• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Introduction
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 The monkey that would not kill
 Gum
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: The monkey that would not kill
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087268/00001
 Material Information
Title: The monkey that would not kill
Physical Description: xvi 115 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Drummond, Henry, 1851-1897
Wain, Louis, 1860-1939 ( Illustrator )
Hodder and Stoughton ( Publisher )
Publisher: Hodder and Stoughton
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: 1898
 Subjects
Subject: Monkeys -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Monkeys -- Behavior -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Human-animal relationships -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Shepherds -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Sailors -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animal welfare -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Theft -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1898   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Citation/Reference: Osborne catalogue,
Statement of Responsibility: stories by Henry Drummond ; with 16 full-page illustrations by Louis Wain.
General Note: First published serially in 1891 in Wee Willie Winkie.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements precede text.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087268
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225541
notis - ALG5816
oclc - 63072735

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Half Title
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Frontispiece
        Page v
    Title Page
        Page vi
    Dedication
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Introduction
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
        Page xii
    Table of Contents
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
    List of Illustrations
        Page xv
        Page xvi
    The monkey that would not kill
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
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    Gum
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    Back Cover
        Page 116
        Page 117
    Spine
        Page 118
Full Text











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7ii


The Baldwin Library
SUnivesity
Forida


t. I


\by





















THE MONKEY
THAT WOULD NOT KILL























WORKS BY THE SAME AUTHOR

NATURAL LAW IN THE SPIRITUAL WORLD.
Crown 8vo, 3s. 6d.
THE LOWELL LECTURES ON THE ASCENT OF MAN.
Crown 8vo, net, 3s. 6d.
TROPICAL AFRICA.
Crown 8vo, 3s 6d.
THE GREATEST THING IN THE WORLD.
White Leatherette, is.
PAX VOBISCUM.
White Leatherette, is.
THE CHANGED LIFE.
White Leatherette, Is.
THE PROGRAMME OF CHRISTIANITY.
White Leatherette, is.
THE CITY WITHOUT A CHURCH.
White Leatherette, Is.
BAXTER'S SECOND INNINGS.
Cloth, is. 6d.
THE GREATEST THING IN THE WORLD.
Collected Addresses. Crown 8vo, 6s.

LONDON: HODDER AND STOUGHTON.




















































N. -~



.,.~y.


THE MOST PRECIOUS OF ALL IS GUM (p. 114)


Y'ii









THE MONKEY THAT

WOULD NOT KILL

Stories by

HENRY DRUMMOND

with 16 full-page illustrations by

LOUIS WAIN


LONDON
HODDER AND STOUGHTON
27 PATERNOSTER ROW
1898


AD V






























TO

THE READERS OF

'WEE WILLIE WINKIE,' FOR WHOM

THE STORIES WERE ORIGINALLY

WRITTEN














INTRODUCTION


A FEW years ago the readers of Wee
Willie Winkie detected a new vein
running through the editorial notes
and announcements which prefaced the
monthly collection of juvenile literary
efforts which make up their little
magazine.
There was an originality and a
humour which they had not noticed
before, and competitions were sug-
gested to them of a type for a
repetition of which they clamoured.
And then presently a new serial story
b







x INTRODUCTION
began, and the hairbreadth escapes of
that immortal monkey which it re-
corded were breathlessly followed by
Wee Willie Winkie's army of bairns
all over the world, and, when it was
concluded, so numerous were the en-
treaties for a sequel, that compulsion
had to be resorted to in order to secure
the revelation of the later life of the
hero, under a new name. And now at
last the editors who were responsible
for the periodical referred to have to
make a confession.
Once upon a time they both, mother
and daughter, forsook their office and
went away to Canada for several
months in 1891, and during that time







INTRODUCTION xi
their joint editorial chair was occupied
by no other than Professor Henry
Drummond. And now our readers
will understand to whom they are
indebted for the quaint sayings and
funny stories and competitions, be-
tokening some one who 'understood'
boys, and girls too. And they will
be grateful to a certain contributor
who failed to send his copy in time
for the monthly issue on one occasion,
and so forced the then editor to sit
down and write Something.
It was the first time he had ever
tried to write fiction, and as the story
grew under his pen he began to
realise the joy of creation. And so







xii INTRODUCTION

it was that in spite of his playful

deprecation of 'such nonsense' being

printed, the adventures of The Monkey

that would not Kill came to be told,

and we know that we can do our

old friends and readers no greater

kindness than to dedicate these chro-

nicles to them in permanent form, in

memory of one to whom Wee Willie

and his bairnss' were ever a subject

of affectionate interest.

ISHBEL ABERDEEN,
MARJORIE A. H. GORDON,
Editors of Wee Willie Winkie.


GOVERNMENT HOUSE,
OTTAWA, November I897.
























CONTENTS



I


THE MONKEY THAT WOULD NOT KILL,


U 59


GUM,























LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS



THE MOST PRECIOUS OF ALL IS GUM, Frontisfiece
1'AGE
TRICKY UPSET EVERYTHING, .


NEXT MORNING TRICKY WAS STILL THERE,. 13


IT WAS ONLY TRICKY SHAKING THE SALT-

WATER OFF, 17


HE BEGAN WITH THE PARROT, 21


THE SHEPHERD BOLTED LIKE WILDFIRE, 25


ALL WAS READY, 33


HE TOOK MONKEY AND STONE AND HEAVED

THEM OVER THE CLIFF, 43


WITH THE STONE IN HIS ARMS HE WALKED

CALMLY TOWARDS THE SHORE, 47











xvi LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

PAGE
TRICKY HELD BACK THE BABY, 57


THE MONKEY'S RESCUE, 65


A MONKEY PERFORMING GYMNASTIC EXER-

CISES, 73


BURIED HIS TEETH IN THE CONDUCTOR'S

WRIST, 79


THE NUGGET OF GOLD, 87


POINTING A LOADED REVOLVER AT HIS HEAD, 91


THE CAN OF GUNPOWDER TIED TO HIS TAIL, 105























THE MONKEY THAT WOULD

NOT KILL















A














CHAPTER I


THERE is no such thing as an immortal
monkey, but this monkey was as near
it as possible. Talk of a cat's nine
lives-this monkey had ninety! A
monkey's business in the world is
usually to make everybody merry, but
the special mission of this one, I fear,
was to make everybody as angry as
ever they could be. In wrath-pro-
ducing power, in fact, this monkey
positively shone.
How many escapes the monkey had
before the runaway slave presented it
to the missionary-from whom I first
heard of it-no one knows. It cer-







THE MONKEY


tainly had not much hair on when it
arrived, and there was an ominous scar
on its head, and its ears were not
wholly symmetrical. But the children
were vastly delighted with it, and after
much kind treatment the creature was
restored to rude health, and, I must
confess, to quite too rude spirits. The
children wanted him baptized by the
time-honoured title of 'Jacko'; but
by a series of exploits in which the
monkey distinguished himself at the
expense of every member of the house-
hold in turn, it became evident that
only one name would fit a quadruped
of his peculiar disposition; and that
was 'Tricky.' Tricky, therefore, he
was called, and as Tricky he lived
and-did not die.
There was no peace in the home



























TRICKY UPSET EVERYTHING .


a
I''


~








THE MONKEY


after Tricky came. He ate every-
thing, upset everything, broke every-
thing, stole everything, did everything
that the average monkey ought not
to do. If they shut him up in a room,
Tricky got out by the chimney. If
they put him out of the room, Tricky
came in by the chimney. What could
you do with such a creature? He
could not be kept in, and he could
not be kept out; so a court-martial
was held, and Tricky was sentenced
to be given away.
But by this time the whole place
knew Tricky, and no one would have
him. Such an unusual refusal of a
present was never known before. Even
the runaway slave smiled sweetly when
his old friend was offered to him, and
protested that, to his deep regret, he







THE MONKEY


was unable to buy nuts enough to
keep him.
The idea of 'wandering' Tricky in
the woods, of course, occurred to the
genius of the village, and a detachment
of boys set off one Saturday to carry
it into effect. But you might as well
have tried to wander a carrier pigeon.
Like Mary's little lamb, everywhere
these boys went, that monkey went.
When they ran, it ran; when they
doubled back, it doubled back; and
when they got home, dead tired, it was
only to find Tricky laughing at them
from the church roof.
That night the worst happened.
When the people assembled for the
weekly meeting, there was not found
in that church one whole hymn-book.
Some one, apparently, had been pelting








THAT WOULD NOT KILL 9
the pulpit with them. The cushions
were torn; the blinds were a wreck;
two stops in the harmonium were pulled
out bodily. After the service the
missionary was solemnly waited on by a
deputation. They were closeted for an
hour and a half, but no one, except
themselves, ever knew what was said
or done. The only circumstances that
one could in any way connect with
this mysterious council was that about
midnight a small boat was seen stealthily
putting out to sea. It contained two
figures-one, who rowed, was the senior
elder; the other, who sat in the stern,
looked like a very small boy.















CHAPTER II


THE day was not yet broken when the
'watch' of the ship Vulcan, lying be-
calmed off the coast, was roused
by a peculiar noise aft. Going to the
spot he was surprised to find a much-
bedraggled monkey rubbing itself on
a pile of sail-cloth. The creature had
evidently swum or drifted a long dis-
tance, and was now endeavouring to
restore circulation. Jerry, being a
humane man, got it some biscuit, and
a saucer of grog, and waited develop-
ments. These were not slow to show
themselves; within twenty-four hours
the commander of the ship Vulcan,
10








THE MONKEY


740 tons register, was a monkey named
Tricky.
Time would fail me to tell of the life
that monkey led them all on board
the Vulcan. After the first week only
two things lay between him and death
at any moment. One was his inven-
tiveness. Tricky's wickedness was
nothing if not original. Every day
he was at some new villainy; and any-
thing new on board ship is sacred.
There is no Punch published on board
ship; but Tricky was all the comic
papers rolled into one. But that was
not the main reason. There is a good
deal of quiet quarrelling on board ship.
The mate spared Tricky because he
thought he would some day give the
Captain a.'turn'; the Captain let him
live, hoping he would do something








THE MONKEY


dreadful to the mate. Everybody
waited to see Tricky do something
to somebody else. So he rose to the
highest rank in the merchant-marine,
and was respected almost to idolatry
by all on board the Vulcan.
One day Tricky was hanged -
formally, deliberately, and judicially
hanged. What had he done? He
had killed the ship cat. It was a
deliberate murder, with no extenuating
circumstances, and a rope, with a noose,
was swung over the yard-arm, and
Tricky run up in the presence of all the
crew. This happened about eight bells,
and at dusk Tricky was still hanging
there, very quiet and motionless. Next
morning Tricky was still there-as live
as you are. Tricky was not hanged,
he was only hanging; and, as every-






























































NEXT MORNING TRICKY WAS STILL THERE


I lk-l








THE MONKEY


body knows, monkeys rather like
hanging. In fact, though Tricky was
still up there, he had got his hands
well round the rope, and was, on the
whole, fairly at home. The rope round
a neck like Tricky's was a mere
boa.
The executioners were rather ashamed
of themselves when they saw how
matters stood ; but instead of softening
them, this dangling mockery of a dead
monkey still further roused their wrath,
and the boatswain was told off to end
the drama by tossing Tricky into the
sea. The boatswain was up the shrouds
in a moment, and loosening the rope
with one hand, and catching the monkey
by the tail with the other, he swung
poor Tricky a good yard over the
ship's side into the Atlantic.








THE MONKEY


When the boatswain descended upon
the deck he was greeted with a sudden
deluge of rain. It was only Tricky
shaking the salt-water off. The monkey
had climbed up the stern rope, and
reached the deck before him. What
would have happened next is hard to
predict, but at this point the Captain,
attracted by the scream of laughter
which greeted the drenching of the
boatswain, came up and was told the
sequel to the hanging. Now the
Captain was a blunt, good-natured
man, and he avowed that neither man
nor monkey who had ever been hanged
on board his ship should ever be put
to death again. This was the law on
shore, he said, and he would see fair-
play. So Tricky received another
lease of life, and thus the ship Vulcan




















E'41 .


B m i^ L /'









IT WAS ONLY TRICKY SHAKING THE SALT-WATER OFF
B








THE MONKEY


was kept in hot water for two months
more.
About the end of that period there
came a crisis. The ship was nearing
port, and a heavy cleaning was in
progress. Among other things the
ship's boats had to be painted. In an
evil hour one of the men went below
to dinner, and left his paint-pot standing
on the deck. If Tricky had lost such
a chance he would not have been a
monkey at all. Needless to say, he
rose to the occasion. That his supreme
hour was come was quite evident from
the way he set to work at once. He
began with the parrot, which he painted
vermillion; then he passed the brush
gaily along the newly varnished wood-
work-daubed the masts and shrouds
all over, obliterated the name on the








THE MONKEY


life-buoys, and wound up a somewhat
successful performance by emptying
the pot over the Captain's best coat,
which was laid in' the sun to get the
creases out.
I draw a veil over what happened
on the Vulcan during the next quarter
of an hour. There was never such a
muster of the crew since they left port.
Everybody seemed to have business on
deck. When the Captain came up
you could have heard a pin drop. I
shall not repeat his language, nor try
to compare with anything earthly the
voice with which he ordered every
man below. All I will record is-and
it is to his everlasting honour-that
in that awful hour the Captain was
true to his vow. 'Do you see land?'
he roared to the steersman. 'Ay,
































































































HE BEGAN WITH THE PARROT


HE BEGAN WITH THE PARROT


"'
B;





i.,..








THE MONKEY 23
ay, sir,' said the man, 'land on the
larboard bow.' 'Then,' said the Cap-
tain, 'put her head to it.'
That night, late, the ship stood close
in to a small island on the north coast
of Scotland and a boat was solemnly
sent ashore, and after that Tricky
was no more seen by any of the crew
of the Vulcan.














CHAPTER III


THE island on which the Captain of the
Vulcan exiled Tricky was marked on
the chart 'uninhabited.' But the chart
was wrong. Ten years before, a
shepherd had come there, and now
lived with his wife and family near the
top of the great sea-cliff. You may
judge of the sensation when a real live
monkey appeared in the early morning
in this remote and lonely spot. The
shepherd was watching his sheep when
the apparition rose, as it were, from
the ground. He had never seen
a monkey before, any more than
the sheep; and sheep and shepherd
bolted like wildfire. Tricky, of course,
24








































































THE SHEPHERD BOLTED LIKE WILDFIRE








THE MONKEY


followed the biped, for he had always
been accustomed to human society; and
as the shepherd fled towards the hut,
he saw the monkey close at his heels.
So he made a rush at the open door,
and pulled it after him with a bang
which almost brought down the house.
The fugitive had just got inside
when, in a moment, he felt himself
seized from behind. It seemed as if
a powerful hand was dragging him
backward, and he threw himself down
on the ground, and roared with fear.
What had happened was that the flying
end of his plaid had got jammed in the
door, but he felt sure the evil spirit was
holding him in its clutches, and it was
some time before his startled wife could
convince him that there was nothing
there. The good woman gathered








THE MONKEY


him up, and soothed him; and as soon
as he could speak he told her in a
shivering voice about the awful monster
which had come to slay them all. He
had scarcely got out the word 'monster,'
when there was a scurrying in the
chimney, and the monster presented
himself before them, and calmly sat
down on the meal-barrel. 'It's just
a puggy!' cried the shepherd's wife
(she had been to Inverness), and began
to stroke Tricky on the back. As
she did so, she noticed that the creature
had a strand of an old ship's rope round
its neck, and to this was attached a
small piece of paper. She opened it
and read four words, scrawled in a
hasty hand:-

'WON'T HANG.
WON'T DROWN.'








THAT WOULD NOT KILL 29
The shepherd seemed more frightened
than ever at this revelation. 'Won't
hang, won't drown,' he muttered.
'Then, we'll see if it won't shoot,'
and he reached over the fireplace for
the gun which he killed the rabbits with.
As he loaded it, it seemed to the shep-
herd's wife as if all the powder and
shot in the house was being poured
into the barrel. She pleaded with her
husband to spare Tricky's life, and it
almost looked as if she had succeeded,
for the shepherd lowered the gun from
his shoulder and stood for a moment
as if in doubt. But it was not because
of his wife he stopped. It was partly
because he was quite too shaky to aim
straight, and partly because he was
too much of a sportsman to shoot off-
hand a thing which was sitting quiet








30 THE MONKEY


and still on his own meal-barrel; but
the main reason was that he was afraid
to shoot the baby, whose crib was just
beside it. So he gave the meal barrel
a kick with his foot to dislodge the
monkey. He thought it would make
for the door, and there, in the open air,
he would shoot it fair and square.
But the monkey had other views.
What it wanted was something to eat;
and the children's porridge being handy,
it put its paw in and began breakfast.
The shepherd was too much petrified
to interfere, and it was only when
Tricky next spilt the milk-jug over
the baby that he roused himself to do
his duty to his family. He raised the
gun once more, and, watching his chance
when Tricky was exactly opposite the
door, aimed straight at its heart and








THAT WOULD NOT KILL 31
pulled the trigger. Now, the next
moment that monkey ought to have
been scattered all over the hillside in
multitudinous fragments. On the con-
trary, it was up on the table, imitating
the click of the gun with a spoon.
Not that the shepherd missed. For
the first time in its life the rusty lock
had 'struck,' and the dazed shepherd
was more than ever confirmed in his
belief that the monkey was a witch.
Won't shoot,' he muttered to him-
self, 'won't hang, won't drown. I
have tried the first; I '11 prove the
next.' So, as he was too superstitious
to try to shoot it again, he went out
to hang the monkey.
But there was no tree on the island.
All day the shepherd searched for a
place to hang .Tricky, but in vain.







32 THE MONKEY
That night he lay thinking, hour after
hour, where he would hang it, and in
the early morning an inspiration came
to him-he would try the pump! So
he rose softly and fixed the handle of
the pump high in the air, so that it
stuck out like a gallows, and tied a
rope with a noose to the end of it.
Then he got Tricky to perch on the
top of the pump, tied the rope round
his neck, and all was ready. The
shepherd had heard. that the object
of hanging was to break the neck of
the criminal by: a sudden 'di-op,' but
as he could not give. Tricky a long
enough drop he determined, to make
up for it in another way. .So he
gathered all his strength, and with
a tremendous sweep of his arms sent
Tricky flying into space. Of course












-' _- -

. ? '- -


ALL WAS READY
C








THE MONKEY


you know what happened. The rope
-it was quite rotten-broke, and
Tricky landed on his four paws, and
stood grinning at his executioner as
if he would like it all over again.
That whole day the sheep and lambs
on the Island of were neglected.
All day long you might have seen
the shepherd sitting by the marsh-side
plaiting something with his fingers.
Round him, the ground was strewn
with rushes, some loose, and some in
bundles, but for every one the work-
man chose he threw away a hundred,
because they were not tough and
strong. And as he plaited, and
twisted, and knotted, and tested, there
was fire in the shepherd's eye, and
thunder all over his face.
At daybreak next morning the shep-








THE MONKEY


herd and the monkey once more formed
in procession and wended their way to
the old pump. The new rope could
hang an elephant. It was thick as a
boa-constrictor, and the shepherd took
a full hour to adjust the noose and get
the gallows into working order. Then
the fatal moment came. With a
mightier shove than before the monkey
was launched into the air, and the rope
stiffened and held like a ship's hawser.
But the executioner had not calculated
everything. The rope and the 'drop'
were all right, but when the gallows
felt the shock, the pump-handle cracked
off like a match, and the old moss-
covered tube gave two rocks and reeled
from its moorings, and lay split in
pieces on the ground. Jagged and
needlelike splinters at the same moment








THAT WOULD NOT KILL 37

scraped and pierced and gouged at the
shepherd's shins, and tore his nether
garments, and made him dance with
pain and rage. If anything could have
added more agony to the next few
minutes it was the sight of Tricky.
That ever gay animal was careering
down the hill straight towards the
feeding sheep. The pump-handle was
still tied to its neck, and it clattered
over the stones with a noise weird
enough to drive the whole flock into
the sea. The shepherd knew there
must be a catastrophe, but he was
powerless to avert it. He was too sore
to follow, so he slowly limped towards
the hut, to nurse his wrath and his
wounds.















CHAPTER IV


FOR three days after the monkey had
been 'hanged' it did not come near
the shepherd or his house. A monkey
has feelings. To be nearly hanged is
bad enough, but to have a boa-con-
strictor and a pump-handle tied to
your neck is more than any self-
respecting animal would stand. So
Tricky devoted himself exclusively to
the sheep. For the space of three
days, with the invaluable aid of the
pump-handle, Tricky shepherded that
flock. Not a blade of grass was nibbled
during this period ; one prolonged
stampede was kept up night and day.
88








THE MONKEY 39

The lambs dropped with hunger. The
old sheep tottered with fatigue. The
whole flock was demoralised. In fact,
when the 'Reign of Terror' closed
there was not a pound of sound mutton
left on the island.
Why did not the shepherd interfere ?
Because, as we shall see, for these three
days he had more urgent work to do.
When the shepherd's wife went out to
the pump that morning for water to
make the porridge with, she found it
a heap of ruins. She came back and
broke the tidings to the shepherd, and
said she believed it had been struck
with lightning. The shepherd dis-
creetly said nothing, but presently stole
sullenly out to inspect the damage once
more. It was worse than he thought.
A pump must hold in both air and







THE MONKEY


water; this pump was rent and split
in a dozen places. There was no water
either to drink or make the porridge
with till the tube was mended. So
all that day the shepherd was splicing,
and hammering, and glueing, and
bandaging. All the next day he was
doing the same. He got nothing to
eat or drink; nobody got anything to
eat or drink. The poor children were
kept alive on a single bowlful, which
happened to be in the house, but this
was now finished, and they were cry-
ing out from want. Positively, if this
drought and famine had been kept up
for a few days more the island would
certainly have been restored to the
condition described on the chart-
'uninhabited.'
On the morning of the fourth day








THAT WOULD NOT KILL 41
the pump stood erect, and wind and
water-tight once more. Only one
thing was wanting there was no
handle. The only thing left was to
try to catch Tricky, for there was
nothing else on the island which would
make a handle. But just then Tricky
required no catching. At that moment
he was sitting on the doorstep con-
templating the group round the pump.
Everybody being out, he had seized
the opportunity to have a good break-
fast-consisting of every particle of
meal in the barrel-and was now
enjoying a period of repose before
recommencing hostilities. The shep-
herd made a rush at him, but, alas!
what he wanted was no longer there.
A piece of frayed rope dangled on its
neck, but the pump-handle was gone.







THE MONKEY


It took two days more to find it.
Every inch of the island was patiently
examined. Even the child next the
baby had to join in the search. Night
and day they were all at it; and at last
it was found by the shepherd's wife-
stuck in a rabbit-hole. All this time
no one had leisure to kill Tricky.
But on the seventh day the shepherd
rose with murder written on his brow.
The monkey would not shoot, and he
would not hang; it remained to try
what drowning would do. So he tied
a large stone round the monkey's neck,
and led him forth to the edge of the
great sea-cliff.
A hundred feet below, the sea lay
like a mirror; and the shepherd, as he
looked over for a deep place, saw the
great fronds of the sea-weeds and the





















_-- -






:- -:-".: =



























HE TOOK MONKEY AND STONE AND HEAVED THEM
OVER THE CLIFF








THE MONKEY


jelly-fish and the anemones lying motion-
less in the crystal waters. Then he
took the monkey and the stone in his
great hands, examined the knots hastily,
and, with one sudden swing, heaved
them over the cliff.
The shepherd would much rather
at this point have retired from the
scene. But he dared not. He could
not trust that monkey. An actual
certificate of death was due to himself
and to his family. So he peered over
the cliff and saw the splash in the sea,
and watched the ripples clearing off
till the sea-bottom stood out again with
every shell distinct. And there, sure
enough, was Tricky, down among the
star-fish, safely moored to his grave-
stone, and the yard of good rope holding
like a chain-cable. The shepherd rose








THE MONKEY


for the first time since that monkey
set foot upon the island and 'breathed
freely. Then he slowly went back to
the hose and told the tale of the end
of Tricky.
It was not till midnight that Tricky
came back. Of course you knew
Tricky would come back. You knew
the rope would slip over the stone,
or break, or be eaten through by a
great fish, or something, and, though
none of these things happened, it is
certainly true that that night at mid-
night Tricky did turn up. Perhaps I
should say turn down, for he came in,
as usual, by the chimney. But the
exact way in which this singular creature
escaped from its watery grave must be
reserved for another chapter.





























A. .

JI









.............. ._


















WITH THE STONE IN HIS ARMS HE WALKED CALMLY
TOWARDS THE SHORE















CHAPTER V


IF the shepherd had stood looking over
the cliff for one moment longer, he
would have witnessed a curious scene.
Every schoolboy knows that a stone
is lighter in water than in air. How
the monkey knew this, or whether he
did or did not, it is impossible to say,
but his actions were certainly those
of a philosopher. For, instead of
resigning himself to his fate, he bent
down and grasped the stone which
held him to his watery grave, picked
it up in his arms, and walked calmly
along the bottom towards the shore.
With a supreme effort he next got the








THE MONKEY


stone edged on to a half-submerged
ledge; but now that it was half out
of the water it was once more too
heavy to lift, and Tricky lay in great
perplexity in the shallow water, won-
dering how ever he was to get out of
this. fresh dilemma. There appeared
nothing for it but to attack the rope
with his teeth, and for an hour Tricky
worked at the tough strands, but with-
out almost any success. After another
hour's work the monkey made an
appalling discovery. When he began
work, the water was only up to his
knees; and to his consternation, it now
covered him up to his middle. In a
short time more it came up to his neck,
and it was clear to Tricky that if the
ledge went on sinking at this rate he
was a dead monkey. Tricky thought








THAT WOULD NOT KILL 51
he knew all about the sea, but in the
foreign sea, where he had lived with
the missionary, there were no tides, and
this creeping in of the water greatly
disturbed his peace of mind. To his
great joy, however, he found that the
stone, now wholly covered with water,
was once more light enough to lift,
and he trundled it along the ledge till
the water became too shallow to move
it further. Just above this point was
another ledge, high and dry above
tide-mark, and the yard of rope was
just long enough to allow the monkey
to take up his position there, and shake
himself dry in the sun.
Now, this shaking process suggested
an idea to Tricky-a very obvious one
to you or me, but a real inspiration to
a monkey. Tricky noticed that the








THE MONKEY


very part of the rope where he had
been gnawing rested against the sharp
edge of the rocky ledge, and that one
frayed strand had suddenly parted while
he was shaking himself. The rock-
edge, in fact, was a regular knife, and
after much and hard rubbing, and many
rests, Tricky found himself within three
or four strands of freedom. It was
all but midnight when the last strand
parted, and in a few minutes more the
gallant monkey crawled up the cliff
and stood once more at the door of
his executioner's house.
I am afraid you will be as much sur-
prised as Tricky was at the startling
discovery he made when he got there.
The cottage was on fire! For days,
you will remember, there had been
no food in the shepherd's home. But








THAT WOULD NOT KILL 53
that day the family had celebrated the
mending of the pump by a great ban-
quet, and a washing. Such a fire was
lit as had not blazed on the hearth
for years, and when it grew dark
the red sparks flew into the air and
fell in dangerous showers upon the
dry thatched roof. The wind, too,
rose about nightfall, and fanned one
smouldering square of turf into life; and
when Tricky reached the spot at least
half the roof was already in a blaze.
But Tricky was hungry after his day's
adventures, and the chimney end of
the roof being still untouched by the
fire, he jumped on to the roof and down
into the kitchen with a bound. The
baby's cradle lay, as usual, close to the
side of the fire, and the monkey, in
passing, must have swished it with








THE MONKEY


his tail, for the infant broke into a
sudden yell, which rang through the
room, and woke the shepherd with a
start. The good man was awake not
a moment too soon. Had the monkey
arrived five minutes later the whole
family must have perished; the smoke
had already filled the other room, and
was pouring in, in rolling clouds, below
the kitchen door. With one thunder-
struck glare at the night-watchman who
had wakened him so opportunely-and
who now occupied his usual throne on
the meal-barrel, violently sneezing out
smoke, and wondering whether it was
not better to be drowned-the shepherd
rushed towards the door to save the
two elder children who lay locked in
slumber in the burning room beyond.
Seizing them in his arms, he bore them








THAT WOULD NOT KILL 55

safely to the open air, and then returned
for his wife and the other children.
Tricky followed at their heels; and the
next moment the rescued family stood
in a shivering group, helplessly watching
the flames. The roof soon fell in, and
in the morning all that remained of the
shepherd's house was a few charred
rafters.


On the spot where the shepherd's
cottage was burned now stands a noble
lighthouse. It was put up a few months
after the fire, and one of the three light-
house-keepers is the shepherd. The
second is a man who is fond of telling
tales of the sea, and how he was once
mate of a ship called the Vulcan. The
third keeper of the lighthouse is a
quadruped called Tricky. The affec-








THE MONKEY


tion between him and the ex-shepherd
is peculiar. Other people think there
is some history connected with it, but
the shepherd never says much. When
asked if it is really true that the
monkey cannot be killed, he always
replies, 'Yes; but that is not why it
is alive.' Only on one occasion was
the shepherd known to add anything
to that remark. It was one night when
Tricky had held back the baby-it had
just learned to creep-from tumbling
over the cliff. Then the shepherd
smiled as he threw Tricky a whole
bagful of nuts, and said, 'That monkey
won't kill-nor let anybody else kill.'




























4$r



'I



tii av '\


TRICKY HELD BACK THE BABY


- ----.-~-~~




















GUM
















CHAPTER I


I SUPPOSE you thought the monkey I
told you about before was. dead. But
my opinion is that he is still alive. At
least, I am pretty sure it is the same
monkey that I have now to tell you
about, though I cannot be quite sure.
In the first place this new monkey was
very like Tricky, and in the second
place it was a monkey that would not
kill. Now, I never heard before of
any monkey that would not kill except
one, and that was Tricky.
Another thing that makes me think
it is the same monkey is that Tricky
disappeared from the island where we


_ ~mll____l_____








GUM


saw him last. No one knows how it
happened, but there was a coincidence
about the time which I must relate.
One morning a boat's crew landed on
the island where Tricky lived with
the lighthouse-keeper, to: fill their
water -kegs. The lighthouse keeper
was .kind to them, for they were
foreigners, and showed them all over
the lighthouse, and when they got to
the very top they found the monkey
dusting the lamps just like a human
being. The sailors were much aston-
ished, and one of them, who could
speak a little English, wanted to buy
Tricky for two pounds. When the
lighthouse-keeper heard this he was
very angry, and ordered them all down
the ladder. This made the men angry
in turn, for they did not know the








GUM


reason why the lighthouse-keeper loved
the monkey, and they told him they
would not forget the way he had
insulted them. Of course he had not
insulted them at all, but foreign sailors
are sometimes quick- tempered, and
these men came from a country where
slights are easily felt. The sailors
spent the whole day on shore, as the
wind was unfavourable for getting out
to sea, but no one saw them enter the
lighthouse again. Next morning, all
that the lighthouse-keeper saw of the
sailors and their ship was the tips of
their top-gallants dipping over the
horizon edge. And all that he saw of
the monkey that-would-not-kill,
after searching night and day for a
week was-nothing


















CHAPTER II


MR. DONALD MACALSH, gold-miner
from Silver Creek, California, happening
to be in San Francisco, read one morning
the following paragraph in the San
Francisco Herald:-

'CURIOUS TALE OF THE SEA.-Captain
J. E. Dawkins, of the Mermaid, which has
just arrived in this port from Liverpool,
reports a singular occurrence. About ten
days' out from home the look-out observed
what he took to be a great sea-serpent, but
which, on further inspection, turned out to
be a quantity of wreckage. On approaching
the spot the figure of a boy was distinctly
observed clinging to the broken portion of a
64


















































`Pk


TIHE MONKEY'S RESCUE
E









GUM


mast, and obviously still alive. A small
boat was instantly lowered, the ship's crew
meantime making signals to the boy to
inform him that he was being rescued.
After a suspense of some half-hour the boat
returned with the extraordinary intelligence
that the figure seen was not that of a boy,
but of a monkey. Search among the
wreckage for human remains proved un-
availing, and it is feared that a serious
catastrophe has occurred. The only clue to
the nationality of the vessel, which, it is
only too plain, has met with a disastrous
fate, are the letters "vorni" on a portion of
what had evidently formed the bow of one
of the life-boats. Possibly these letters are
part of Livorni," the Italian word for Leg-
horn, and the list of recent sailings from
that port is now being scrutinised with some
anxiety.'



Now what interested Donald-' Big
Donald' he was always called-in this








GUM


story was not the monkey, but the
arrival of the Mermaid. For the
captain was a friend of his, and was
bringing him some tools from home in
this very ship. Though 'Big Donald'
was now a gold-miner, he came out
from Scotland when quite a lad. His
father was a small farmer in Skye, and,
dying early, the family emigrated to
America. As it was to get these tools
that Donald came in to San Francisco,
he soon found his way to the harbour,
and, finding out the Mermaid, walked
on board. No one was visible on deck,
so Donald sat down on a coil of rope
to wait. He had not been there three
minutes when a matted head and two
very brilliant eyes suddenly shot up the
companion, and a full-grown monkey
sprang in front of him and stared into








GUM


his face. Donald, much startled by
this apparition, called out in a loud
voice for the creature to go away; but
the moment the words were spoken the
monkey sprang on his back and clasped
its long hairy arms about his neck.
The miner shook it off in terror and
tried to run ashore, but the monkey
followed, frisking and gambolling round
him, and chasing him all over the quay.
Donald soon discovered, however, that
the monkey meant no harm, and a few
days later an explanation of this sudden
outburst of interest in a stranger-the
Captain told Donald that the monkey
had never been known to behave like
this before-broke in upon the miner's
mind. He remembered that when he
suddenly spoke to the monkey he had
called to it in Gaelic. Under the








GUM


impulse of a sudden fear, I suppose, the
language of his boyhood had started to
his lips, and the words came out uncon-
sciously nIich air falb,' which means
'Go away.' What made Donald re-
member the circumstance was this, that
whenever afterwards he used the High-
land tongue the monkey manifested
peculiar signs of joy. The only way
the miner could account for this
singular fact was to suppose that some-
how or other this monkey had once
belonged to some one who used the
Gaelic language-a suggestion, how-
ever, which people generally laughed
at. The miner always maintained,
nevertheless, that the monkey really
knew Gaelic, and he seldom spoke
to it in any other language. Of
course, people said this was simply








GUM


to show off that he knew two
languages.
I do not know whether the miner
bought the monkey, or whether the
Captain give it to him, or whether it
ran away, but it is certain that from
this hour it belonged to Donald.
When he left the ship with his tools,
the monkey followed, trotting after him
like a dog all the way till he reached
his lodgings. The miner then went
into the house and shut the door,
leaving the monkey outside. In ten
minutes it seemed as if all the boys in
San Francisco had gathered in that
street. They formed a crowd round
the door which almost stopped the
traffic; and when the policeman shortly
appeared, he was rather disgusted to
find that it was only a monkey perform-








GUM


ing gymnastic exercises on a door-
knocker. Roughly ringing the bell, he
ordered Donald to take in his monkey.
Donald replied meekly that he was not
responsible for the monkey, but the
officer said he would be summoned
for 'obstructing the thoroughfare and
causing a breach of the peace' if he
did not take in his guest at once. So
Donald had to submit, for he saw there
would be no rest in San Francisco till
this wayward creature had its will and
was safe inside. That night Donald
had a serious talk with the monkey as
it sat upright in its chair at supper.
He told it that if it would behave it-
self he would take it up to the Rocky
Mountains to the gold diggings. The
monkey seemed to understand, for it
put down a lump of cheese it was about

















































A MONKEY PERFORMING GYMNASTIC EXERCISES


SIPi~e~L. -:~,E~








GUM 75

to eat, skipped off its chair, and nestled
against Big Donald's side. Only one
other thing happened that night :
Donald gave the monkey its name.
He called it 'Gum'-because it stuck
to him.















CHAPTER III


NEXT morning Donald and Gum
started from San Francisco by an early
train on their way to Silver Creek.
The appearance of the monkey in the
railway carriage created much amuse-
ment among the passengers, and
Donald had to stand a running fire of
questions as to whether it belonged to
his great-grandfather or to a barrel-
organ. The fun was stopped in a little
while by the entrance of the conductor,
who demanded Gum's ticket. Gum
not having a ticket, an angry discussion
arose on the subject of fare; but
Donald said he would only pay when








GUM


the conductor showed him the correct
price for a monkey printed in black and
white in the official books. There
being no special mention in these
volumes of monkeys on tour, Donald
declined to pay a cent, and the
conductor departed, vowing he would
put Gum out of the train at the next
station. When the next station came,
however, Donald and the monkey were
entrenched in a corner, the latter
tightly grasped in the miner's great
arms, and the conductor, after a glance
at the situation, decided: to wait for a
more convenient season. In America
the conductor, instead of entering the
carriages only when the train stops,
moves about all. the time from one
carriage to another, so that as the
station for.Silver Creek was still eleven








GUM


hours' distant, he had little doubt his
chance would come.
And come it did. It was a piping
hot day, even for California, and late
in the afternoon Donald fell asleep.
His arms were still clasped round the
monkey, and the conductor would
never have succeeded in his object
but for an accident. It happened that
about that time the train was approach-
ing an important junction, and part ot
every ticket had to be given up at that
point. In America a railway ticket is
sometimes half a yard in length, and
pieces have to be torn off from point
to point. To avoid the disturbance
caused by this operation, miners, cow-
boys, and others are in the habit of
wearing their tickets slipped into the
band of their great wide-awake hats,


















-I
.-


iF 'Il ,


BURID IS TT IN TE CONDUCTORS WRIST


BURIED TIIS TF'TIIT IN THE CONDUCTOR S W\RIST


-i
,e







GUM


and Donald was in this inviting
position when the conductor came
round. He snatched it out of the hat
to tear off the necessary piece, when
the monkey, thinking a theft was
meant, sprang at the man and buried
his teeth in his wrist. Roaring with
pain, the conductor seized his assailant
by the throat, and, before Donald could
come to the rescue, tossed him out of
the window. The train was dashing
round a curve at thirty miles an hour,
and when Donald stretched out his
neck to find out whether Gum was
killed, it was with small hope of ever
seeing him more. For two minutes the
miner gazed at the receding distance,
then, without uttering a word, turned
round and felled the conductor to the
floor.













CHAPTER IV


WHEN the train rolled into the junction,
about an hour after, Donald went into
the refreshment room to quiet his
nerves with a cup of cocoa. He was
about to take his seat again in the
carriage when he observed a crowd on
the platform opposite the brake-van at
the rear end of the train. Making his
way to the spot and looking over the
heads of the crowd, what was his
amazement to see Gum seated on the
coupling apparatus, and looking about
him with perfect serenity. One hand
held an iron rod, and with the other he
scratched his head; and, but for a great
splash of brown earth on one side, the
82








GUM


monkey seemed wholly untouched by
his adventure. A single word in
Gaelic from Donald made the monkey
spring from its perch, and over the
heads of the people into his arms, and
in a few minutes the strange friends
were pursuing their journey again as
if nothing had happened. A new
conductor was now on the train, and
Donald made friends with him by
reciting the whole adventure, so that
they were allowed to end the day in
peace. About midnight the two got
out at a roadside station, where they
spent the night, and in the grey of the
morning set out by coach for Silver
Creek. From Silver Creek Donald's
cabin was still thirty miles' walk over
the mountains, and after another day s
hard toiling they reached the spot.













CHAPTER V


AFTER a long journey over the moun-
tains Donald reached his log cabin on
the Silver Creek. The monkey, how-
ever, did not find quite so immediate a
welcome as himself from Donald's wife.
The only pet her children had ever seen
before was a baby puma, which the
miner had picked out of the stream one
day in a half-drowned state. Donald
had mistaken it for a kitten of some
new brand, and it was not until some
weeks later, when it sprang upon his
little girl and buried his claws in her
neck, that he realized what sort of
plaything-the puma is the lion of
the Rocky Mountains-he had intro-
84




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