velocity of 2 feet per second.

Policy 3.1.6: Each pumping station shall have the capacity of pumping the design peak flow at the maximum
computed total dynamic head with pipe friction loss calculated by the 'Hazen-Williams' Formula. All
calculations shall be submitted to and approved by the Physical Plant Division prior to final design.

Policy 3.1.7: The University shall implement sanitary sewer facility improvements as needed. The timing and
phasing requirements for improvements are established in the Capital Improvements Element.

Policy 3.1.8: Sanitary sewer facility improvements shall be implemented based on the following priorities:

1. Elimination of existing system deficiencies;
2. Maintaining the existing system; and
3. Expanding the system to accommodate new sanitary sewer needs.

Policy 3.1.9: The University shall continue to comply with the regulations and requirements set forth in its
wastewater permit from the Department of Environmental Protection.

Policy 3.1.10: The University shall continue to maintain accurate records of the projected flows to the
wastewater treatment plant.




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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN. 2005-2015


GENERAL INFRASTRUCTURE
ELEMENT


Policy 3.1.11: The University shall provide proper maintenance and ensure adequate capacity of the wastewater
treatment plant for future development on campus.

Policy 3.1.12: The University shall coordinate with Gainesville Regional Utilities (GRU) to ensure that
adequate sanitary sewer service will be available for any proposed development connecting to the GRU system.
The University shall pursue any memoranda of understanding or interlocal agreements necessary to ensure that
sanitary sewer will be available to applicable areas of the campus to meet the future needs of the University.

Policy 3.1.13: The Physical Plant Division shall be charged with reviewing all proposed development projects
to ensure that adequate sanitary sewer capacity exists.

Policy 3.1.14: Proposed increases in campus sewer demands shall be approved only upon a finding that
existing wastewater collection and treatment plant capacity is already on-line to accommodate the increased need,
or that additional capacity is funded and will be on-line at the forecast time of need. It shall be the responsibility
of the University's Physical Plant Division to maintain a record of existing and committed project flows in order
to determine whether adequate system capacity is available to meet additional demands.

Policy 3.1.15: The Physical Plant Division shall appropriately size wastewater facilities to meet anticipated
future demand (based on the 10-year capital improvement list) when doing routine upgrades, replacements or
new installations.

Policy 3.1.16: The University shall explore opportunities to use alternative wastewater disposal systems such as
composting toilets at remote locations where centralized wastewater collection is not feasible.

Objective 3.2: To maximize the use of reclaimed water for campus irrigation.

Policy 3.2.1: The University shall continue to implement and/or upgrade the reclaimed water distribution and
storage systems throughout campus.

Policy 3.2.2: The University shall curtail the use of well water or domestic water for irrigation purposes by
increasing the use of reclaimed water.

Policy 3.2.3: The University shall ensure that all new construction projects requiring irrigation provide a
reclaimed water distribution system, when feasible.

Policy 3.2.4: Investigate the feasibility of supplying additional reclaimed water to operations on-site or to
potential customers off-site, in lieu of sending this effluent to deep-well injection.


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GENERAL INFRASTRUCTURE
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN, 2005-2015 ELEMENT

Solid Waste Sub-Element

GOAL 4: To provide for Safe, Sanitary, Efficient, Economical and Environmentally Sound Solid
Waste Management that Assures Public Health and Safety for the Current and Future Demands
of the University.

Objective 4.1: Correct existing solid waste collection and disposal facility deficiencies and ensure the
provision of adequate facility capacity to meet the future needs of the University.

Policy 4.1.1: The University shall establish and adopt a level of service for solid waste of 2.0 pounds per capital
per day, based on total UF students, faculty, and staff population. Higher levels may be required for special use
facilities.

Policy 4.1.1: The University shall ensure that the necessary solid waste facilities and services are in place and
operational at the adopted level of service at the time of building occupancy.

Policy 4.1.2: The University shall continue to comply with the regulations and level of service requirements set
forth in the Florida Administrative Code, Chapter 62-701.

Policy 4.1.3: The University shall provide solid waste collection and disposal facility service capacity to meet
future demands.

Policy 4.1.4: The University shall identify and prioritize any solid waste collection and disposal facility
deficiencies. These deficiencies shall be remedied as funding becomes available. Solid waste facility
improvements shall be implemented based on the following general priorities:

1. Increase recycling;
2. Elimination of existing system deficiencies;
3. Maintaining the existing system; and
4. Expanding the system to accommodate new refuse/recycling needs.

Policy 4.1.5: Future development on the UF campus that increases the demand for waste collection and
disposal shall be approved under the provision of a solid waste collection and disposal system that provides the
level of service established and adopted in Policy 1.1 above.

Policy 4.1.6: The Environmental Health and Safety Division shall continue to provide hazardous and bio-
medical waste collection and disposal service to meet future demands on campus.

Objective 4.2: Continue to expand the recycling program to help minimize the solid waste disposed
of by means of landfill

Policy 4.2.1: The University shall continue to coordinate with applicable entities or persons on expanding the
recycling programs for all new and/or expansion projects.

Policy 4.2.2: The University shall continue to provide recycling containers at numerous convenient locations
across the campus and look for opportunities to expand the current recycling program to include additional
recycling bins and other recyclable materials.


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CAMPUS MASTER PLAN. 2005-2015


GENERAL INFRASTRUCTURE
ELEMENT


Policy 4.2.3: The University shall promote recycling through increased educational efforts directed toward
faculty, students and staff.

Policy 4.2.4: The University shall continue implementing and expanding recycling programs associated with
major sporting, entertainment and other large events on campus.

Policy 4.2.5: The University shall continue to look at expanding the types of materials that are recycled.

Policy 4.2.6: The University shall strive to recycle 100% of solid waste by the year 2015, and continuously
increase recycling each year until that target is achieved.

Objective 4.3: Coordination with Alachua County to ensure that proper service and capacity will be
availableforfuture demands.

Policy 4.3.1: The University shall coordinate with Alachua County annually to ensure proper solid waste
collection and disposal service for future growth. The University shall pursue any memoranda of understanding
or interlocal agreements necessary to ensure that solid waste service and capacity will be supplied to meet the
future needs of the University.

Policy 4.3.2: Proposed increases in solid waste generating uses shall be approved only upon a finding by the
University that existing solid waste disposal capacity is already on-line to accommodate the increased need, or
that additional capacity will be funded and on-line at the forecast future time of need. The Physical Plant
Division shall be responsible for the review of all development proposals and perform the appropriate
coordination efforts with Alachua County to determine that solid waste disposal capacity is available.


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