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Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Florida LAKEWATCH and the Program for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences in Cooperation with Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission School of Forest Resources and Conservation Long-Term Fish, Plants, and Wa ter Quality Monitoring Program: 2009

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Acknowledgments This program is funded by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FFWCC). We thank all FFWCC, Florida LAKEWATCH and Program for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences personnel who assisted in the collection of data for this program. i

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Table of Contents PAGE Acknowledgments ................................................................................................................. i Table of Contents .................................................................................................................. ii Introduction ........................................................................................................................... 1 Methods Florida LAKEWATCH Fish Sampling Procedures...................................................... 2 Florida LAKEWATCH Aquatic Plant Sampling Procedures....................................... 4 Florida LAKEWATCH Water Sampling Field and Laboratory Procedures............... 5 Deliverables Contract Deliverable 1: 2009 Electrofishing data....................................................... 6 Contract Deliverable 2: 2009 Aquatic Plant Sampling data....................................... 6 Contract Deliverable 3: 2009 Water Quality Sampling data...................................... 7 Table 1. List of Florida LAKEWATCH and FFWCC long-term fish monitoring lakes....... 8 Table 2. Latitude and Longitudes for all electrofishing transects in long term monitoring project lakes sampled by Florida LAKEWATCH in 2009.................................................... 10 Literature Cited ................................................................................................................... 15 Appendix A Electrofishing data for all lakes sampled by Florida LAKEWATCH during 2009 ........................................................................................................................... 17 County Lake Alachua.................................................Wauberg....................................................... 18 Highlands.............................................Josephine...................................................... 19 Highlands.............................................June.............................................................. 20 Hillsborough.........................................Wilson.......................................................... 21 Lake......................................................Grasshopper................................................. 22 Lake......................................................Sellers........................................................... 23 Lake......................................................Wildcat......................................................... 24 Marion..................................................Mill Dam...................................................... 25 Marion..................................................Weir.............................................................. 26 Miami-Dade.........................................E................................................................... 27 ii

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Orange..................................................Butler............................................................ 28 Orange..................................................Conway........................................................ 29 Orange..................................................Ivanhoe......................................................... 30 Orange..................................................Johns........................................................... 31 Orange..................................................Starke........................................................... 32 Osceola.................................................Tohopekaliga East........................................ 33 Polk.......................................................Dexter........................................................... 34 Walton..................................................Juniper.......................................................... 35 Walton..................................................Spring........................................................... 36 Appendix B Long-term monitoring project plant survey results for lakes sampled during 2009 ......................................................................................................................... 37 County Lake Alachua.................................................Lochloosa..................................................... 38 Alachua.................................................Newnan........................................................ 39 Alachua.................................................Orange.......................................................... 40 Alachua.................................................Santa Fe........................................................ 42 Bay.......................................................Deer Point.................................................... 44 Brevard.................................................Poinsett......................................................... 45 Collier...................................................Trafford........................................................ 46 Gadsden................................................Talquin......................................................... 47 Gulf.......................................................Dead Lakes................................................... 48 Highlands.............................................Istokpoga...................................................... 49 Highlands.............................................Josephine...................................................... 51 Hillsborough.........................................Wilson.......................................................... 55 Indian River..........................................Farm 13........................................................ 56 Indian River..........................................Stick Marsh.................................................. 57 Lake......................................................Grasshopper................................................. 58 Lake......................................................Sellers........................................................... 59 Leon......................................................Jackson......................................................... 60 Orange..................................................Butler............................................................ 61 Orange..................................................Conway........................................................ 63 Orange..................................................Ivanhoe......................................................... 65 Orange..................................................Johns........................................................... 68 Orange..................................................Starke........................................................... 70 Osceola.................................................Alligator....................................................... 72 Osceola.................................................Kissimmee.................................................... 74 Osceola.................................................Tohopekaliga................................................ 76 iii

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Polk.......................................................Dexter........................................................... 78 Polk.......................................................Weohyakapka............................................... 79 Seminole...............................................Jesup............................................................. 81 Sumter..................................................Panasoffkee.................................................. 82 Appendix C Water chemistry data for all lakes sampled in 2009 as part of the long term monitoring program ............................................................................................................ 84 County Lake Alachua.................................................Lochloosa..................................................... 85 Alachua.................................................Newnan........................................................ 86 Alachua.................................................Orange.......................................................... 87 Alachua.................................................Santa Fe........................................................ 88 Alachua.................................................Wauberg....................................................... 89 Bay.......................................................Deer Point.................................................... 90 Bradford...............................................Sampson....................................................... 91 Brevard.................................................Poinsett......................................................... 92 Broward................................................Conservation Area 3.................................... 93 Collier...................................................Trafford........................................................ 94 Gadsden................................................Talquin......................................................... 95 Gulf.......................................................Dead Lakes................................................... 96 Highlands.............................................Istokpoga...................................................... 97 Highlands.............................................Josephine...................................................... 99 Highlands.............................................June.............................................................. 102 Hillsborough.........................................Wilson.......................................................... 103 Indian River..........................................Farm 13........................................................ 104 Indian River..........................................Stick Marsh.................................................. 105 Lake......................................................Cherry.......................................................... 106 Lake......................................................Dorr.............................................................. 107 Lake......................................................Grasshopper................................................. 108 Lake......................................................Griffin.......................................................... 109 Lake......................................................Harris............................................................ 110 Lake......................................................Minneola...................................................... 114 Lake......................................................Sellers........................................................... 115 Lake......................................................Wildcat......................................................... 116 Leon......................................................Jackson......................................................... 117 Marion..................................................Mill Dam...................................................... 118 Marion..................................................Weir.............................................................. 119 Miami-Dade.........................................E................................................................... 120 iv

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Orange..................................................Apopka......................................................... 121 Orange..................................................Butler............................................................ 122 Orange..................................................Conway........................................................ 123 Orange..................................................Ivanhoe......................................................... 125 Orange..................................................Johns........................................................... 128 Orange..................................................Starke........................................................... 129 Osceola.................................................Alligator....................................................... 130 Osceola.................................................Kissimmee.................................................... 131 Osceola.................................................Tohopekaliga East........................................ 132 Osceola.................................................Tohopekaliga................................................ 133 Polk.......................................................Dexter........................................................... 136 Polk.......................................................Eloise............................................................ 137 Polk.......................................................Weohyakapka............................................... 138 Putnam..................................................Crescent........................................................ 139 Putnam..................................................George.......................................................... 141 Putnam..................................................Rodman........................................................ 142 Seminole...............................................Jesup............................................................. 151 Seminole...............................................Monroe......................................................... 153 Sumter..................................................Panasoffkee.................................................. 156 Walton..................................................Juniper.......................................................... 157 Walton..................................................Spring........................................................... 159 Appendix D: Florida LAKEWATCH procedures for measuring aquatic vegetation Percent Area Covered and Percent Volume Infested........................................................... 160 Appendix E: Fish Community Analysis (D. Gwinn and M. Allen).................................... 166 Appendix F: Electrofishing Catchability Evaluation (M. Hanslaben and M. Allen).......... 185 v

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Florida LAKEWATCH Long-term Fish Monitoring Program Introduction Florida LAKEWATCH is a volunteer citizens lake monitoring program. Citizens from throughout Florida are trained by staff from the University of Floridas School of Forest Resource and Conservations Program for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences to conduct long-term scientific lake monitoring programs. Special attention is given to the monitoring of water quality and the distribution of scientifically sound lake management information. Florida LAKEWATCH also provides citizens with educational material regarding their lakes and provides a vehicle by which concerned citizens can work with professionals in government to foster a better understanding of Florida lakes. The Florida LAKEWATCH program is extremely successful and to date, over 1000 lakes from 50 Florida Counties have been part of the LAKEWATCH program. Currently Florida LAKEWATCH is maintaining approximately 800 active lakes and rivers in the program with over 600 active citizen volunteers. One major concern of the citizens involved with LAKEWATCH is the health of the fish populations in their lakes. To help get more information on fish and long-term trends in fish populations Florida LAKEWATCH began cooperating with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FFWCC) in the collection of fish data on 32 water bodies. These lakes have all been in Florida LAKEWATCH for the duration of sampling, yielding good background information on water chemistry and aquatic plants in these lakes. In 2007 FFWCC and Florida LAKEWATCH expanded this cooperative sampling to cover 52 lakes statewide. The list of lakes now in the monitoring program, along with each groups responsibilities for sampling are listed in Table 1. The fish populations in 32 lakes were sampled with electrofishing in the springs of 1999 through 2007, although some lakes were missed due to low water in the spring of 2000 and 2001. In the fall of 2007 Florida LAKEWATCH shifted community sampling from spring to fall to coincide with the FFWCC sampling schedule. This shift allowed better 1

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pooling and comparison of electrofishing data in the future. Lakes selected for the long-term fish sampling program cover most of Florida (Table 1), thereby spreading the work load to different regional personnel of both Florida LAKEWATCH and FFWCC. The lakes were also selected to cover a wide range of lake trophic states and aquatic macrophyte abundances, as these are major factors impacting fish populations in lakes. The goal of this project is three fold: 1) to examine the long-term variation in fish communities from a range of lakes in relation to: water chemistry, lake trophic status, aquatic macrophyte abundances, and lake morphology, 2) educate citizens in the functioning of Florida fish populations and 3) facilitate the interaction and cooperation among Florida citizens, the Program for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, the University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Methods Florida LAKEWATCH Fish Sampling Procedures: Electrofishing samples were collected in the fall (September-December) of 2009. One hundred and ninety electrofishing samples were taken on 19 of the lakes listed in Table 1. Six transects (10 minutes each) were collected at fixed stations spaced uniformly around each lake. On four of the lakes (June, Tohopekaliga East, Weir, and Johns) twenty five randomly selected 10 minute transects were conducted as requested by FFWCC. The latitude and longitude of these transects were marked with Global Positioning System units (GPS) (Table 2) to insure constant sampling locations. Electrofishing was conducted with one dipper, along the shore with the pedal down constantly for 10 minutes. All fish were collected and placed in an aerated tank. At the end of each transect all fish were separated by species, measured to total length (TL mm) and released. Other data 2

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collected from each transect included time of day, approximate depth and percent composition of each prominent macrophyte species along the transect (estimated visually). Only fish length was measured on all of the fish collected during this study. This was done to minimize the amount of time needed to work up fish and expedite live releases. However, to examine weights in relation to other Florida lakes, weights were calculated using length/weight regressions from unpublished data (Bill Schaeffer, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission). Nine fish community measures were calculated for each sampling event (Catch per unit effort for numbers and weights, percent composition of total numbers and weight, species richness, diversity (three different measures), and evenness). Species richness was defined as the number of individual species caught per lake per sampling event. Three different forms of the Simpsons Diversity Index were calculated. The Simpsons Index (D) is the probability of picking two organisms at random that are the same species and is calculated as follows: 2ipD (1) where D = Simpsons index p i = Proportion of species i in the community The Simpsons Index of Diversity (1-D) is the probability of picking two organisms at random that are different species. Simpsons index of diversity is calculated as follows: 2)( 1p 1iD (2) where (1-D) = Simpsons index of diversity p i = Proportion of individuals of species i in the community Lastly, the Simpsons Reciprocal Index ( D1 ) is the number of equally common species required the generate the observed heterogeneity of the sample and is calculated as follows: 3

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2 1 1ipD (3) where D = Simpsons reciprocal index 1pi = Proportion of species i in the community ies undance of the different species making up the richess a samle and was given by: These methods give more weight to commonly sampled, and often more desired, spec(Krebs 1999). Each of these equations are widely accepted and commonly used, and were therefore all included. Species evenness is a measure of the relative ab nofp sD E/1 D/1 (4) ness = Simpsons index (equation 1) his evenness calculation gives values that range from 0 to 1 with greater evenness ring etation rest ch ed for each water body. All plant species seen while sampling where DE/1= Simpsons measure of even D s = Number of species in sample T having values closer to 1 (Krebs 1999). Florida LAKEWATCH Aquatic Plant Sampling Procedures: Aquatic macrophyte surveys were conducted on 29 of the lakes listed in Table 1 duthe summer (May September) of 2009. The above-ground standing crop of emergent,floating-leaved, and submerged vegetation was measured along uniformly placed transects (5 to 30, depending on the size of the water body) around the water body. At each transect divers cut the above-ground portions of aquatic macrophytes that were inside a 0.25m 2 plastic square randomly thrown once in each plant zone. The vegwas placed in nylon mesh bags, spun to remove excess water, and weighed to the nea0.1 kg. Average standing crop (kg wet weight/m 2 ) for each vegetation zone was calculated by averaging samples from each transect. The combined width (m) of the floating-leaved and emergent zones was estimated using a laser range measurer at eatransect and then averag 4

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w ere listed according to the frequency that they occurred in evenly spaced transects x D his method is unpublished and modified from the methodology developed by Jim shed data). nd tional easured volume of water from the 4-L jugs was collected and filtered through a Gelman WCC ies and Aquatic Science's water quality around the water body. The percent volume infested with aquatic macrophytes (PVI) and the percent area covered with aquatic macrophytes (PAC) were determined according to modified methods of Maceina and Shireman (1980). The methods were modified because of advancing technologies. PAC and PVI in deeper, open water portions of the lakes were measured using sonar bottom transect images recorded with a Lowrance LCX 28c HD sonar and GPS system. Random samples from all data points on each water body were taken and measured for lake depth and plant height, if plants were present. Appendishows the current Florida LAKEWATCH working method for measuring PAC and PVI. T Griffin of the University of South Florida (personal communication, unpubli Florida LAKEWATCH Water Sampling Field and Laboratory Procedures: On sampling dates throughout the year, citizen volunteers, UF staff, or FFWCC staff collected surface water samples from one to six mid-water locations (depending upon water body size) from lakes in Table 1. Water samples for nutrients (total phosphorus atotal nitrogen) were collected at each sampling station in 250-ml, acid-cleaned, triple-rinsed Nalgene bottles provided by the Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. Water clarity at each sampling location was measured with a Secchi disc and addisurface water samples were collected at each location in 4-L, tap-water rinsed, plastic jugs. To estimate the concentration of plankton algae at each sampling station, a m Type A-E glass fiber filter. Filters were then stored over silica gel desiccant and frozen. Water samples and the glass fiber filters were stored frozen at the homes of the citizen volunteers, at one of thirty-four collection centers located across the state, or at FFfacilities for one to four months. All frozen samples along with Secchi disc information was delivered to the Department of Fisher 5

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laboratory where the water samples and filters were analyzed for total phosphorus, total nitrogen and chlorophyll concentrations. At the laboratory, total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) were determined using the procedures of Murphy and Riley (1962) with a persulfate digestion (Menzel and Corwin 1965). Total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) were determined by oxidizing water samples with persulfate and determining nitrate-nitrogen with second derivative spectroscopy (DElia et al. 1977; Simal et al. 1985; Wollin 1987). A total nitrogen equivalenof nitrogen in surface waters demonstrated that this method is a suitable substitute for the standard USEPA method involving the sum of nitrate-nitrogen and Kjeldahl-nitrogen as measured with an automated analyzer (Sylvia S. Labie, Administrator Florida cy study epartment of Environmental Regulation Quality Assurance Section, 1991). Chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) were determined spectrophotometrically (Method 10200 H; APHA 1989) following pigment extraction wrtory and Grobbelaar 1984). Deliverables counties n /hour) of fish caught as well as percent composition of tal numbers and weight by species. Species richness, diversity (three indices), and data is ttached to the end of this report. D ith ethanol (Sa Contract Deliverable 1: 2009 Electrofishing data (pages 17-36): One hundred and ninety electrofishing events were conducted on 19 lakes in 10by Florida LAKEWATCH personnel during the fall of 2009. GPS coordinates for all transects sampled are provided in Table 2. Results for each lake sampled are shown iAppendix A. Catch per unit effort (CPUE) data is provided for both numbers (number/hour) and weights (grams to evenness measures are shown for each sampling event. A CD with the raw a Contract Deliverable 2: 2009 Aquatic Plant Sampling data (pages 37-83): 6

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Aquatic plant communities were sampled from 29 lakes in 15 counties by Florida LAKEWATCH personnel during the summer of 2009. Results for each lake sampled are shown in Appendix B. Percent are a covered (PAC), percent volume infested (PVI), iomass (emergent, floating, and submerged plants), littoral zone width, and average nd equency of occurrence of each aquatic plant species present. A CD with the raw data is mpled are shown in Appendix C. Physical haracteristics and sampling history of each lake are provided. Long-term average and 2009 values for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L), and secchi depth for each sampling occasion are listed. A CD with the raw data is attached to the end of this report. b depth are presented for each lake as well as the common and scientific name a fr attached to the end of this report. Contract Deliverable 3: 2009 Water Quality Sampling data (pages 84-159): Water chemistry from 50 lakes in 22 counties was sampled by volunteers, Florida LAKEWATCH, various water management district personnel, and FFWCC personnel throughout 2009. Results for each lake sa c 7

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Table 1. List of sampling responsibilities for Florida LAKEWATCH (LW) and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FFWCC) long-term fish monitoring lakes. Water samples being taken by the local Water Management District offices (District) are noted. County Lake Fish Sampler Water Sampler Plant Sampler Alachua Lochloosa FFWCC LW LW Alachua Newnan FFWCC LW LW Alachua Orange FFWCC LW LW Alachua Santa Fe FFWCC LW LW Alachua Wauberg LW LW LW Bay Deerpoint FFWCC LW LW Bradford Sampson FFWCC LW LW Brevard Poinsett FFWCC LW LW Broward Cons. Area 3 FFWCC LW LW Collier Trafford FFWCC LW LW Gadsden Talquin FFWCC LW LW Gulf Dead Lakes FFWCC LW LW Highlands Istokpoga FFWCC LW LW Highlands Josephine FFWCC LW LW Highlands June LW LW LW Hillsborough Wilson LW LW LW Indian River Stick Marsh FFWCC LW LW Lake Apopka FFWCC District LW Lake Cherry FFWCC LW LW Lake Dorr FFWCC LW LW Lake Grasshopper LW LW LW Lake Griffin FFWCC LW LW Lake Harris FFWCC LW LW Lake Minneola FFWCC LW LW Lake Sellers LW LW LW Lake Wildcat LW LW LW Leon Jackson FFWCC LW LW Marion Mill Dam FFWCC LW LW Marion Weir LW LW LW Miami-Dade E LW LW LW Orange Butler LW LW LW Orange Conway LW LW LW Orange Ivanhoe LW LW LW Orange Johns FFWCC LW LW Orange Starke LW LW LW Osceola Alligator FFWCC LW LW Osceola Kissimmee FFWCC LW LW Osceola Tohopekaliga FFWCC LW LW Osceola Toho East LW LW LW 8

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Table 1: Continued. Palm Beach Okeechobee FFWCC District LW Pinellas Tarpon FFWCC LW LW Polk Dexter LW LW LW Polk Eloise FFWCC LW LW Polk Weohyakapka FFWCC LW LW Putnam Crescent FFWCC LW LW Putnam George FFWCC District LW Putnam Rodman FFWCC LW LW Seminole Jesup FFWCC LW LW Seminole Monroe FFWCC LW LW Sumter Panasoffkee FFWCC LW LW Walton Juniper LW LW LW Walton Spring LW LW LW 9

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Table 2: Latitude and Longitudes for all electrofishing transects sampled in the long term monitoring project lakes by Florida LAKEWATCH personnel during 2009. Sections with a (.) are locations where coordinates were not taken. Start Stop County Lake Tran Latitude Longitude Latitude Longitude Alachua Wauberg 1 29 31.765 82 17.929 29 31.522 82 17.862 2 29 31.440 82 17.978 29 31.439 82 18.168 3 29 31.496 82 18.299 29 31.639 82 18.372 4 29 31.785 82 18.422 29 31.979 82 18.341 5 29 32.112 82 18.207 29 32.208 82 18.050 6 29 32.034 82 17.971 29 31.840 82 17.905 Highlands Josephine 1 27 24.203 81 26.856 27 24.015 81 26.808 2 27 24.138 81 27.495 27 24.295 81 27.610 3 27 23.863 81 26.561 27 26.759 81 26.416 4 27 23.315 81 26.527 27 23.482 81 26.633 5 27 24.040 81 26.003 27 24.117 81 25.858 6 27 23.900 81 25.150 27 23.733 81 25.082 Highlands June 1 27 19.101 81 24.852 27 19.204 81 24.631 2 27 19.265 81 24.451 27 19.356 81 24.239 3 27 19.384 81 24.038 27 19.431 81 23.790 4 27 19.410 81 23.570 27 19.387 81 23.336 5 27 19.241 81 23.229 27 19.103 81 23.045 6 29 19.036 81 22.590 27 18.940 81 22.448 7 27 18.837 81 22.291 27 18.911 81 22.068 8 27 18.992 81 21.990 27 18.991 81 21.796 9 27 18.807 81 21.817 27 18.694 81 21.933 10 27 18.600 81 22.163 27 18.460 81 22.292 11 27 18.451 81 22.535 27 18.641 81 22.664 12 27 18.712 81 22.798 27 18.744 81 22.996 13 27 18.270 81 23.382 27 18.044 81 23.414 14 27 17.872 81 23.404 27 17.626 81 23.374 15 27 17.472 81 23.335 27 17.312 81 23.189 16 27 16.885 81 23.335 27 16.780 81 23.541 17 27 16.738 81 23.753 27 16.738 81 23.998 18 27 16.828 81 24.166 27 16.955 81 24.326 19 27 17.107 81 24.461 27 17.288 81 24.591 20 27 17.424 81 24.746 27 17.573 81 24.886 21 27 17.777 81 24.983 27 17.957 81 25.076 22 27 18.151 81 25.084 27 18.379 81 25.072 23 27 18.548 81 25.033 27 18.784 81 24.993 24 27 19.142 81 25.370 27 19.307 81 25.275 25 27 19.302 81 25.049 27 19.170 81 24.973 Hillsborough Wilson 1 28 8.661 82 29.073 28 8.675 82 29.244 2 28 8.695 82 29.267 28 8.829 82 29.338 3 28 8.848 82 29.306 28 8.987 82 29.274 4 28 8.998 82 29.245 28 9.005 82 29.137 5 28 9.000 82 29.141 28 8.838 82 29.135 6 28 8.814 82 29.140 28 8.681 82 29.111 10

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Table 2: Continued. Start Stop County Lake Trans Latitude Longitude Latitude Longitude Lake Grasshopper 1 29 8.050 81 37.177 29 7.967 81 37.049 2 29 7.977 81 36.953 29 8.076 81 36.867 3 29 8.177 81 36.847 29 8.303 81 36.777 4 29 8.471 81 36.585 29 8.576 81 36.639 5 29 8.617 81 36.810 29 8.500 81 36.767 6 29 8.381 81 36.794 29 8.260 81 36.859 Lake Sellers 1 29 6.637 81 37.888 29 6.540 81 38.032 2 29 6.568 81 38.280 29 6.477 81 38.453 3 29 6.470 81 38.825 29 6.555 81 38.832 4 29 6.870 81 38.575 29 6.966 81 38.553 5 29 7.026 81 38.434 29 7.113 81 38.501 6 29 7.033 81 37.785 29 6.839 81 37.770 Lake Wildcat 1 29 10.212 81 37.588 29 10.166 81 37.754 2 29 10.032 81 38.074 29 9.981 81 38.163 3 29 9.299 81 37.614 29 9.184 81 37.542 4 29 9.455 81 37.489 29 9.567 81 37.525 5 29 9.902 81 37.535 29 9.971 81 37.500 6 29 10.037 81 37.568 29 10.004 81 37.666 Marion Mill Dam 1 29 10.734 81 50.042 29 10.899 81 49.999 2 29 10.900 81 49.999 29 11.058 81 50.069 3 29 11.061 81 50.068 29 11.140 81 50.211 4 29 11.129 81 50.331 29 11.068 81 50.496 5 29 10.992 81 50.546 29 10.814 81 50.524 6 29 10.717 81 50.478 28 10.644 81 50.309 Marion Weir 1 29 0.052 81 57.048 28 0.238 81 57.140 2 29 0.357 81 57.232 29 0.558 81 57.628 3 29 0.640 81 57.590 29 0.892 81 57.737 4 29 0.943 81 57.745 29 1.117 81 57.752 5 29 1.267 81 57.635 29 1.502 81 57.502 6 29 1.662 81 57.475 . . 7 29 2.018 81 57.235 29 2.197 81 57.023 8 29 2.422 81 66.007 29 2.408 81 55.693 9 29 2.375 81 55.513 29 2.233 81 55.243 10 29 1.482 81 54.750 29 1.255 81 54.808 11 29 0.697 81 55.020 29 0.475 81 55.162 12 29 0.323 81 55.240 29 0.082 81 55.340 13 28 59.962 81 55.388 28 59.803 81 55.433 14 28 59.666 81 55.653 28 59.595 81 55.892 15 28 59.593 81 56.094 28 59.572 81 56.310 16 28 59.687 81 56.990 28 59.812 81 57.212 17 28 59.524 81 57.444 28 59.419 81 57.657 18 28 59.303 81 58.135 28 59.299 81 58.351 19 28 59.368 81 58.578 28 59.549 81 58.616 20 28 59.688 81 58.679 28 59.833 81 58.707 21 28 59.919 81 58.527 29 0.068 81 58.387 22 29 0.045 81 58.094 28 59.930 81 58.262 11

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Table 2: Continued. Start Stop County Lake Trans Latitude Longitude Latitude Longitude Marion Weir 23 28 59.831 81 58.129 28 59.880 81 57.932 24 29 0.087 81 57.854 . . 25 29 0.156 81 57.904 29 0.115 81 57.658 Miami-Dade E 1 25 38.323 80 20.809 25 38.241 80 20.696 2 25 38.211 80 20.839 25 38.313 80 20.937 3 25 38.549 80 20.935 25 38.554 80 20.764 4 25 38.570 80 20.696 25 38.490 80 20.583 5 25 38.435 80 20.590 25 38.423 80 20.804 6 25 38.349 80 20.799 25 38.351 80 20.596 Orange Butler 1 28 29.951 81 32.984 28 29.959 81 33.185 2 28 29.642 81 33.931 28 29.570 81 33.821 3 28 28.930 81 33.659 28 28.759 81 33.683 4 28 28.695 81 32.712 28 28.785 81 32.561 5 28 29.145 81 32.137 28 29.177 81 32.084 6 28 29.732 81 32.602 28 29.776 81 32.740 Orange Conway 1 28 27.835 81 21.420 28 27.770 81 21.228 2 28 27.779 81 20.678 28 27.677 81 20.484 3 28 27.304 81 21.031 28 27.440 81 21.185 4 28 27.843 81 21.492 28 27.944 81 21.636 5 28 28.848 81 20.961 28 28.802 81 20.770 6 28 28.251 81 20.419 28 28.141 81 20.592 Orange Ivanhoe 1 28 33.880 81 22.422 28 33.395 81 22.479 2 28 33.628 81 22.264 28 33.758 81 22.650 3 28 33.815 81 22.736 28 33.655 81 22.771 4 28 33.645 81 22.928 28 33.769 81 22.883 5 28 33.832 81 22.836 28 33.824 81 23.027 6 28 33.968 81 23.036 28 33.997 81 22.860 Orange John's 1 28 32.083 81 40.988 28 32.197 81 41.062 2 28 32.282 81 40.592 20 32.133 81 40.568 3 28 31.875 81 39.927 28 31.988 81 39.783 4 28 32.408 81 39.557 28 32.773 81 39.527 5 28 32.270 81 39.402 28 32.162 81 39.278 6 28 32.353 81 38.740 28 32.345 81 38.940 7 28 32.665 81 38.695 28 32.508 81 38.612 8 28 32.445 81 38.550 28 32.590 81 38.305 9 28 32.652 81 38.168 28 32.578 81 37.855 10 28 32.663 81 37.583 28 32.443 81 37.463 11 28 32.300 81 37.558 28 32.028 81 37.550 12 28 32.080 81 37.502 28 32.115 81 37.220 13 28 32.059 81 37.238 28 31.937 81 37.266 14 28 31.901 81 37.560 28 31.864 81 37.669 15 28 32.106 81 37.744 28 31.936 81 37.830 16 28 31.630 81 37.895 28 31.480 81 37.972 17 28 31.257 81 38.090 28 31.204 81 38.267 18 28 31.333 81 38.535 28 31.445 81 38.695 12

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Table 2: Continued Start Stop County Lake Trans Latitude Longitude County Lake Orange John's 19 28 31.867 81 39.095 28 31.683 81 39.169 20 28 31.437 81 39.158 28 31.351 81 39.323 21 28 31.352 81 39.567 28 31.325 81 39.616 22 28 31.624 81 39.656 28 31.712 81 39.629 23 28 31.382 81 40.116 28 31.264 81 40.240 24 28 31.219 81 40.400 28 31.078 81 40.461 25 28 31.452 81 40.708 28 31.595 81 40.739 Orange Starke 1 28 34.332 81 32.513 28 34.431 81 32.441 2 28 34.549 81 32.335 28 34.556 81 32.135 3 28 34.234 81 31.916 28 34.158 81 31.814 4 28 34.073 81 32.325 28 34.197 81 32.451 5 28 33.901 81 32.319 28 33.821 81 32.261 6 29 34.062 81 32.081 28 33.980 81 32.254 Osceola Toho East 1 28 15.955 81 18.018 28 16.023 81 18.250 2 28 16.445 81 18.515 28 16.650 81 18.607 3 28 16.927 81 18.772 28 17.208 81 18.902 4 28 17.542 81 18.965 28 17.670 81 19.118 5 28 17.962 81 18.983 28 18.192 81 19.002 6 28 18.287 81 19.022 28 18.457 81 18.950 7 28 18.663 81 18.825 28 18.710 81 18.733 8 28 18.867 81 18.368 28 19.200 81 18.252 9 28 19.233 81 18.075 28 19.332 81 17.632 10 28 19.320 81 17.562 28 19.402 81 17.107 11 28 19.412 81 16.783 28 19.407 81 16.348 12 28 19.370 81 15.953 28 19.208 81 15.692 13 28 19.361 81 15.380 28 19.520 81 15.230 14 28 20.086 81 15.184 28 20.201 81 15.175 15 28 20.434 81 15.149 28 20.481 81 14.996 16 28 20.086 81 14.352 28 19.948 81 14.414 17 28 19.546 81 15.194 28 19.372 81 15.365 18 28 19.132 81 15.400 28 19.058 81 15.293 19 28 18.173 81 14.982 28 18.062 81 15.011 20 28 17.779 81 15.025 28 17.669 81 15.103 21 28 16.690 81 15.307 28 16.552 81 15.384 22 28 16.083 81 15.836 28 15.976 81 15.925 23 28 15.756 81 16.128 28 15.741 81 16.274 24 28 15.726 81 17.421 28 15.763 81 17.601 25 28 16.003 81 18.088 28 16.138 81 18.184 Polk Dexter 1 27 59.591 81 40.592 27 59.431 81 40.689 2 27 59.375 81 40.747 27 59.266 81 40.796 3 27 59.168 81 40.882 27 59.171 81 41.101 4 27 59.257 81 40.960 27 59.407 81 41.024 5 27 59.617 81 41.004 27 59.702 81 40.822 6 27 59.716 81 40.782 27 59.622 81 40.594 13

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Table 2: Continued Start Stop County Lake Trans Latitude Longitude County Lake Walton Juniper 1 30 46.430 86 7.948 30 46.434 86 7.778 2 30 46.435 86 7.779 30 46.520 86 7.611 3 30 46.396 86 7.335 30 46.209 86 7.266 4 30 46.127 86 7.390 30 46.132 86 7.599 5 30 46.014 86 7.744 30 46.010 86 7.930 6 30 46.215 86 8.061 30 46.205 86 8.273 Walton Spring 1 30 44.908 86 3.687 30 45.028 86 3.831 2 30 45.105 86 3.772 30 45.207 86 3.920 3 30 45.384 86 3.650 30 45.346 86 3.477 4 30 45.253 86 3.361 30 45.097 86 3.435 5 30 45.062 86 3.471 30 44.888 86 3.581 6 30 44.866 86 3.595 30 44.819 86 3.688 14

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Literature Cited APHA. 1989. Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater. 17th Edition. American Public Health Association. Washington, D.C. Brooks, H. K. 1981. Guide to the physiographic divisions of Florida. Florida Coop. Extension Service., Institute Food Agriculture Sciences. University of Florida. Canfield, D.E. Jr., 1991. Assessment of water quality in the lakes of north and central Florida: The use of volunteer citizen monitors. Final Report (DER ContractWM344). Florida Department of Environmental Regulation. Tallahassee, Florida Canfield, D. E. Jr., and M. V. Hoyer. 1992. Aquatic macrophytes and their relation to the limnology of Florida lakes. Final Report to Bureau of Aquatic Plant Management. Florida Department of Natural Resources. Tallahassee, FL 32303. DElia, C. F., P. A. Steudler, and N. Corwin. 1977. Determination of total nitrogen in aqueous samples using persulfate digestion. Limnology and Oceanography 22:760-764. Griffith, G. E., D. E. Canfield, Jr., C. A. Horsburgh, J. M. Omernik, and S. H. Azevedo. 1997. Lake regions of Florida. Report to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR. Hoyer, M. V., and D. E. Canfield, Jr. 1994. Handbook of Common Freshwater Fish in Florida Lakes. Gainesville Florida. University of Florida Publications #SP 160. Krebs, C.J. 1999. Ecological Methodology. Second Edition. Addison-Wesley Educational Publishers, Inc. Maceina, M. J., and J. V. Shireman. 1980. The use of a recording fathometer for the determination of distribution and biomass of hydrilla. Journal of Aquatic Plant Management. 18: 34-49. 15

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Menzel, D. W. and N. Corwin. 1965. The measurement of total phosphorus in seawater based on the liberation of organically bound fractions by persulfate oxidation. Limnology and Oceanography 10: 280-282. Murphy, J. and J. P. Riley. 1962. A modified single solution method for the determination of phosphate in natural waters. Analytica Chimica Acta 27:31-36. Sartory, D. P., and J. U. Grobbelaar. 1984. Extraction of chlorophyll a from freshwater phytoplankton for spectrophotometric analysis. Hydrobiologia 114: 177-187. Simal, J., M. A. Lage, and I. Iglesias. 1985. Second derivative ultraviolet spectroscopy and sulfamic acid method for determination of nitrates in water. Journal of Analytical Chemistry 68:962-964. Wollin, K. M. 1987. Nitrate determination in surface waters as an example of the application of UV derivative spectrometry to environmental analysis. Acta Hydrochemica Hydrobiologia 15:459-469 (Ger.) 16

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Appendix A: Electrofishing data for all lakes sampled by Florida LAKEWATCH personnel during 2009. 17

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Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects) Alachua County/Wauberg 2009 Common Name Number/hour Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total Bluegill 92.0 36.9 8148.8 17.7 Bowfin 8.0 3.2 18473.7 40.1 Brook silverside 10.0 4.0 25.0 0.1 Eastern mosquitofish 2.0 0.8 1.5 0.0 Florida gar 10.0 4.0 5575.3 12.1 Gizzard shad 86.0 34.5 6863.4 14.9 Golden shiner 23.0 9.2 812.6 1.8 Largemouth bass 11.0 4.4 5008.3 10.9 Redear sunfish 3.0 1.2 876.1 1.9 Seminole killifish 1.0 0.4 13.2 0.0 Warmouth 3.0 1.2 276.3 0.6 Total 249.0 46074.2 Simpson's D 0.27 Simpson's 1/D 3.69 Simpson's 1-D 0.73 Simpson's evenness 0.34 Species Richness 11 18

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Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects) Highlands County/Josephine 2009 Common Name Number/hour Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total Bluegill 9.0 20.5 1049.8 8.5 Bowfin 1.0 2.3 2280.7 18.5 Brook silverside 6.0 13.6 13.2 0.1 Largemouth bass 9.0 20.5 7290.2 59.0 Redear sunfish 12.0 27.3 1695.9 13.7 Threadfin shad 7.0 15.9 21.7 0.2 Total 44.0 12351.5 Simpson's D 0.20 Simpson's 1/D 4.94 Simpson's 1-D 0.80 Simpson's evenness 0.82 Species Richness 6 19

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Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Twenty Five 10 Minute Transects) Highlands County/June 2009 Common Name Number/hour Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total Blue tilapia* 0.2 0.4 528.8 3.7 Bluegill 18.0 27.6 1618.7 11.3 Bowfin 0.5 0.7 936.6 6.5 Brook silverside 5.5 8.5 9.2 0.1 Chain pickerel 1.0 1.5 991.6 6.9 Eastern mosquitofish 0.2 0.4 0.3 0.0 Florida gar 1.9 2.9 690.7 4.8 Gizzard shad 1.0 1.5 455.7 3.2 Golden shiner 1.0 1.5 20.2 0.1 Lake chubsucker 1.4 2.2 872.8 6.1 Largemouth bass 12.0 18.4 5358.1 37.3 Redear sunfish 21.4 32.7 2867.8 20.0 Seminole killifish 0.5 0.7 6.3 0.0 Threadfin shad 0.7 1.1 2.7 0.0 Total 65.3 14359.5 Simpson's D 0.23 Simpson's 1/D 4.42 Simpson's 1-D 0.77 Simpson's evenness 0.32 Species Richness 14 Exotic Species 20

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Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects) Hillsborough County/Wilson 2009 Common Name Number/hour Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total Bluegill 107.0 36.3 3285.7 8.0 Bowfin 2.0 0.7 2622.2 6.4 Florida gar 10.0 3.4 6237.3 15.2 Golden shiner 1.0 0.3 16.3 0.0 Lake chubsucker 2.0 0.7 2224.7 5.4 Largemouth bass 53.0 18.0 22171.9 53.9 Redear sunfish 69.0 23.4 4033.3 9.8 Threadfin shad 51.0 17.3 512.9 1.2 Total 295.0 41104.3 Simpson's D 0.25 Simpson's 1/D 4.01 Simpson's 1-D 0.75 Simpson's evenness 0.50 Species Richness 8 21

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Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects) Lake County/Grasshopper 2009 Common Name Number/hour Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total Bluegill 18.0 8.9 506.4 7.0 Bluespotted sunfish 2.0 1.0 5.2 0.1 Chain pickerel 1.0 0.5 784.4 10.9 Eastern mosquitofish 173.0 85.2 119.7 1.7 Lake chubsucker 1.0 0.5 696.6 9.6 Largemouth bass 3.0 1.5 5093.8 70.5 Lined topminnow 2.0 1.0 8.1 0.1 Redfin pickerel 2.0 1.0 9.0 0.1 Swamp darter 1.0 0.5 0.7 0.0 Total 203.0 7224.1 Simpson's D 0.73 Simpson's 1/D 1.36 Simpson's 1-D 0.27 Simpson's evenness 0.15 Species Richness 9 22

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Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects) Lake County/Sellers 2009 Common Name Number/hour Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total Bluegill 45.0 20.7 1098.4 6.7 Bowfin 1.0 0.5 1651.8 10.0 Brook silverside 132.0 60.8 280.3 1.7 Eastern mosquitofish 5.0 2.3 3.7 0.0 Florida gar 1.0 0.5 746.8 4.5 Golden topminnow 1.0 0.5 4.0 0.0 Lake chubsucker 15.0 6.9 5257.2 32.0 Largemouth bass 15.0 6.9 7251.1 44.1 Lined topminnow 1.0 0.5 4.0 0.0 Yellow bullhead 1.0 0.5 156.4 1.0 Total 217.0 16453.8 Simpson's D 0.42 Simpson's 1/D 2.36 Simpson's 1-D 0.58 Simpson's evenness 0.24 Species Richness 10 23

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Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects) Lake County/Wildcat 2009 Common Name Number/hour Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total Bluegill 46.0 79.3 289.9 2.3 Bowfin 1.0 1.7 1471.4 11.7 Eastern mosquitofish 1.0 1.7 0.7 0.0 Florida gar 1.0 1.7 398.1 3.2 Lake chubsucker 3.0 5.2 2630.0 21.0 Largemouth bass 6.0 10.3 7762.0 61.8 Total 58.0 12552.1 Simpson's D 0.64 Simpson's 1/D 1.55 Simpson's 1-D 0.36 Simpson's evenness 0.26 Species Richness 6 24

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Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects) Marion County/Mill Dam 2009 Common Name Number/hour Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total Black crappie 1.0 0.1 304.9 1.3 Bluegill 203.0 24.9 921.9 4.0 Bluespotted sunfish 2.0 0.2 5.2 0.0 Bowfin 3.0 0.4 3475.7 15.2 Brook silverside 524.0 64.4 851.7 3.7 Eastern mosquitofish 1.0 0.1 0.7 0.0 Florida gar 12.0 1.5 4541.5 19.9 Lake chubsucker 15.0 1.8 7348.3 32.2 Largemouth bass 28.0 3.4 3781.0 16.6 Lined topminnow 1.0 0.1 1.9 0.0 Redear sunfish 19.0 2.3 957.7 4.2 Warmouth 5.0 0.6 645.6 2.8 Total 814.0 22836.1 Simpson's D 0.48 Simpson's 1/D 2.09 Simpson's 1-D 0.52 Simpson's evenness 0.17 Species Richness 12 25

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Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Twenty Five 10 Minute Transects) Marion County/Weir 2009 Common Name Number/hour Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total Black crappie 0.5 0.2 8.0 0.0 Bluegill 72.2 34.5 3340.8 12.1 Bowfin 1.0 0.5 1797.8 6.5 Brook silverside 1.7 0.8 4.0 0.0 Brown bullhead 0.2 0.1 41.6 0.2 Chain pickerel 4.1 1.9 2480.3 9.0 Dollar sunfish 1.0 0.5 6.9 0.0 Florida gar 1.0 0.5 758.2 2.7 Golden shiner 7.0 3.3 213.5 0.8 Lake chubsucker 6.2 3.0 3171.1 11.5 Largemouth bass 68.9 32.9 13284.2 48.0 Redear sunfish 18.2 8.7 2265.4 8.2 Seminole killifish 9.1 4.4 94.9 0.3 Spotted sunfish 0.2 0.1 5.9 0.0 Threadfin shad 15.1 7.2 48.2 0.2 Warmouth 3.1 1.5 152.0 0.5 Total 209.5 27672.9 Simpson's D 0.24 Simpson's 1/D 4.09 Simpson's 1-D 0.76 Simpson's evenness 0.26 Species Richness 16 26

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Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects) Miami-Dade County/E 2009 Common Name Number/hour Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total Bluegill 14.0 38.9 258.5 3.9 Butterfly Peacock* 3.0 8.3 2052.0 31.2 Largemouth bass 7.0 19.4 3640.9 55.3 Redear sunfish 9.0 25.0 543.9 8.3 Warmouth 3.0 8.3 83.9 1.3 Total 36.0 6579.2 Simpson's D 0.27 Simpson's 1/D 3.77 Simpson's 1-D 0.73 Simpson's evenness 0.75 Species Richness 5 Exotic Species 27

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Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects) Orange County/Butler 2009 Common Name Number/hour Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total Bluegill 7.0 5.8 582.9 3.3 Bowfin 4.0 3.3 7925.2 44.7 Brook silverside 80.0 66.7 198.2 1.1 Chain pickerel 1.0 0.8 43.7 0.2 Florida gar 2.0 1.7 1328.8 7.5 Golden shiner 1.0 0.8 148.6 0.8 Lake chubsucker 1.0 0.8 959.4 5.4 Largemouth bass 19.0 15.8 5738.7 32.4 Redear sunfish 5.0 4.2 802.9 4.5 Total 120.0 17728.3 Simpson's D 0.48 Simpson's 1/D 2.10 Simpson's 1-D 0.52 Simpson's evenness 0.23 Species Richness 9 28

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Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects) Orange County/Conway 2009 Common Name Number/hour Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total Bluegill 130.0 58.0 5613.5 24.4 Brook silverside 24.0 10.7 54.6 0.2 Chain pickerel 3.0 1.3 6944.8 30.2 Florida gar 3.0 1.3 2040.0 8.9 Golden shiner 3.0 1.3 166.9 0.7 Largemouth bass 44.0 19.6 7159.5 31.1 Redear sunfish 7.0 3.1 963.6 4.2 Seminole killifish 7.0 3.1 76.0 0.3 Taillight shiner 3.0 1.3 3.2 0.0 224.0 23022.0 Total Simpson's D 0.39 Simpson's 1/D 2.57 Simpson's 1-D 0.61 Simpson's evenness 0.29 Species Richness 9 29

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Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects) Orange County/Ivanhoe 2009 Common Name Number/hour Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total Bluegill 208.0 63.4 5809.2 24.1 Brook silverside 1.0 0.3 2.5 0.0 Florida gar 2.0 0.6 1223.5 5.1 Golden shiner 20.0 6.1 319.0 1.3 Largemouth bass 67.0 20.4 14844.6 61.7 Redbreast sunfish 1.0 0.3 30.2 0.1 Redear sunfish 13.0 4.0 1570.8 6.5 Threadfin shad 13.0 4.0 84.9 0.4 Warmouth 3.0 0.9 182.4 0.8 Total 328.0 24067.0 Simpson's D 0.45 Simpson's 1/D 2.22 Simpson's 1-D 0.55 Simpson's evenness 0.25 Species Richness 9 30

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Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Twenty Five 10 Minute Transects) Orange County/Johns 2009 Common Name Number/hour Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total Bluegill 28.1 29.0 1599.3 6.9 Bowfin 0.5 0.5 654.5 2.8 Brook silverside 5.3 5.5 11.3 0.0 Chain pickerel 0.7 0.7 250.7 1.1 Eastern mosquitofish 8.6 8.9 6.5 0.0 Florida gar 3.1 3.2 2382.0 10.3 Gizzard shad 3.6 3.7 1582.4 6.8 Golden shiner 19.2 19.9 817.6 3.5 Grass carp* 0.2 0.2 4452.2 19.2 Lake chubsucker 3.4 3.5 2288.2 9.9 Largemouth bass 19.2 19.9 8405.7 36.2 Redear sunfish 3.4 3.5 727.2 3.1 Seminole killifish 1.0 1.0 11.9 0.1 Threadfin shad 0.2 0.2 1.2 0.0 Warmouth 0.2 0.2 2.8 0.0 Total 96.7 23193.6 Simpson's D 0.18 Simpson's 1/D 5.58 Simpson's 1-D 0.82 Simpson's evenness 0.37 Species Richness 15 Exotic Species 31

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Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects) Orange County/Starke 2009 Common Name Number/hour Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total Bluegill 88.0 12.4 3543.4 11.2 Brown bullhead 1.0 0.1 431.4 1.4 Florida gar 1.0 0.1 589.4 1.9 Golden shiner 86.0 12.2 1758.4 5.5 Lake chubsucker 3.0 0.4 2283.1 7.2 Largemouth bass 42.0 5.9 16759.9 52.8 Redbreast sunfish 1.0 0.1 69.4 0.2 Redear sunfish 12.0 1.7 1703.7 5.4 Seminole killifish 11.0 1.6 160.7 0.5 Sailfin Catfish* 1.0 0.1 2228.5 7.0 Threadfin shad 461.0 65.2 2234.7 7.0 Total 707.0 31762.4 Simpson's D 0.46 Simpson's 1/D 2.18 Simpson's 1-D 0.54 Simpson's evenness 0.20 Species Richness 11 Exotic Species 32

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Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Twenty Five 10 Minute Transects) Osceola County/Tohopekaliga East 2009 Common Name Number/hour Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total Black crappie 0.5 0.6 247.9 1.5 Bluegill 13.7 16.1 808.3 4.9 Bowfin 1.7 2.0 3839.9 23.2 Brook silverside 29.5 34.8 45.3 0.3 Chain pickerel 0.7 0.8 132.9 0.8 Eastern mosquitofish 0.5 0.6 0.4 0.0 Florida gar 3.4 4.0 1651.0 10.0 Gizzard shad 0.7 0.8 510.6 3.1 Golden shiner 0.7 0.8 136.8 0.8 Lake chubsucker 1.0 1.1 531.9 3.2 Largemouth bass 21.4 25.2 5434.0 32.8 Longnose gar 0.5 0.6 1387.7 8.4 Redear sunfish 9.4 11.0 1762.6 10.6 Seminole killifish 0.7 0.8 4.3 0.0 Spotted sunfish 0.2 0.3 1.5 0.0 Warmouth 0.2 0.3 56.5 0.3 Total 84.7 16551.5 Simpson's D 0.23 Simpson's 1/D 4.43 Simpson's 1-D 0.77 Simpson's evenness 0.28 Species Richness 16 33

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Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects) Polk County/Dexter 2009 Common Name Number/hour Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total Blue tilapia* 1.0 0.7 2203.2 9.5 Bluegill 22.0 15.6 738.2 3.2 Brook silverside 15.0 10.6 33.1 0.1 Eastern mosquitofish 3.0 2.1 1.7 0.0 Florida gar 17.0 12.1 9756.3 42.1 Golden shiner 8.0 5.7 133.5 0.6 Lake chubsucker 8.0 5.7 2936.1 12.7 Largemouth bass 48.0 34.0 6927.9 29.9 Redear sunfish 18.0 12.8 456.5 2.0 Warmouth 1.0 0.7 11.5 0.0 Total 141.0 23197.9 Simpson's D 0.19 Simpson's 1/D 5.28 Simpson's 1-D 0.81 Simpson's evenness 0.53 Species Richness 10 Exotic Species 34

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Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects) Walton County/Juniper 2009 Common Name Number/hour Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total Bluegill 23.0 25.0 796.4 6.0 Bowfin 1.0 1.1 2056.0 15.5 Brook silverside 27.0 29.3 60.5 0.5 Largemouth bass 30.0 32.6 9311.5 70.2 Redear sunfish 11.0 12.0 1042.9 7.9 Total 92.0 13267.4 Simpson's D 0.27 Simpson's 1/D 3.71 Simpson's 1-D 0.73 Simpson's evenness 0.74 Species Richness 5 35

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Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects) Walton County/Spring 2009 Common Name Number/hour Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total Bluegill 35.0 25.0 422.5 1.9 Lake chubsucker 69.0 49.3 19811.4 88.3 Largemouth bass 17.0 12.1 1523.8 6.8 Redear sunfish 19.0 13.6 689.6 3.1 Total 140.0 22447.3 Simpson's D 0.34 Simpson's 1/D 2.95 Simpson's 1-D 0.66 Simpson's evenness 0.74 Species Richness 4 36

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Appendix B: Long-term monitoring project plant survey results for lakes sampled during 2009 37

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Lochloosa / Alachua Aquatic plant data collected on September 8, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 3.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 0.3 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 7.5 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 9.4 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 10.4 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 384.3 Average lake depth (m) 1.7 Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) coontail Ceratophyllum demersum 100 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 100 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 100 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 100 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 100 hydrilla* Hydrilla verticillata 90 frog's-bit Limnobium spongia 90 common salvinia Salvinia minima 90 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 90 buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis 70 Egyptian paspalidium Paspalidium geminatum 70 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 60 water-lettuce* Pistia stratiotes 60 American cupscale Sacciolepis striata 60 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 50 soft rush Juncus effusus 50 common duckweed Lemna minor 50 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 50 sesbans Sesbania spp. 50 red maple Acer rubrum 40 cat-tail Typha spp. 40 American lotus Nelumbo lutea 30 zigzag bladderwort Utricularia subulata 30 southern water-hemp Amaranthus australis 20 elephant-ear* Colocasia esculenta 20 parrot's-feather* Myriophyllum aquaticum 20 Panicum spp. 20 common arrowhead Sagittaria latifolia 20 willow Salix spp. 20 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 10 seashore marsh-mallow Kosteletzkya virginica 10 southern cutgrass Leersia hexandra 10 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 10 southern naiad Najas guadalupensis 10 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 10 duck-potato Sagittaria lancifolia 10 tapegrass Vallisneria americana 10 38

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Newnan / Alachua Aquatic plant data collected on June 4, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 0.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 0.0 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 2.9 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 1.7 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 1.7 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 387.3 Average lake depth (m) 1.4 Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) willow Salix spp. 100 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 100 buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis 90 American lotus Nelumbo lutea 90 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 90 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 90 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 80 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 80 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 70 coontail Ceratophyllum demersum 70 common duckweed Lemna minor 70 cone-spur bladderwort Utricularia gibba 60 red maple Acer rubrum 50 swamp tupelo Nyssa sylvatica 40 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 40 giant sedge Carex gigantea 30 parrot's-feather* Myriophyllum aquaticum 30 American cupscale Sacciolepis striata 30 common salvinia Salvinia minima 30 cat-tail Typha spp. 30 inundated beaksedge Rhynchospora inundata 20 southern water-hemp Amaranthus australis 10 bacopa Bacopa monnieri 10 coinwort Centella asiatica 10 barnyard grass* Echinochloa crusgalli 10 slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 10 hydrilla* Hydrilla verticillata 10 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 10 primrosewillow Ludwigia spp. 10 southern naiad Najas guadalupensis 10 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 10 torpedograss* Panicum repens 10 water-lettuce* Pistia stratiotes 10 soft stem bulrush Scirpus validus 10 39

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Orange / Alachua Aquatic plant data collected on September 3, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 51.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 19.6 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 8.0 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 12.1 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 12.1 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 2582.3 Average lake depth (m) 1.5 Frequency that plant species occur in 25 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) coontail Ceratophyllum demersum 100 hydrilla* Hydrilla verticillata 100 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 100 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 100 frog's-bit Limnobium spongia 96 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 88 cat-tail Typha spp. 88 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 84 willow Salix spp. 84 common arrowhead Sagittaria latifolia 80 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 68 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 64 seashore marsh-mallow Kosteletzkya virginica 60 common duckweed Lemna minor 56 buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis 52 southern water-hemp Amaranthus australis 48 duck-potato Sagittaria lancifolia 48 water hemlock Cicuta mexicana 40 American lotus Nelumbo lutea 40 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 40 red maple Acer rubrum 36 American cupscale Sacciolepis striata 36 elephant-ear* Colocasia esculenta 24 common salvinia Salvinia minima 24 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 24 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 20 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 20 burhead sedge* Scirpus cubensis 20 azolla Azolla caroliniana 16 flatsedge Cyperus odoratus 16 slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 16 water-lettuce* Pistia stratiotes 16 barnyard grass* Echinochloa crusgalli 12 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 12 yellow water-lily Nymphaea mexicana 12 arrow-arum Peltandra virginica 12 sesbans Sesbania spp. 12 giant foxtail Setaria magna 12 40

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Orange / Alachua Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) sweetbay Magnolia virginiana 8 swamp tupelo Nyssa sylvatica 8 bladderwort Utricularia foliosa 8 zigzag bladderwort Utricularia subulata 8 fanwort Cabomba caroliniana 4 sawgrass Cladium jamaicense 4 tropical flatsedge Cyperus surinamensis 4 southern water-grass Luziola fluitans 4 southern naiad Najas guadalupensis 4 cabbage palm Sabal palmetto 4 sand cordgrass Spartina bakeri 4 purple bladderwort Utricularia purpurea 4 41

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Santa Fe / Alachua Aquatic plant data collected on May 12, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 0.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 0.0 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 6.2 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 3.2 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 0.6 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 150.0 Average lake depth (m) 5.2 Frequency that plant species occur in 15 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 100 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 100 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 93 buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis 80 common salvinia Salvinia minima 80 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 73 water-moss Fontinalis spp. 67 slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 60 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 60 banana-lily Nymphoides aquatica 53 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 47 red maple Acer rubrum 40 sawgrass Cladium jamaicense 40 torpedograss* Panicum repens 40 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 40 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 33 rush fuirena Fuirena scirpoidea 27 baby-tears Micranthemum umbrosum 27 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 27 elephant-ear* Colocasia esculenta 20 creeping rush Juncus repens 20 bulrush spp. Juncus spp. 20 redpod rush Juncus trigonocarpus 20 southern water-grass Luziola fluitans 20 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 20 coinwort Centella asiatica 13 haspan flatsedge Cyperus haspan 13 dahoon holly Ilex cassine 13 common duckweed Lemna minor 13 duck-potato Sagittaria lancifolia 13 sesbans Sesbania spp. 13 salt-bush Baccharis spp. 7 southern blue flag Iris virginica 7 large-headed rush Juncus megacephalus 7 frog's-bit Limnobium spongia 7 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 7 sweetbay Magnolia virginiana 7 southern naiad Najas guadalupensis 7 42

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Santa Fe / Alachua Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 7 swamp tupelo Nyssa sylvatica 7 American cupscale Sacciolepis striata 7 common arrowhead Sagittaria latifolia 7 willow Salix spp. 7 burhead sedge* Scirpus cubensis 7 exotic bur-reed Sparganium erectum 7 cat-tail Typha spp. 7 43

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Deer Point / Bay Aquatic plant data collected on August 25, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 9.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 1.7 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 7.9 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 0.9 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 3.6 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 134.4 Average lake depth (m) 2.7 Frequency that plant species occur in 15 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) lemon bacopa Bacopa caroliniana 93 buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis 93 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 93 Eurasian watermilfoil* Myriophyllum spicatum 87 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 87 elephant-ear* Colocasia esculenta 80 hazel alder Alnus serrulata 67 torpedograss* Panicum repens 67 sawgrass Cladium jamaicense 53 duck-potato Sagittaria lancifolia 53 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 53 red maple Acer rubrum 47 musk-grass Chara spp. 33 swamp titi Cyrilla racemiflora 33 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 33 cat-tail Typha spp. 33 slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 27 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 27 lizard's-tail Saururus cernuus 27 burhead sedge* Scirpus cubensis 27 water-shield Brasenia schreberi 20 giant cutgrass Zizaniopsis miliacea 20 salt-bush Baccharis spp. 13 seashore marsh-mallow Kosteletzkya virginica 13 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 13 tapegrass Vallisneria americana 13 water hemlock Cicuta mexicana 7 red-root flatsedge Cyperus erythrorhizos 7 umbrella sedge* Cyperus involucratus 7 swamp loosestrife Decodon verticillatus 7 rush fuirena Fuirena scirpoidea 7 sweetbay Magnolia virginiana 7 American lotus Nelumbo lutea 7 Illinois pondweed Potamogeton illinoensis 7 willow Salix spp. 7 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 7 Florida bladderwort Utricularia floridana 7 44

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Poinsett / Brevard Aquatic plant data collected on June 23, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 5.4 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 1.9 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 0.0 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 582.2 Average lake depth (m) Frequency that plant species occur in 15 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) common reed Phragmites australis 100 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 100 sesbans Sesbania spp. 93 barnyard grass* Echinochloa crusgalli 87 water-lettuce* Pistia stratiotes 80 torpedograss* Panicum repens 67 willow Salix spp. 67 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 60 sand cordgrass Spartina bakeri 60 southern water-hemp Amaranthus australis 40 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 40 Brazilian pepper* Schinus terebinthifolius 33 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 27 buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis 20 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 20 common duckweed Lemna minor 20 Panicum spp. 20 Egyptian paspalidium Paspalidium geminatum 20 marsh fleabane Pluchea spp. 20 common salvinia Salvinia minima 20 soft stem bulrush Scirpus validus 20 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 13 azolla Azolla caroliniana 7 parrot's-feather* Myriophyllum aquaticum 7 45

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Trafford / Collier Aquatic plant data collected on July 23, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 3.6 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 1.0 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 0.0 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 90.9 Average lake depth (m) Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) maidencane Panicum hemitomon 100 cat-tail Typha spp. 100 pond apple Annona glabra 90 fire flag Thalia geniculata 90 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 80 southern water-hemp Amaranthus australis 80 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 80 barnyard grass* Echinochloa crusgalli 70 willow Salix spp. 60 swamp rosemallow Hibiscus grandiflorus 50 common reed Phragmites australis 50 sesbans Sesbania spp. 50 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 40 red maple Acer rubrum 30 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 30 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 30 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 20 water-lettuce* Pistia stratiotes 20 rush fuirena Fuirena scirpoidea 10 torpedograss* Panicum repens 10 Egyptian paspalidium Paspalidium geminatum 10 marsh fleabane Pluchea spp. 10 duck-potato Sagittaria lancifolia 10 46

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Talquin / Gadsden Aquatic plant data collected on August 27, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 1.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 0.2 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 6.4 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 1.6 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 0.0 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 190.6 Average lake depth (m) 3.9 Frequency that plant species occur in 15 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) elephant-ear* Colocasia esculenta 93 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 60 common salvinia Salvinia minima 60 red maple Acer rubrum 53 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 53 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 53 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 47 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 40 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 40 swamp tupelo Nyssa sylvatica 40 buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis 33 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 33 water-lettuce* Pistia stratiotes 33 cat-tail Typha spp. 27 southern water-hemp Amaranthus australis 20 swamp titi Cyrilla racemiflora 20 flatsedge Cyperus odoratus 13 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 13 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 13 common duckweed Lemna minor 13 willow Salix spp. 13 burhead sedge* Scirpus cubensis 13 salt-bush Baccharis spp. 7 barnyard grass* Echinochloa crusgalli 7 swamp rosemallow Hibiscus grandiflorus 7 baby-tears Micranthemum umbrosum 7 banana-lily Nymphoides aquatica 7 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 7 47

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Dead / Gulf Aquatic plant data collected on August 26, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 0.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 0.0 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 2.9 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 1.2 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 0.0 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 2026.8 Average lake depth (m) 1.9 Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) bald cypress Taxodium distichum 100 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 90 willow Salix spp. 90 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 70 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 60 buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis 60 swamp tupelo Nyssa sylvatica 50 giant cutgrass Zizaniopsis miliacea 40 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 10 48

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Istokpoga / Highlands Aquatic plant data collected on July 20, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 17.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 4.6 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 6.3 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 3.5 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 3.6 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 887.7 Average lake depth (m) 1.6 Frequency that plant species occur in 20 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) hydrilla* Hydrilla verticillata 85 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 85 duck-potato Sagittaria lancifolia 85 cat-tail Typha spp. 85 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 80 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 75 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 70 common salvinia Salvinia minima 65 tapegrass Vallisneria americana 65 banana-lily Nymphoides aquatica 60 American lotus Nelumbo lutea 55 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 50 bladderwort Utricularia foliosa 50 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 45 swamp rosemallow Hibiscus grandiflorus 45 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 45 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 45 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 40 coontail Ceratophyllum demersum 40 southern naiad Najas guadalupensis 40 torpedograss* Panicum repens 40 water-lettuce* Pistia stratiotes 40 club-rush Eleocharis cellulosa 35 elephant-ear* Colocasia esculenta 30 slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 30 Egyptian paspalidium Paspalidium geminatum 30 flatsedge Cyperus odoratus 25 frog's-bit Limnobium spongia 25 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 25 willow Salix spp. 25 baby-tears Micranthemum umbrosum 20 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 20 swamp tupelo Nyssa sylvatica 20 red maple Acer rubrum 15 buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis 15 rush fuirena Fuirena scirpoidea 15 Illinois pondweed Potamogeton illinoensis 15 purple bladderwort Utricularia purpurea 15 49

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Istokpoga / Highlands Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) jointed spikerush Eleocharis interstincta 10 common reed Phragmites australis 10 burhead sedge* Scirpus cubensis 10 southern water-hemp Amaranthus australis 5 azolla Azolla caroliniana 5 salt-bush Baccharis spp. 5 water hemlock Cicuta mexicana 5 common duckweed Lemna minor 5 southern water-grass Luziola fluitans 5 swamp bay Persea palustris 5 American cupscale Sacciolepis striata 5 Brazilian pepper* Schinus terebinthifolius 5 three-square Scirpus americanus 5 sesbans Sesbania spp. 5 50

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Josephine Center / Highlands Aquatic plant data collected on July 22, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 19.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 3.0 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 6.5 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 6.1 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 0.4 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 524.3 Average lake depth (m) 1.1 Frequency that plant species occur in 8 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 100 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 100 common salvinia Salvinia minima 100 slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 88 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 88 torpedograss* Panicum repens 88 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 88 American cupscale Sacciolepis striata 75 burhead sedge* Scirpus cubensis 75 flatsedge Cyperus odoratus 63 coontail Ceratophyllum demersum 50 red root Lachnanthes caroliniana 50 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 50 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 50 azolla Azolla caroliniana 38 elephant-ear* Colocasia esculenta 38 common duckweed Lemna minor 38 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 38 swamp bay Persea palustris 38 water-lettuce* Pistia stratiotes 38 cat-tail Typha spp. 38 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 25 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 25 southern water-grass Luziola fluitans 25 club-rush Eleocharis cellulosa 13 jointed spikerush Eleocharis interstincta 13 water spider orchid Habenaria repens 13 hydrilla* Hydrilla verticillata 13 needlepod rush Juncus scirpoides 13 frog's-bit Limnobium spongia 13 baby-tears Micranthemum umbrosum 13 southern naiad Najas guadalupensis 13 sesbans Sesbania spp. 13 sand cordgrass Spartina bakeri 13 bladderwort Utricularia foliosa 13 yellow-eyed grass Xyris spp. 13 51

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Josephine East / Highlands Aquatic plant data collected on July 22, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 9.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 0.8 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 6.2 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 3.6 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 3.2 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 411.8 Average lake depth (m) 1.3 Frequency that plant species occur in 8 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 100 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 100 common salvinia Salvinia minima 100 cat-tail Typha spp. 100 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 88 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 88 torpedograss* Panicum repens 88 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 88 common duckweed Lemna minor 75 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 75 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 63 coontail Ceratophyllum demersum 63 red maple Acer rubrum 50 fanwort Cabomba caroliniana 50 hydrilla* Hydrilla verticillata 50 southern water-grass Luziola fluitans 50 willow Salix spp. 38 burhead sedge* Scirpus cubensis 38 elephant-ear* Colocasia esculenta 25 club-rush Eleocharis cellulosa 25 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 25 red root Lachnanthes caroliniana 25 American cupscale Sacciolepis striata 25 flatsedge Cyperus odoratus 13 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 13 rush fuirena Fuirena scirpoidea 13 American lotus Nelumbo lutea 13 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 13 Egyptian paspalidium Paspalidium geminatum 13 water-lettuce* Pistia stratiotes 13 duck-potato Sagittaria lancifolia 13 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 13 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 13 bladderwort Utricularia foliosa 13 52

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Josephine West / Highlands Aquatic plant data collected on July 22, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 18.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 3.0 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 4.2 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 4.1 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 1.4 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 338.3 Average lake depth (m) 1.3 Frequency that plant species occur in 8 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) spatterdock Nuphar luteum 100 American cupscale Sacciolepis striata 100 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 88 slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 88 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 88 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 88 common salvinia Salvinia minima 88 buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis 75 coontail Ceratophyllum demersum 75 water-lettuce* Pistia stratiotes 75 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 75 cat-tail Typha spp. 75 burhead sedge* Scirpus cubensis 63 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 50 red root Lachnanthes caroliniana 50 red maple Acer rubrum 38 flatsedge Cyperus odoratus 38 elephant-ear* Colocasia esculenta 25 baby-tears Micranthemum umbrosum 25 torpedograss* Panicum repens 25 swamp bay Persea palustris 25 duck-potato Sagittaria lancifolia 25 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 25 asters Aster spp. 13 azolla Azolla caroliniana 13 barnyard grass* Echinochloa crusgalli 13 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 13 jointed spikerush Eleocharis interstincta 13 rush fuirena Fuirena scirpoidea 13 soft rush Juncus effusus 13 needlepod rush Juncus scirpoides 13 common duckweed Lemna minor 13 frog's-bit Limnobium spongia 13 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 13 Egyptian paspalidium Paspalidium geminatum 13 common arrowhead Sagittaria latifolia 13 willow Salix spp. 13 sand cordgrass Spartina bakeri 13 53

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Josephine West / Highlands Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) bald cypress Taxodium distichum 13 54

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Wilson / Hillsborough Aquatic plant data collected on August 12, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 2.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 0.1 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 2.5 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 1.0 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 1.7 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 41.7 Average lake depth (m) 3.6 Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) torpedograss* Panicum repens 100 tapegrass Vallisneria americana 100 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 80 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 70 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 50 cat-tail Typha spp. 50 slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 40 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 40 buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis 30 lilac tasselflower* Emilia sonchifolia 30 baby-tears Micranthemum umbrosum 30 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 30 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 30 salt-bush Baccharis spp. 20 yellow nut-grass* Cyperus esculentus 20 flatsedge Cyperus odoratus 20 tropical flatsedge Cyperus surinamensis 20 barnyard grass* Echinochloa crusgalli 20 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 20 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 20 willow Salix spp. 20 Brazilian pepper* Schinus terebinthifolius 20 musk-grass Chara spp. 10 manyspike flatsedge Cyperus polystachyos 10 slender fimbry Fimbristylis autumnalis 10 large-headed rush Juncus megacephalus 10 American lipocarpha Lipocarpha maculata 10 melaleuca* Melaleuca quinquenervia 10 swamp tupelo Nyssa sylvatica 10 marsh fleabane Pluchea spp. 10 duck-potato Sagittaria lancifolia 10 sesbans Sesbania spp. 10 giant foxtail Setaria magna 10 55

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Farm 13 / Indian River Aquatic plant data collected on June 24, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 0.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 0.0 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 2.5 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 0.0 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 0.0 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 3.3 Average lake depth (m) 1.8 Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) para grass* Urochloa mutica 100 common reed Phragmites australis 70 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 60 southern water-hemp Amaranthus australis 50 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 40 willow Salix spp. 40 salt-bush Baccharis spp. 30 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 30 barnyard grass* Echinochloa crusgalli 10 swamp rosemallow Hibiscus grandiflorus 10 cabbage palm Sabal palmetto 10 sesbans Sesbania spp. 10 56

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Stick Marsh / Indian River Aquatic plant data collected on June 24, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 0.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 0.0 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 5.2 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 2.5 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 0.0 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 20.1 Average lake depth (m) 1.4 Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) common reed Phragmites australis 100 willow Salix spp. 80 para grass* Urochloa mutica 80 cabbage palm Sabal palmetto 50 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 30 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 30 water-lettuce* Pistia stratiotes 30 Brazilian pepper* Schinus terebinthifolius 30 salt-bush Baccharis spp. 20 cat-tail Typha spp. 20 southern water-hemp Amaranthus australis 10 asters Aster spp. 10 swamp rosemallow Hibiscus grandiflorus 10 Egyptian paspalidium Paspalidium geminatum 10 marsh fleabane Pluchea spp. 10 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 10 sesbans Sesbania spp. 10 57

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Grasshopper / Lake Aquatic plant data collected on August 18, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 1.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 0.3 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 3.0 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 3.0 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 4.5 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 171.9 Average lake depth (m) 3.4 Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis 100 loblolly bay Gordonia lasianthus 100 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 100 purple bladderwort Utricularia purpurea 100 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 80 spider-grass Websteria confervoides 80 rush fuirena Fuirena scirpoidea 70 torpedograss* Panicum repens 60 St. John's wort Hypericum spp. 50 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 50 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 50 swamp tupelo Nyssa sylvatica 50 red root Lachnanthes caroliniana 40 Florida bladderwort Utricularia floridana 40 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 30 Tracy's beaksedge Rhynchospora tracyi 30 slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 20 hatpin Eriocaulon decangulare 20 pink sundew Drosera capillaris 10 jointed spikerush Eleocharis interstincta 10 bog-moss Mayaca fluviatilis 10 banana-lily Nymphoides aquatica 10 yellow-eyed grass Xyris spp. 10 58

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Sellers / Lake Aquatic plant data collected on August 19, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 39.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 1.8 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 2.4 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 1.8 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 1.3 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 732.0 Average lake depth (m) 5.8 Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) maidencane Panicum hemitomon 100 buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis 90 slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 80 rush fuirena Fuirena scirpoidea 80 bog-moss Mayaca fluviatilis 80 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 80 swamp tupelo Nyssa sylvatica 80 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 80 spider-grass Websteria confervoides 80 sawgrass Cladium jamaicense 60 red root Lachnanthes caroliniana 60 bacopa Bacopa monnieri 50 shrubby primrosewillow Ludwigia suffruicosa 50 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 50 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 50 red maple Acer rubrum 30 St. John's wort Hypericum spp. 30 Florida bladderwort Utricularia floridana 30 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 20 bladderwort Utricularia foliosa 20 asters Aster spp. 10 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 10 banana-lily Nymphoides aquatica 10 marsh fleabane Pluchea spp. 10 dwarf arrowhead Sagittaria subulata 10 sand cordgrass Spartina bakeri 10 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 10 yellow-eyed grass Xyris spp. 10 59

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Jackson / Leon Aquatic plant data collected on August 24, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 90.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 47.2 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 4.9 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 3.6 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 4.4 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 4110.3 Average lake depth (m) 1.4 Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) maidencane Panicum hemitomon 100 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 90 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 90 willow Salix spp. 90 lemon bacopa Bacopa caroliniana 80 purple bladderwort Utricularia purpurea 80 water-shield Brasenia schreberi 70 American lotus Nelumbo lutea 70 coontail Ceratophyllum demersum 60 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 50 hydrilla* Hydrilla verticillata 40 fanwort Cabomba caroliniana 30 swamp rosemallow Hibiscus grandiflorus 30 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 30 bladderwort Utricularia foliosa 30 slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 20 southern naiad Najas guadalupensis 20 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 20 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 10 jointed spikerush Eleocharis interstincta 10 rush fuirena Fuirena scirpoidea 10 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 10 shrubby primrosewillow Ludwigia suffruicosa 10 Savannah primrosewillow Ludwigia virgata 10 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 10 banana-lily Nymphoides aquatica 10 torpedograss* Panicum repens 10 dwarf arrowhead Sagittaria subulata 10 sesbans Sesbania spp. 10 sand cordgrass Spartina bakeri 10 tapegrass Vallisneria americana 10 yellow-eyed grass Xyris spp. 10 60

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Butler / Orange Aquatic plant data collected on July 9, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 9.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 1.0 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 4.3 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 1.5 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 0.7 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 152.3 Average lake depth (m) 4.1 Frequency that plant species occur in 20 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) torpedograss* Panicum repens 90 tapegrass Vallisneria americana 90 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 85 rush fuirena Fuirena scirpoidea 80 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 80 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 80 Illinois pondweed Potamogeton illinoensis 80 duck-potato Sagittaria lancifolia 80 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 75 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 60 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 60 baby-tears Micranthemum umbrosum 55 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 50 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 45 common salvinia Salvinia minima 40 elephant-ear* Colocasia esculenta 35 slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 35 stonewort Nitella spp. 35 cat-tail Typha spp. 35 bulrush spp. Juncus spp. 30 salt-bush Baccharis spp. 25 sesbans Sesbania spp. 25 bladderwort Utricularia foliosa 25 red maple Acer rubrum 20 buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis 10 haspan flatsedge Cyperus haspan 10 flatsedge Cyperus odoratus 10 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 10 hydrilla* Hydrilla verticillata 10 melaleuca* Melaleuca quinquenervia 10 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 10 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 10 swamp tupelo Nyssa sylvatica 10 willow Salix spp. 10 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 10 sand cordgrass Spartina bakeri 10 purple bladderwort Utricularia purpurea 10 lemon bacopa Bacopa caroliniana 5 61

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Butler / Orange Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) yellow nut-grass* Cyperus esculentus 5 leconte sedge Cyperus lecontei 5 manyspike flatsedge Cyperus polystachyos 5 shore rush Juncus marginatus 5 American lotus Nelumbo lutea 5 marsh fleabane Pluchea spp. 5 fire flag Thalia geniculata 5 62

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Conway North / Orange Aquatic plant data collected on July 8, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 40.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 6.6 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 2.4 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 0.8 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 0.9 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 58.8 Average lake depth (m) 5.4 Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) Nitella prolonga 100 torpedograss* Panicum repens 100 Illinois pondweed Potamogeton illinoensis 90 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 70 stonewort Nitella spp. 70 tapegrass Vallisneria americana 60 duck-potato Sagittaria lancifolia 50 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 30 rush fuirena Fuirena scirpoidea 30 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 30 cat-tail Typha spp. 30 manyspike flatsedge Cyperus polystachyos 20 flat sedge spp. Cyperus spp. 20 tropical flatsedge Cyperus surinamensis 20 slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 20 hydrilla* Hydrilla verticillata 20 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 20 lemon bacopa Bacopa caroliniana 10 yellow nut-grass* Cyperus esculentus 10 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 10 baby-tears Micranthemum umbrosum 10 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 10 dwarf arrowhead Sagittaria subulata 10 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 10 bladderwort Utricularia foliosa 10 63

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Conway South / Orange Aquatic plant data collected on July 8, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 57.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 9.4 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 3.0 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 0.6 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 2.1 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 51.9 Average lake depth (m) 5.1 Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) hydrilla* Hydrilla verticillata 100 torpedograss* Panicum repens 90 stonewort Nitella spp. 80 Illinois pondweed Potamogeton illinoensis 80 tapegrass Vallisneria americana 80 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 50 duck-potato Sagittaria lancifolia 50 cat-tail Typha spp. 40 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 30 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 30 leconte sedge Cyperus lecontei 20 rush fuirena Fuirena scirpoidea 20 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 20 lemon bacopa Bacopa caroliniana 10 yellow nut-grass* Cyperus esculentus 10 manyspike flatsedge Cyperus polystachyos 10 flat sedge spp. Cyperus spp. 10 tropical flatsedge Cyperus surinamensis 10 barnyard grass* Echinochloa crusgalli 10 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 10 melaleuca* Melaleuca quinquenervia 10 baby-tears Micranthemum umbrosum 10 Nitella prolonga 10 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 10 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 10 three-square Scirpus americanus 10 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 10 64

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Ivanhoe East / Orange Aquatic plant data collected on July 7, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 7.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 0.9 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 7.3 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 2.3 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 11.8 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 52.8 Average lake depth (m) 4.8 Frequency that plant species occur in 5 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) hydrilla* Hydrilla verticillata 100 tapegrass Vallisneria americana 100 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 80 torpedograss* Panicum repens 60 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 60 elephant-ear* Colocasia esculenta 40 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 40 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 40 Brazilian pepper* Schinus terebinthifolius 40 southern naiad Najas guadalupensis 20 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 20 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 20 willow Salix spp. 20 cat-tail Typha spp. 20 65

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Ivanhoe Middle / Orange Aquatic plant data collected on July 7, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 35.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 11.4 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 5.8 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 3.4 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 6.8 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 51.6 Average lake depth (m) 4.5 Frequency that plant species occur in 5 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) hydrilla* Hydrilla verticillata 100 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 80 elephant-ear* Colocasia esculenta 60 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 60 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 60 tapegrass Vallisneria americana 60 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 40 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 20 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 20 American lotus Nelumbo lutea 20 torpedograss* Panicum repens 20 Egyptian paspalidium Paspalidium geminatum 20 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 20 willow Salix spp. 20 Brazilian pepper* Schinus terebinthifolius 20 cat-tail Typha spp. 20 66

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Ivanhoe West / Orange Aquatic plant data collected on July 7, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 19.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 5.7 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 7.4 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 5.2 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 8.7 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 58.2 Average lake depth (m) 5.1 Frequency that plant species occur in 5 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) hydrilla* Hydrilla verticillata 100 tapegrass Vallisneria americana 100 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 80 manyspike flatsedge Cyperus polystachyos 60 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 60 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 60 torpedograss* Panicum repens 60 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 60 red maple Acer rubrum 20 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 20 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 20 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 20 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 20 willow Salix spp. 20 fire flag Thalia geniculata 20 67

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John's / Orange Aquatic plant data collected on July 15, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 15.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 5.2 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 4.6 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 3.6 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 2.8 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 190.8 Average lake depth (m) 3.5 Frequency that plant species occur in 30 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 100 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 100 torpedograss* Panicum repens 90 baby-tears Micranthemum umbrosum 80 hydrilla* Hydrilla verticillata 67 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 67 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 50 coontail Ceratophyllum demersum 43 duck-potato Sagittaria lancifolia 43 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 40 southern naiad Najas guadalupensis 40 willow Salix spp. 40 buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis 37 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 37 sand cordgrass Spartina bakeri 37 salt-bush Baccharis spp. 30 leconte sedge Cyperus lecontei 30 haspan flatsedge Cyperus haspan 23 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 23 common salvinia Salvinia minima 23 bacopa Bacopa monnieri 20 Illinois pondweed Potamogeton illinoensis 20 slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 17 flatsedge Cyperus odoratus 13 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 13 sesbans Sesbania spp. 13 manyspike flatsedge Cyperus polystachyos 10 American lotus Nelumbo lutea 10 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 10 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 10 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 10 cat-tail Typha spp. 10 tropical flatsedge Cyperus surinamensis 7 rush fuirena Fuirena scirpoidea 7 shore rush Juncus marginatus 7 large-headed rush Juncus megacephalus 7 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 7 burhead sedge* Scirpus cubensis 7 68

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John's / Orange Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) southern water-hemp Amaranthus australis 3 Baldwin flatsedge Cyperus globulosus 3 swamp flatsedge Cyperus ligularis 3 slender fimbry Fimbristylis autumnalis 3 red root Lachnanthes caroliniana 3 southern water-grass Luziola fluitans 3 banana-lily Nymphoides aquatica 3 water-lettuce* Pistia stratiotes 3 tapegrass Vallisneria americana 3 69

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Starke / Orange Aquatic plant data collected on September 1, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 20.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 3.1 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 5.6 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 3.1 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 3.0 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 103.5 Average lake depth (m) 4.5 Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 100 Illinois pondweed Potamogeton illinoensis 100 slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 90 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 90 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 90 torpedograss* Panicum repens 90 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 90 duck-potato Sagittaria lancifolia 90 tapegrass Vallisneria americana 90 coontail Ceratophyllum demersum 80 water-lettuce* Pistia stratiotes 70 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 70 cat-tail Typha spp. 70 flatsedge Cyperus odoratus 50 baby-tears Micranthemum umbrosum 50 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 50 willow Salix spp. 50 elephant-ear* Colocasia esculenta 40 hydrilla* Hydrilla verticillata 40 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 40 common salvinia Salvinia minima 40 red maple Acer rubrum 30 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 30 rush fuirena Fuirena scirpoidea 30 St. John's wort Hypericum spp. 30 soft rush Juncus effusus 30 common duckweed Lemna minor 30 haspan flatsedge Cyperus haspan 20 barnyard grass* Echinochloa crusgalli 20 jointed spikerush Eleocharis interstincta 20 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 20 southern naiad Najas guadalupensis 20 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 20 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 20 salt-bush Baccharis spp. 10 musk-grass Chara spp. 10 manyspike flatsedge Cyperus polystachyos 10 tropical flatsedge Cyperus surinamensis 10 70

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Starke / Orange Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) dwarf umbrella sedge Fuirena pumila 10 shore rush Juncus marginatus 10 large-headed rush Juncus megacephalus 10 sesbans Sesbania spp. 10 71

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Alligator / Osceola Aquatic plant data collected on June 11, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 0.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 0.0 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 2.5 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 1.4 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 0.6 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 292.0 Average lake depth (m) 3.2 Frequency that plant species occur in 15 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) torpedograss* Panicum repens 100 duck-potato Sagittaria lancifolia 87 rush fuirena Fuirena scirpoidea 80 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 80 banana-lily Nymphoides aquatica 73 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 73 slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 60 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 60 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 60 red maple Acer rubrum 47 buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis 47 swamp rosemallow Hibiscus grandiflorus 47 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 47 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 47 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 40 dwarf arrowhead Sagittaria subulata 40 red ludwigia Ludwigia repens 33 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 33 sand cordgrass Spartina bakeri 33 shore rush Juncus marginatus 27 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 27 bacopa Bacopa monnieri 20 common duckweed Lemna minor 20 southern water-grass Luziola fluitans 20 bog-moss Mayaca fluviatilis 20 cat-tail Typha spp. 20 yellow-eyed grass Xyris spp. 20 yellow nut-grass* Cyperus esculentus 13 leconte sedge Cyperus lecontei 13 manyspike flatsedge Cyperus polystachyos 13 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 13 weak rush Juncus debilis 13 swamp tupelo Nyssa sylvatica 13 common salvinia Salvinia minima 13 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 7 red root Lachnanthes caroliniana 7 Egyptian paspalidium Paspalidium geminatum 7 willow Salix spp. 7 72

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Alligator / Osceola Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) exotic bur-reed Sparganium erectum 7 purple bladderwort Utricularia purpurea 7 73

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Kissimmee / Osceola Aquatic plant data collected on August 3, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 7.1 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 4.7 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 5.9 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 1340.1 Average lake depth (m) Frequency that plant species occur in 20 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) Egyptian paspalidium Paspalidium geminatum 100 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 95 willow Salix spp. 85 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 80 tapegrass Vallisneria americana 80 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 75 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 75 torpedograss* Panicum repens 70 flatsedge Cyperus odoratus 65 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 65 duck-potato Sagittaria lancifolia 65 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 60 American lotus Nelumbo lutea 55 bladderwort Utricularia foliosa 55 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 50 hydrilla* Hydrilla verticillata 50 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 50 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 50 sesbans Sesbania spp. 50 coontail Ceratophyllum demersum 45 slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 45 red ludwigia Ludwigia repens 45 southern water-grass Luziola fluitans 40 Illinois pondweed Potamogeton illinoensis 40 cat-tail Typha spp. 40 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 35 swamp rosemallow Hibiscus grandiflorus 30 American cupscale Sacciolepis striata 30 buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis 25 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 25 rush fuirena Fuirena scirpoidea 25 burhead sedge* Scirpus cubensis 25 sand cordgrass Spartina bakeri 25 bladderwort species Utricularia spp. 25 common salvinia Salvinia minima 20 barnyard grass* Echinochloa crusgalli 15 southern naiad Najas guadalupensis 15 soft stem bulrush Scirpus validus 15 74

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Kissimmee / Osceola Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) lemon bacopa Bacopa caroliniana 10 tropical flatsedge Cyperus surinamensis 10 club-rush Eleocharis cellulosa 10 frog's-bit Limnobium spongia 10 water-lettuce* Pistia stratiotes 10 common arrowhead Sagittaria latifolia 10 purple bladderwort Utricularia purpurea 10 azolla Azolla caroliniana 5 baby-tears Micranthemum umbrosum 5 stonewort Nitella spp. 5 banana-lily Nymphoides aquatica 5 Brazilian pepper* Schinus terebinthifolius 5 75

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Tohopekaliga / Osceola Aquatic plant data collected on August 5, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 5.7 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 3.7 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 6.0 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 2517.2 Average lake depth (m) Frequency that plant species occur in 20 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) Egyptian paspalidium Paspalidium geminatum 100 cat-tail Typha spp. 85 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 80 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 75 tapegrass Vallisneria americana 65 hydrilla* Hydrilla verticillata 60 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 60 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 60 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 60 duck-potato Sagittaria lancifolia 55 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 50 willow Salix spp. 45 American lotus Nelumbo lutea 40 sesbans Sesbania spp. 40 slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 35 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 35 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 30 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 30 club-rush Eleocharis cellulosa 25 common salvinia Salvinia minima 25 coontail Ceratophyllum demersum 20 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 20 Brazilian pepper* Schinus terebinthifolius 20 tropical flatsedge Cyperus surinamensis 15 swamp rosemallow Hibiscus grandiflorus 15 red ludwigia Ludwigia repens 15 southern naiad Najas guadalupensis 15 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 15 bladderwort Utricularia foliosa 15 elephant-ear* Colocasia esculenta 10 flatsedge Cyperus odoratus 10 rush fuirena Fuirena scirpoidea 10 common duckweed Lemna minor 10 southern water-grass Luziola fluitans 10 torpedograss* Panicum repens 10 water-lettuce* Pistia stratiotes 10 soft stem bulrush Scirpus validus 10 red maple Acer rubrum 5 76

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Tohopekaliga / Osceola Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) azolla Azolla caroliniana 5 lemon bacopa Bacopa caroliniana 5 musk-grass Chara spp. 5 Baldwin flatsedge Cyperus globulosus 5 manyspike flatsedge Cyperus polystachyos 5 barnyard grass* Echinochloa crusgalli 5 water spikerush Eleocharis elongata 5 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 5 frog's-bit Limnobium spongia 5 baby-tears Micranthemum umbrosum 5 banana-lily Nymphoides aquatica 5 American cupscale Sacciolepis striata 5 common arrowhead Sagittaria latifolia 5 fire flag Thalia geniculata 5 77

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Dexter / Polk Aquatic plant data collected on June 9, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 84.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 28.5 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 3.5 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 4.9 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 2.7 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 74.7 Average lake depth (m) 3.3 Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) cat-tail Typha spp. 100 tapegrass Vallisneria americana 100 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 80 Illinois pondweed Potamogeton illinoensis 80 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 70 duck-potato Sagittaria lancifolia 70 hydrilla* Hydrilla verticillata 60 torpedograss* Panicum repens 60 rush fuirena Fuirena scirpoidea 50 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 50 melaleuca* Melaleuca quinquenervia 40 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 40 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 30 sawgrass Cladium jamaicense 30 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 30 slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 30 baby-tears Micranthemum umbrosum 30 southern naiad Najas guadalupensis 30 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 30 salt-bush Baccharis spp. 20 elephant-ear* Colocasia esculenta 20 common duckweed Lemna minor 20 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 20 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 20 willow Salix spp. 20 burhead sedge* Scirpus cubensis 20 coontail Ceratophyllum demersum 10 haspan flatsedge Cyperus haspan 10 flatsedge Cyperus odoratus 10 manyspike flatsedge Cyperus polystachyos 10 weak rush Juncus debilis 10 common salvinia Salvinia minima 10 soft stem bulrush Scirpus validus 10 78

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Weohyakapka / Polk Aquatic plant data collected on June 10, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 0.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 0.0 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 2.4 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 0.9 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 1.4 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 421.5 Average lake depth (m) 2.1 Frequency that plant species occur in 20 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) torpedograss* Panicum repens 90 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 90 cat-tail Typha spp. 85 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 65 duck-potato Sagittaria lancifolia 65 willow Salix spp. 65 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 60 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 55 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 55 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 50 leconte sedge Cyperus lecontei 40 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 40 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 40 common salvinia Salvinia minima 40 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 35 flatsedge Cyperus odoratus 35 Egyptian paspalidium Paspalidium geminatum 35 soft stem bulrush Scirpus validus 35 buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis 30 water hemlock Cicuta mexicana 25 slender spikerush Eleocharis baldwinii 25 club-rush Eleocharis cellulosa 25 rush fuirena Fuirena scirpoidea 25 banana-lily Nymphoides aquatica 25 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 20 lemon bacopa Bacopa caroliniana 15 barnyard grass* Echinochloa crusgalli 15 weak rush Juncus debilis 15 tapegrass Vallisneria americana 15 red maple Acer rubrum 10 manyspike flatsedge Cyperus polystachyos 10 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 10 water-lettuce* Pistia stratiotes 10 sand cordgrass Spartina bakeri 10 fanwort Cabomba caroliniana 5 swamp rosemallow Hibiscus grandiflorus 5 shore rush Juncus marginatus 5 large-headed rush Juncus megacephalus 5 79

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Weohyakapka / Polk Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) path rush Juncus tenuis 5 baby-tears Micranthemum umbrosum 5 three-square Scirpus americanus 5 80

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Jesup / Seminole Aquatic plant data collected on June 25, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 0.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 0.0 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 4.8 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 3.2 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 0.1 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 1941.3 Average lake depth (m) 1.5 Frequency that plant species occur in 20 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) common reed Phragmites australis 100 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 70 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 45 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 45 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 35 southern water-hemp Amaranthus australis 30 buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis 30 water-lettuce* Pistia stratiotes 25 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 25 common duckweed Lemna minor 20 American cupscale Sacciolepis striata 20 common salvinia Salvinia minima 20 swamp rosemallow Hibiscus grandiflorus 15 spatterdock Nuphar luteum 15 swamp tupelo Nyssa sylvatica 15 willow Salix spp. 15 red maple Acer rubrum 10 salt-bush Baccharis spp. 5 elephant-ear* Colocasia esculenta 5 hydrilla* Hydrilla verticillata 5 water primrose Ludwigia spp. 5 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 5 Egyptian paspalidium Paspalidium geminatum 5 three-square Scirpus americanus 5 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 5 sesbans Sesbania spp. 5 sand cordgrass Spartina bakeri 5 fire flag Thalia geniculata 5 81

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Panasoffkee / Sumter Aquatic plant data collected on August 6, 2009 Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %) 69.0 Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %) 36.6 Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 9.2 Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 5.1 Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2) 7.9 Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.) 226.6 Average lake depth (m) 1.3 Frequency that plant species occur in 15 evenly spaced transects around the lake. Indicates non-native plant species Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) southern water-hemp Amaranthus australis 93 coontail Ceratophyllum demersum 93 duck-potato Sagittaria lancifolia 93 willow Salix spp. 93 water-pennywort Hydrocotyle umbellata 73 cat-tail Typha spp. 73 tapegrass Vallisneria americana 73 pickerelweed Pontederia cordata 67 red maple Acer rubrum 60 buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis 60 swamp rosemallow Hibiscus grandiflorus 60 fragrant water-lily Nymphaea odorata 60 common salvinia Salvinia minima 60 smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides 53 giant bulrush Scirpus californicus 53 southern naiad Najas guadalupensis 47 water-lettuce* Pistia stratiotes 47 bald cypress Taxodium distichum 47 alligator-weed* Alternanthera philoxeroides 40 hydrilla* Hydrilla verticillata 40 sawgrass Cladium jamaicense 33 common duckweed Lemna minor 33 flatsedge Cyperus odoratus 27 floating water-hyacinth* Eichhornia crassipes 27 American cupscale Sacciolepis striata 27 barnyard grass* Echinochloa crusgalli 20 maidencane Panicum hemitomon 20 azolla Azolla caroliniana 13 water hemlock Cicuta mexicana 13 swamp tupelo Nyssa sylvatica 13 musk-grass Chara spp. 7 elephant-ear* Colocasia esculenta 7 water spikerush Eleocharis elongata 7 wax myrtle Myrica cerifera 7 torpedograss* Panicum repens 7 swamp bay Persea palustris 7 common reed Phragmites australis 7 marsh fleabane Pluchea spp. 7 82

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Panasoffkee / Sumter Common Name Plant Species Frequency (%) Illinois pondweed Potamogeton illinoensis 7 common arrowhead Sagittaria latifolia 7 sesbans Sesbania spp. 7 sand cordgrass Spartina bakeri 7 bladderwort Utricularia foliosa 7 83

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Appendix C: Water chemistry data for all lakes sampled in 2009 as part of the long term monitoring program. 84

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Lochloosa (Alachua County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'2.6", Longitude 82'22.5" Period of record: 143 sampling dates; 9/3/93 to 2/23/10 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 5648.7 acres / 2286 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by phosphatic sand, silty sand, and clay of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Alachua Prairies subdivision of the Northern Peninsual Plains division of the Ocala Uplift District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 7 sampling dates: pH 7.4 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 24.4 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 90 Color (Pt-Co units) 89 Chloride (mg/L) 11.6 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 143 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 23 68 180 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 750 2234 6460 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 9 92 349 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 0.5 1.8 5.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 4 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/27/09 59 3343 113 0.5 2/26/09 71 3110 108 0.6 3/31/09 72 3860 184 0.5 4/28/09 58 1380 16 3.5 6/23/09 23 1498 31 4.0 7/16/09 60 1558 57 2.4 8/27/09 60 1555 54 2.3 9/22/09 54 1443 46 2.5 10/29/09 45 1440 41 2.5 2009 Average 56 2132 72 2.1 85

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Newnan (Alachua County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'55.9", Longitude 82'20.2" Period of record: 121 sampling dates; 9/10/93 to 5/30/09 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 7427 acres / 3006 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by phosphatic sand, clayey fine sand, and clay of the Bone Valley Formation, and by the phosphatic sand, silty sand, and clay of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Newnans Lake Basin subdivision of the Northern Peninsual Plains division of the Ocala Uplift District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 5 sampling dates: pH 6.9 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 12.4 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 67 Color (Pt-Co units) 145 Chloride (mg/L) 11.4 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 121 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 58 146 348 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 1250 3378 11500 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 19 194 493 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 0.4 1.1 2.5 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/31/09 205 3833 158 0.8 2/28/09 258 4667 169 0.8 3/31/09 280 4967 203 0.8 4/29/09 277 4690 218 0.8 5/30/09 179 3747 203 0.8 2009 Average 240 4381 190 0.8 86

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Orange (Alachua County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'49.9", Longitude 82'52" Period of record: 140 sampling dates; 9/3/93 to 2/23/10 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 13859.8 acres / 5609 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by terrace deposits of surface sand over clayey sand and clay with basal deposits of limestone of the preglacial Pleistocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Alachua Prairies subdivision of the Northern Peninsual Plains division of the Ocala Uplift District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 4 sampling dates: pH 7.1 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 19.4 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 74 Color (Pt-Co units) 53 Chloride (mg/L) 10.8 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 140 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 22 72 303 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 955 1796 5483 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 5 50 308 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 0.7 2.5 7.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 4 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/27/09 39 1658 20 2.7 2/26/09 45 1748 21 2.6 3/31/09 45 2008 28 2.0 4/28/09 43 1983 25 2.0 6/23/09 33 1738 35 3.2 7/16/09 34 1853 37 2.0 8/27/09 60 2685 83 1.7 9/22/09 32 1863 26 2.5 10/29/09 34 1650 22 3.5 2009 Average 40 1909 33 2.5 87

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Santa Fe (Alachua County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'19.2", Longitude 82'20.1" Period of record: 263 sampling dates; 8/16/86 to 3/1/10 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 4970 acres / 2011 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Upper Santa Fe Flatwoods (75-03) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by deeply weathered clayey sand and granular sand of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Perched Lake and Prairies division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 7 sampling dates: pH 5.9 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 1.8 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 60 Color (Pt-Co units) 30 Chloride (mg/L) 12.7 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 263 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 4 12 39 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 273 478 997 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 8 37 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 3.3 7.3 17.5 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/25/09 34 997 34 4.8 2/25/09 19 637 11 5.1 3/30/09 20 617 12 4.6 4/29/09 24 547 12 5.0 5/27/09 32 827 37 4.0 6/29/09 24 767 25 4.0 7/29/09 26 847 32 3.8 9/29/09 20 823 21 4.0 11/29/09 30 890 25 4.8 2009 Average 26 772 23 4.5 88

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Wauberg (Alachua County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'48.4", Longitude 82'1.74" Period of record: 222 sampling dates; 3/31/90 to 7/25/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 370.6 acres / 150 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by clayey sand and clay with sandy to clayey limestone of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Fairfield Hills subdivision of the Marion Hills division of the Ocala Uplift District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 10 sampling dates: pH 7.6 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 20.3 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 82 Color (Pt-Co units) 25 Chloride (mg/L) 13.1 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 222 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 54 126 317 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 1153 1931 3240 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 30 97 240 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.0 1.9 3.5 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/26/09 125 2087 57 2.5 2/28/09 126 2037 56 2.3 3/21/09 134 2500 86 2.0 4/29/09 128 2083 61 2.0 5/25/09 116 1830 94 2.0 6/20/09 127 2283 1.8 7/25/09 126 2550 166 1.3 2009 Average 126 2196 87 2.0 89

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Deer Point (Bay County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 30'24.18", Longitude 8535'30.05" Period of record: 84 sampling dates; 1/10/90 to 2/9/10 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 5000 acres / 2024 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Gulf Coast Lowlands (75-01) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by fine sand and silt with lenses of gravel and clay of the Apalachicola paleo-cuspate delta and alluvial plain Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Delta Plain division of the Apalachicola Delta District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 5 sampling dates: pH 6.9 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 28.5 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 75 Color (Pt-Co units) 48 Chloride (mg/L) 5.8 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 84 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 3 8 30 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 70 255 673 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 0 2 7 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 2.3 6.5 12.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/20/09 7 413 8.0 2/24/09 8 253 2 4.2 4/21/09 9 330 2 2.3 6/26/09 12 240 7 5.7 8/25/09 11 167 5 11/17/09 10 293 3 6.8 2009 Average 9 283 4 5.4 90

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Sampson (Bradford County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'32.3", Longitude 82'25" Period of record: 125 sampling dates; 4/16/99 to 9/20/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 1865.6 acres / 755 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Upper Santa Fe Flatwoods (75-03) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by deeply weathered clayey sand and granular sand of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Perched Lake and Prairies division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 5 sampling dates: pH 6.8 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 9.3 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 143 Color (Pt-Co units) 66 Chloride (mg/L) 17.9 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 125 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 5 23 67 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 347 724 1393 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 7 34 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.5 4.8 11.3 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/28/09 17 880 5 5.3 2/22/09 16 817 4 6.3 3/24/09 18 780 4 6.0 4/27/09 16 890 4 4.0 5/26/09 22 683 9 4.8 6/25/09 25 1080 14 3.3 7/26/09 24 970 20 2.3 9/20/09 22 953 11 4.0 2009 Average 20 882 9 4.5 91

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Poinsett (Brevard County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'23.7", Longitude 80'10.4" Period of record: 38 sampling dates; 2/18/93 to 1/29/10 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 4334 acres / 1754 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Eastern Flatlands (75-10) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by dune sand and shell with silty sand, silt, and clay of the Princess Ann Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the St Johns Wet Prairie division of the Eastern Flatwoods District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 4 sampling dates: pH 7.7 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 62.5 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 785 Color (Pt-Co units) 98 Chloride (mg/L) 204.3 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 38 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 39 110 355 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 1043 2216 4543 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 2 20 83 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 0.5 1.4 3.5 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/26/09 53 2397 17 1.9 2/24/09 101 3137 31 0.9 3/16/09 65 1987 17 1.4 4/20/09 178 1740 83 0.5 5/18/09 71 1997 22 1.2 6/23/09 279 2210 8 1.6 7/28/09 158 2140 5 1.0 8/24/09 116 1750 3 1.5 9/23/09 104 5 1.3 10/27/09 60 5 1.5 11/23/09 59 5 1.5 12/28/09 49 . 1.8 2009 Average 108 2170 18 1.4 92

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Conservation Area 3 (Broward County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 25'20.1", Longitude 80'38.82" Period of record: 29 sampling dates; 7/19/07 to 11/16/09 Surface Area : acre / hectare Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Everglades (76-01) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated clastic and shell deposits of the Fort Thompson Group Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The station lies in the Pompano-Fort Lauderdale Gap subdivision of the Southern Atlantic Coastal Strip division of the Gold Coast-Florida Bay District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from sampling dates: pH Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) Color (Pt-Co units) Chloride (mg/L) Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 29 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 5 10 34 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 1107 1677 2103 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 5 45 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 3.5 6.9 11.1 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/16/09 8 1753 2 9.5 2/14/09 5 1530 4 10.7 3/17/09 11 1760 4 7.9 4/16/09 12 2083 5 6.9 5/18/09 34 2103 45 3.5 6/18/09 16 1927 6 4.2 7/17/09 7 1443 3 6.5 8/17/09 9 1453 3 6.2 9/17/09 11 1577 2 7.9 10/14/09 11 1667 2 8.3 11/16/09 11 1590 1 8.2 2009 Average 12 1717 7 7.3 93

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Trafford (Collier County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 26'18.95", Longitude 8129'36.47" Period of record: 32 sampling dates; 5/15/01 to 11/12/09 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 1494 acres / 605 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Immokalee Rise (75-37) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated clastic and shell deposits of the Fort Thompson Group Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Corkscrew Swamp division of the Southwestern Flatwoods District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 3 sampling dates: pH 8.4 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 110.8 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 225 Color (Pt-Co units) 48 Chloride (mg/L) 27.1 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 32 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 68 239 505 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 983 2971 5563 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 16 46 108 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 0.8 1.4 2.4 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/15/09 394 2640 17 1.8 2/17/09 316 2207 34 1.7 3/14/09 370 983 21 1.9 4/17/09 377 2630 47 1.2 5/21/09 320 3120 45 1.0 6/15/09 323 2670 30 1.2 7/15/09 361 2043 28 1.4 8/18/09 211 1820 61 1.9 9/16/09 290 2827 108 2.4 10/18/09 229 3263 78 1.0 11/12/09 248 3163 64 1.1 2009 Average 313 2488 48 1.5 94

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Talquin (Gadsden County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 30'54.7", Longitude 84'13.4" Period of record: 56 sampling dates; 1/6/92 to 12/6/09 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 8850 acres / 3582 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Tifton/Tallahassee Uplands (65-04) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by clayey sand and clay with sandy to clayey limestone of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Quincy Hills division of the Tifton Uplands District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 7 sampling dates: pH 6.5 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 19.0 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 83 Color (Pt-Co units) 48 Chloride (mg/L) 12.7 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 56 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 35 59 104 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 437 885 1390 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 4 35 84 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 0.8 2.8 3.9 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/11/09 71 1123 11 2.7 2/8/09 71 1187 16 2.8 3/8/09 59 1207 32 2.3 4/5/09 104 1113 4 0.8 5/3/09 77 1237 22 1.9 6/1/09 91 1327 52 1.9 8/2/09 44 757 39 3.0 10/10/09 61 877 43 3.0 12/6/09 55 960 2.6 2009 Average 70 1087 27 2.3 95

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Dead (Gulf County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 30'20.97", Longitude 85'44.68" Period of record: 11 sampling dates; 5/24/07 to 2/9/10 Surface Area : acre / hectare Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Gulf Coast Lowlands (75-01) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by undifferentiated sand, shell, clay, marl, and peat of the Holocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Coastal Strip division of the Apalachicola Delta District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 2 sampling dates: pH 7.4 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 70.5 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 160 Color (Pt-Co units) 21 Chloride (mg/L) 6.3 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 11 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 7 18 36 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 467 748 1037 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 7 14 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 2.1 3.7 4.7 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/20/09 7 467 3.0 2/24/09 11 633 1 4.0 4/21/09 20 1037 2 2.1 6/26/09 19 737 11 4.7 8/26/09 19 890 11 11/17/09 20 770 7 4.2 2009 Average 16 756 6 3.6 96

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Istokpoga (Highlands County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 27'24.66", Longitude 8116'11.94" Period of record: 165 sampling dates; 2/24/96 to 1/20/10 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 30116.54 acres / 12188 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Kissimmee/Okeechobee Lowland (75-35) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by undifferentiated sand, shell, clay, marl, and peat of the Holocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Istokpoga Prairie division of the Eastern Flatwoods District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 5 sampling dates: pH 7.0 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 12.8 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 115 Color (Pt-Co units) 106 Chloride (mg/L) 16.7 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 165 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 16 56 107 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 753 1346 2587 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 2 39 91 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.2 2.5 6.7 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/23/09 50 1337 28 2.2 2/25/09 57 1260 33 2.5 3/19/09 70 1663 45 1.8 4/9/09 84 1737 50 1.8 5/13/09 74 2340 82 1.5 6/17/09 69 1693 61 1.8 7/14/09 49 1337 47 2.0 9/18/09 50 1487 46 2.0 11/15/09 68 1850 61 1.8 2009 Average 64 1634 50 1.9 97

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Istokpoga North (Highlands County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 27'2.4", Longitude 81'39" Period of record: 147 sampling dates; 2/10/96 to 12/17/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 30116.54 acres / 12188 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Kissimmee/Okeechobee Lowland (75-35) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by undifferentiated sand, shell, clay, marl, and peat of the Holocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Istokpoga Prairie division of the Eastern Flatwoods District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 2 sampling dates: pH 7.5 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 16.0 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 173 Color (Pt-Co units) 79 Chloride (mg/L) 22.0 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 147 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 36 71 216 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 830 1337 2133 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 5 44 110 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.0 1.9 3.9 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/14/09 63 1517 51 1.7 2/17/09 63 1533 47 1.6 3/16/09 51 1273 26 2.0 4/17/09 79 1707 50 1.4 5/13/09 75 2133 67 1.3 6/15/09 60 1457 45 1.7 8/8/09 52 1390 46 1.9 10/13/09 40 1177 32 1.8 12/17/09 41 1187 30 2.0 2009 Average 58 1486 44 1.7 98

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Josephine Center (Highlands County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 27'37.32", Longitude 8126'45.51" Period of record: 156 sampling dates; 3/16/96 to 12/15/09 Surface Area .: acre / hectare Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Lake Wales Ridge Transition (75-34) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by deeply weathered beach and dune sand with some clay lenses of the preglacial Pleistocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Eastern Complex of the Central Ridge subdivision of the Lake Wales Ridge division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 5 sampling dates: pH 6.3 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 3.7 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 88 Color (Pt-Co units) 101 Chloride (mg/L) 17.6 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 156 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 32 67 162 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 523 1042 1493 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 8 25 58 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.0 1.7 6.8 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/5/09 55 850 16 1.2 2/28/09 56 1017 13 1.5 3/19/09 61 1137 25 1.5 4/22/09 90 1490 38 1.5 5/26/09 55 997 31 1.5 6/25/09 59 1123 42 1.5 8/21/09 56 1193 28 1.5 10/30/09 47 1333 27 1.5 12/15/09 35 983 17 2.0 2009 Average 57 1125 26 1.5 99

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Josephine East (Highlands County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 27'37.26", Longitude 8125'27.36" Period of record: 146 sampling dates; 5/9/95 to 1/18/10 Surface Area .: acre / hectare Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Lake Wales Ridge Transition (75-34) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by deeply weathered beach and dune sand with some clay lenses of the preglacial Pleistocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Eastern Complex of the Central Ridge subdivision of the Lake Wales Ridge division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 5 sampling dates: pH 6.5 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 3.5 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 102 Color (Pt-Co units) 69 Chloride (mg/L) 16.9 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 146 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 22 48 128 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 623 982 1490 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 14 34 104 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.1 2.2 4.7 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/9/09 51 807 35 1.3 2/12/09 40 927 21 1.8 3/11/09 34 840 16 1.9 4/22/09 58 1190 32 1.1 6/11/09 38 730 26 2.3 7/16/09 42 843 32 1.6 8/16/09 41 993 33 1.7 9/27/09 38 990 25 2.0 11/22/09 39 993 24 2.2 12/14/09 38 920 29 1.9 2009 Average 42 923 28 1.8 100

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Josephine West (Highlands County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 27'9.61", Longitude 81'7.43" Period of record: 158 sampling dates; 3/16/96 to 12/15/09 Surface Area .: acre / hectare Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Lake Wales Ridge Transition (75-34) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by deeply weathered beach and dune sand with some clay lenses of the preglacial Pleistocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Eastern Complex of the Central Ridge subdivision of the Lake Wales Ridge division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 5 sampling dates: pH 6.1 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 3.9 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 87 Color (Pt-Co units) 134 Chloride (mg/L) 18.0 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 158 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 43 100 206 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 665 1065 1597 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 8 22 94 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.0 1.5 2.5 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/5/09 72 800 10 1.5 2/28/09 68 1087 9 1.5 3/19/09 66 1000 11 1.5 4/22/09 70 1023 13 1.5 5/26/09 66 1327 48 1.5 6/25/09 72 1223 43 1.5 8/21/09 72 1080 31 1.5 10/30/09 64 1263 18 1.5 12/15/09 43 1050 13 2.0 2009 Average 66 1095 22 1.6 101

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June (Highlands County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 27'59.76", Longitude 8123'54.18" Period of record: 172 sampling dates; 4/22/94 to 12/14/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 5724 acres / 2317 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Southern Lake Wales Ridge (75-33) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by deeply weathered beach and dune sand with some clay lenses of the preglacial Pleistocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Eastern Complex of the Central Ridge subdivision of the Lake Wales Ridge division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 7 sampling dates: pH 6.8 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 6.9 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 152 Color (Pt-Co units) 11 Chloride (mg/L) 21.5 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 172 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 5 13 25 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 293 555 920 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 3 10 25 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 2.3 6.9 12.1 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/12/09 11 333 13 5.9 2/16/09 11 373 8 7.0 3/9/09 11 537 5 6.9 4/12/09 17 547 8 7.8 5/14/09 12 537 6 8.6 6/5/09 16 517 9 6.5 7/14/09 14 463 6 6.7 8/15/09 13 453 10 7.8 9/9/09 13 450 8 6.9 10/5/09 12 507 9 7.7 12/14/09 15 550 10 5.4 2009 Average 13 479 8 7.0 102

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Wilson (Hillsborough County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'46.5", Longitude 82'12.6" Period of record: 93 sampling dates; 2/21/93 to 11/6/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 62 acres / 25 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Land-o-Lakes (75-24) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by argillaceous to sandy impure limestone of the Tampa Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Land-o-Lakes subdivision of the Tampa Plain division of the Ocala Uplift District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 3 sampling dates: pH 6.6 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 16.1 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 258 Color (Pt-Co units) 27 Chloride (mg/L) 59.5 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 93 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 8 18 32 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 560 791 1157 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 4 10 32 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 4.0 6.8 10.7 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/3/09 17 637 4 9.3 3/22/09 17 807 8 7.0 8/13/09 18 873 5 7.8 11/6/09 16 853 6 4.4 2009 Average 17 793 6 7.1 103

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Farm 13 (Indian River County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 27'20.4", Longitude 80'15.66" Period of record: 105 sampling dates; 1/30/01 to 1/29/10 Surface Area : acre / hectare Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Eastern Flatlands (75-10) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated clastic and shell deposits of the Fort Thompson Group Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Upper St Johns Karst division of the Eastern Flatwoods District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 2 sampling dates: pH 8.0 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 126.5 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 855 Color (Pt-Co units) 76 Chloride (mg/L) 157.5 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 105 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 38 155 537 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 863 1775 3230 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 8 45 189 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 0.7 2.3 5.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/26/09 303 1870 8 1.5 2/26/09 272 1917 20 1.4 3/19/09 241 2013 20 0.9 4/21/09 287 3013 46 0.7 5/26/09 253 2153 31 1.0 6/24/09 279 1923 61 1.9 7/28/09 275 2183 93 1.8 8/24/09 204 2053 70 2.0 9/25/09 230 867 71 1.7 10/28/09 190 863 60 1.8 11/20/09 175 1060 55 1.6 12/30/09 166 940 2.0 2009 Average 240 1738 49 1.5 104

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Stick Marsh (Indian River County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 27'56.52", Longitude 8042'32.58" Period of record: 105 sampling dates; 1/30/01 to 1/29/10 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 2379 acres / 963 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Eastern Flatlands (75-10) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated clastic and shell deposits of the Fort Thompson Group Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Upper St Johns Karst division of the Eastern Flatwoods District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 2 sampling dates: pH 7.9 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 129.5 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 846 Color (Pt-Co units) 76 Chloride (mg/L) 161.3 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 105 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 49 148 482 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 857 1766 2977 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 7 49 151 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 0.7 2.1 4.5 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/26/09 294 1783 13 1.6 2/26/09 282 1963 20 1.6 3/19/09 248 2167 20 1.0 4/21/09 267 2017 48 0.8 5/26/09 263 2323 37 1.1 6/24/09 259 1780 61 2.1 7/28/09 284 2213 97 1.8 8/24/09 204 2030 76 1.9 9/25/09 233 857 50 1.9 10/28/09 224 883 45 1.9 11/20/09 183 1157 96 1.3 12/30/09 189 993 1.8 2009 Average 244 1681 51 1.6 105

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Cherry (Lake County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'47.9", Longitude 81'53.7" Period of record: 88 sampling dates; 5/9/90 to 12/1/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 613 acres / 248 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Clermont Uplands (75-19) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by deeply weathered clayey sand and granular sand of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Groveland Karst division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 13 sampling dates: pH 5.9 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 2.6 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 86 Color (Pt-Co units) 88 Chloride (mg/L) 18.0 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 88 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 6 15 41 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 457 932 1940 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 6 26 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.4 5.8 14.5 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 12/1/09 19 1200 19 3.0 1/23/09 22 687 8 2.2 2/26/09 23 720 7 2.0 3/24/09 19 630 11 2.7 4/30/09 28 670 10 2.0 5/26/09 26 567 11 2.4 6/16/09 22 497 12 3.0 8/28/09 28 530 35 2.2 12/21/09 13 700 6 3.1 2009 Average 23 625 12 2.5 106

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Dorr (Lake County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'12.18", Longitude 81'44.52" Period of record: 186 sampling dates; 1/30/90 to 12/21/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 1877 acres / 759 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Eastern Flatlands (75-10) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by dune sand and shell with silty sand, silt, and clay of the Princess Ann Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the St Johns Offset division and the Mount Dora Ridge subdivision of the Apopka Upland division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 10 sampling dates: pH 5.4 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 1.2 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 63 Color (Pt-Co units) 89 Chloride (mg/L) 13.0 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 186 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 11 18 32 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 310 488 797 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 2 11 35 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.0 2.8 6.7 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/23/09 22 687 8 2.2 2/26/09 23 720 7 2.0 3/24/09 19 630 11 2.7 4/30/09 28 670 10 2.0 5/26/09 26 567 11 2.4 6/16/09 22 497 12 3.0 8/28/09 28 530 35 2.2 12/21/09 13 700 6 3.1 2009 Average 23 625 12 2.5 107

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Grasshopper (Lake County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'59.76", Longitude 81'1.02" Period of record: 230 sampling dates; 1/30/90 to 12/21/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 197 acres / 47 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Ocala Scrub (75-09) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by sand dunes and well sorted fine sand of the Pleistocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Ocala Scrub division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 9 sampling dates: pH 4.5 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 0.0 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 60 Color (Pt-Co units) 30 Chloride (mg/L) 12.3 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 230 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 0 6 15 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 43 477 1760 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 3 15 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.0 7.1 16.5 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/23/09 9 1017 2 3.7 2/26/09 10 1097 3 3.9 3/24/09 8 1153 3 3.6 4/30/09 10 1080 4 3.9 5/26/09 12 723 5 5.0 6/17/09 14 657 4 4.0 8/31/09 13 587 8 3.0 12/21/09 6 2 3.0 2009 Average 10 902 4 3.8 108

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Griffin (Lake County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'31.62", Longitude 8151'5.1" Period of record: 141 sampling dates; 5/8/90 to 1/26/10 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 16505 acres / 6679 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by deeply weathered clayey sand and granular sand of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Central Lakes division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 7 sampling dates: pH 8.7 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 102.1 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 298 Color (Pt-Co units) 23 Chloride (mg/L) 28.9 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 141 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 26 63 127 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 1510 2975 5463 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 11 130 384 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 0.5 1.5 4.3 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/26/09 31 2857 14 2.5 2/11/09 33 2827 22 3.0 3/16/09 38 2843 33 2.8 4/8/09 59 2430 64 1.8 5/13/09 45 2043 38 2.2 6/27/09 28 1910 47 1.8 7/21/09 30 1937 55 1.8 8/18/09 26 2443 70 1.6 9/23/09 30 2490 71 1.8 10/21/09 30 2543 72 1.8 11/11/09 32 2383 63 1.6 12/16/09 31 2230 29 2.4 2009 Average 35 2411 48 2.1 109

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Harris (Lake County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'37.2", Longitude 81'13.1" Period of record: 211 sampling dates; 1/20/90 to 12/15/09 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 13788 acres / 5580 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by deeply weathered clayey sand and granular sand of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Central Lakes division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 10 sampling dates: pH 8.6 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 95.5 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 249 Color (Pt-Co units) 16 Chloride (mg/L) 21.0 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 211 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 15 35 70 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 840 1775 2327 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 4 57 121 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 0.8 2.1 9.5 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/16/09 41 2097 29 2.3 2/9/09 37 1640 23 2.3 3/13/09 37 1847 30 2.2 4/23/09 38 1783 40 2.0 5/22/09 41 2050 63 3.2 6/12/09 32 1883 31 2.5 7/24/09 23 1633 30 2.3 8/21/09 26 1427 42 2.3 9/19/09 29 1127 38 3.0 10/15/09 30 1460 45 2.6 11/20/09 29 1753 39 3.1 12/15/09 32 1690 35 2.4 2009 Average 33 1699 37 2.5 110

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Harris East (Lake County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'9.6", Longitude 81'9" Period of record: 48 sampling dates; 2/16/06 to 1/12/10 Surface Area .: acre / hectare Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by deeply weathered clayey sand and granular sand of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Central Lakes division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 1 sampling date: pH 8.1 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 72.0 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 211 Color (Pt-Co units) 36 Chloride (mg/L) 20.5 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 48 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 21 37 59 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 1140 1775 2360 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 22 53 94 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.5 2.1 3.3 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/12/09 45 2063 40 2.0 2/13/09 36 1630 27 2.1 3/13/09 40 1800 27 2.1 4/13/09 45 1950 42 1.9 5/15/09 38 2113 59 1.9 6/10/09 26 1870 43 2.0 7/15/09 23 1687 45 1.9 8/12/09 21 1593 39 2.2 9/4/09 27 1400 51 2.2 10/12/09 27 1747 43 2.0 11/16/09 30 1817 45 1.9 12/17/09 33 1963 46 2.0 2009 Average 33 1803 42 2.0 111

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Harris Middle (Lake County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'30.6", Longitude 81'42.78" Period of record: 76 sampling dates; 1/23/97 to 12/8/09 Surface Area .: acre / hectare Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by deeply weathered clayey sand and granular sand of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Central Lakes division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 1 sampling date: pH 8.5 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 108.0 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 298 Color (Pt-Co units) 36 Chloride (mg/L) 23.8 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 76 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 22 37 56 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 1053 1709 2517 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 11 57 105 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.3 2.1 6.1 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/5/09 35 1807 29 1.8 2/14/09 37 1713 26 1.9 3/6/09 45 1897 34 1.6 4/11/09 46 1913 39 1.8 6/9/09 . 61 1.5 7/14/09 26 1753 45 1.5 8/8/09 25 1783 49 1.5 11/14/09 34 1867 54 1.7 12/8/09 33 1920 51 1.9 2009 Average 35 1832 43 1.7 112

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Little Harris (Lake County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'10.2", Longitude 81'30.7" Period of record: 147 sampling dates; 1/20/90 to 1/27/10 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 2739 acres / 1108 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by deeply weathered clayey sand and granular sand of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Central Lakes division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 5 sampling dates: pH 8.3 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 102.1 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 278 Color (Pt-Co units) 21 Chloride (mg/L) 18.8 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 147 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 15 37 60 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 1053 1803 2663 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 5 57 111 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.0 2.1 6.2 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 2/21/09 38 1870 27 1.5 4/24/09 34 1830 38 1.8 5/23/09 38 1990 69 2.3 8/29/09 25 2200 64 1.5 9/30/09 28 2070 54 1.8 11/1/09 30 1923 57 1.8 11/20/09 30 1933 52 2.0 12/15/09 31 1853 50 2.0 2009 Average 32 1959 51 1.8 113

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Minneola (Lake County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'2.7", Longitude 81'48.09" Period of record: 78 sampling dates; 6/1/90 to 10/29/09 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 1888 acres / 764 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Clermont Uplands (75-19) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by deeply weathered clayey sand and granular sand of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Groveland Karst division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 9 sampling dates: pH 5.9 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 3.7 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 94 Color (Pt-Co units) 103 Chloride (mg/L) 20.0 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 78 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 4 25 44 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 363 1064 2033 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 6 28 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.5 4.4 12.3 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 3/19/09 21 720 4 4.7 4/13/09 23 647 4 4.3 5/25/09 19 547 4 5.5 6/25/09 17 630 4 5.5 10/29/09 17 703 3 5.5 2009 Average 20 649 4 5.1 114

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Sellers (Lake County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'44.58", Longitude 81'1.86" Period of record: 227 sampling dates; 1/30/90 to 12/21/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 501 acres / 203 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Ocala Scrub (75-09) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by sand dunes and well sorted fine sand of the Pleistocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Ocala Scrub division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 9 sampling dates: pH 4.6 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 0.4 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 52 Color (Pt-Co units) 3 Chloride (mg/L) 9.2 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 227 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 0 4 10 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 0 107 537 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 0 2 8 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 9.0 17.4 26.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/23/09 4 163 1 13.3 2/26/09 8 263 2 12.7 3/24/09 2 200 2 13.4 4/14/09 6 163 2 9.7 5/26/09 9 217 1 11.3 6/16/09 8 117 2 19.7 8/28/09 9 95 2 12.3 12/21/09 4 2 14.8 2009 Average 6 174 2 13.4 115

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Wildcat (Lake County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'35.1", Longitude 81'39.72" Period of record: 125 sampling dates; 11/24/90 to 12/22/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 351 acres / 142 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Ocala Scrub (75-09) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by sand dunes and well sorted fine sand of the Pleistocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The Lake lies in the Ocala Scrub division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 10 sampling dates: pH 4.7 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 0.5 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 45 Color (Pt-Co units) 40 Chloride (mg/L) 10.0 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 125 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 3 7 13 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 143 341 610 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 4 16 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 2.0 7.6 16.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/23/09 7 527 7 4.8 2/26/09 8 543 4 4.6 3/24/09 10 507 2 4.8 4/30/09 7 420 4 5.3 5/27/09 12 373 3 5.3 6/17/09 12 343 4 4.1 8/31/09 13 423 6 3.5 12/22/09 . 2 3.1 2009 Average 10 448 4 4.5 116

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Jackson (Leon County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 30'40.32", Longitude 8420'16.44" Period of record: 26 sampling dates; 2/20/02 to 7/9/09 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 4004 acres / 1620 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Tifton/Tallahassee Uplands (65-04) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by phosphatic sand, silty sand, and clay of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Tallahassee Red Hills subdivision of the State Line Hills division of the Ocala Uplift District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 5 sampling dates: pH 6.5 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 7.4 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 30 Color (Pt-Co units) 10 Chloride (mg/L) 3.9 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 26 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 14 27 51 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 550 754 1133 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 3 10 29 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 4.3 6.1 8.5 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 4/17/09 24 883 29 5.7 7/9/09 30 887 16 4.8 2009 Average 27 885 22 5.3 117

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Mill Dam (Marion County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'48.4", Longitude 81'16.7" Period of record: 84 sampling dates; 1/31/90 to 11/23/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 310 acres / 125 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Ocala Scrub (75-09) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by deeply weathered clayey sand and granular sand of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Lynne Karst division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 14 sampling dates: pH 6.4 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 2.8 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 72 Color (Pt-Co units) 12 Chloride (mg/L) 10.6 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 84 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 7 12 43 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 333 500 763 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 2 4 11 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 4.3 8.2 14.7 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 3/24/09 13 467 5 7.3 7/6/09 11 470 4 10.3 11/23/09 8 467 2 9.4 2009 Average 11 468 4 9.0 118

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Weir (Marion County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'15.1", Longitude 81'11" Period of record: 166 sampling dates; 3/9/90 to 10/9/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 7071 acres / 2862 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Lake Weir/Leesburg Upland (75-14) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by deeply weathered clayey sand and granular sand of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Central Lakes division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 9 sampling dates: pH 7.0 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 17.2 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 173 Color (Pt-Co units) 5 Chloride (mg/L) 32.8 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 166 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 6 11 26 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 290 758 1047 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 3 12 23 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 4.0 6.2 12.2 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 3/24/09 13 1047 15 4.5 5/1/09 15 1043 14 4.1 10/9/09 16 947 16 4.2 2009 Average 15 1012 15 4.3 119

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E (Miami-Dade County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 25'21.1", Longitude 80'52" Period of record: 82 sampling dates; 6/27/99 to 12/5/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 98 acres / 37 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Miami Ridge/Atlantic Coastal Strip (76-03) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by oolite, bioclastic and quartz sand of the Miami Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Miami Rock Ridge subdivision of the Southern Atlantic Coastal Strip division of the Gold Coast-Florida Bay District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 5 sampling dates: pH 8.2 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 96.6 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 361 Color (Pt-Co units) 5 Chloride (mg/L) 45.3 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 82 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 3 5 11 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 193 347 730 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 2 4 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 11.0 17.3 23.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 2/14/09 5 463 2 19.7 3/28/09 6 353 1 17.8 4/12/09 9 283 2 15.8 5/3/09 7 283 2 17.3 6/21/09 7 310 3 15.5 8/30/09 7 350 2 16.2 10/18/09 9 367 2 14.3 12/5/09 8 467 3 14.2 2009 Average 7 360 2 16.1 120

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Apopka (Orange County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'11.4", Longitude 81.6'28" Period of record: 5 sampling dates; 11/2/06 to 7/16/09 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 30671 acres / 12518 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated undifferentiated sand, shell, clay, marl, and peat of the Holocene and limestone consisting of skeletons of fossils in a silt to sand size matrix of the Ocala Limestone Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Central Lakes division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 1 sampling date: pH 9.6 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 86.0 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 328 Color (Pt-Co units) 33 Chloride (mg/L) 44.5 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 5 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 71 102 142 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 3380 3985 4570 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 38 79 152 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 0.8 0.9 1.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 2/27/09 124 4570 62 0.8 7/16/09 71 3380 38 1.0 2009 Average 98 3975 50 0.9 121

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Butler (Orange County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'20.88", Longitude 8133'32.04" Period of record: 130 sampling dates; 10/14/93 to 9/2/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 1904 acres / 771 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Doctor Phillips Ridge (75-20) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by phosphatic sand, silty sand, and clay of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Apopka Hills subdivision of the Apopka Upland division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 9 sampling dates: pH 5.9 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 11.0 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 222 Color (Pt-Co units) 9 Chloride (mg/L) 32.2 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 130 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 5 14 51 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 387 567 1130 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 0 3 15 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 4.0 11.5 23.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 2/6/09 10 457 1 11.0 3/8/09 9 467 1 11.0 4/22/09 14 487 1 10.0 6/17/09 15 620 2 11.0 7/20/09 11 580 2 10.0 9/2/09 19 593 3 10.0 2009 Average 13 534 2 10.5 122

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Conway North (Orange County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'16.4", Longitude 81'59.5" Period of record: 62 sampling dates; 8/1/92 to 11/4/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 676 acres / 274 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Orlando Ridge (75-21) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by phosphatic sand, silty sand, and clay of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Orlando Promontory division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 7 sampling dates: pH 7.4 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 25.3 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 237 Color (Pt-Co units) 6 Chloride (mg/L) 33.9 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 62 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 7 10 17 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 327 440 817 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 6 22 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 3.9 12.8 21.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 3/17/09 10 523 2 21.0 5/27/09 9 363 2 17.8 7/8/09 7 373 3 11.8 11/4/09 12 467 8 11.6 2009 Average 9 432 4 15.5 123

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Conway South (Orange County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'31.4", Longitude 81'47.6" Period of record: 80 sampling dates; 7/27/92 to 11/4/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 869 acres / 352 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Orlando Ridge (75-21) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by phosphatic sand, silty sand, and clay of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Orlando Promontory division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 8 sampling dates: pH 7.5 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 27.1 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 235 Color (Pt-Co units) 7 Chloride (mg/L) 33.7 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 80 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 7 10 15 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 260 389 773 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 5 25 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 4.6 13.7 21.8 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 3/17/09 9 507 1 20.5 5/27/09 10 347 2 14.5 7/8/09 9 393 3 14.2 11/4/09 12 470 8 14.0 2009 Average 10 429 4 15.8 124

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Ivanhoe East (Orange County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'48.9", Longitude 81'30.84" Period of record: 146 sampling dates; 3/24/92 to 11/4/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 109 acres / 44 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Orlando Ridge (75-21) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by phosphatic sand, silty sand, and clay of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Orlando Promontory division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 7 sampling dates: pH 8.2 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 60.9 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 208 Color (Pt-Co units) 11 Chloride (mg/L) 17.7 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 146 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 10 27 167 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 397 736 1360 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 3 28 89 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.3 3.8 13.3 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 4/10/09 23 513 13 6.0 7/7/09 12 610 17 4.8 11/4/09 23 860 20 6.3 2009 Average 19 661 17 5.7 125

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Ivanhoe Middle (Orange County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'43.62", Longitude 8122'50.4" Period of record: 151 sampling dates; 4/20/92 to 11/4/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 69 acres / 28 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Orlando Ridge (75-21) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by phosphatic sand, silty sand, and clay of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Orlando Promontory division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 6 sampling dates: pH 7.9 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 60.3 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 203 Color (Pt-Co units) 11 Chloride (mg/L) 17.1 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 151 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 7 28 48 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 383 640 1260 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 3 25 56 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.9 4.5 14.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 4/10/09 21 383 6 8.0 7/7/09 20 700 25 3.3 11/4/09 28 770 27 2.5 2009 Average 23 618 19 4.6 126

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Ivanhoe West (Orange County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'54.48", Longitude 8122'58.98" Period of record: 135 sampling dates; 4/5/93 to 11/4/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 70 acres / 28 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Orlando Ridge (75-21) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by phosphatic sand, silty sand, and clay of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Orlando Promontory division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 6 sampling dates: pH 8.1 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 58.3 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 205 Color (Pt-Co units) 11 Chloride (mg/L) 18.3 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 135 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 9 31 74 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 287 632 1040 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 3 28 60 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.7 4.2 16.8 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 4/10/09 22 463 7 8.2 7/7/09 12 570 11 6.3 11/4/09 26 770 26 4.8 2009 Average 20 601 15 6.4 127

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John's (Orange County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'7.02", Longitude 81'26.28" Period of record: 153 sampling dates; 10/29/89 to 9/18/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 3862 acres / 1563 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Apopka Upland (75-16) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by deeply weathered beach and dune sand with some clay lenses of the preglacial Pleistocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Gap subdivision of the Lake Wales Ridge division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 10 sampling dates: pH 6.8 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 23.0 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 218 Color (Pt-Co units) 46 Chloride (mg/L) 30.7 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 153 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 13 42 79 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 720 1072 1768 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 2 15 79 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.2 3.9 6.8 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 4 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/10/09 71 973 11 3.1 7/15/09 40 1020 11 3.4 9/18/09 40 885 19 3.3 2009 Average 50 959 14 3.3 128

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Starke (Orange County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'26.96", Longitude 8132'13.52" Period of record: 147 sampling dates; 7/30/92 to 11/5/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 328 acres / 133 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Apopka Upland (75-16) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by phosphatic sand, silty sand, and clay of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Apopka Hills subdivision of the Apopka Upland division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 1 sampling date: pH 7.7 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 45.0 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 249 Color (Pt-Co units) 16 Chloride (mg/L) 32.0 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 147 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 13 26 51 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 463 991 1520 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 4 24 72 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.5 3.4 12.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/30/09 22 803 17 6.6 5/1/09 19 463 4 12.0 6/1/09 23 593 6 8.2 7/6/09 37 1283 57 1.5 9/9/09 30 975 29 3.2 11/5/09 . 33 2.3 2009 Average 26 824 24 5.6 129

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Alligator (Osceola County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'49.8", Longitude 81'55.8" Period of record: 165 sampling dates; 6/19/90 to 11/12/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 3501 acres / 1417 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Osceola Slope (75-27) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by coastal sand and shelly silty sand of the preglacial Pleistocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Kissimmee Valley division of the Eastern Flatwoods District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 5 sampling dates: pH 5.8 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 1.9 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 115 Color (Pt-Co units) 43 Chloride (mg/L) 24.1 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 165 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 6 15 27 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 396 641 1220 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 4 13 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 2 5.4 10.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 11/12/09 27 1220 4 2.0 2009 Average 27 1220 4 2.0 130

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Kissimmee (Osceola County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 27'36.3", Longitude 81'58.62" Period of record: 58 sampling dates; 4/12/95 to 5/15/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 48945 acres / 19808 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Kissimmee/Okeechobee Lowland (75-35) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by coastal sand and shelly silty sand of the preglacial Pleistocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Kissimmee Valley division of the Eastern Flatwoods District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 6 sampling dates: pH 7.7 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 24.0 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 135 Color (Pt-Co units) 65 Chloride (mg/L) 17.1 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 58 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 26 52 100 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 907 1313 2050 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 6 33 76 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.5 2.7 4.8 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/27/09 26 1180 15 3.7 4/20/09 47 1545 37 2.3 5/15/09 51 1667 40 2.4 2009 Average 41 1464 31 2.8 131

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Tohopekaliga East (Osceola County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'33", Longitude 81'8.4" Period of record: 98 sampling dates; 12/17/97 to 10/12/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 13691 acres / 5541 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Osceola Slope (75-27) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by coastal sand and shelly silty sand of the preglacial Pleistocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Kissimmee Valley division of the Eastern Flatwoods District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 11 sampling dates: pH 6.5 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 13.5 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 120 Color (Pt-Co units) 39 Chloride (mg/L) 21.6 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 98 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 11 21 32 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 487 678 1053 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 5 16 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 3.3 5.9 11.8 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/27/09 16 770 6 7.2 3/13/09 19 827 4 5.5 4/19/09 17 817 5 6.2 5/17/09 22 737 5 6.0 8/11/09 19 707 6 5.3 10/12/09 25 780 6.2 2009 Average 19 773 5 6.1 132

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Tohopekaliga-Middle (Osceola County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'14.64", Longitude 8123'40.68" Period of record: 42 sampling dates; 6/13/2000 to 9/30/2009 Surface Area : acre / hectare Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Kissimmee/Okeechobee Lowland (75-35) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by coastal sand and shelly silty sand of the preglacial Pleistocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Kissimmee Valley division of the Eastern Flatwoods District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 4 sampling dates: pH 7.8 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 35.1 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 160 Color (Pt-Co units) 69 Chloride (mg/L) 23.8 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 42 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 23 49 86 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 750 1148 1570 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 9 25 57 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.3 3.0 4.7 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/30/09 33 1187 21 3.4 4/16/09 40 1413 19 3.0 5/24/09 45 1080 26 1.3 6/22/09 49 1007 28 9/30/09 63 1153 25 2.5 2009 Average 46 1168 24 2.6 133

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Tohopekaliga-North (Osceola County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'51.36", Longitude 8124'2.76" Period of record: 54 sampling dates; 6/13/2000 to 10/24/2009 Surface Area : acre / hectare Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Kissimmee/Okeechobee Lowland (75-35) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by coastal sand and shelly silty sand of the preglacial Pleistocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Kissimmee Valley division of the Eastern Flatwoods District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 4 sampling dates: pH 7.8 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 35.1 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 160 Color (Pt-Co units) 69 Chloride (mg/L) 23.8 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 54 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 32 64 136 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 680 1120 2163 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 6 30 102 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.4 2.8 7.5 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/30/09 51 1153 21 3.7 3/13/09 49 1223 20 4.2 4/18/09 47 1163 27 2.3 5/16/09 59 1270 1.8 6/20/09 72 1060 39 2.5 8/15/09 63 1153 37 2.4 10/24/09 41 1140 21 2.8 2009 Average 54 1166 28 2.8 134

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Tohopekaliga-South (Osceola County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'44.94", Longitude 8121'28.38" Period of record: 28 sampling dates; 6/13/2000 to 9/30/2009 Surface Area : acre / hectare Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Kissimmee/Okeechobee Lowland (75-35) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by coastal sand and shelly silty sand of the preglacial Pleistocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Kissimmee Valley division of the Eastern Flatwoods District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 4 sampling dates: pH 7.8 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 35.1 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 160 Color (Pt-Co units) 69 Chloride (mg/L) 23.8 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 28 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 23 45 83 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 780 1219 1987 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 6 29 50 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.8 3.0 5.6 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/30/09 49 1473 29 2.3 4/16/09 42 1247 27 3.5 5/24/09 47 1023 26 6/22/09 49 927 26 9/30/09 57 1120 22 2.5 2009 Average 49 1158 26 2.8 135

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Dexter (Polk County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 27'26.34", Longitude 8140'56.1" Period of record: 165 sampling dates; 12/21/92 to 8/30/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 173 acres / 70 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Winter Haven/Lake Henry Ridges (75-31) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by deeply weathered clayey sand and granular sand of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Winter Haven Karst division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 4 sampling dates: pH 7.8 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 33.0 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 218 Color (Pt-Co units) 9 Chloride (mg/L) 18.8 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 165 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 5 10 24 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 293 441 770 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 3 10 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 7.7 12.9 19.5 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/30/09 7 523 2 2/28/09 7 413 1 3/30/09 6 480 1 13.5 4/30/09 14 313 1 5/29/09 12 417 1 6/30/09 16 443 6 11.0 8/30/09 14 473 2 10.0 2009 Average 11 438 2 11.5 136

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Eloise (Polk County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 27'4.26", Longitude 81'18" Period of record: 20 sampling dates; 10/29/91 to 1/21/10 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 1160 acres / 469 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Winter Haven/Lake Henry Ridges (75-31) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by deeply weathered clayey sand and granular sand of the Hawthorne Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Winter Haven Karst division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 1 sampling date: pH 8.2 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 65.0 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 287 Color (Pt-Co units) 16 Chloride (mg/L) 34.4 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 20 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 23 37 53 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 850 1242 1777 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 21 42 89 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.8 2.9 4.7 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 4/3/09 50 1777 89 2.0 5/26/09 51 863 35 2.5 10/27/09 28 950 25 4.0 11/20/09 28 943 25 4.0 2009 Average 39 1133 43 3.1 137

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Weohyakapka (Polk County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 27'55.62", Longitude 8125'49.8" Period of record: 131 sampling dates; 10/26/92 to 10/27/09 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 7325 acres / 2964 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Kissimmee/Okeechobee Lowland (75-35) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by coastal sand and shelly silty sand of the preglacial Pleistocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Kissimmee Valley division of the Eastern Flatwoods District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 5 sampling dates: pH 7.0 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 12.0 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 110 Color (Pt-Co units) 33 Chloride (mg/L) 16.7 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 131 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 11 23 52 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 407 720 1160 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 11 47 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.9 4.8 8.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 3/6/09 33 993 18 2.7 8/4/09 42 33 1.9 10/27/09 37 1097 28 2.9 2009 Average 37 1045 27 2.5 138

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Crescent North (Putnam County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'6.3", Longitude 81'57.3" Period of record: 22 sampling dates; 3/23/07 to 3/30/09 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 15960 acres / 6514 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Eastern Flatlands (75-10) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by undifferentiated sand, shell, clay, marl, and peat of the Holocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Crescent Lake Basin subdivision of the Palatka Anomalies division of the Eastern Flatwoods District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 1 sampling date: pH 7.7 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 55.0 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 808 Color (Pt-Co units) 43 Chloride (mg/L) 204.0 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 22 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 50 70 128 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 970 1477 2047 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 9 36 103 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.4 2.4 3.9 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/28/09 61 1970 9 1.4 2/27/09 59 1790 22 1.7 3/30/09 58 1590 1.9 2009 Average 60 1783 15 1.7 139

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Crescent South (Putnam County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'38.8", Longitude 81'36.2" Period of record: 27 sampling dates; 3/14/07 to 9/15/09 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 15960 acres / 6514 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Eastern Flatlands (75-10) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by undifferentiated sand, shell, clay, marl, and peat of the Holocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Crescent Lake Basin subdivision of the Palatka Anomalies division of the Eastern Flatwoods District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 2 sampling dates: pH 7.9 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 65.0 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 893 Color (Pt-Co units) 51 Chloride (mg/L) 219.8 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 27 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 58 107 246 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 940 1703 2460 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 45 160 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 0.6 1.6 2.8 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/26/09 61 1927 15 1.4 2/27/09 76 1973 50 1.4 3/30/09 78 1847 12 1.2 4/23/09 69 1580 47 2.0 5/29/09 246 1380 3 1.3 7/21/09 174 2147 3 1.1 9/15/09 184 2013 1 1.0 2009 Average 127 1838 19 1.3 140

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George (Putnam County) St. Johns River Water Management District Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'59.8", Longitude 81'54.8" Surface Area : Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Eastern Flatlands (75-10) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by undifferentiated sand, shell, clay, marl, and peat of the Holocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the St Johns Offset division of the Central Lake District Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 66 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 23 51 111 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 437 962 1727 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 3 27 93 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1 2 4 2009 St. Johns River Water Management District Data Numbers reported below are values calculated from 1 mid-lake station for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL A, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL A( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/12/09 134 1911 16 1.4 2/4/09 183 2405 49 1.1 3/12/09 55 1114 12 2.3 4/9/09 79 1260 44 2.2 5/5/09 42 1221 26 2.5 6/3/09 95 1318 44 2.1 7/1/09 163 1566 17 1.9 8/4/09 92 1240 40 2.3 9/1/09 127 1615 10 1.5 10/8/09 121 1549 9 1.6 11/4/19 132 1836 22 1.6 12/14/09 74 1275 15 2.3 2009 Average 108 1526 25 1.9 141

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Rodman-1 (Putnam County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'23.4", Longitude 81'26.4" Period of record: 106 sampling dates; 1/25/00 to 11/15/09 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 13000 acres / 5261 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by undifferentiated sand, shell, clay, marl, and peat of the Holocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the St Johns Offset division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from sampling dates: pH Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) Color (Pt-Co units) Chloride (mg/L) Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 106 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 4 30 112 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 170 670 1710 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 8 72 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.5 6.1 13.5 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 1 mid-lake station for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/23/09 26 810 24 5 2/21/09 23 650 3 7 3/19/09 17 460 2 4/22/09 19 340 1 10 5/17/09 22 440 7 9 6/8/09 48 1080 14 2 7/19/09 37 1020 4 4 9/16/09 41 1280 15 4 11/15/09 22 640 7 8 2009 Average 28 747 9 6 142

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Rodman-2 (Putnam County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'33", Longitude 81'14.4" Period of record: 102 sampling dates; 1/25/00 to 6/8/09 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 13000 acres / 5261 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by undifferentiated sand, shell, clay, marl, and peat of the Holocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the St Johns Offset division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from sampling dates: pH Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) Color (Pt-Co units) Chloride (mg/L) Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 102 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 5 32 135 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 230 661 1630 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 0 8 51 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.5 5.7 13.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 1 mid-lake station for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/23/09 30 960 27 5 2/21/09 23 620 3 8 3/19/09 28 770 2 4/22/09 19 310 0 10 5/17/09 20 460 5 10 6/8/09 54 1150 15 2 2009 Average 29 712 9 7 143

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Rodman-3 (Putnam County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'27", Longitude 81'9" Period of record: 114 sampling dates; 1/25/00 to 6/7/09 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 13000 acres / 5261 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by undifferentiated sand, shell, clay, marl, and peat of the Holocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the St Johns Offset division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from sampling dates: pH Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) Color (Pt-Co units) Chloride (mg/L) Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 114 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 8 27 97 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 150 550 1480 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 0.3 3 24 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.5 4.7 11.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 1 mid-lake station for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/18/09 14 420 1 7 2/15/09 20 440 3 4 3/15/09 19 250 2 8 4/12/09 17 600 2 9 5/17/09 25 330 2 8 6/7/09 48 1420 1 2 2009 Average 24 577 2 6 144

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Rodman-4 (Putnam County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'9.6", Longitude 81'27.6" Period of record: 99 sampling dates; 1/25/00 to 9/16/09 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 13000 acres / 5261 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by undifferentiated sand, shell, clay, marl, and peat of the Holocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the St Johns Offset division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from sampling dates: pH Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) Color (Pt-Co units) Chloride (mg/L) Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 99 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 5 34 166 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 200 697 2260 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 0 6 39 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.5 5.9 12.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 1 mid-lake station for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/9/09 28 860 7 7 2/21/09 18 450 2 7 3/20/09 17 460 5 7 4/20/09 10 220 1 9 5/21/09 13 320 4 6/8/09 71 1550 5 3 7/19/09 41 1060 3 4 9/16/09 35 1340 4 6 2009 Average 29 783 4 6 145

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Rodman-5 (Putnam County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'5.7", Longitude 81'0.3" Period of record: 96 sampling dates; 1/25/00 to 5/21/09 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 13000 acres / 5261 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by undifferentiated sand, shell, clay, marl, and peat of the Holocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the St Johns Offset division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from sampling dates: pH Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) Color (Pt-Co units) Chloride (mg/L) Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 96 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 9 37 142 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 300 759 1900 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 0 3 20 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.5 7.4 17.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 1 mid-lake station for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/9/09 37 730 1 2/21/09 21 1270 2 10 3/20/09 30 660 1 13 4/20/09 20 470 1 14 5/21/09 24 1900 2 2009 Average 26 1006 1 12 146

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Rodman-6 (Putnam County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'27.6", Longitude 81'16.2" Period of record: 117 sampling dates; 1/25/00 to 11/17/09 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 13000 acres / 5261 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by undifferentiated sand, shell, clay, marl, and peat of the Holocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the St Johns Offset division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from sampling dates: pH Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) Color (Pt-Co units) Chloride (mg/L) Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 117 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 18 45 148 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 300 1082 2430 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 0 8 57 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1 5.2 9.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 1 mid-lake station for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/18/09 41 1400 5 2/16/09 38 300 5 3/17/09 44 1290 9 7 4/11/09 35 1410 6 5/16/09 38 1180 12 7 6/8/09 39 1510 0 3 7/19/09 29 1220 2 4 9/15/09 42 1480 1 4 11/17/09 42 940 5 2009 Average 39 1192 5 5 147

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Rodman-out 1 (Putnam County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'32.4", Longitude 81'49.2" Period of record: 114 sampling dates; 1/25/00 to 6/7/09 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 13000 acres / 5261 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-09) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by undifferentiated sand, shell, clay, marl, and peat of the Holocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the St Johns Offset division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from sampling dates: pH Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) Color (Pt-Co units) Chloride (mg/L) Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 114 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 6 34 122 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 250 731 1860 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 8 68 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1 5.6 14.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 1 mid-lake station for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/18/09 29 760 7 10 2/15/09 21 610 14 6 3/15/09 17 510 5 9 4/12/09 24 560 6 7 5/17/09 20 540 6 7 6/7/09 45 1230 9 2 2009 Average 26 702 8 7 148

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Rodman-out 2 (Putnam County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'30", Longitude 81'57.6" Period of record: 104 sampling dates; 1/25/00 to 6/8/09 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 13000 acres / 5261 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-15) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by undifferentiated sand, shell, clay, marl, and peat of the Holocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the St Johns Offset division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from sampling dates: pH Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) Color (Pt-Co units) Chloride (mg/L) Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 104 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 5 31 128 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 130 680 1860 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 9 65 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.5 5.9 14.5 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 1 mid-lake station for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/23/09 28 800 20 8 2/21/09 27 590 2 7 3/19/09 28 620 2 4/22/09 25 500 1 9 5/17/09 20 470 6 10 6/8/09 45 1120 9 2 2009 Average 29 683 7 7 149

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Rodman-out 3 (Putnam County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 29'30", Longitude 81'58.2" Period of record: 83 sampling dates; 5/17/01 to 11/15/09 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 13000 acres / 5261 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-21) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by undifferentiated sand, shell, clay, marl, and peat of the Holocene Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the St Johns Offset division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from sampling dates: pH Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) Color (Pt-Co units) Chloride (mg/L) Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 83 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 9 93 341 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 170 1040 2800 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 0 3 17 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 0.5 2.9 6.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 1 mid-lake station for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/9/09 37 570 1 4 2/21/09 69 1060 1 3 3/20/09 52 600 1 5 4/20/09 20 330 1 5 5/21/09 57 1330 3 3 6/8/09 169 2510 1 1 7/19/09 126 2800 1 1 9/16/09 48 1410 9 3 11/15/09 61 630 0 2009 Average 71 1249 2 3 150

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Jesup (Seminole County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'4.5", Longitude 81'8.82" Period of record: 95 sampling dates; 4/25/91 to 10/25/09 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 10011 acres / 4051 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Eastern Flatlands (75-10) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by dune sand and shell with silty sand, silt, and clay of the Princess Ann Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the St Johns Offset division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 5 sampling dates: pH 7.9 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 73.8 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 729 Color (Pt-Co units) 54 Chloride (mg/L) 177.5 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 95 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 90 166 339 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 1320 3110 6623 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 37 145 405 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 0.5 1.2 2.5 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/25/09 140 2645 106 1.0 2/22/09 167 3070 170 0.8 3/28/09 166 4030 195 0.8 4/19/09 236 4400 167 0.8 5/10/09 224 4103 134 0.8 6/14/09 119 2250 89 1.3 8/22/09 111 2460 123 1.2 10/25/09 99 2223 98 1.2 2009 Average 158 3148 135 1.0 151

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Jesup North (Seminole County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'48.42", Longitude 8110'44.04" Period of record: 99 sampling dates; 2/17/01 to 12/27/09 Surface Area : acre / hectare Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Eastern Flatlands (75-10) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by dune sand and shell with silty sand, silt, and clay of the Princess Ann Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the St Johns Offset division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 1 sampling date: pH 8.8 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 102.0 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 1890 Color (Pt-Co units) 52 Chloride (mg/L) 515.0 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 99 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 79 147 253 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 1020 2729 7203 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 27 119 296 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 0.5 1.2 2.2 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/18/09 132 2763 75 1.0 2/17/09 214 2987 102 0.8 3/15/09 167 3090 122 0.9 4/18/09 153 2707 71 1.0 6/8/09 166 2413 96 1.2 8/16/09 139 3020 150 1.0 10/20/09 123 2723 116 1.1 12/27/09 148 2860 98 1.3 2009 Average 155 2820 104 1.1 152

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Monroe (Seminole County) St. Johns River Water Management District Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'55.86", Longitude 8114'11.94" Period of record: 18 sampling dates; 9/25/00 to 3/10/09 Surface Area .: acre / hectare Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Eastern Flatlands (75-10) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by dune sand and shell with silty sand, silt, and clay of the Princess Ann Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the St Johns Offset division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 1 sampling date: pH 8.0 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 44.0 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 1687 Color (Pt-Co units) 35 Chloride (mg/L) 434.0 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 18 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 47 101 248 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 1237 1701 2093 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 5 26 60 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.4 1.8 2.5 2009 Florida St. Johns River Water Management District Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 2 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll A (CHL A, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/21/09 154 2328 46 1.3 2/17/09 93 1687 32 2.1 3/17/09 99 1644 25 1.8 4/29/09 142 1826 35 1.6 5/27/09 94 1259 31 2.3 6/17/09 127 1511 42 2.0 7/21/09 89 1513 34 2.2 8/18/09 146 1980 4 1.5 9/15/09 130 1732 6 1.8 10/21/09 107 1818 11 1.3 11/17/09 90 1881 9 2.1 12/15/09 74 1815 21 2.3 2009 Average 112 1749 25 1.9 153

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Monroe East (Seminole County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'55.86", Longitude 8114'11.94" Period of record: 18 sampling dates; 9/25/00 to 3/10/09 Surface Area .: acre / hectare Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Eastern Flatlands (75-10) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by dune sand and shell with silty sand, silt, and clay of the Princess Ann Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the St Johns Offset division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 1 sampling date: pH 8.0 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 44.0 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 1687 Color (Pt-Co units) 35 Chloride (mg/L) 434.0 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 18 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 47 101 248 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 1237 1701 2093 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 5 26 60 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.4 1.8 2.5 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 3/10/09 58 1237 36 2.5 2009 Average 58 1237 36 2.5 154

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Monroe West (Seminole County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'31.92", Longitude 8117'46.56" Period of record: 47 sampling dates; 9/24/00 to 3/10/09 Surface Area .: acre / hectare Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Eastern Flatlands (75-10) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by dune sand and shell with silty sand, silt, and clay of the Princess Ann Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the St Johns Offset division of the Central Lake District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 2 sampling dates: pH 7.4 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 41.5 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 1552 Color (Pt-Co units) 35 Chloride (mg/L) 402.0 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 47 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 30 79 221 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 837 1505 3277 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 0 13 73 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 0.8 2.0 4.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 3/10/09 57 1327 23 2.5 2009 Average 57 1327 23 2.5 155

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Panasoffkee (Sumter County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 28'56.82", Longitude 827'6.6" Period of record: 106 sampling dates; 8/5/88 to 5/1/09 Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 4460 acres / 1805 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated undifferentiated sand, shell, clay, marl, and peat of the Holocene and limestone consisting of skeletons of fossils in a silt to sand size matrix of the Ocala Limestone Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the Tsala Apopka Basin division of the Ocala Uplift District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 6 sampling dates: pH 8.2 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 102.9 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 259 Color (Pt-Co units) 51 Chloride (mg/L) 10.5 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 106 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 10 32 125 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 333 809 2060 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 2 14 140 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 2.0 3.9 8.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 2/27/09 23 810 10 5/1/09 32 730 4 2009 Average 28 770 7 156

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Juniper East (Walton County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 30'43.14", Longitude 867'36" Period of record: 118 sampling dates; 4/19/97 to 12/17/09 Surface Area .: acre / hectare Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Dougherty/Marianna Plains (65-02) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by gravel, sand and clay of the Citronelle Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the De Funiak Karst division of the Dougherty Karst District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 3 sampling dates: pH 5.4 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 0.2 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 19 Color (Pt-Co units) 25 Chloride (mg/L) 5.3 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 118 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 4 12 76 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 157 448 1413 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 6 16 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 3.0 7.0 12.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/21/09 17 1265 4 3.7 2/10/09 21 1267 4 4.3 3/4/09 21 1220 5 3.0 4/21/09 14 943 6 3.0 5/12/09 21 833 6 3.5 6/3/09 76 623 10 4.1 7/14/09 22 647 10 4.0 9/3/09 21 547 8 4.3 10/1/09 10 510 . 11/12/09 12 595 . 12/17/09 9 550 . 2009 Average 22 818 7 3.8 157

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Juniper West (Walton County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 30'28.5", Longitude 86'19.62" Period of record: 104 sampling dates; 4/19/97 to 12/17/09 Surface Area .: acre / hectare Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Dougherty/Marianna Plains (65-02) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by gravel, sand and clay of the Citronelle Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the De Funiak Karst division of the Dougherty Karst District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 4 sampling dates: pH 5.1 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 1.2 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 22 Color (Pt-Co units) 28 Chloride (mg/L) 5.3 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 104 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 5 11 23 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 247 650 1320 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 6 19 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 2.8 6.2 9.0 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 1 mid-lake station for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/21/09 16 1240 3 3.5 2/10/09 23 1260 4 3.5 3/4/09 20 1110 3 2.8 4/21/09 11 740 4 3.8 5/12/09 18 910 7 4.0 6/3/09 15 490 9 4.0 7/14/09 21 530 8 4.3 9/3/09 21 520 9 4.3 10/1/09 9 520 . 11/12/09 13 660 . 12/17/09 9 580 . 2009 Average 16 778 6 3.8 158

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Spring (Walton County) LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary Location: Latitude 30'51", Longitude 86'39" Period of record: 203 sampling dates; 2/2/90 to 1/16/10 Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 242 acres / 98 hectares Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Dougherty/Marianna Plains (65-02) Geologic formation (Brooks 1981): The geology is dominated by silty fine sand to sandy clay of the Shoal River Formation Physiographic region (Brooks 1981): The lake lies in the De Funiak Karst division of the Dougherty Karst District Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida. Data reported are means from 4 sampling dates: pH 6.0 Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3) 1.4 Conductance (S/cm @ 25 C) 18 Color (Pt-Co units) 11 Chloride (mg/L) 4.9 Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 203 months sampled: Minimum Average Maximum Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (g/L) 6 14 36 Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (g/L) 240 518 1150 Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (g/L) 1 9 84 Long-term Secchi depth (ft) 1.8 7.4 12.3 2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, g/L), total nitrogen (TN, g/L), chlorophyll (CHL, g/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009: Date TP ( g/L) TN ( g/L) CHL ( g/L) SECCHI (ft) 1/7/09 9 563 5 9.0 1/25/09 8 603 2 8.0 2/18/09 13 543 2 8.0 3/27/09 11 3 8.6 4/25/09 14 . 8.0 8/31/09 14 370 2 10.0 10/20/09 11 533 3 9.0 2009 Average 11 523 3 8.7 159

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Appendix D: Florida LAKEWATCH procedures for measuring aquatic vegetation Percent Area Covered and Percent Volume Infested Florida LAKEWATCH conducts aquatic plant surveys on all of the lake in the long-term monitoring project every other year. A major component of these surveys is collecting data on submerged vegetation to acquire measures of the Percent Area Covered (PAC) and the Percent Volume Infested (PVI) with submerged aquatic vegetation. The following is a step-by-step outline of how PAC and PVI data is currently collected and analyzed. This procedure is modified from those of Jim Griffin of the University of South Florida (personal communication, unpublished data). Boat setup: Three items are needed: 1. Lowrance LCX-28cHD head unit 2. Transducer 3. GPS receiver The Lowrance system works best when the transducer is permanently mounted to the boat, however, data can be obtained using removable mounting hardware. A standard deep cycle or cranking battery is needed for power. Read and understand owners manual completely Field procedures: Turn on power and allow GPS to acquire position (check using STATUS page). Once at location, start transect by using the PAGES button to get to SONAR and chose FULL SONAR CHART. Use the MENU button and chose LOG SONAR DATA. Name the transect appropriately and select the drive for saving the map (hard drive or removable memory card). Push ENTER on START LOGGING to begin transect. Push PAGES and go to MAP and chose the MAP WITH SONAR screen (this allows you to see your position on the map, speed, and the sonar chart simultaneously). Constant speed is not necessary for all applications since GPS coordinates are being taken, however, keeping the speed around 10mph is recommended from previous experiences. Keeping a constant speed is necessary for Lakewatch procedures as GIS is not used to map transects after they are recorded. As you approach the end of the transect return to the SONAR page and use the MENU button to again access the LOG SONAR DATA screen. Once at the end of the transect press ENTER while highlighting END LOGGING (it will be in the same area as the START LOGGING prompt was earlier). Repeat these steps for every transect needed. Office procedures: 160

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A LEI/MMC card reader is needed to retrieve data from the removable memory card. The program Sonar Viewer is needed to view bottom maps on a computer. This program is a free download from: http://www.lowrance.com/Downloads/SLV/sonar_viewer.asp Once the transect files are moved from the Lowrance unit to the computer via the memory card, save each transect or group of transects in folders with water body name and date, as this information is not part of the data saved in the files. To access the maps, open Sonar Viewer from the desktop or the computers main menu. Opening these files by double clicking on the file name in my documents will not allow use of all needed options. Once a file is open in Sonar Viewer: 1. Go to FILE and click on OUTPUT CHART INFORMATION. This will open up a SAVE AS window. 2. Name the chart differently if desired and save. This has saved the file as a comma delimited file (.CSV) in Microsoft Excel. It is a spread sheet of the numerical data for the opened chart. 3. Repeat these steps for all transect files per sampling event. The newly formed Excel spread sheet contains all of the data recorded by the Lowrance (depth, water temp., position, etc.). Much of the data is not needed for PAC/PVI determination; however, the data should be kept for possible future analysis. Desired data can be copied and pasted into another worksheet in the Excel file to be more easily viewed (when this is done the file must be resaved as a .XLS file as .CSV files cannot have more than one worksheet). A column called Depth Valid is part of the data shown on the spreadsheet. The cells will contain either a T or an F. T means everything was working properly, a depth was taken, and the bottom chart will be clear and usable. An F means that no depth was taken and the chart is most likely unclear in this section. Therefore, any rows with an F in the Depth Valid cell should not be used and can be deleted. Two new columns must be added to the far left of the spread sheet. Transect number which will be the same in every cell in each file and Sounding number which will start with 0 and go through the number of data points for each transect (the number of rows in the file) (Figure 1). Once Transect and Sounding numbers have been added to all transect files from a sampling event the data from each individual transect should be copied and placed in order of transect into a new file called lakename_ALL. This file will now contain data for the full sampling event organized in order by transect and sounding number. A new column called Random should be added to the right of the spread sheet. A random number formula should be used to assign a random number to each sounding. Using the formula =rand() in Excel will generate a random number between 0 and 1. Copy and paste this formula down the entire column. Copy the entire Random column and paste it back in the same place using the Paste Special Values operation. This prevents the formula from continuously regenerating the random number each time you work on the spread sheet. 161

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Highlight the entire worksheet and Sort by Random in ascending order. Select the appropriate number of soundings to be analyzed for PAC/PVI. Common methods are to use a set number of soundings (ex. 100) for each water body, or a percentage of the total number of soundings (ex. 0.1%). The percentage should be low as this system generates thousands of data points (ex. Talquin reservoir, FL = 86,000 data points from 5 transects at 10mph constant speed). Once these rows are selected, copy and paste them into another worksheet. Sort these rows in ascending order first by transect number then by sounding number. These are the points from each transect chart that will be visually measured to determine PAC/PVI. Add two new columns Bottom depth and Veg depth. Veg depth is the depth of the top of the plants, so if no plants are present the veg depth value will be the same as the Bottom depth. If plants are to the surface, topped out, than Veg depth will equal 0. In Sonar Viewer chart settings must be set the same to aid in standardization of this method: 1. Set Colorline = 60 2. Set Sensitivity = 70 3. Go to View in the upper menu and open Chart Settings 4. Set Surface Clarity = High 5. Set ASP = Normal 6. View chart as color with white background (default) Open Sonar Viewer and Excel simultaneously. For each transect place the mouse pointer on the designated sounding on the chart in Sonar Viewer and record the bottom depth (figure 2) and plant height (figure 3) in Excel. Repeat for all points. Add column Veg height and Veg presence. Veg height can be determined with (Bottom depth Veg depth). Veg presence is binomial with 0 meaning no plants (Veg height = 0) and 1 meaning plants (Veg height >0) (Figure 4). PAC is determined using the formula ( Veg presence/ Total number of soundings analyzed)100] (figure 5). PVI is determined using the formula [( Veg height/ Bottom depth)100] (figure 5). 162

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163Figure 1: Transect number and Sounding number columns added to raw Lowrance transect data prior to combining individual files into a lake ALL file. Figure 2: Bottom depth is determined by placing the cursor at the change between the large yellow line and the beginning of the darker colored plants (black arrow). The information box shows the cursor depth. This value should be entered into the Excel spreadsheet.

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164Figure 3: Veg depth is determined by placing the cursor at the top of the yellow/orange colored plants on the chart (black arrow). The information box shows the cursor depth. This value should be entered into the Excel spreadsheet. Figure 4: Veg height and Veg presence columns added to spreadsheet after Bottom and Veg depths are measured.

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Figure 5: PVI and PAC values which are determined using the data from the above columns. 165

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Appendix E: Fish Community Analysis Dan Gwinn and Mike Allen School of Forest Resources and Conservation The University of Florida dgwinn@ufl.edu, msal@ufl.edu 166

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Introduction The mission of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is Managing fish and wildlife resources for their long-term well-being and the benefit of people. As such, a set of lakes was established in 2006 for monitoring by the FWC in partnership with Florida Lakewatch to track long-term status and trends in fish communities. This program was designed to inform sport fish management and provide information on fish community composition and structure in relation to: water chemistry, lake trophic status, aquatic macrophyte abundances, and lake morphology (Bonvechio 2008). When developing a monitoring program, evaluation of the ability of the program to track indices of the system state is important (Yoccos et al. 2001, Legg and Nagy 2006, Field et al. 2007). This report summarizes work accomplished in 2009 to evaluate the use of diversity indices to monitor fish communities in Florida lakes and evaluate the current monitoring programs utility for such indices. Our objectives were to: 1) evaluate sample size requirements to detect changes in species diversity using electrofishing for Florida lakes, 2) evaluate statistical power to detect changes in regional (i.e., statewide) diversity of fish communities through time, and 3) evaluate patterns in species diversity and evenness across lakes and trophic states 167

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Methods Sampling The FWC monitoring lakes vary widely in size, trophic state, and aquatic plant abundance. In this report we focused on the electrofishing data, which constitutes the majority of sampling at all lakes. Although fish data have been collected on various lakes in Florida for decades, we limited our analysis to data collected from the conception of the FWC long term lake monitoring program in 2006, and used data through 2008. We also limited our analysis to 40 lakes listed in Table 1 because these lakes had the most comprehensive sampling during this time period. A random selection of fixed transects were selected at each lake, and fish were sampled via electrofishing in the fall (September-December) of each year. The number of transects sampled on each lake and each year ranged from 6 to 90 with 6 being standard sampling for Florida Lakewatch. Specific details on sampling can be found in Bonvechio (2008). Analysis We estimated species diversity and evenness for each lake and year using Shannon and Simpson estimators (Kreb et al. 1999). The Shannon index of species diversity (H') is a measure of the amount of uncertainty in categorical data and accounts for both the number of species and the relative proportion in which they occur. The Shannon index increases in magnitude when 1) the number of species increases and 2) the proportion in which they occur becomes homogeneous. We calculated the Shannon index as: 168

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siiippH1))(ln( (1) where pi is the relative proportion of species (i) in the sample. Although the original Shannon index used log base two in the calculation (Kreb et al. 1999), we employed the natural log for computational simplicity. This change from the original formulation only affects the magnitude of the index and does not effect the relative change in the index due to community changes. The Shannon index is sensitive to changes in species with lower pi values due to the logarithm term in the function, but changes in pi for rare species can also occur through increased catches of common species. The Simpson reciprocal index (Dr from here on referred to as Simpson index), like the Shannon index accounts for the number of species and the relative proportion in which they occur and was calculated as: siirpD121 (2) where pi is, again, the relative proportion of species (i) in the sample (Kreb et al. 1999). The Simpson index of species diversity is less sensitive to changes in rare species than the Shannon index because it lacks the logarithm term in the equation and therefore weights the change in abundant and rare species equally. The Simpson index of species evenness is only a measure of the homogeneity of the proportions in which the species occur and was calculated as: sDEr (3) where (Dr) is the Simpson index of species diversity and s is the number of species in the sample. Because the evenness index is standardized by dividing diversity by the number 169

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of species, it is mostly sensitive to homogeneity of the proportion of species and is uninfluenced by the number of species in the sample. Detecting trends in indices through time is a direct function of sampling variation (i.e. the amount by which the index of each replicate sample deviates from the mean value). In general, smaller sampling variation equates to greater statistical power to detect changes in a given index. However, the biological meaning of the change can be viewed as a function of process variation (i.e. how much change is due to stochastic processes in the system). A biologically relevant change is therefore one that is outside the bounds of the natural stochasticity. Thus, an appropriate index is one for which the power to detect change is commensurate with the expected process variation. For example, if annual process variation is within 50% of the mean index, a monitoring program that can detect a 50% or greater change is appropriate because any change outside of the process variation ( 50%) will be detected (i.e. biologically relevant change). Alternately, if the ability to detect change in the index is limited to a 100% or greater change, any biologically relevant change between 50% and 100% of the mean index may go undetected. Thus, the interplay between process and sampling variation is important because it provides information that can lead to more efficient and effective sampling designs. We evaluated the magnitude of variability in the diversity indices among transects and among years as proxies for sampling variation and process variation, respectively for each lake. We estimated the sampling variation by calculating the coefficient of variation of each index across transects for each lake. We approximated process variation by calculating the coefficient of variation of the mean index through time for each lake. This estimation of process error is likely biased high because the observed changes in the 170

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mean indices results from both process variation and observation error. However, we believe that employing the mean indices in the estimation of process variation reduces observation error and provides a useful approximation, none-the-less. The best index in terms of sampling variation and change detection was identified as the one that produced the lowest and least variable coefficient of variations for both the sampling and process variation estimates. To evaluate the level of sampling effort needed to detect changes in the recommended index, we first determined biologically relevant levels of change and then performed a power analysis at those levels. We determined two relevant levels of change as the average process variation across lakes and years and the upper 95% confidence limit of the process variation. Process variation was calculated as the percent change in the mean index between consecutive years. We then employed the coefficient of variation of the mean index (i.e. sampling variation) to estimate the number of transects to detect relevant changes (mean and upper 95% CI of process variation) in the index for each lake through time with 90% probability using a modified t distribution (Abramowitz and Stegun 1970; Gerow 2007). We evaluated the ability of the current monitoring program to detect trends in the average regional diversity of Florida lakes by estimating the average diversity index across lakes, estimating the uncertainty in the average values, and performing a power analysis. Because this question addresses regional changes, the unit of observation was the lake as apposed to the transect. Thus, we estimated the diversity index for each lake using catch data pooled across transects. We averaged these values across lakes for each year and estimated the 95% confidence intervals and the coefficient of variation. We then estimated the power to detect from 5% to 50% decrease in the index using the non171

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central t distribution per Gerow (2007). For all the power calculations we assumed random samples and variance proportional to the mean. We evaluated the use of ancillary data collected annually by FWC and Florida Lakewatch to explain patterns in species diversity among a subset of 26 lakes using multiple linear regression. We selected only those lakes that were sampled with at least 14 transects to ensure the robustness of the analysis. Because we were evaluating patterns across lakes we, again, employed the lake as the unit of observation. Thus, the dependent variable in our regression models were the diversity index calculated with data pooled across transects for each lake in each year. Predictor variables evaluated were conductivity, pH, and dissolved oxygen, collected annually by FWC and percent aerial coverage by plants (PAC), total phosphorous, total nitrogen, chlorophyll concentration, secchi depth, and lake surface area collected annually by Florida Lakewatch. We evaluated these variables because they can indicate trophic state of a lake, the structural complexity of the habitat, and because species richness is often related to lake size (Matuszek and Beggs 1988, Bachmann et al. 1996, Allen et al. 1998). The set of variables that best predicted diversity was determined by a comparison of all possible models using Bayesian information criterion (Schwarz 1978). We chose Bayesian information criterion because it penalizes more heavily for additional parameters than other information criterion such as Akaike information criterion. This heavy penalization for the number of parameters in the model is desirable when fitting multiple models to reduce the likelihood of spurious results. Results 172

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The Shannon index of species diversity showed the least amount of sampling variation (Figure 1) and process variation (Figure 2) with the lowest median coefficient of variation values among transects and years, respectively. This indicated that on average a greater power to detect change would be obtained using the Shannon index and that biologically meaningful change would be easy to observe due to the low process variability. However, this index produced unusually high sampling variation in a large number of lakes (Figure 1), indicating a level of unpredictability that was not observed for the other indices. These anomalous values were produced because of high variation in the relative abundance of rare species among transect replicates. We found the Simpson index produced coefficient of variations that were larger on average within a lake, but varied less among lakes. Species evenness produced similar sampling variation as the Simpson diversity index (Figure 1), but demonstrated higher process variation (Figure 2). We believe that the Simpson index of species diversity is the best index from a sampling perspective. Although, the Simpson index of diversity did not show the lowest observation or process variability it appeared less variable among lakes. The remaining results will be presented for only the Simpson index of species diversity, with the understanding that any sample size requirements will be a little less for most lakes when employing a Shannon index and very similar for most lakes when employing the Simpson index of species evenness. The average Simpson index varied among years for all lakes indicating some form of process variation. The average change in Simpson diversity between consecutive years was 17% and the upper 95% confidence interval of the change between consecutive years was 38%. Thus, we adopted a 20% and 40% decrease in the 173

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Simpson index to represent biologically relevant change for power analyses, as this represented the estimated changes across lakes through times. The number of transects required to detect a change in the Simpson index varied among lakes, but the average number was relatively consistent across years (Figure 3). To detect a 20% decrease in diversity most lakes would require no more than 110 (Figure 3) transects, whereas detecting a 40% decrease in diversity in most lakes would require no more than 20 transects (Figure 3). We found that the number of transects required to detect a 40% decrease often varied quite drastically among years within lakes (Table 1). For example the recommended number of transects changed by 50% or more for 43% of the lakes among years, thus, highlighting the difficulty in making sample size predictions that will remain appropriate through time for any given lake. All but one lake required more than 6 transects to detect a 40% decrease in diversity for at least one of the years evaluated. This indicates that the Florida Lakewatch sampling protocol of 6 replicate transects per lake would be inadequate to detect a 40% decrease in the Simpson index of diversity under most circumstances. The average regional diversity of the long-term monitoring lakes remained relatively stable across years (Figure 4). Broad confidence interval overlap indicated no significant change in the average Simpson index through time. Our power analysis indicated that the current sampling program will allow for the detection of about a 25% decrease in the regional index with 90% probability (Figure 5). We also found that most ancillary data collected by FWC and Lake Watch was not a good predictor of species diversity. The Bayesian information criterion indicated that Simpson diversity index was best explained by a model containing only secchi depth and conductivity as predictor variables. This model was significant (p = 0.012) but 174

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explained only17% of the variability in the Simpson index (adjusted R2 = 0.1699). This relationship is likely of little use for predicting fish diversity in Florida lakes. Discussion The results of these preliminary analyses highlight vagueness in the use of diversity indices to inform management. Because the diversity indices are unitless numbers with no species-specific information, it is unclear what level of change is biologically relevant or should trigger management actions to improve fish populations. For this study, we used inter-annual variability as a proxy for process error with the assumption that any change greater than the expected process variation is biologically relevant. However, we only used three years of data to quantify process variation which limits our ability to predict process variation in the future. Another area of uncertainty is the information content of the diversity index. Observing changes in diversity indices alone does not provide adequate information for management. This is particularly true for this dataset because of the lack of strong relationship between ancillary data and diversity. For example, a change in the Simpson diversity from 4.53 to 2.18 lacks the valuable information of how the community composition changed. Alternatively, observing a reduction or loss in species belonging to a specific feeding guild may provide better information to guide the direction of management. We have been exploring the use of occupancy modeling to estimate community metrics such as species richness and species-specific parameters such as occupancy probability, extinction rates, and colonization rates. We will finalize this analysis in the coming year using the same data set as this interim report. We will also perform a power 175

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analysis to determine the best sampling scheme to support this type of analysis. We believe that employing occupancy modeling will provide clarity for selecting management triggers and a higher quality information to inform management actions. Our analysis thus far has focused on the three most comprehensive years of fish sampling (2006-2008) with only one sampling gear (electrofishing). However, longer term fish data do exist as part of the Lakewatch sampling back to 1997, and in the coming year we will integrate those data into our analyses. Inclusion of more years will increase the contrast in the data set due to flood and drought periods, which will improve our understanding of the value of the long term monitoring data set. The results thus far pertain to electrofishing sampling only, and in the coming year we will explore analyses to assess the relative richness and diversity measures obtained with electrofishing versus other sampling gears (trawls, block nets). 176

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References Allen, A. P., Whittier, T. R., Kautman, P. R., Larsen, D. P., OConnor, R. J., Hughes, R. M., Stemberger, R. S., Dixit, S. S., Brinkhurst, R. O., Herlihy, A. T., and Paulsen, S. G. 1998. Concordance of taxonomic richness patterns across multiple assemblages in lakes of the northeastern United States. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. 56: 739-747. Bachmann, R.W., Jones, B.L., Fox, D.D., Hoyer, M., Bull, L.A.,and Canfield, D.E., Jr. 1996. Relations between trophic state indicators and fish in Florida (U.S.A.) lakes. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. 53: 842. Bonvechio, K. 2008. Standardized sampling manual for lentic systems. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Fish and Wildlife Research Institute. Freshwater Fisheries Research Section. Version 5. Field, S. A., OConnor, P. J., Tyre, A. J., and Possingham, H. P. 2007. Making monitoring meaningful. Austral Ecology. 32: 485-491. Legg, C. J. and Nagy, L. 2006. Why most conservation monitoring is, but need not be, a waste of time. Journal of Environmental Management. 78: 194-199. Matuszek, J.E. and Beggs, G. L. 1988. Fish species richness in relation to lake area, pH, and other abiotic factors in Ontario lakes. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. 45: 1931-1941. 177

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Schwarz, G. E. 1978. Estimating the dimension of a model. Annals of Statistics. 6: 461464.Yoccoz, N. G., Nichols, J. D., and Boulinier, T. 2001. Monitoring of biological diversity in space and time. TRENDS in Ecology and Evolution. 16: 446-453. 178

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Table 1. Number of transects required to detect a 40% decrease in the Simpson index of species diversity with 90% probability. Number of TransectsLake200620072008maxApopka1491114Butler129612Conway2122323Crescent12211221DeadLake8111212Deerpoin1192020E614714Eloise3868Garcia13211121Grasshop224822Griffin7588Harris1081010Istokpog681111Ivanhoe10141214Jesup7101414June911411Kissimme1481515Lochloos1051010Minneola7677Monroe11151315Newnans2012720Orange14341434Panasoff571010Poinsett9192222Rodman178817Sampson118811SantaFe891111Sellers4588Spring381212Starke6656StickMar810710Talquin1310513Tarpon714714Toho7131414TohoEast716716Wauberg119611Weir5939Wildcat3151315Wilson5111212WIW1711517 179

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Figures EvennessShannonSimpson 0.00.20.40.60.81.0Coefficient of Variation Figure 1. Sampling variability for each lake and each year, plotted for each diversity index. The y-axis is the coefficient of variation of the mean diversity index averaged across transects for each lake and each year. The error bars represent 2.5 and 97.5 percentiles; the bottom and top of the box represents the 25 and 75 percentiles, respectively; and the center line represents the median value. 180

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EvennessShannonSimpson 0.00.20.40.60.81.0Coefficient of Variation Figure 2. Process variability for each lake, plotted for each diversity index. The y-axis is the coefficient of variation for each diversity index (x axis) across years. The error bars represent 2.5 and 97.5 percentiles; the bottom and top of the box represents the 25 and 75 percentiles, respectively; and the center line represents the median value. 181

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200620072008 020406080100120Number of Transects 20% 200620072008 020406080100120 40% Figure 3. Distribution of required number of transects to detect a 20% and 40% decrease in Simpson diversity. The error bars represent 2.5 and 97.5 percentiles; the bottom and top of the box represents the 25 and 75 percentiles, respectively; and the center line represents the median value. 182

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3.54.04.55.05.5 YearSimpson Diversity 200620072008 Figure 4. Mean Simpson diversity index averaged across lakes for each year. The error bars represent 95% confidence intervals of the mean. 183

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0.10.20.30.40.5 0.20.40.60.81.0 Percent DecreaseStatistical Power 200620072008 Figure 5. Power to detect variable change in the regional average Simpson diversity. The x-axis is the hypothesized percent increase in the index. The y-axis represents the probability of detection the change. 184

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Appendix F: Electrofishing Catchability Evaluation Matt Hansleben and Mike Allen School of Forest Resources and Conservation The University of Florida mhansleben@ufl.edu, msal@ufl.edu 185

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Introduction Electrofishing catch per unit effort (CPUE) is widely used by fisheries managers to index abundance of fish communities. Many studies have shown that factors such as gear configuration can affect electrofishing catchability (q = the fraction of a fish stock collected per unit effort), but few studies have evaluated how lake conditions (water clarity, depth, and vegetation coverage) affect catchability. Catchability will also be influenced by factors such as fish size, fish species, and season. The objectives of this study are to: 1) evaluate how catchability varies for different species, different length groups and across seasons in lakes and ponds with different vegetation communities and other environmental variables, and 2) evaluate how catchability varies for different species and different length groups within a season in lakes and ponds for a constant set of conditions. Methods We will use a series of hatchery pond and lake studies for this project. Capture-recapture methodologies will be used to establish marked populations, and those populations will be sampled with electrofishing to estimate catchability. Five lakes and six hatchery ponds are currently being used to investigate these questions. The five lakes sampled include a range of water clarity and aquatic plant coverages. Two of the lakes, Devils Hole and Speckled Perch, are relatively clear and have a small ring of mixed vegetation around the perimeter of the lake. Another lake, Johnsons Pond, has low water clarity with a thick band of dense spatterdock Nuphar luteum around the perimeter. Two other lakes, Keys and Big Fish, have clear water and little to no vegetation around their perimeters. 186

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Each lake was electrofished four times between October and December 2009 to establish marked populations of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, bluegill Lepomis macrochirus, and lake chubsucker Erimyzon succetta. Each recapture event included electrofishing around the entire shoreline of the lake using standard FWC protocal for boat settings, driving pattern, and dippers. Recapture events were conducted in Devils Hole and Speckled Perch on December 12 and 16 2009. Recapture events in the fall were not conducted at Big Fish, Keys, and Johnsons Pond because of insufficient marked populations. After the fall recapture events two to four electrofishing marking events took place in each lake before two more recapture events took place in all the lakes between March 3 and 10, 2010. Further marking events will take place before two more recapture events in late June 2010. The six hatchery ponds sampled are all 0.4-ha and had different plant coverages. Each pond was electrofished on September 17, 21, 24 in 2009. Each pond was then drained to obtain true populations of largemouth bass and bluegill. From this sampling we will evaluate how catchability varies for largemouth bass and bluegill with different plant coverages and how catchability varies over time. Lake Results A total of 1,913 largemouth bass, bluegill and lake chubsucker have been captured in Devils Hole Lake during six electofishing marking events, four angling marking events and four electrofishing recapture events. Two recapture events took on December 12 and 16, 2009. Two other recapture events took place March 1 and 8, 2010. The total number of marked and recaptured fish for each species are shown in Table 1. We were able to recapture an average of 3%, 0.7% and 4% of the marked largemouth 187

PAGE 194

bass, bluegill, and lake chubsucker, respectively, on each recapture event. Total length of captured largemouth bass, bluegill and lake chubsucker ranged from 101-488mm, 50-243mm, and 132-400mm, respectively (Figures 1-3). Other species captured include black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus, brook silverside Labidesthes sicculus, brown bullhead Ameiurus nubulosus, bowfin Amia calva, chain pickerel Esox niger, Florida gar Lepisosteus platyrhincus, golden shiner Notemigonus crysoleucas, lined topminnow Fundulus lineolatus, mosquitofish Gambusia affinis, redear sunfish L. mircolophus and warmouth L. gulosus. A total of 1,313 largemouth bass, bluegill and lake chubsucker have been captured in Speckled Perch Lake during seven electrofishing marking events, four angling marking events and four electrofishing recapture events. Two recapture events took on December 12 and 16, 2009. Two other recapture events took place on March 1 and 8, 2010. Marked and recaptured fish of each species is shown in Table 1, and the recaptures averaged 5%, 0.5% and 5% of the largemouth bass, bluegill, and lake chubsucker, respectively on each recapture event. Total length of captured largemouth bass, bluegill and lake chubsucker range from 101-602mm, 50-327mm, and 109-405mm, respectively (Figures 1-3). Other species captured include black crappie, bowfin, brook silverside, Florida gar, golden shiner, redear sunfish and warmouth. Marked and recaptured fish at Lakes Big Fish and Keys are shown in Table 1. The number of marked largemouth bass was higher in Big Fish than Keys Lake. Both lakes were composed of primarily small largemouth bass (Figure 1). Two recapture events were conducted on March 3 and 10, 2010, with an average of 3%, 0.7% and 6% of the marked largemouth bass, bluegill, and lake chubsucker, respectively, captured on each event. 188

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A total of 673 largemouth bass, bluegill and lake chubsucker have been captured in Johnsons Pond during eight electrofishing marking events and two electofishing recapture events. The two recapture events took place on March 3 and 10, 2010 with an average of 6%, 0.2% and 3% of the marked largemouth bass, bluegill, and lake chubsucker, respectively captured on each event. Marked and recaptured fish are shown in Table 1. Total length of captured largemouth bass, bluegill and lake chubsucker ranged from 122-662mm, 54-261mm and 310-414mm, respectively (Figures 1-3). Other species captured include black crappie, bowfin, golden shiner, redear sunfish, shad Dorosoma spp., and warmouth. Marking events will continue through May and June targeting larger bluegill. Two recapture events will follow in the beginning of June to complete the first year of sampling. Each lake will have six recapture events, two in late fall, two in early spring and two in the summer next year to complete the lake portion of the study. In the coming year, catchability estimates will be made for each lake, season, and species. Pond Results The hatchery ponds were sampled on September 17, 21, 24 in 2009 and drained on October 15-28, 2009. The number of fish captured in each pond is shown in Table 2. Here we present catchability results for largemouth bass. Largemouth bass catchablity (fraction of pond population captured per minute of electrofishing) values ranged widely in some ponds between sampling events (i.e., ponds 5, 8) and were relatively stable in others (ponds 1, 4, Figure 4). Catchability (proportion of fish caught per minute) ranged from 0.006 to 0.024 across sampling events at Pond 5, suggesting an order of magnitude difference in q between sampling events only days 189

PAGE 196

apart. Thus, the hatchery pond results thus far indicated that q can vary substantially even when season, habitat, and water temperature are nearly constant. Summary and Future Work The sampling approach in the lakes will allow for catchability to be compared between seasons, species and lake types. However, comparing catchability for different length groups has proven to be a challenge. Not enough fish are being captured and marked to produce enough recaptures in a wide range of size groups, despite the large amount of sampling effort. Further sampling in early summer of 2010 will provide insight as to whether this sampling approach will be able to evaluate catchability for various size groups and if changes need to be made for the second year of sampling. The sampling approach in the ponds will allow us to evaluate how catchability varies for different species across ponds with different plant communities. The sampling approach will also allow us to compare how catchability varies over a short time period (e.g., the hatchery pond results thus far). Evaluating catchablity over a short time period is important to managers because if catchability is highly variable when season and habitat conditions remain unchanged, then CPUE will not be able to effectively index fish abundance. More work in the coming year will improve our knowledge of these relationships. 190

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Table 1. Number of marked and recaptured fish by angling and electrofishing in Devils Hole, Speckled Perch, Big Fish, Keys, and Johnsons Pond. The abbreviations are LMB = largemouth bass, BLUE = bluegill, and LACH = lake chubsucker. 000003 LakeEvent TypeLMB 100-249 mmLMB 250+ mmBLUELACHmarked by electrofishing239132599633marked by angling2290recapture by electrofishing442831176marked by electrofishing270165579281marked by angling0180recapture by electrofishing72752892marked by electrofishing249483460marked by angling0160recapture by electrofishing5014280marked by electrofishing6128483215marked by angling0231recapture by electrofishing1281699marked by electrofishing8731824523marked by angling000recapture by electrofishing6623KeysJohnson's PondDevils HoleSpeckled PerchBig Fish 191

PAGE 198

192 Table 2. Number of largemouth bass >100mm captured in hatche ry ponds during three electrofishing events on September 17, 21, 24, 2009. PondEventCatchNumber available to be caught 14138 22138 32138 1374 2473 3173 18126 29124 37121 113142 222140 36136 1258 2357 3457 19102 2299 3799 7 8 1 2 4 5

PAGE 199

193 Devils Hole Count 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Marked Fish Recaptured Fish Speckled Perch Marked Fish Recaptured Fish Johnson's Pond TL (mm) 1 00 15 0 200 2 50 30 0 350 4 00 45 0 500 5 50 600 650 Count 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Marked Fish Recaptured Fish Big Fish TL (mm) 1 00 15 0 200 2 50 30 0 350 400 4 50 500 550 6 00 65 0 Count 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Marked Fish Recaptured Fish Keys TL (mm) 100 1 50 200 2 5 0 3 00 350 4 00 4 50 5 0 0 5 50 600 6 50 Marked Fish Recaptured Fish Figure 1. Count of marked and recaptured largem outh bass in Devils Hole, Speckled Perch, Big Fish, Keys and Johnson’s Pond.

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194 Speckled Perch Marked Fish Recaptured Fish Devils Hole Count 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Marked Fish Recapture Fish Keys TL (mm) 25 5 0 7 5 100 125 15 0 1 7 5 2 0 0 225 250 275 30 0 3 2 5 3 5 0 Marked Fish Recaptured Fish Big Fish TL (mm) 25 50 7 5 1 0 0 1 25 150 1 7 5 200 225 2 5 0 275 3 0 0 3 25 350 Count 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Marked Fish Recaptured Fish Johnson's Pond TL (mm) 2 5 50 75 100 1 2 5 1 50 175 2 00 225 2 5 0 275 3 0 0 3 25 350 Count 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Marked Fish Recaptured Fish Figure 2. Count of marked and recaptured bl uegill in Devils Hole, Speckled Perch, Big Fish, Keys, and Johnson’s Pond.

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195 Devils Hole Count 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 Marked Fish Recaptured Fish Speckled Perch Marked Fish Recaptured Fish Keys TL (mm) 80 100 1 20 140 160 180 2 00 22 0 240 260 280 30 0 320 340 360 3 80 400 420 Count 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 Marked Fish Recaptured Fish Johnson's Pond TL (mm) 8 0 100 120 1 40 1 6 0 1 8 0 200 2 20 2 40 2 6 0 2 8 0 300 3 20 3 4 0 3 6 0 380 400 4 20 Marked Fish Recaptured Fish Figure 3. Count of marked and recaptured lake chubsucker in Devils Hole, Speckled Perch, Keys, and Johnson’s Pond. No lake chubsucker were caught in Big Fish Lake.

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196 Pond Catchability for LMB >100mm Pond 124578 Catchability per minute 0.000 0.005 0.010 0.015 0.020 0.025 Event 1 Event 2 Event 3 Figure 4. Pond catchability for largemout h bass >100mm for September 17, 2009 (event 1), September 21, 2009 (event 2) and September 24, 2009 (event 3).


Long-term fish, plants, and water quality monitoring program.
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Full Text



UWF UNIVERSITY of

UF FLORIDA
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
School of Forest Resources and Conservation

Long-Term Fish, Plants, and Water Quality Monitoring Program:
2009

. .


Florida LAKEWATCH and the Program for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences in
Cooperation with Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission









Acknowledgments


This program is funded by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
(FFWCC). We thank all FFWCC, Florida LAKEWATCH and Program for Fisheries and
Aquatic Sciences personnel who assisted in the collection of data for this program.










Table of Contents
PAGE
A ck n o w le d g m en ts .................................................................................................................


T ab le o f C o n ten ts ............................................................................... ii


In tro du ctio n .......................................................... ......... 1


Methods
Florida LAKEWA TCH Fish Sampling Procedures................................... ................ 2
Florida LAKEWA TCH Aquatic Plant Sampling Procedures....................................... 4
Florida LAKEWA TCH Water Sampling Field and Laboratory Procedures ............. 5

Deliverables
Contract Deliverable 1: 2009 Electrofishing data................................................. 6
Contract Deliverable 2. 2009 Aquatic Plant Sampling data....... .......................... 6
Contract Deliverable 3: 2009 Water Quality Sampling data .............. ......... 7


Table 1. List of Florida LAKEWATCH and FFWCC long-term fish monitoring lakes...... 8
Table 2. Latitude and Longitudes for all electrofishing transects in long term monitoring
project lakes sampled by Florida LAKEWATCH in 2009............ ........................... 10


Literature Cited ... ...................................................... ..... .......... 15


Appendix A Electrofishing data for all lakes sampled by Florida LAKEWATCH
during 2009 ... .............................................................. ............ 17
County Lake
A lachua .... ....... .... ...... ............. W auberg ................... .............. ........ 18
H highlands ................... .. .... .. ......... .... JoJosephine.. ........ ........... .... ..... 19
H highlands ................................. .......... June .......................................... 20
H illsborough ............ ..... ..................W ilson ....................................... ....... 21
L ake ............... ............ ..................... G rasshopper ................. .......... ....... 22
Lake .................. .................... Sellers............................................ ......... 23
L ake ..... . .......... ................... W ildcat .................................................. 24
M arion ........... ... .... .... ........ ...............M ill D am .................... ............ ....... 25
M arion .............. ....... ..........................W eir ................................ . ...... 26
M iam i-D ade ......................................... E ........................ ... ........... ........ 27









Orange ............................................. Butler .............. .......... ........ 28
O range ........ ........................ ............ C onw ay ................... .... ........ . . .... 29
O range ................................................ Ivanhoe .............. .......... ............ 30
Orange ................................................ John's ........... .. ......... ........ 31
O range ................................................ Starke ............. .......... ........ 32
O sceola .............................. ..... .......... Tohopekaliga East....... ......................... 33
Polk .................. ..................... Dexter......... ........... ......... 34
W alton ................................................ Juniper............. ....... ........ 35
W alton ................................................ Spring ............. . ......... ........ 36


Appendix B Long-term monitoring project plant survey results for lakes sampled
during 2009 ............................................................. 37
County Lake
A lachua ................................................ Lochloosa ............. ........ .......... 38
Alachua ................................................Newnan ..... .... ......... ......... 39
Alachua ........................ ....... Orange .......... .... .................... 40
Alachua................. .... ........... Santa Fe............... ............ ........ 42
B ay ...................................................... D eer Point ......... .............. ......... 44
Brevard ......... ........ .......... ......... Poinsett .................... ........ 45
C ollier .................................... T afford ...................... ... 46
Gadsden ......................... ............. Talquin ............... ........ ........ 47
Gulf ........ ....... ........... ............... D ead Lakes........... ........ ........... 48
Highlands ................... ........ Istokpoga ............... ......... ............. 49
H highlands ............................................. Josephine....................................... ......... 51
Hillsborough ................. ........ .... W ilson .......................... 55
Indian R iver................................... Farm 13 .................................. ...... 56
Indian River ............. ............. Stick M arsh ....................... 57
Lake ...................................................... Grasshopper .......... ..... ......... 58
L ake ...................................................... Sellers........... ........ ........ 59
Leon ..................................................... Jackson ........... ....... ........ 60
O range ................................................ B utler ......................... .............. 61
Orange ................................................ Conw ay ............. ......... ........ 63
O range ................................................ Ivanhoe .............. .......... ............ 65
Orange ................................................ John' s ........... .. ......... ........ 68
O range ................................................ Starke ............. .......... ........ 70
O sceola ..................... ........ A lligator .................... .... 72
Osceola ................................................ Kissimmee ........... ....... ........ 74
O sceola ... ............................... ...............Tohopekaliga ..... .............. ......... 76









Polk .................................... ......... ..... D exter........................ ......... 78
Polk........ ....... .... ................ W eohyakapka........................ ........... 79
Sem inole ..................................... Jesup ............................................... ......... 81
Sum ter .... ...... ...... ........ ... ............ .P anasoffk ee .................................... ......... 82


Appendix C Water chemistry data for all lakes sampled in 2009 as part of the long term
m monitoring program ..................... .... ................................................ .. ......... .. ....... 84
County Lake
A lachua ................................................ L ochloosa ..................... ............ . ..... 85
A lachua ............ ... .... ........ ..........N ew nan ............................. .. ............ 86
Alachua .................................. Orange .......... ......................... 87
Alachua................ .... ........... Santa Fe........ ....... ............ ........ 88
A lachua .... . .................... .............. W auberg ..................... .............. ........ 89
B ay ................ .......... ................... D eer Point ............. .............. ......... 90
B radford ............ ..... ......... ......... Sam pson ..... ............ ........ ...... .. ...... 91
B rev ard ................................................ P oin sett .......................... ..... .. ....... 92
B row ard ............................................... Conservation A rea 3 ................... ......... 93
C ollier ................................................ Trafford ....................... ........... 94
G adsden ................................................ Talquin ....................... ........ 95
Gulf ........ ....... ........... ............... Dead Lakes........... ........ ........ 96
H highlands ............................................ Istokpoga.................... ............ ........ 97
H highlands ........... ... ... .............. .. Josephine...................... ........... .......... 99
Highlands ............................................. June .................. ..... ......... 102
H illsborough ......... ................ ... .... W ilson ................ .... .......... ....... 103
Indian R iver.................................... Farm 13 ............................................ .. 104
Indian R iver ................. .... ..............Stick M arsh ............................... 105
Lake ................. ................................ Cherry ......... .............. ........... 106
Lake ........ ....... ......................... D orr ............. ....... ........ 107
L ake .............................. ................. G rasshopper .......................... ........... .. 108
L ake ..................... ............................. G griffin ....... .. .. .................. .......... .. 109
L ake ............................ .. ............. ... H arris.......... ............... . ....... 110
Lake .............................. ................ M inneola .......... .... .......... 114
Lake ............................................. Sellers........... .... ........... 115
L ake .............................. ................... W wildcat ......................................... . ........ 116
Leon ........................... ................... Jackson .......... ..... ........... 117
M arion ............................................... M ill D am ..................... .. 118
M arion .............. ........ ........................W eir ................................. .. ...... 1 19
M iam i-D ade ........................................ E ......................... ... .......... ........ 120









Orange .............................. .............. Apopka ............. ........ ......... 121
O range ............................. ... ........... Butler .............. .......... ........ 122
O range ................ ................. ............ C onw ay ................. .... ........ ......... ... 123
Orange .............................. .............. Ivanhoe .............. ........ ......... 125
O range .............................. .............. John's ....................... ............. 128
Orange .............................. .............. Starke ........................ ......... 129
O sceola ..................... ........ A lligator ...................... .... 130
Osceola ............................................... Kissim m ee ............. .... ........ 131
Osceola ................................ ............... Tohopekaliga East........... ........... 132
Osceola .......................... .................... Tohopekaliga ... ............ ........... 133
Polk .......... .... ..... ............... Dexter................... ........ 136
Polk ..................................................... Eloise............ ....... ........ 137
Polk ......... ...... ................................... W eohyakapka.......................... 138
Putnam ................................................ Crescent .............. ........ ........ 139
Putnam ................................................ George ............. . ........ ........ 141
Putnam ..................................................Rodm an ................. ........... 142
Sem inole .................. .... ........... Jesup ............................................ ........... 151
Seminole ........... ..................... Monroe......... .... .............. 153
Sumter ................... .......... Panasoffkee ..................... 156
W alton ................................................ Juniper............. ...... ........ 157
W alton ................................................ Spring ........................ ......... 159



Appendix D: Florida LAKEWATCH procedures for measuring aquatic vegetation
Percent Area Covered and Percent Volume Infested.................................. 160


Appendix E: Fish Community Analysis (D. Gwinn and M. Allen)......................... .. 166


Appendix F: Electrofishing Catchability Evaluation (M. Hanslaben and M. Allen)....... 185









Florida LAKEWATCH Long-term Fish Monitoring Program


Introduction

Florida LAKEWATCH is a volunteer citizen's lake monitoring program. Citizens from
throughout Florida are trained by staff from the University of Florida's School of Forest
Resource and Conservation's Program for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences to conduct
long-term scientific lake monitoring programs. Special attention is given to the
monitoring of water quality and the distribution of scientifically sound lake management
information. Florida LAKEWATCH also provides citizens with educational material
regarding their lakes and provides a vehicle by which concerned citizens can work with
professionals in government to foster a better understanding of Florida lakes.


The Florida LAKEWATCH program is extremely successful and to date, over 1000 lakes
from 50 Florida Counties have been part of the LAKEWATCH program. Currently
Florida LAKEWATCH is maintaining approximately 800 active lakes and rivers in the
program with over 600 active citizen volunteers. One major concern of the citizens
involved with LAKEWATCH is the health of the fish populations in their lakes. To help
get more information on fish and long-term trends in fish populations Florida
LAKEWATCH began cooperating with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FFWCC) in the collection of fish data on 32 water bodies. These lakes have
all been in Florida LAKEWATCH for the duration of sampling, yielding good
background information on water chemistry and aquatic plants in these lakes. In 2007
FFWCC and Florida LAKEWATCH expanded this cooperative sampling to cover 52
lakes statewide. The list of lakes now in the monitoring program, along with each
group's responsibilities for sampling are listed in Table 1.


The fish populations in 32 lakes were sampled with electrofishing in the springs of 1999
through 2007, although some lakes were missed due to low water in the spring of 2000
and 2001. In the fall of 2007 Florida LAKEWATCH shifted community sampling from
spring to fall to coincide with the FFWCC sampling schedule. This shift allowed better









pooling and comparison of electrofishing data in the future.


Lakes selected for the long-term fish sampling program cover most of Florida (Table 1),
thereby spreading the work load to different regional personnel of both Florida
LAKEWATCH and FFWCC. The lakes were also selected to cover a wide range of lake
trophic states and aquatic macrophyte abundances, as these are major factors impacting
fish populations in lakes. The goal of this project is three fold: 1) to examine the long-
term variation in fish communities from a range of lakes in relation to: water chemistry,
lake trophic status, aquatic macrophyte abundances, and lake morphology, 2) educate
citizens in the functioning of Florida fish populations and 3) facilitate the interaction and
cooperation among Florida citizens, the Program for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, the
University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, and the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Commission.





Methods


Florida LAKEWA TCH Fish Sampling Procedures:


Electrofishing samples were collected in the fall (September-December) of 2009. One
hundred and ninety electrofishing samples were taken on 19 of the lakes listed in Table 1.
Six transects (10 minutes each) were collected at fixed stations spaced uniformly around
each lake. On four of the lakes (June, Tohopekaliga East, Weir, and John's) twenty five
randomly selected 10 minute transects were conducted as requested by FFWCC. The
latitude and longitude of these transects were marked with Global Positioning System
units (GPS) (Table 2) to insure constant sampling locations. Electrofishing was
conducted with one dipper, along the shore with the pedal down constantly for 10
minutes.


All fish were collected and placed in an aerated tank. At the end of each transect all fish
were separated by species, measured to total length (TL mm) and released. Other data









collected from each transect included time of day, approximate depth and percent
composition of each prominent macrophyte species along the transect (estimated
visually).


Only fish length was measured on all of the fish collected during this study. This was
done to minimize the amount of time needed to work up fish and expedite live releases.
However, to examine weights in relation to other Florida lakes, weights were calculated
using length/weight regressions from unpublished data (Bill Schaeffer, Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission).


Nine fish community measures were calculated for each sampling event (Catch per unit
effort for numbers and weights, percent composition of total numbers and weight, species
richness, diversity (three different measures), and evenness). Species richness was
defined as the number of individual species caught per lake per sampling event. Three
different forms of the Simpson's Diversity Index were calculated. The Simpson's Index
(D) is the probability of picking two organisms at random that are the same species and is
calculated as follows:

D= p2 (1)

where D = Simpson's index
p, = Proportion of species i in the community


The Simpson's Index of Diversity (1-D) is the probability of picking two organisms at
random that are different species. Simpson's index of diversity is calculated as follows:
1-D = 1- (p,)2 (2)

where (1-D) = Simpson's index of diversity
p, = Proportion of individuals of species i in the community



Lastly, the Simpson's Reciprocal Index (-) is the number of equally common species
D
required the generate the observed heterogeneity of the sample and is calculated as
follows:









1 1
D (3)

1
where =Simpson's reciprocal index
D
p, = Proportion of species i in the community


These methods give more weight to commonly sampled, and often more desired, species
(Krebs 1999). Each of these equations are widely accepted and commonly used, and
were therefore all included. Species evenness is a measure of the relative abundance of
the different species making up the richness of a sample and was given by:

ElID D (4)
s
where E D = Simpson's measure of evenness

D = Simpson's index (equation 1)
s = Number of species in sample


This evenness calculation gives values that range from 0 to 1 with greater evenness
having values closer to 1 (Krebs 1999).


Florida LAKEWATCH Aquatic Plant Sampling Procedures:


Aquatic macrophyte surveys were conducted on 29 of the lakes listed in Table 1 during
the summer (May September) of 2009. The above-ground standing crop of emergent,
floating-leaved, and submerged vegetation was measured along uniformly placed
transects (5 to 30, depending on the size of the water body) around the water body. At
each transect divers cut the above-ground portions of aquatic macrophytes that were
inside a 0.25m2 plastic square randomly thrown once in each plant zone. The vegetation
was placed in nylon mesh bags, spun to remove excess water, and weighed to the nearest
0.1 kg. Average standing crop (kg wet weight/m2) for each vegetation zone was
calculated by averaging samples from each transect. The combined width (m) of the
floating-leaved and emergent zones was estimated using a laser range measure at each
transect and then averaged for each water body. All plant species seen while sampling









were listed according to the frequency that they occurred in evenly spaced transects
around the water body.


The percent volume infested with aquatic macrophytes (PVI) and the percent area
covered with aquatic macrophytes (PAC) were determined according to modified
methods ofMaceina and Shireman (1980). The methods were modified because of
advancing technologies. PAC and PVI in deeper, open water portions of the lakes were
measured using sonar bottom transect images recorded with a Lowrance LCX 28c HD
sonar and GPS system. Random samples from all data points on each water body were
taken and measured for lake depth and plant height, if plants were present. Appendix D
shows the current Florida LAKEWATCH working method for measuring PAC and PVI.
This method is unpublished and modified from the methodology developed by Jim
Griffin of the University of South Florida (personal communication, unpublished data).


Florida LAKEWATCH Water Sampling Field and Laboratory Procedures:


On sampling dates throughout the year, citizen volunteers, UF staff, or FFWCC staff
collected surface water samples from one to six mid-water locations (depending upon
water body size) from lakes in Table 1. Water samples for nutrients (total phosphorus and
total nitrogen) were collected at each sampling station in 250-ml, acid-cleaned, triple-
rinsed Nalgene bottles provided by the Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences.
Water clarity at each sampling location was measured with a Secchi disc and additional
surface water samples were collected at each location in 4-L, tap-water rinsed, plastic
jugs. To estimate the concentration of plankton algae at each sampling station, a
measured volume of water from the 4-L jugs was collected and filtered through a Gelman
Type A-E glass fiber filter. Filters were then stored over silica gel desiccant and frozen.


Water samples and the glass fiber filters were stored frozen at the homes of the citizen
volunteers, at one of thirty-four collection centers located across the state, or at FFWCC
facilities for one to four months. All frozen samples along with Secchi disc information
was delivered to the Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Science's water quality









laboratory where the water samples and filters were analyzed for total phosphorus, total
nitrogen and chlorophyll concentrations.


At the laboratory, total phosphorus concentrations (pg/L) were determined using the
procedures of Murphy and Riley (1962) with a persulfate digestion (Menzel and Corwin
1965). Total nitrogen concentrations (.g/L) were determined by oxidizing water samples
with persulfate and determining nitrate-nitrogen with second derivative spectroscopy
(D'Elia et al. 1977; Simal et al. 1985; Wollin 1987). A total nitrogen equivalency study
of nitrogen in surface waters demonstrated that this method is a suitable substitute for the
standard USEPA method involving the sum of nitrate-nitrogen and Kj eldahl-nitrogen as
measured with an automated analyzer (Sylvia S. Labie, Administrator Florida
Department of Environmental Regulation Quality Assurance Section, 1991). Chlorophyll
concentrations ([g/L) were determined spectrophotometrically (Method 10200 H; APHA
1989) following pigment extraction with ethanol (Sartory and Grobbelaar 1984).




Deliverables


Contract Deliverable 1: 2009 Electrofishing data (pages 17-36):


One hundred and ninety electrofishing events were conducted on 19 lakes in 10 counties
by Florida LAKEWATCH personnel during the fall of 2009. GPS coordinates for all
transects sampled are provided in Table 2. Results for each lake sampled are shown in
Appendix A. Catch per unit effort (CPUE) data is provided for both numbers
(number/hour) and weights (grams/hour) of fish caught as well as percent composition of
total numbers and weight by species. Species richness, diversity (three indices), and
evenness measures are shown for each sampling event. A CD with the raw data is
attached to the end of this report.


Contract Deliverable 2: 2009 Aquatic Plant Sampling data (pages 37-83):









Aquatic plant communities were sampled from 29 lakes in 15 counties by Florida
LAKEWATCH personnel during the summer of 2009. Results for each lake sampled are
shown in Appendix B. Percent area covered (PAC), percent volume infested (PVI),
biomass (emergent, floating, and submerged plants), littoral zone width, and average
depth are presented for each lake as well as the common and scientific name and
frequency of occurrence of each aquatic plant species present. A CD with the raw data is
attached to the end of this report.


Contract Deliverable 3: 2009 Water Quality Sampling data (pages 84-159):


Water chemistry from 50 lakes in 22 counties was sampled by volunteers, Florida
LAKEWATCH, various water management district personnel, and FFWCC personnel
throughout 2009. Results for each lake sampled are shown in Appendix C. Physical
characteristics and sampling history of each lake are provided. Long-term average and
2009 values for total phosphorus (TP, [tg/L), total nitrogen (TN, tg/L), chlorophyll
(CHL, tg/L), and secchi depth for each sampling occasion are listed. A CD with the raw
data is attached to the end of this report.









Table 1. List of sampling responsibilities for Florida LAKEWATCH (LW) and Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FFWCC) long-term fish monitoring lakes.
Water samples being taken by the local Water Management District offices (District) are


noted.
County


Lake


h siF Sampler


Water Sam
r elp


Alachua Lochloosa FFWCC LW LW
Alachua Newnan FFWCC LW LW
Alachua Orange FFWCC LW LW
Alachua Santa Fe FFWCC LW LW
Alachua Wauberg LW LW LW
Bay Deerpoint FFWCC LW LW
Bradford Sampson FFWCC LW LW
Brevard Poinsett FFWCC LW LW
Broward Cons. Area 3 FFWCC LW LW
Collier Trafford FFWCC LW LW
Gadsden Talquin FFWCC LW LW
Gulf Dead Lakes FFWCC LW LW
Highlands Istokpoga FFWCC LW LW
Highlands Josephine FFWCC LW LW
Highlands June LW LW LW
Hillsborough Wilson LW LW LW
Indian River Stick Marsh FFWCC LW LW
Lake Apopka FFWCC District LW
Lake Cherry FFWCC LW LW
Lake Dorr FFWCC LW LW
Lake Grasshopper LW LW LW
Lake Griffin FFWCC LW LW
Lake Harris FFWCC LW LW
Lake Minneola FFWCC LW LW
Lake Sellers LW LW LW
Lake Wildcat LW LW LW
Leon Jackson FFWCC LW LW
Marion Mill Dam FFWCC LW LW
Marion Weir LW LW LW
Miami-Dade E LW LW LW
Orange Butler LW LW LW
Orange Conway LW LW LW
Orange Ivanhoe LW LW LW
Orange Johns FFWCC LW LW
Orange Starke LW LW LW
Osceola Alligator FFWCC LW LW
Osceola Kissimmee FFWCC LW LW
Osceola Tohopekaliga FFWCC LW LW
Osceola Toho East LW LW LW


alP nt Sampler









Table 1: Continued.
Palm Beach Okeechobee FFWCC District LW
Pinellas Tarpon FFWCC LW LW
Polk Dexter LW LW LW
Polk Eloise FFWCC LW LW
Polk Weohyakapka FFWCC LW LW
Putnam Crescent FFWCC LW LW
Putnam George FFWCC District LW
Putnam Rodman FFWCC LW LW
Seminole Jesup FFWCC LW LW
Seminole Monroe FFWCC LW LW
Sumter Panasoffkee FFWCC LW LW
Walton Juniper LW LW LW
Walton Spring LW LW LW










Table 2: Latitude and Longitudes for all electrofishing transects sampled in the long term
monitoring project lakes by Florida LAKEWATCH personnel during 2009. Sections
with a (.) are locations where coordinates were not taken.


Start


Lake Tran
Wauberg 1
2
3
4
5
6


Latitude
29 31.765
29 31.440
29 31.496
29 31.785
29 32.112
29 32.034


Stop


Longitude
82 17.929
82 17.978
82 18.299
82 18.422
82 18.207
82 17.971


Latitude
29 31.522
29 31.439
29 31.639
29 31.979
29 32.208
29 31.840


Longitude
82 17.862
82 18.168
82 18.372
82 18.341
82 18.050
82 17.905


Highlands Josephine 1 27 24.203 81 26.856 27 24.015 81 26.808
2 27 24.138 81 27.495 27 24.295 81 27.610
3 27 23.863 81 26.561 27 26.759 81 26.416
4 27 23.315 81 26.527 27 23.482 81 26.633
5 27 24.040 81 26.003 27 24.117 81 25.858
6 27 23.900 81 25.150 27 23.733 81 25.082
Highlands June 1 27 19.101 81 24.852 27 19.204 81 24.631
2 27 19.265 81 24.451 27 19.356 81 24.239
3 27 19.384 81 24.038 27 19.431 81 23.790
4 27 19.410 81 23.570 27 19.387 81 23.336
5 27 19.241 81 23.229 27 19.103 81 23.045
6 29 19.036 81 22.590 27 18.940 81 22.448
7 27 18.837 81 22.291 27 18.911 81 22.068
8 27 18.992 81 21.990 27 18.991 81 21.796
9 27 18.807 81 21.817 27 18.694 81 21.933
10 27 18.600 81 22.163 27 18.460 81 22.292
11 27 18.451 81 22.535 27 18.641 81 22.664
12 27 18.712 81 22.798 27 18.744 81 22.996
13 27 18.270 81 23.382 27 18.044 81 23.414
14 27 17.872 81 23.404 27 17.626 81 23.374
15 27 17.472 81 23.335 27 17.312 81 23.189
16 27 16.885 81 23.335 27 16.780 81 23.541
17 27 16.738 81 23.753 27 16.738 81 23.998
18 27 16.828 81 24.166 27 16.955 81 24.326
19 27 17.107 81 24.461 27 17.288 81 24.591
20 27 17.424 81 24.746 27 17.573 81 24.886
21 27 17.777 81 24.983 27 17.957 81 25.076
22 27 18.151 81 25.084 27 18.379 81 25.072
23 27 18.548 81 25.033 27 18.784 81 24.993
24 27 19.142 81 25.370 27 19.307 81 25.275
25 27 19.302 81 25.049 27 19.170 81 24.973


Hillsborough


8.661
8.695
8.848
8.998
9.000
8.814


82 29.073
82 29.267
82 29.306
82 29.245
82 29.141
82 29.140


8.675
8.829
8.987
9.005
8.838
8.681


82 29.244
82 29.338
82 29.274
82 29.137
82 29.135
82 29.111


County
Alachua


Wilson










Table 2: Continued.


Start


County Lake
Lake Grasshopper


Trans
1
2
3
4
5
6


Latitude
29 8.050
29 7.977
29 8.177
29 8.471
29 8.617
29 8.381


Stop


Longitude Latitude Longitude


81 37.177
81 36.953
81 36.847
81 36.585
81 36.810
81 36.794


7.967
8.076
8.303
8.576
8.500
8.260


81 37.049
81 36.867
81 36.777
81 36.639
81 36.767
81 36.859


Lake Sellers 1 29 6.637 81 37.888 29 6.540 81 38.032
2 29 6.568 81 38.280 29 6.477 81 38.453
3 29 6.470 81 38.825 29 6.555 81 38.832
4 29 6.870 81 38.575 29 6.966 81 38.553
5 29 7.026 81 38.434 29 7.113 81 38.501
6 29 7.033 81 37.785 29 6.839 81 37.770
Lake Wildcat 1 29 10.212 81 37.588 29 10.166 81 37.754
2 29 10.032 81 38.074 29 9.981 81 38.163
3 29 9.299 81 37.614 29 9.184 81 37.542
4 29 9.455 81 37.489 29 9.567 81 37.525
5 29 9.902 81 37.535 29 9.971 81 37.500
6 29 10.037 81 37.568 29 10.004 81 37.666
Marion Mill Dam 1 29 10.734 81 50.042 29 10.899 81 49.999
2 29 10.900 81 49.999 29 11.058 81 50.069
3 29 11.061 81 50.068 29 11.140 81 50.211
4 29 11.129 81 50.331 29 11.068 81 50.496
5 29 10.992 81 50.546 29 10.814 81 50.524
6 29 10.717 81 50.478 28 10.644 81 50.309


Marion


Weir


0.052
0.357
0.640
0.943
1.267
1.662
2.018
2.422
2.375
1.482
0.697
0.323
59.962
59.666
59.593
59.687
59.524
59.303
59.368
59.688
59.919
0.045


81 57.048
81 57.232
81 57.590
81 57.745
81 57.635
81 57.475
81 57.235
81 66.007
81 55.513
81 54.750
81 55.020
81 55.240
81 55.388
81 55.653
81 56.094
81 56.990
81 57.444
81 58.135
81 58.578
81 58.679
81 58.527
81 58.094


0.238
0.558
0.892
1.117
1.502

2.197
2.408
2.233
1.255
0.475
0.082
59.803
59.595
59.572
59.812
59.419
59.299
59.549
59.833
0.068
59.930


81 57.140
81 57.628
81 57.737
81 57.752
81 57.502

81 57.023
81 55.693
81 55.243
81 54.808
81 55.162
81 55.340
81 55.433
81 55.892
81 56.310
81 57.212
81 57.657
81 58.351
81 58.616
81 58.707
81 58.387
81 58.262










Table 2: Continued.


Lake Trans
Weir 23
24
25


Start
Latitude Longitude
28 59.831 81 58.129
29 0.087 81 57.854
29 0.156 81 57.904


Latitude
28 59.880

29 0.115


to
Longitude
81 57.932

81 57.658


Miami-Dade E 1 25 38.323 80 20.809 25 38.241 80 20.696
2 25 38.211 80 20.839 25 38.313 80 20.937
3 25 38.549 80 20.935 25 38.554 80 20.764
4 25 38.570 80 20.696 25 38.490 80 20.583
5 25 38.435 80 20.590 25 38.423 80 20.804
6 25 38.349 80 20.799 25 38.351 80 20.596
Orange Butler 1 28 29.951 81 32.984 28 29.959 81 33.185
2 28 29.642 81 33.931 28 29.570 81 33.821
3 28 28.930 81 33.659 28 28.759 81 33.683
4 28 28.695 81 32.712 28 28.785 81 32.561
5 28 29.145 81 32.137 28 29.177 81 32.084
6 28 29.732 81 32.602 28 29.776 81 32.740
Orange Conway 1 28 27.835 81 21.420 28 27.770 81 21.228
2 28 27.779 81 20.678 28 27.677 81 20.484
3 28 27.304 81 21.031 28 27.440 81 21.185
4 28 27.843 81 21.492 28 27.944 81 21.636
5 28 28.848 81 20.961 28 28.802 81 20.770
6 28 28.251 81 20.419 28 28.141 81 20.592
Orange Ivanhoe 1 28 33.880 81 22.422 28 33.395 81 22.479
2 28 33.628 81 22.264 28 33.758 81 22.650
3 28 33.815 81 22.736 28 33.655 81 22.771
4 28 33.645 81 22.928 28 33.769 81 22.883
5 28 33.832 81 22.836 28 33.824 81 23.027
6 28 33.968 81 23.036 28 33.997 81 22.860


John's


28 32.083
28 32.282
28 31.875
28 32.408
28 32.270
28 32.353
28 32.665
28 32.445
28 32.652
28 32.663
28 32.300
28 32.080
28 32.059
28 31.901
28 32.106
28 31.630
28 31.257
28 31.333


81 40.988
81 40.592
81 39.927
81 39.557
81 39.402
81 38.740
81 38.695
81 38.550
81 38.168
81 37.583
81 37.558
81 37.502
81 37.238
81 37.560
81 37.744
81 37.895
81 38.090
81 38.535


28 32.197
20 32.133
28 31.988
28 32.773
28 32.162
28 32.345
28 32.508
28 32.590
28 32.578
28 32.443
28 32.028
28 32.115
28 31.937
28 31.864
28 31.936
28 31.480
28 31.204
28 31.445


81 41.062
81 40.568
81 39.783
81 39.527
81 39.278
81 38.940
81 38.612
81 38.305
81 37.855
81 37.463
81 37.550
81 37.220
81 37.266
81 37.669
81 37.830
81 37.972
81 38.267
81 38.695


County
Marion


Orange










Table 2: Continued


Start
Lake Trans Latitude Longitude


John's


28 31.867
28 31.437
28 31.352
28 31.624
28 31.382
28 31.219
28 31.452


39.095
39.158
39.567
39.656
40.116
40.400
40.708


Stop
County
28 31.683 8
28 31.351 8
28 31.325 8
28 31.712 8
28 31.264 8
28 31.078 8
28 31.595 8


Orange Starke 1 28 34.332 81 32.513 28 34.431 81 32.441
2 28 34.549 81 32.335 28 34.556 81 32.135
3 28 34.234 81 31.916 28 34.158 81 31.814
4 28 34.073 81 32.325 28 34.197 81 32.451
5 28 33.901 81 32.319 28 33.821 81 32.261
6 29 34.062 81 32.081 28 33.980 81 32.254
Osceola Toho East 1 28 15.955 81 18.018 28 16.023 81 18.250
2 28 16.445 81 18.515 28 16.650 81 18.607
3 28 16.927 81 18.772 28 17.208 81 18.902
4 28 17.542 81 18.965 28 17.670 81 19.118
5 28 17.962 81 18.983 28 18.192 81 19.002
6 28 18.287 81 19.022 28 18.457 81 18.950
7 28 18.663 81 18.825 28 18.710 81 18.733
8 28 18.867 81 18.368 28 19.200 81 18.252
9 28 19.233 81 18.075 28 19.332 81 17.632
10 28 19.320 81 17.562 28 19.402 81 17.107
11 28 19.412 81 16.783 28 19.407 81 16.348
12 28 19.370 81 15.953 28 19.208 81 15.692
13 28 19.361 81 15.380 28 19.520 81 15.230
14 28 20.086 81 15.184 28 20.201 81 15.175
15 28 20.434 81 15.149 28 20.481 81 14.996
16 28 20.086 81 14.352 28 19.948 81 14.414
17 28 19.546 81 15.194 28 19.372 81 15.365
18 28 19.132 81 15.400 28 19.058 81 15.293
19 28 18.173 81 14.982 28 18.062 81 15.011
20 28 17.779 81 15.025 28 17.669 81 15.103
21 28 16.690 81 15.307 28 16.552 81 15.384
22 28 16.083 81 15.836 28 15.976 81 15.925
23 28 15.756 81 16.128 28 15.741 81 16.274
24 28 15.726 81 17.421 28 15.763 81 17.601
25 28 16.003 81 18.088 28 16.138 81 18.184


Dexter


27 59.591
27 59.375
27 59.168
27 59.257
27 59.617
27 59.716


40.592
40.747
40.882
40.960
41.004
40.782


27 59.431
27 59.266
27 59.171
27 59.407
27 59.702
27 59.622


County
Orange


Lake
39.169
39.323
39.616
39.629
40.240
40.461
40.739


Polk


40.689
40.796
41.101
41.024
40.822
40.594










Table 2: Continued


Start
Latitude Longitude
30 46.430 86 7.948
30 46.435 86 7.779
30 46.396 86 7.335
30 46.127 86 7.390
30 46.014 86 7.744
30 46.215 86 8.061


30 44.908
30 45.105
30 45.384
30 45.253
30 45.062
30 44.866


3.687
3.772
3.650
3.361
3.471
3.595


Stop
County
30 46.434 8
30 46.520 8
30 46.209 8
30 46.132 8
30 46.010 8
30 46.205 8
30 45.028 8
30 45.207 8
30 45.346 8
30 45.097 8
30 44.888 8
30 44.819 8


Lake
Juniper


Trans
1
2


County
Walton


Walton


Spring


Lake
7.778
7.611
7.266
7.599
7.930
8.273
3.831
3.920
3.477
3.435
3.581
3.688









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Edition. American Public Health Association. Washington, D.C.


Brooks, H. K. 1981. Guide to the physiographic divisions of Florida. Florida Coop.
Extension Service., Institute Food Agriculture Sciences. University of Florida.


Canfield, D.E. Jr., 1991. Assessment of water quality in the lakes of north and central
Florida: The use of volunteer citizen monitors. Final Report (DER
ContractWM344). Florida Department of Environmental Regulation. Tallahassee,
Florida


Canfield, D. E. Jr., and M. V. Hoyer. 1992. Aquatic macrophytes and their relation to the
limnology of Florida lakes. Final Report to Bureau of Aquatic Plant Management.
Florida Department of Natural Resources. Tallahassee, FL 32303.


D'Elia, C. F., P. A. Steudler, and N. Corwin. 1977. Determination of total nitrogen in
aqueous samples using persulfate digestion. Limnology and Oceanography
22:760-764.


Griffith, G. E., D. E. Canfield, Jr., C. A. Horsburgh, J. M. Omernik, and S. H. Azevedo.
1997. Lake regions of Florida. Report to the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR.


Hoyer, M. V., and D. E. Canfield, Jr. 1994. Handbook of Common Freshwater Fish in
Florida Lakes. Gainesville Florida. University of Florida Publications #SP 160.


Krebs, C.J. 1999. Ecological Methodology. Second Edition. Addison-Wesley
Educational Publishers, Inc.


Maceina, M. J., and J. V. Shireman. 1980. The use of a recording fathometer for the
determination of distribution and biomass of hydrilla. Journal of Aquatic Plant
Management. 18: 34-49.









Menzel, D. W. and N. Corwin. 1965. The measurement of total phosphorus in seawater
based on the liberation of organically bound fractions by persulfate oxidation.
Limnology and Oceanography 10: 280-282.


Murphy, J. and J. P. Riley. 1962. A modified single solution method for the
determination of phosphate in natural waters. Analytica Chimica Acta 27:31-36.


Sartory, D. P., and J. U. Grobbelaar. 1984. Extraction of chlorophyll a from freshwater
phytoplankton for spectrophotometric analysis. Hydrobiologia 114: 177-187.


Simal, J., M. A. Lage, and I. Iglesias. 1985. Second derivative ultraviolet spectroscopy
and sulfamic acid method for determination of nitrates in water. Journal of
Analytical Chemistry 68:962-964.


Wollin, K. M. 1987. Nitrate determination in surface waters as an example of the
application of UV derivative spectrometry to environmental analysis. Acta
Hydrochemica Hydrobiologia 15:459-469 (Ger.)

































Appendix A: Electrofishing data for all lakes sampled by Florida LAKEWATCH
personnel during 2009.











Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects)
Alachua Countv/Wauberg
2009


Common Name
Bluegill
Bowfin
Brook silverside
Eastern mosquitofish
Florida gar
Gizzard shad
Golden shiner
Largemouth bass
Redear sunfish
Seminole killifish
Warmouth
Total

Simpson's D
Simpson's 1/D
Simpson's 1-D
Simpson's evenness
Species Richness


Number/hour
92.0
8.0
10.0
2.0
10.0
86.0
23.0
11.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
249.0


Percent of Total Grams/hour
36.9 8148.8
3.2 18473.7
4.0 25.0
0.8 1.5
4.0 5575.3
34.5 6863.4
9.2 812.6
4.4 5008.3
1.2 876.1
0.4 13.2
1.2 276.3
46074.2


Percent of Total
17.7
40.1
0.1
0.0
12.1
14.9
1.8
10.9
1.9
0.0
0.6


0.27
3.69
0.73
0.34
11











Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects)
Highlands County/Josephine
2009


Common Name
Bluegill
Bowfin
Brook silverside
Largemouth bass
Redear sunfish
Threadfin shad
Total

Simpson's D
Simpson's 1/D
Simpson's 1-D
Simpson's evenness
Species Richness


Number/hour
9.0
1.0
6.0
9.0
12.0
7.0
44.0


Percent of Total
20.5
2.3
13.6
20.5
27.3
15.9


Grams/hour
1049.8
2280.7
13.2
7290.2
1695.9
21.7
12351.5


Percent of Total
8.5
18.5
0.1
59.0
13.7
0.2


0.20
4.94
0.80
0.82
6











Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Twenty Five 10 Minute Transects)
Highlands County/June
2009


Common Name
Blue tilapia*
Bluegill
Bowfin
Brook silverside
Chain pickerel
Eastern mosquitofish
Florida gar
Gizzard shad
Golden shiner
Lake chubsucker
Largemouth bass
Redear sunfish
Seminole killifish
Threadfin shad
Total

Simpson's D
Simpson's 1/D
Simpson's 1-D
Simpson's evenness
Species Richness

















* Exotic Species


Number/hour
0.2
18.0
0.5
5.5
1.0
0.2
1.9
1.0
1.0
1.4
12.0
21.4
0.5
0.7
65.3


Percent of Total
0.4
27.6
0.7
8.5
1.5
0.4
2.9
1.5
1.5
2.2
18.4
32.7
0.7
1.1


Grams/hour
528.8
1618.7
936.6
9.2
991.6
0.3
690.7
455.7
20.2
872.8
5358.1
2867.8
6.3
2.7
14359.5


Percent of Total
3.7
11.3
6.5
0.1
6.9
0.0
4.8
3.2
0.1
6.1
37.3
20.0
0.0
0.0


0.23
4.42
0.77
0.32
14











Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects)
Hillsborough County/Wilson
2009


Common Name
Bluegill
Bowfin
Florida gar
Golden shiner
Lake chubsucker
Largemouth bass
Redear sunfish
Threadfin shad
Total

Simpson's D
Simpson's 1/D
Simpson's 1-D
Simpson's evenness
Species Richness


Number/hour
107.0
2.0
10.0
1.0
2.0
53.0
69.0
51.0
295.0


Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total
36.3 3285.7 8.0
0.7 2622.2 6.4
3.4 6237.3 15.2
0.3 16.3 0.0
0.7 2224.7 5.4
18.0 22171.9 53.9
23.4 4033.3 9.8
17.3 512.9 1.2
41104.3


0.25
4.01
0.75
0.50
8











Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects)
Lake County/Grasshopper
2009


Common Name
Bluegill
Bluespotted sunfish
Chain pickerel
Eastern mosquitofish
Lake chubsucker
Largemouth bass
Lined topminnow
Redfin pickerel
Swamp darter
Total

Simpson's D
Simpson's 1/D
Simpson's 1-D
Simpson's evenness
Species Richness


Number/hour
18.0
2.0
1.0
173.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
203.0


Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total
8.9 506.4 7.0
1.0 5.2 0.1
0.5 784.4 10.9
85.2 119.7 1.7
0.5 696.6 9.6
1.5 5093.8 70.5
1.0 8.1 0.1
1.0 9.0 0.1
0.5 0.7 0.0
7224.1


0.73
1.36
0.27
0.15
9











Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects)
Lake County/Sellers
2009


Common Name
Bluegill
Bowfin
Brook silverside
Eastern mosquitofish
Florida gar
Golden topminnow
Lake chubsucker
Largemouth bass
Lined topminnow
Yellow bullhead
Total

Simpson's D
Simpson's 1/D
Simpson's 1-D
Simpson's evenness
Species Richness


Number/hour
45.0
1.0
132.0
5.0
1.0
1.0
15.0
15.0
1.0
1.0
217.0


Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total
20.7 1098.4 6.7
0.5 1651.8 10.0
60.8 280.3 1.7
2.3 3.7 0.0
0.5 746.8 4.5
0.5 4.0 0.0
6.9 5257.2 32.0
6.9 7251.1 44.1
0.5 4.0 0.0
0.5 156.4 1.0
16453.8


0.42
2.36
0.58
0.24
10











Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects)
Lake County/Wildcat
2009


Common Name
Bluegill
Bowfin
Eastern mosquitofish
Florida gar
Lake chubsucker
Largemouth bass
Total

Simpson's D
Simpson's 1/D
Simpson's 1-D
Simpson's evenness
Species Richness


Number/hour
46.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
6.0
58.0


Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total
79.3 289.9 2.3
1.7 1471.4 11.7
1.7 0.7 0.0
1.7 398.1 3.2
5.2 2630.0 21.0
10.3 7762.0 61.8
12552.1


0.64
1.55
0.36
0.26
6











Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects)
Marion County/Mill Dam
2009


Common Name
Black crappie
Bluegill
Bluespotted sunfish
Bowfin
Brook silverside
Eastern mosquitofish
Florida gar
Lake chubsucker
Largemouth bass
Lined topminnow
Redear sunfish
Warmouth
Total

Simpson's D
Simpson's 1/D
Simpson's 1-D
Simpson's evenness
Species Richness


Number/hour
1.0
203.0
2.0
3.0
524.0
1.0
12.0
15.0
28.0
1.0
19.0
5.0
814.0


Percent of Total
0.1
24.9
0.2
0.4
64.4
0.1
1.5
1.8
3.4
0.1
2.3
0.6


Grams/hour
304.9
921.9
5.2
3475.7
851.7
0.7
4541.5
7348.3
3781.0
1.9
957.7
645.6
22836.1


Percent of Total
1.3
4.0
0.0
15.2
3.7
0.0
19.9
32.2
16.6
0.0
4.2
2.8


0.48
2.09
0.52
0.17
12











Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Twenty Five 10 Minute Transects)
Marion County/Weir
2009


Common Name
Black crappie
Bluegill
Bowfin
Brook silverside
Brown bullhead
Chain pickerel
Dollar sunfish
Florida gar
Golden shiner
Lake chubsucker
Largemouth bass
Redear sunfish
Seminole killifish
Spotted sunfish
Threadfin shad
Warmouth
Total

Simpson's D
Simpson's 1/D
Simpson's 1-D
Simpson's evenness
Species Richness


Number/hour
0.5
72.2
1.0
1.7
0.2
4.1
1.0
1.0
7.0
6.2
68.9
18.2
9.1
0.2
15.1
3.1
209.5


Percent of Total
0.2
34.5
0.5
0.8
0.1
1.9
0.5
0.5
3.3
3.0
32.9
8.7
4.4
0.1
7.2
1.5


Grams/hour
8.0
3340.8
1797.8
4.0
41.6
2480.3
6.9
758.2
213.5
3171.1
13284.2
2265.4
94.9
5.9
48.2
152.0
27672.9


Percent of Total
0.0
12.1
6.5
0.0
0.2
9.0
0.0
2.7
0.8
11.5
48.0
8.2
0.3
0.0
0.2
0.5


0.24
4.09
0.76
0.26
16











Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects)
Miami-Dade Countv/E
2009


Common Name
Bluegill
Butterfly Peacock*
Largemouth bass
Redear sunfish
Warmouth
Total


Number/hour
14.0
3.0
7.0
9.0
3.0
36.0


Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total
38.9 258.5 3.9
8.3 2052.0 31.2
19.4 3640.9 55.3
25.0 543.9 8.3
8.3 83.9 1.3
6579.2


Simpson's D
Simpson's 1/D
Simpson's 1-D
Simpson's evenness
Species Richness




























* Exotic Species


0.27
3.77
0.73
0.75
5











Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects)
Orange County/Butler
2009


Common Name
Bluegill
Bowfin
Brook silverside
Chain pickerel
Florida gar
Golden shiner
Lake chubsucker
Largemouth bass
Redear sunfish
Total

Simpson's D
Simpson's 1/D
Simpson's 1-D
Simpson's evenness
Species Richness


Number/hour
7.0
4.0
80.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
19.0
5.0
120.0


Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total
5.8 582.9 3.3
3.3 7925.2 44.7
66.7 198.2 1.1
0.8 43.7 0.2
1.7 1328.8 7.5
0.8 148.6 0.8
0.8 959.4 5.4
15.8 5738.7 32.4
4.2 802.9 4.5
17728.3


0.48
2.10
0.52
0.23
9











Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects)
Orange County/Conway
2009


Common Name
Bluegill
Brook silverside
Chain pickerel
Florida gar
Golden shiner
Largemouth bass
Redear sunfish
Seminole killifish
Taillight shiner
Total

Simpson's D
Simpson's 1/D
Simpson's 1-D
Simpson's evenness
Species Richness


Number/hour
130.0
24.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
44.0
7.0
7.0
3.0
224.0


Percent of Total
58.0
10.7
1.3
1.3
1.3
19.6
3.1
3.1
1.3


Grams/hour
5613.5
54.6
6944.8
2040.0
166.9
7159.5
963.6
76.0
3.2
23022.0


Percent of Total
24.4
0.2
30.2
8.9
0.7
31.1
4.2
0.3
0.0


0.39
2.57
0.61
0.29
9











Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects)
Orange County/Ivanhoe
2009


Common Name
Bluegill
Brook silverside
Florida gar
Golden shiner
Largemouth bass
Redbreast sunfish
Redear sunfish
Threadfin shad
Warmouth
Total

Simpson's D
Simpson's 1/D
Simpson's 1-D
Simpson's evenness
Species Richness


Number/hour
208.0
1.0
2.0
20.0
67.0
1.0
13.0
13.0
3.0
328.0


Percent of Total
63.4
0.3
0.6
6.1
20.4
0.3
4.0
4.0
0.9


Grams/hour
5809.2
2.5
1223.5
319.0
14844.6
30.2
1570.8
84.9
182.4
24067.0


Percent of Total
24.1
0.0
5.1
1.3
61.7
0.1
6.5
0.4
0.8


0.45
2.22
0.55
0.25
9











Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Twenty Five 10 Minute Transects)
Orange County/John's
2009


Common Name
Bluegill
Bowfin
Brook silverside
Chain pickerel
Eastern mosquitofish
Florida gar
Gizzard shad
Golden shiner
Grass carp*
Lake chubsucker
Largemouth bass
Redear sunfish
Seminole killifish
Threadfin shad
Warmouth
Total

Simpson's D
Simpson's 1/D
Simpson's 1-D
Simpson's evenness
Species Richness
















* Exotic Species


Number/hour
28.1
0.5
5.3
0.7
8.6
3.1
3.6
19.2
0.2
3.4
19.2
3.4
1.0
0.2
0.2
96.7


Percent of Total
29.0
0.5
5.5
0.7
8.9
3.2
3.7
19.9
0.2
3.5
19.9
3.5
1.0
0.2
0.2


Grams/hour
1599.3
654.5
11.3
250.7
6.5
2382.0
1582.4
817.6
4452.2
2288.2
8405.7
727.2
11.9
1.2
2.8
23193.6


Percent of Total
6.9
2.8
0.0
1.1
0.0
10.3
6.8
3.5
19.2
9.9
36.2
3.1
0.1
0.0
0.0


0.18
5.58
0.82
0.37
15











Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects)
Orange Countv/Starke
2009


Common Name
Bluegill
Brown bullhead
Florida gar
Golden shiner
Lake chubsucker
Largemouth bass
Redbreast sunfish
Redear sunfish
Seminole killifish
Sailfin Catfish*
Threadfin shad
Total

Simpson's D
Simpson's 1/D
Simpson's 1-D
Simpson's evenness
Species Richness





















* Exotic Species


Number/hour
88.0
1.0
1.0
86.0
3.0
42.0
1.0
12.0
11.0
1.0
461.0
707.0


Percent of Total Grams/hour
12.4 3543.4
0.1 431.4
0.1 589.4
12.2 1758.4
0.4 2283.1
5.9 16759.9
0.1 69.4
1.7 1703.7
1.6 160.7
0.1 2228.5
65.2 2234.7
31762.4


Percent of Total
11.2
1.4
1.9
5.5
7.2
52.8
0.2
5.4
0.5
7.0
7.0


0.46
2.18
0.54
0.20
11











Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Twenty Five 10 Minute Transects)
Osceola Countv/Tohopekaliga East
2009


Common Name
Black crappie
Bluegill
Bowfin
Brook silverside
Chain pickerel
Eastern mosquitofish
Florida gar
Gizzard shad
Golden shiner
Lake chubsucker
Largemouth bass
Longnose gar
Redear sunfish
Seminole killifish
Spotted sunfish
Warmouth
Total

Simpson's D
Simpson's 1/D
Simpson's 1-D
Simpson's evenness
Species Richness


Number/hour
0.5
13.7
1.7
29.5
0.7
0.5
3.4
0.7
0.7
1.0
21.4
0.5
9.4
0.7
0.2
0.2
84.7


Percent of Total
0.6
16.1
2.0
34.8
0.8
0.6
4.0
0.8
0.8
1.1
25.2
0.6
11.0
0.8
0.3
0.3


Grams/hour
247.9
808.3
3839.9
45.3
132.9
0.4
1651.0
510.6
136.8
531.9
5434.0
1387.7
1762.6
4.3
1.5
56.5
16551.5


Percent of Total
1.5
4.9
23.2
0.3
0.8
0.0
10.0
3.1
0.8
3.2
32.8
8.4
10.6
0.0
0.0
0.3


0.23
4.43
0.77
0.28
16











Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects)
Polk County/Dexter
2009


Common Name
Blue tilapia*
Bluegill
Brook silverside
Eastern mosquitofish
Florida gar
Golden shiner
Lake chubsucker
Largemouth bass
Redear sunfish
Warmouth
Total

Simpson's D
Simpson's 1/D
Simpson's 1-D
Simpson's evenness
Species Richness






















* Exotic Species


Number/hour
1.0
22.0
15.0
3.0
17.0
8.0
8.0
48.0
18.0
1.0
141.0


Percent of Total Grams/hour
0.7 2203.2
15.6 738.2
10.6 33.1
2.1 1.7
12.1 9756.3
5.7 133.5
5.7 2936.1
34.0 6927.9
12.8 456.5
0.7 11.5
23197.9


Percent of Total
9.5
3.2
0.1
0.0
42.1
0.6
12.7
29.9
2.0
0.0


0.19
5.28
0.81
0.53
10











Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects)
Walton County/Juniper
2009


Common Name
Bluegill
Bowfin
Brook silverside
Largemouth bass
Redear sunfish
Total


Number/hour
23.0
1.0
27.0
30.0
11.0
92.0


Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total
25.0 796.4 6.0
1.1 2056.0 15.5
29.3 60.5 0.5
32.6 9311.5 70.2
12.0 1042.9 7.9
13267.4


Simpson's D
Simpson's 1/D
Simpson's 1-D
Simpson's evenness
Species Richness


0.27
3.71
0.73
0.74
5











Electrofishing CPUE Data (Average of Six 10 Minute Transects)
Walton County/Spring
2009


Common Name
Bluegill
Lake chubsucker
Largemouth bass
Redear sunfish
Total


Number/hour
35.0
69.0
17.0
19.0
140.0


Percent of Total Grams/hour Percent of Total
25.0 422.5 1.9
49.3 19811.4 88.3
12.1 1523.8 6.8
13.6 689.6 3.1
22447.3


Simpson's D
Simpson's 1/D
Simpson's 1-D
Simpson's evenness
Species Richness


0.34
2.95
0.66
0.74
4
































Appendix B: Long-term monitoring project plant survey results for lakes sampled
during 2009











Lochloosa / Alachua

Aquatic plant data collected on September 8, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
coontail
spatterdock
maidencane
smartweed
pickerelweed
hydrilla*
frog's-bit
common salvinia
bald cypress
buttonbush
Egyptian paspalidium
alligator-weed*
water-lettuce*
American cupscale
water-pennywort
soft rush
common duckweed
water primrose
sesbans
red maple
cat-tail
American lotus
zigzag bladderwort
southern water-hemp
elephant-ear*
parrot's-feather*

common arrowhead
willow
floating water-hyacinth*
seashore marsh-mallow
southern cutgrass
wax myrtle
southern naiad
fragrant water-lily
duck-potato
tapegrass


Plant Species
Ceratophyllum demersum
Nuphar luteum
Panicum hemitomon
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Pontederia cordata
Hydrilla verticillata
Limnobium spongia
Salvinia minima
Taxodium distichum
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Paspalidium geminatum
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Pistia stratiotes
Sacciolepis striata
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Juncus et1t.\l u.
Lemna minor
Ludwigia spp.
Sesbania spp.
Acer rubrum
Typha spp.
Nelumbo lutea
Utricularia subulata
Amaranthus australis
Colocasia esculenta
Myriophyllum aquaticum
Panicum spp.
Sagittaria latifolia
Salix spp.
Eichhornia crassipes
Kosteletzkya virginica
Leersia hexandra
Myrica cerifera
Najas guadalupensis
Nymphaea odorata
Sagittaria lancifolia
Vallisneria americana


Frequency (%)
100
100
100
100
100
90
90
90
90
70
70
60
60
60
50
50
50
50
50
40
40
30
30
20
20
20
20
20
20
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10


3.0
0.3
7.5
9.4
10.4
384.3
1.7











Newnan / Alachua

Aquatic plant data collected on June 4, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
willow
bald cypress
buttonbush
American lotus
smartweed
pickerelweed
water-pennywort
maidencane
alligator-weed*
coontail
common duckweed
cone-spur bladderwort
red maple
swamp tupelo
giant bulrush
giant sedge
parrot's-feather*
American cupscale
common salvinia
cat-tail
inundated beaksedge
southern water-hemp
bacopa
coinwort
barnyard grass*
slender spikerush
hydrilla*
water primrose
primrosewillow
southern naiad
fragrant water-lily
torpedograss*
water-lettuce*
soft stem bulrush


Plant Species
Salix spp.
Taxodium distichum
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Nelumbo lutea
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Pontederia cordata
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Panicum hemitomon
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Ceratophyllum demersum
Lemna minor
Utricularia gibba
Acer rubrum
Nyssa sylvatica
Scirpus californicus
Carex gigantea
Myriophyllum aquaticum
Sacciolepis striata
Salvinia minima
Typha spp.
Rhynchospora inundata
Amaranthus australis
Bacopa monnieri
Centella asiatica
Echinochloa crusgalli
Eleocharis baldwinii
Hydrilla verticillata
Ludwigia spp.
Ludwigia spp.
Najas guadalupensis
Nymphaea odorata
Panicum repens
Pistia stratiotes
Scirpus validus


Frequency (%)
100
100
90
90
90
90
80
80
70
70
70
60
50
40
40
30
30
30
30
30
20
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10


0.0
0.0
2.9
1.7
1.7
387.3
1.4











Orange / Alachua

Aquatic plant data collected on September 3, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 25 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
coontail
hydrilla*
spatterdock
smartweed
frog's-bit
pickerelweed
cat-tail
water primrose
willow
common arrowhead
water-pennywort
maidencane
seashore marsh-mallow
common duckweed
buttonbush
southern water-hemp
duck-potato
water hemlock
American lotus
fragrant water-lily
red maple
American cupscale
elephant-ear*
common salvinia
bald cypress
alligator-weed*
giant bulrush
burhead sedge*
azolla
flatsedge
slender spikerush
water-lettuce*
barnyard grass*
wax myrtle
yellow water-lily
arrow-arum
sesbans
giant foxtail


Plant Species
Ceratophyllum demersum
Hydrilla verticillata
Nuphar luteum
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Limnobium spongia
Pontederia cordata
Typha spp.
Ludwigia spp.
Salix spp.
Sagittaria latifolia
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Panicum hemitomon
Kosteletzkya virginica
Lemna minor
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Amaranthus australis
Sagittaria lancifolia
Cicuta mexicana
Nelumbo lutea
Nymphaea odorata
Acer rubrum
Sacciolepis striata
Colocasia esculenta
Salvinia minima
Taxodium distichum
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Scirpus californicus
Scirpus cubensis
Azolla caroliniana
Cyperus odoratus
Eleocharis baldwinii
Pistia stratiotes
Echinochloa crusgalli
Myrica cerifera
Nymphaea mexicana
Peltandra virginica
Sesbania spp.
Setaria magna


Frequency (%)
100
100
100
100
96
88
88
84
84
80
68
64
60
56
52
48
48
40
40
40
36
36
24
24
24
20
20
20
16
16
16
16
12
12
12
12
12
12


51.0
19.6
8.0
12.1
12.1
2582.3
1.5











Orange / Alachua


Common Name
sweetbay
swamp tupelo
bladderwort
zigzag bladderwort
fanwort
sawgrass
tropical flatsedge
southern water-grass
southern naiad
cabbage palm
sand cordgrass
purple bladderwort


Plant Species
Magnolia virginiana
Nyssa sylvatica
Utriculariafoliosa
Utricularia subulata
Cabomba caroliniana
Cladium jamaicense
Cyperus surinamensis
Luziola fluitans
Najas guadalupensis
Sabal palmetto
Spartina bakeri
Utricularia purpurea


Frequency (%)
8
8
8
8
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4











Santa Fe / Alachua

Aquatic plant data collected on May 12, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 15 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
alligator-weed*
maidencane
bald cypress
buttonbush
common salvinia
floating water-hyacinth*
water-moss
slender spikerush
water-pennywort
banana-lily
wax myrtle
red maple
sawgrass
torpedograss*
pickerelweed
smartweed
rush fuirena
baby-tears
giant bulrush
elephant-ear*
creeping rush
bulrush spp.
redpod rush
southern water-grass
spatterdock
coinwort
haspan flatsedge
dahoon holly
common duckweed
duck-potato
sesbans
salt-bush
southern blue flag
large-headed rush
frog's-bit
water primrose
sweetbay
southern naiad


Plant Species
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Panicum hemitomon
Taxodium distichum
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Salvinia minima
Eichhornia crassipes
Fontinalis spp.
Eleocharis baldwinii
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Nymphoides aquatica
Myrica cerifera
Acer rubrum
Cladium jamaicense
Panicum repens
Pontederia cordata
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Fuirena scirpoidea
Micranthemum umbrosum
Scirpus californicus
Colocasia esculenta
Juncus repens
Juncus spp.
Juncus trigonocarpus
Luziola fluitans
Nuphar luteum
Centella asiatica
Cyperus haspan
Ilex cassine
Lemna minor
Sagittaria lancifolia
Sesbania spp.
Baccharis spp.
Iris virginica
Juncus megacephalus
Limnobium spongia
Ludwigia spp.
Magnolia virginiana
Najas guadalupensis


Frequency (%)
100
100
93
80
80
73
67
60
60
53
47
40
40
40
40
33
27
27
27
20
20
20
20
20
20
13
13
13
13
13
13
7
7
7
7
7
7
7


0.0
0.0
6.2
3.2
0.6
150.0
5.2











Santa Fe / Alachua


Common Name
fragrant water-lily
swamp tupelo
American cupscale
common arrowhead
willow
burhead sedge*
exotic bur-reed
cat-tail


Plant Species
Nymphaea odorata
Nyssa sylvatica
Sacciolepis striata
Sagittaria latifolia
Salix spp.
Scirpus cubensis
Sparganium erectum
Typha spp.


Frequency (%)
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7











Deer Point / Bay

Aquatic plant data collected on August 25, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 15 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
lemon bacopa
buttonbush
wax myrtle
Eurasian watermilfoil*
fragrant water-lily
elephant-ear*
hazel alder
torpedograss*
sawgrass
duck-potato
bald cypress
red maple
musk-grass
swamp titi
pickerelweed
cat-tail
slender spikerush
spatterdock
lizard's-tail
burhead sedge*
water-shield
giant cutgrass
salt-bush
seashore marsh-mallow
water primrose
tapegrass
water hemlock
red-root flatsedge
umbrella sedge*
swamp loosestrife
rush fuirena
sweetbay
American lotus
Illinois pondweed
willow
giant bulrush
Florida bladderwort


Plant Species
Bacopa caroliniana
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Myrica cerifera
Myriophyllum spicatum
Nymphaea odorata
Colocasia esculenta
Alnus serrulata
Panicum repens
Cladium jamaicense
Sagittaria lancifolia
Taxodium distichum
Acer rubrum
Chara spp.
Cyrilla racemiflora
Pontederia cordata
Typha spp.
Eleocharis baldwinii
Nuphar luteum
Saururus cernuus
Scirpus cubensis
Brasenia schreberi
Zizaniopsis miliacea
Baccharis spp.
Kosteletzkya virginica
Ludwigia spp.
Vallisneria americana
Cicuta mexicana
Cyperus erythrorhizos
Cyperus involucratus
Decodon verticillatus
Fuirena scirpoidea
Magnolia virginiana
Nelumbo lutea
Potamogeton illinoensis
Salix spp.
Scirpus californicus
Utriculariafloridana


Frequency (%)
93
93
93
87
87
80
67
67
53
53
53
47
33
33
33
33
27
27
27
27
20
20
13
13
13
13
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7


9.0
1.7
7.9
0.9
3.6
134.4
2.7











Poinsett / Brevard

Aquatic plant data collected on June 23, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 15 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
common reed
giant bulrush
sesbans
barnyard grass*
water-lettuce*
torpedograss*
willow
alligator-weed*
sand cordgrass
southern water-hemp
smartweed
Brazilian pepper*
spatterdock
buttonbush
floating water-hyacinth*
common duckweed

Egyptian paspalidium
marsh fleabane
common salvinia
soft stem bulrush
maidencane
azolla
parrot's-feather*


Plant Species
Phragmites australis
Scirpus californicus
Sesbania spp.
Echinochloa crusgalli
Pistia stratiotes
Panicum repens
Salix spp.
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Spartina bakeri
Amaranthus australis
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Schinus terebinthifolius
Nuphar luteum
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Eichhornia crassipes
Lemna minor
Panicum spp.
Paspalidium geminatum
Pluchea spp.
Salvinia minima
Scirpus validus
Panicum hemitomon
Azolla caroliniana
Myriophyllum aquaticum


Frequency (%)
100
100
93
87
80
67
67
60
60
40
40
33
27
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
13
7
7


5.4
1.9
0.0
582.2











Trafford / Collier

Aquatic plant data collected on July 23, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
maidencane
cat-tail
pond apple
fire flag
alligator-weed*
southern water-hemp
smartweed
barnyard grass*
willow
swamp rosemallow
common reed
sesbans
floating water-hyacinth*
red maple
water-pennywort
pickerelweed
water primrose
water-lettuce*
rush fuirena
torpedograss*
Egyptian paspalidium
marsh fleabane
duck-potato


Plant Species
Panicum hemitomon
Typha spp.
Annona glabra
Thalia geniculata
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Amaranthus australis
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Echinochloa crusgalli
Salix spp.
Hibiscus grandiflorus
Phragmites australis
Sesbania spp.
Eichhornia crassipes
Acer rubrum
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Pontederia cordata
Ludwigia spp.
Pistia stratiotes
Fuirena scirpoidea
Panicum repens
Paspalidium geminatum
Pluchea spp.
Sagittaria lancifolia


Frequency (%)
100
100
90
90
80
80
80
70
60
50
50
50
40
30
30
30
20
20
10
10
10
10
10











Talquin / Gadsden

Aquatic plant data collected on August 27, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 15 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
elephant-ear*
wax myrtle
common salvinia
red maple
maidencane
smartweed
bald cypress
alligator-weed*
spatterdock
swamp tupelo
buttonbush
water primrose
water-lettuce*
cat-tail
southern water-hemp
swamp titi
flatsedge
floating water-hyacinth*
water-pennywort
common duckweed
willow
burhead sedge*
salt-bush
barnyard grass*
swamp rosemallow
baby-tears
banana-lily
giant bulrush


Plant Species
Colocasia esculenta
Myrica cerifera
Salvinia minima
Acer rubrum
Panicum hemitomon
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Taxodium distichum
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Nuphar luteum
Nyssa sylvatica
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Ludwigia spp.
Pistia stratiotes
Typha spp.
Amaranthus australis
Cyrilla racemiflora
Cyperus odoratus
Eichhornia crassipes
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Lemna minor
Salix spp.
Scirpus cubensis
Baccharis spp.
Echinochloa crusgalli
Hibiscus grandiflorus
Micranthemum umbrosum
Nymphoides aquatica
Scirpus californicus


Frequency (%)
93
60
60
53
53
53
47
40
40
40
33
33
33
27
20
20
13
13
13
13
13
13
7
7
7
7
7
7


1.0
0.2
6.4
1.6
0.0
190.6
3.9











Dead / Gulf

Aquatic plant data collected on August 26, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
bald cypress
smartweed
willow
spatterdock
alligator-weed*
buttonbush
swamp tupelo
giant cutgrass
giant bulrush


Plant Species
Taxodium distichum
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Salix spp.
Nuphar luteum
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Nyssa sylvatica
Zizaniopsis miliacea
Scirpus californicus


Frequency (%)
100
90
90
70
60
60
50
40
10


0.0
0.0
2.9
1.2
0.0
2026.8
1.9











Istokpoga / Highlands

Aquatic plant data collected on July 20, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 20 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
hydrilla*
pickerelweed
duck-potato
cat-tail
giant bulrush
spatterdock
maidencane
common salvinia
tapegrass
banana-lily
American lotus
bald cypress
bladderwort
floating water-hyacinth*
swamp rosemallow
water-pennywort
water primrose
alligator-weed*
coontail
southern naiad
torpedograss*
water-lettuce*
club-rush
elephant-ear*
slender spikerush
Egyptian paspalidium
flatsedge
frog's-bit
smartweed
willow
baby-tears
fragrant water-lily
swamp tupelo
red maple
buttonbush
rush fuirena
Illinois pondweed
purple bladderwort


Plant Species
Hydrilla verticillata
Pontederia cordata
Sagittaria lancifolia
Typha spp.
Scirpus californicus
Nuphar luteum
Panicum hemitomon
Salvinia minima
Vallisneria americana
Nymphoides aquatica
Nelumbo lutea
Taxodium distichum
Utriculariafoliosa
Eichhornia crassipes
Hibiscus grandiflorus
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Ludwigia spp.
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Ceratophyllum demersum
Najas guadalupensis
Panicum repens
Pistia stratiotes
Eleocharis cellulosa
Colocasia esculenta
Eleocharis baldwinii
Paspalidium geminatum
Cyperus odoratus
Limnobium spongia
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Salix spp.
Micranthemum umbrosum
Nymphaea odorata
Nyssa sylvatica
Acer rubrum
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Fuirena scirpoidea
Potamogeton illinoensis
Utricularia purpurea


Frequency (%)
85
85
85
85
80
75
70
65
65
60
55
50
50
45
45
45
45
40
40
40
40
40
35
30
30
30
25
25
25
25
20
20
20
15
15
15
15
15


3.6
887.7
1.6











Istokpoga / Highlands


Common Name
jointed spikerush
common reed
burhead sedge*
southern water-hemp
azolla
salt-bush
water hemlock
common duckweed
southern water-grass
swamp bay
American cupscale
Brazilian pepper*
three-square
sesbans


Plant Species
Eleocharis interstincta
Phragmites australis
Scirpus cubensis
Amaranthus australis
Azolla caroliniana
Baccharis spp.
Cicuta mexicana
Lemna minor
Luziola fluitans
Persea palustris
Sacciolepis striata
Schinus terebinthifolius
Scirpus americanus
Sesbania spp.


Frequency (%)
10
10
10
5
5
5
5
5











Josephine Center / Highlands

Aquatic plant data collected on July 22, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 8 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
alligator-weed*
spatterdock
common salvinia
slender spikerush
water primrose
torpedograss*
pickerelweed
American cupscale
burhead sedge*
flatsedge
coontail
red root
maidencane
giant bulrush
azolla
elephant-ear*
common duckweed
wax myrtle
swamp bay
water-lettuce*
cat-tail
floating water-hyacinth*
water-pennywort
southern water-grass
club-rush
jointed spikerush
water spider orchid
hydrilla*
needlepod rush
frog's-bit
baby-tears
southern naiad
sesbans
sand cordgrass
bladderwort
yellow-eyed grass


Plant Species
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Nuphar luteum
Salvinia minima
Eleocharis baldwinii
Ludwigia spp.
Panicum repens
Pontederia cordata
Sacciolepis striata
Scirpus cubensis
Cyperus odoratus
Ceratophyllum demersum
Lachnanthes caroliniana
Panicum hemitomon
Scirpus californicus
Azolla caroliniana
Colocasia esculenta
Lemna minor
Myrica cerifera
Persea palustris
Pistia stratiotes
Typha spp.
Eichhornia crassipes
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Luziola fluitans
Eleocharis cellulosa
Eleocharis interstincta
Habenaria repens
Hydrilla verticillata
Juncus scirpoides
Limnobium spongia
Micranthemum umbrosum
Najas guadalupensis
Sesbania spp.
Spartina bakeri
Utriculariafoliosa
Xyris spp.


Frequency (%)
100
100
100
88
88
88
88
75
75
63
50
50
50
50
38
38
38
38
38
38
38
25
25
25
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13


19.0
3.0
6.5
6.1
0.4
524.3
1.1











Josephine East / Highlands

Aquatic plant data collected on July 22, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 8 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
slender spikerush
water primrose
common salvinia
cat-tail
spatterdock
maidencane
torpedograss*
pickerelweed
common duckweed
wax myrtle
alligator-weed*
coontail
red maple
fanwort
hydrilla*
southern water-grass
willow
burhead sedge*
elephant-ear*
club-rush
water-pennywort
red root
American cupscale
flatsedge
floating water-hyacinth*
rush fuirena
American lotus
fragrant water-lily
Egyptian paspalidium
water-lettuce*
duck-potato
giant bulrush
bald cypress
bladderwort


Plant Species
Eleocharis baldwinii
Ludwigia spp.
Salvinia minima
Typha spp.
Nuphar luteum
Panicum hemitomon
Panicum repens
Pontederia cordata
Lemna minor
Myrica cerifera
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Ceratophyllum demersum
Acer rubrum
Cabomba caroliniana
Hydrilla verticillata
Luziola fluitans
Salix spp.
Scirpus cubensis
Colocasia esculenta
Eleocharis cellulosa
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Lachnanthes caroliniana
Sacciolepis striata
Cyperus odoratus
Eichhornia crassipes
Fuirena scirpoidea
Nelumbo lutea
Nymphaea odorata
Paspalidium geminatum
Pistia stratiotes
Sagittaria lancifolia
Scirpus californicus
Taxodium distichum
Utriculariafoliosa


Frequency (%)
100
100
100
100
88
88
88
88
75
75
63
63
50
50
50
50
38
38
25
25
25
25
25
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13


9.0
0.8
6.2
3.6
3.2
411.8
1.3











Josephine West / Highlands

Aquatic plant data collected on July 22, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 8 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
spatterdock
American cupscale
alligator-weed*
slender spikerush
water primrose
wax myrtle
common salvinia
buttonbush
coontail
water-lettuce*
pickerelweed
cat-tail
burhead sedge*
water-pennywort
red root
red maple
flatsedge
elephant-ear*
baby-tears
torpedograss*
swamp bay
duck-potato
giant bulrush
asters
azolla
barnyard grass*
floating water-hyacinth*
jointed spikerush
rush fuirena
soft rush
needlepod rush
common duckweed
frog's-bit
fragrant water-lily
Egyptian paspalidium
common arrowhead
willow
sand cordgrass


Plant Species
Nuphar luteum
Sacciolepis striata
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Eleocharis baldwinii
Ludwigia spp.
Myrica cerifera
Salvinia minima
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Ceratophyllum demersum
Pistia stratiotes
Pontederia cordata
Typha spp.
Scirpus cubensis
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Lachnanthes caroliniana
Acer rubrum
Cyperus odoratus
Colocasia esculenta
Micranthemum umbrosum
Panicum repens
Persea palustris
Sagittaria lancifolia
Scirpus californicus
Aster spp.
Azolla caroliniana
Echinochloa crusgalli
Eichhornia crassipes
Eleocharis interstincta
Fuirena scirpoidea
Juncus etti1.\l'.\
Juncus scirpoides
Lemna minor
Limnobium spongia
Nymphaea odorata
Paspalidium geminatum
Sagittaria latifolia
Salix spp.
Spartina bakeri


Frequency (%)
100
100
88
88
88
88
88
75
75
75
75
75
63
50
50
38
38
25
25
25
25
25
25
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13


18.0
3.0
4.2
4.1
1.4
338.3
1.3










Josephine West / Highlands


Common Name
bald cypress


Plant Species
Taxodium distichum


Frequency (%)
13











Wilson / Hillsborough

Aquatic plant data collected on August 12, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
torpedograss*
tapegrass
alligator-weed*
bald cypress
water-pennywort
cat-tail
slender spikerush
water primrose
buttonbush
lilac tasselflower*
baby-tears
spatterdock
fragrant water-lily
salt-bush
yellow nut-grass*
flatsedge
tropical flatsedge
barnyard grass*
smartweed
pickerelweed
willow
Brazilian pepper*
musk-grass
manyspike flatsedge
slender fimbry
large-headed rush
American lipocarpha
melaleuca*
swamp tupelo
marsh fleabane
duck-potato
sesbans
giant foxtail


Plant Species
Panicum repens
Vallisneria americana
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Taxodium distichum
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Typha spp.
Eleocharis baldwinii
Ludwigia spp.
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Emilia sonchifolia
Micranthemum umbrosum
Nuphar luteum
Nymphaea odorata
Baccharis spp.
Cyperus esculentus
Cyperus odoratus
Cyperus surinamensis
Echinochloa crusgalli
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Pontederia cordata
Salix spp.
Schinus terebinthifolius
Chara spp.
Cyperus polystachyos
Fimbristylis autumnalis
Juncus megacephalus
Lipocarpha maculata
Melaleuca quinquenervia
Nyssa sylvatica
Pluchea spp.
Sagittaria lancifolia
Sesbania spp.
Setaria magna


Frequency (%)
100
100
80
70
50
50
40
40
30
30
30
30
30
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10











Farm 13 / Indian River

Aquatic plant data collected on June 24, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
para grass*
common reed
smartweed
southern water-hemp
alligator-weed*
willow
salt-bush
floating water-hyacinth*
barnyard grass*
swamp rosemallow
cabbage palm
sesbans


Plant Species
Urochloa mutica
Phragmites australis
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Amaranthus australis
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Salix spp.
Baccharis spp.
Eichhornia crassipes
Echinochloa crusgalli
Hibiscus grandiflorus
Sabal palmetto
Sesbania spp.


Frequency (%)
100
70
60
50
40
40
30
30
10
10
10
10











Stick Marsh / Indian River

Aquatic plant data collected on June 24, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
common reed
willow
para grass*
cabbage palm
alligator-weed*
floating water-hyacinth*
water-lettuce*
Brazilian pepper*
salt-bush
cat-tail
southern water-hemp
asters
swamp rosemallow
Egyptian paspalidium
marsh fleabane
smartweed
sesbans


Plant Species
Phragmites australis
Salix spp.
Urochloa mutica
Sabal palmetto
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Eichhornia crassipes
Pistia stratiotes
Schinus terebinthifolius
Baccharis spp.
Typha spp.
Amaranthus australis
Aster spp.
Hibiscus grandiflorus
Paspalidium geminatum
Pluchea spp.
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Sesbania spp.


Frequency (%)
100
80
80
50
30
30
30
30
20
20
10
10
10
10
10
10
10











Grasshopper / Lake

Aquatic plant data collected on August 18, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
buttonbush
loblolly bay
maidencane
purple bladderwort
fragrant water-lily
spider-grass
rush fuirena
torpedograss*
St. John's wort
wax myrtle
spatterdock
swamp tupelo
red root
Florida bladderwort
pickerelweed
Tracy's beaksedge
slender spikerush
hatpin
pink sundew
jointed spikerush
bog-moss
banana-lily
yellow-eyed grass


Plant Species
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Gordonia lasianthus
Panicum hemitomon
Utricularia purpurea
Nymphaea odorata
Websteria confervoides
Fuirena scirpoidea
Panicum repens
Hypericum spp.
Myrica cerifera
Nuphar luteum
Nyssa sylvatica
Lachnanthes caroliniana
Utriculariafloridana
Pontederia cordata
Rhynchospora tracyi
Eleocharis baldwinii
Eriocaulon decangulare
Drosera capillaris
Eleocharis interstincta
Mayacafluviatilis
Nymphoides aquatica
Xyris spp.


Frequency (%)
100
100
100
100
80
80
70
60
50
50
50
50
40
40
30
30
20
20
10
10
10
10
10


1.0
0.3
3.0
3.0
4.5
171.9
3.4











Sellers / Lake

Aquatic plant data collected on August 19, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
maidencane
buttonbush
slender spikerush
rush fuirena
bog-moss
spatterdock
swamp tupelo
pickerelweed
spider-grass
sawgrass
red root
bacopa
shrubby primrosewillow
wax myrtle
fragrant water-lily
red maple
St. John's wort
Florida bladderwort
smartweed
bladderwort
asters
water primrose
banana-lily
marsh fleabane
dwarf arrowhead
sand cordgrass
bald cypress
yellow-eyed grass


Plant Species
Panicum hemitomon
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Eleocharis baldwinii
Fuirena scirpoidea
Mayacafluviatilis
Nuphar luteum
Nyssa sylvatica
Pontederia cordata
Websteria confervoides
Cladium jamaicense
Lachnanthes caroliniana
Bacopa monnieri
Ludwigia suffruicosa
Myrica cerifera
Nymphaea odorata
Acer rubrum
Hypericum spp.
Utriculariafloridana
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Utriculariafoliosa
Aster spp.
Ludwigia spp.
Nymphoides aquatica
Pluchea spp.
Sagittaria subulata
Spartina bakeri
Taxodium distichum
Xyris spp.


Frequency (%)
100
90
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
60
60
50
50
50
50
30
30
30
20
20
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10


39.0
1.8
2.4
1.8
1.3
732.0
5.8











Jackson / Leon

Aquatic plant data collected on August 24, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
maidencane
fragrant water-lily
smartweed
willow
lemon bacopa
purple bladderwort
water-shield
American lotus
coontail
alligator-weed*
hydrilla*
fanwort
swamp rosemallow
pickerelweed
bladderwort
slender spikerush
southern naiad
bald cypress
floating water-hyacinth*
jointed spikerush
rush fuirena
water primrose
shrubby primrosewillow
Savannah primrosewillow
wax myrtle
banana-lily
torpedograss*
dwarf arrowhead
sesbans
sand cordgrass
tapegrass
yellow-eyed grass


Plant Species
Panicum hemitomon
Nymphaea odorata
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Salix spp.
Bacopa caroliniana
Utricularia purpurea
Brasenia schreberi
Nelumbo lutea
Ceratophyllum demersum
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Hydrilla verticillata
Cabomba caroliniana
Hibiscus grandiflorus
Pontederia cordata
Utriculariafoliosa
Eleocharis baldwinii
Najas guadalupensis
Taxodium distichum
Eichhornia crassipes
Eleocharis interstincta
Fuirena scirpoidea
Ludwigia spp.
Ludwigia suffruicosa
Ludwigia virgata
Myrica cerifera
Nymphoides aquatica
Panicum repens
Sagittaria subulata
Sesbania spp.
Spartina bakeri
Vallisneria americana
Xyris spp.


Frequency (%)
100
90
90
90
80
80
70
70
60
50
40
30
30
30
30
20
20
20
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10


90.0
47.2
4.9
3.6
4.4
4110.3
1.4











Butler / Orange

Aquatic plant data collected on July 9, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 20 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
torpedograss*
tapegrass
bald cypress
rush fuirena
water-pennywort
maidencane
Illinois pondweed
duck-potato
pickerelweed
water primrose
fragrant water-lily
baby-tears
smartweed
alligator-weed*
common salvinia
elephant-ear*
slender spikerush
stonewort
cat-tail
bulrush spp.
salt-bush
sesbans
bladderwort
red maple
buttonbush
haspan flatsedge
flatsedge
floating water-hyacinth*
hydrilla*
melaleuca*
wax myrtle
spatterdock
swamp tupelo
willow
giant bulrush
sand cordgrass
purple bladderwort
lemon bacopa


Plant Species
Panicum repens
Vallisneria americana
Taxodium distichum
Fuirena scirpoidea
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Panicum hemitomon
Potamogeton illinoensis
Sagittaria lancifolia
Pontederia cordata
Ludwigia spp.
Nymphaea odorata
Micranthemum umbrosum
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Salvinia minima
Colocasia esculenta
Eleocharis baldwinii
Nitella spp.
Typha spp.
Juncus spp.
Baccharis spp.
Sesbania spp.
Utriculariafoliosa
Acer rubrum
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Cyperus haspan
Cyperus odoratus
Eichhornia crassipes
Hydrilla verticillata
Melaleuca quinquenervia
Myrica cerifera
Nuphar luteum
Nyssa sylvatica
Salix spp.
Scirpus californicus
Spartina bakeri
Utricularia purpurea
Bacopa caroliniana


Frequency (%)
90
90
85
80
80
80
80
80
75
60
60
55
50
45
40
35
35
35
35
30
25
25
25
20
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
5


9.0
1.0
4.3
1.5
0.7
152.3
4.1











Butler / Orange


Common Name
yellow nut-grass*
leconte sedge
manyspike flatsedge
shore rush
American lotus
marsh fleabane
fire flag


Plant Species
Cyperus esculentus
Cyperus lecontei
Cyperus polystachyos
Juncus marginatus
Nelumbo lutea
Pluchea spp.
Thalia geniculata


Frequency (%)
5











Conway North / Orange

Aquatic plant data collected on July 8, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name

torpedograss*
Illinois pondweed
water-pennywort
stonewort
tapegrass
duck-potato
alligator-weed*
rush fuirena
water primrose
cat-tail
manyspike flatsedge
flat sedge spp.
tropical flatsedge
slender spikerush
hydrilla*
smartweed
lemon bacopa
yellow nut-grass*
floating water-hyacinth*
baby-tears
fragrant water-lily
dwarf arrowhead
bald cypress
bladderwort


Plant Species
Nitella prolonga
Panicum repens
Potamogeton illinoensis
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Nitella spp.
Vallisneria americana
Sagittaria lancifolia
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Fuirena scirpoidea
Ludwigia spp.
Typha spp.
Cyperus polystachyos
Cyperus spp.
Cyperus surinamensis
Eleocharis baldwinii
Hydrilla verticillata
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Bacopa caroliniana
Cyperus esculentus
Eichhornia crassipes
Micranthemum umbrosum
Nymphaea odorata
Sagittaria subulata
Taxodium distichum
Utriculariafoliosa


Frequency (%)
100
100
90
70
70
60
50
30
30
30
30
20
20
20
20
20
20
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10











Conway South / Orange

Aquatic plant data collected on July 8, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
hydrilla*
torpedograss*
stonewort
Illinois pondweed
tapegrass
water-pennywort
duck-potato
cat-tail
alligator-weed*
pickerelweed
leconte sedge
rush fuirena
water primrose
lemon bacopa
yellow nut-grass*
manyspike flatsedge
flat sedge spp.
tropical flatsedge
barnyard grass*
floating water-hyacinth*
melaleuca*
baby-tears

spatterdock
maidencane
three-square
giant bulrush


Plant Species
Hydrilla verticillata
Panicum repens
Nitella spp.
Potamogeton illinoensis
Vallisneria americana
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Sagittaria lancifolia
Typha spp.
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Pontederia cordata
Cyperus lecontei
Fuirena scirpoidea
Ludwigia spp.
Bacopa caroliniana
Cyperus esculentus
Cyperus polystachyos
Cyperus spp.
Cyperus surinamensis
Echinochloa crusgalli
Eichhornia crassipes
Melaleuca quinquenervia
Micranthemum umbrosum
Nitella prolonga
Nuphar luteum
Panicum hemitomon
Scirpus americanus
Scirpus californicus


Frequency (%)
100
90
80
80
80
50
50
40
30
30
20
20
20
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10











Ivanhoe East / Orange

Aquatic plant data collected on July 7, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 5 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
hydrilla*
tapegrass
bald cypress
torpedograss*
giant bulrush
elephant-ear*
wax myrtle
maidencane
Brazilian pepper*
southern naiad
spatterdock
pickerelweed
willow
cat-tail


Plant Species
Hydrilla verticillata
Vallisneria americana
Taxodium distichum
Panicum repens
Scirpus californicus
Colocasia esculenta
Myrica cerifera
Panicum hemitomon
Schinus terebinthifolius
Najas guadalupensis
Nuphar luteum
Pontederia cordata
Salix spp.
Typha spp.


Frequency (%)
100
100
80
60
60
40
40
40
40
20
20
20
20
20











Ivanhoe Middle / Orange

Aquatic plant data collected on July 7, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 5 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
hydrilla*
bald cypress
elephant-ear*
spatterdock
giant bulrush
tapegrass
water-pennywort
water primrose
wax myrtle
American lotus
torpedograss*
Egyptian paspalidium
pickerelweed
willow
Brazilian pepper*
cat-tail


Plant Species
Hydrilla verticillata
Taxodium distichum
Colocasia esculenta
Nuphar luteum
Scirpus californicus
Vallisneria americana
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Ludwigia spp.
Myrica cerifera
Nelumbo lutea
Panicum repens
Paspalidium geminatum
Pontederia cordata
Salix spp.
Schinus terebinthifolius
Typha spp.


Frequency (%)
100
80
60
60
60
60
40
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20











Ivanhoe West / Orange

Aquatic plant data collected on July 7, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 5 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
hydrilla*
tapegrass
bald cypress
manyspike flatsedge
water-pennywort
spatterdock
torpedograss*
giant bulrush
red maple
alligator-weed*
wax myrtle
fragrant water-lily
maidencane
willow
fire flag


Plant Species
Hydrilla verticillata
Vallisneria americana
Taxodium distichum
Cyperus polystachyos
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Nuphar luteum
Panicum repens
Scirpus californicus
Acer rubrum
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Myrica cerifera
Nymphaea odorata
Panicum hemitomon
Salix spp.
Thalia geniculata


Frequency (%)
100
100
80
60
60
60
60
60
20
20
20
20
20
20
20











John's / Orange

Aquatic plant data collected on July 15, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 30 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
alligator-weed*
maidencane
torpedograss*
baby-tears
hydrilla*
smartweed
floating water-hyacinth*
coontail
duck-potato
water primrose
southern naiad
willow
buttonbush
pickerelweed
sand cordgrass
salt-bush
leconte sedge
haspan flatsedge
water-pennywort
common salvinia
bacopa
Illinois pondweed
slender spikerush
flatsedge
fragrant water-lily
sesbans
manyspike flatsedge
American lotus
spatterdock
giant bulrush
bald cypress
cat-tail
tropical flatsedge
rush fuirena
shore rush
large-headed rush
wax myrtle
burhead sedge*


Plant Species
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Panicum hemitomon
Panicum repens
Micranthemum umbrosum
Hydrilla verticillata
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Eichhornia crassipes
Ceratophyllum demersum
Sagittaria lancifolia
Ludwigia spp.
Najas guadalupensis
Salix spp.
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Pontederia cordata
Spartina bakeri
Baccharis spp.
Cyperus lecontei
Cyperus haspan
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Salvinia minima
Bacopa monnieri
Potamogeton illinoensis
Eleocharis baldwinii
Cyperus odoratus
Nymphaea odorata
Sesbania spp.
Cyperus polystachyos
Nelumbo lutea
Nuphar luteum
Scirpus californicus
Taxodium distichum
Typha spp.
Cyperus surinamensis
Fuirena scirpoidea
Juncus marginatus
Juncus megacephalus
Myrica cerifera
Scirpus cubensis


Frequency (%)
100
100
90
80
67
67
50
43
43
40
40
40
37
37
37
30
30
23
23
23
20
20
17
13
13
13
10
10
10
10
10
10
7
7
7
7
7
7


15.0
5.2
4.6
3.6
2.8
190.8














Common Name
southern water-hemp
Baldwin flatsedge
swamp flatsedge
slender fimbry
red root
southern water-grass
banana-lily
water-lettuce*
tapegrass


John's / Orange

Plant Species
Amaranthus australis
Cyperus globulosus
Cyperus ligularis
Fimbristylis autumnalis
Lachnanthes caroliniana
Luziola fluitans
Nymphoides aquatica
Pistia stratiotes
Vallisneria americana


Frequency (%)
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3











Starke / Orange

Aquatic plant data collected on September 1, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
alligator-weed*
Illinois pondweed
slender spikerush
water-pennywort
water primrose
torpedograss*
pickerelweed
duck-potato
tapegrass
coontail
water-lettuce*
smartweed
cat-tail
flatsedge
baby-tears
maidencane
willow
elephant-ear*
hydrilla*
fragrant water-lily
common salvinia
red maple
floating water-hyacinth*
rush fuirena
St. John's wort
soft rush
common duckweed
haspan flatsedge
barnyard grass*
jointed spikerush
wax myrtle
southern naiad
spatterdock
giant bulrush
salt-bush
musk-grass
manyspike flatsedge
tropical flatsedge


Plant Species
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Potamogeton illinoensis
Eleocharis baldwinii
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Ludwigia spp.
Panicum repens
Pontederia cordata
Sagittaria lancifolia
Vallisneria americana
Ceratophyllum demersum
Pistia stratiotes
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Typha spp.
Cyperus odoratus
Micranthemum umbrosum
Panicum hemitomon
Salix spp.
Colocasia esculenta
Hydrilla verticillata
Nymphaea odorata
Salvinia minima
Acer rubrum
Eichhornia crassipes
Fuirena scirpoidea
Hypericum spp.
Juncus eittu.\l.\
Lemna minor
Cyperus haspan
Echinochloa crusgalli
Eleocharis interstincta
Myrica cerifera
Najas guadalupensis
Nuphar luteum
Scirpus californicus
Baccharis spp.
Chara spp.
Cyperus polystachyos
Cyperus surinamensis


Frequency (%)
100
100
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
80
70
70
70
50
50
50
50
40
40
40
40
30
30
30
30
30
30
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
10
10
10
10


20.0
3.1
5.6
3.1
3.0
103.5
4.5











Starke / Orange


Common Name
dwarf umbrella sedge
shore rush
large-headed rush
sesbans


Plant Species
Fuirena pumila
Juncus marginatus
Juncus megacephalus
Sesbania spp.


Frequency (%)
10
10
10
10











Alligator / Osceola

Aquatic plant data collected on June 11, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 15 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
torpedograss*
duck-potato
rush fuirena
maidencane
banana-lily
pickerelweed
slender spikerush
water-pennywort
wax myrtle
red maple
buttonbush
swamp rosemallow
fragrant water-lily
bald cypress
spatterdock
dwarf arrowhead
red ludwigia
water primrose
sand cordgrass
shore rush
giant bulrush
bacopa
common duckweed
southern water-grass
bog-moss
cat-tail
yellow-eyed grass
yellow nut-grass*
leconte sedge
manyspike flatsedge
floating water-hyacinth*
weak rush
swamp tupelo
common salvinia
alligator-weed*
red root
Egyptian paspalidium
willow


Plant Species
Panicum repens
Sagittaria lancifolia
Fuirena scirpoidea
Panicum hemitomon
Nymphoides aquatica
Pontederia cordata
Eleocharis baldwinii
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Myrica cerifera
Acer rubrum
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Hibiscus grandiflorus
Nymphaea odorata
Taxodium distichum
Nuphar luteum
Sagittaria subulata
Ludwigia repens
Ludwigia spp.
Spartina bakeri
Juncus marginatus
Scirpus californicus
Bacopa monnieri
Lemna minor
Luziola fluitans
Mayacafluviatilis
Typha spp.
Xyris spp.
Cyperus esculentus
Cyperus lecontei
Cyperus polystachyos
Eichhornia crassipes
Juncus debilis
Nyssa sylvatica
Salvinia minima
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Lachnanthes caroliniana
Paspalidium geminatum
Salix spp.


Frequency (%)
100
87
80
80
73
73
60
60
60
47
47
47
47
47
40
40
33
33
33
27
27
20
20
20
20
20
20
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
7
7
7
7


0.0
0.0
2.5
1.4
0.6
292.0
3.2











Alligator / Osceola


Common Name
exotic bur-reed
purple bladderwort


Plant Species
Sparganium erectum
Utricularia purpurea


Frequency (%)
7











Kissimmee / Osceola

Aquatic plant data collected on August 3, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 20 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
Egyptian paspalidium
pickerelweed
willow
fragrant water-lily
tapegrass
spatterdock
maidencane
torpedograss*
flatsedge
water primrose
duck-potato
water-pennywort
American lotus
bladderwort
alligator-weed*
hydrilla*
smartweed
giant bulrush
sesbans
coontail
slender spikerush
red ludwigia
southern water-grass
Illinois pondweed
cat-tail
wax myrtle
swamp rosemallow
American cupscale
buttonbush
floating water-hyacinth*
rush fuirena
burhead sedge*
sand cordgrass
bladderwort species
common salvinia
barnyard grass*
southern naiad
soft stem bulrush


Plant Species
Paspalidium geminatum
Pontederia cordata
Salix spp.
Nymphaea odorata
Vallisneria americana
Nuphar luteum
Panicum hemitomon
Panicum repens
Cyperus odoratus
Ludwigia spp.
Sagittaria lancifolia
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Nelumbo lutea
Utriculariafoliosa
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Hydrilla verticillata
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Scirpus californicus
Sesbania spp.
Ceratophyllum demersum
Eleocharis baldwinii
Ludwigia repens
Luziola fluitans
Potamogeton illinoensis
Typha spp.
Myrica cerifera
Hibiscus grandiflorus
Sacciolepis striata
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Eichhornia crassipes
Fuirena scirpoidea
Scirpus cubensis
Spartina bakeri
Utricularia spp.
Salvinia minima
Echinochloa crusgalli
Najas guadalupensis
Scirpus validus


Frequency (%)
100
95
85
80
80
75
75
70
65
65
65
60
55
55
50
50
50
50
50
45
45
45
40
40
40
35
30
30
25
25
25
25
25
25
20
15
15
15


7.1
4.7
5.9
1340.1











Kissimmee / Osceola


Common Name
lemon bacopa
tropical flatsedge
club-rush
frog's-bit
water-lettuce*
common arrowhead
purple bladderwort
azolla
baby-tears
stonewort
banana-lily
Brazilian pepper*


Plant Species
Bacopa caroliniana
Cyperus surinamensis
Eleocharis cellulosa
Limnobium spongia
Pistia stratiotes
Sagittaria latifolia
Utricularia purpurea
Azolla caroliniana
Micranthemum umbrosum
Nitella spp.
Nymphoides aquatica
Schinus terebinthifolius


Frequency (%)
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
5
5











Tohopekaliga / Osceola

Aquatic plant data collected on August 5, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 20 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
Egyptian paspalidium
cat-tail
pickerelweed
giant bulrush
tapegrass
hydrilla*
water primrose
maidencane
smartweed
duck-potato
alligator-weed*
willow
American lotus
sesbans
slender spikerush
bald cypress
floating water-hyacinth*
fragrant water-lily
club-rush
common salvinia
coontail
wax myrtle
Brazilian pepper*
tropical flatsedge
swamp rosemallow
red ludwigia
southern naiad
spatterdock
bladderwort
elephant-ear*
flatsedge
rush fuirena
common duckweed
southern water-grass
torpedograss*
water-lettuce*
soft stem bulrush
red maple


Plant Species
Paspalidium geminatum
Typha spp.
Pontederia cordata
Scirpus californicus
Vallisneria americana
Hydrilla verticillata
Ludwigia spp.
Panicum hemitomon
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Sagittaria lancifolia
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Salix spp.
Nelumbo lutea
Sesbania spp.
Eleocharis baldwinii
Taxodium distichum
Eichhornia crassipes
Nymphaea odorata
Eleocharis cellulosa
Salvinia minima
Ceratophyllum demersum
Myrica cerifera
Schinus terebinthifolius
Cyperus surinamensis
Hibiscus grandiflorus
Ludwigia repens
Najas guadalupensis
Nuphar luteum
Utriculariafoliosa
Colocasia esculenta
Cyperus odoratus
Fuirena scirpoidea
Lemna minor
Luziola fluitans
Panicum repens
Pistia stratiotes
Scirpus validus
Acer rubrum


Frequency (%)
100
85
80
75
65
60
60
60
60
55
50
45
40
40
35
35
30
30
25
25
20
20
20
15
15
15
15
15
15
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
5


5.7
3.7
6.0
2517.2











Tohopekaliga / Osceola


Common Name
azolla
lemon bacopa
musk-grass
Baldwin flatsedge
manyspike flatsedge
barnyard grass*
water spikerush
water-pennywort
frog's-bit
baby-tears
banana-lily
American cupscale
common arrowhead
fire flag


Plant Species
Azolla caroliniana
Bacopa caroliniana
Chara spp.
Cyperus globulosus
Cyperus polystachyos
Echinochloa crusgalli
Eleocharis elongata
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Limnobium spongia
Micranthemum umbrosum
Nymphoides aquatica
Sacciolepis striata
Sagittaria latifolia
Thalia geniculata


Frequency (%)
5
5











Dexter / Polk

Aquatic plant data collected on June 9, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 10 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
cat-tail
tapegrass
fragrant water-lily
Illinois pondweed
water primrose
duck-potato
hydrilla*
torpedograss*
rush fuirena
water-pennywort
melaleuca*
pickerelweed
alligator-weed*
sawgrass
floating water-hyacinth*
slender spikerush
baby-tears
southern naiad
smartweed
salt-bush
elephant-ear*
common duckweed
wax myrtle
maidencane
willow
burhead sedge*
coontail
haspan flatsedge
flatsedge
manyspike flatsedge
weak rush
common salvinia
soft stem bulrush


Plant Species
Typha spp.
Vallisneria americana
Nymphaea odorata
Potamogeton illinoensis
Ludwigia spp.
Sagittaria lancifolia
Hydrilla verticillata
Panicum repens
Fuirena scirpoidea
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Melaleuca quinquenervia
Pontederia cordata
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Cladium jamaicense
Eichhornia crassipes
Eleocharis baldwinii
Micranthemum umbrosum
Najas guadalupensis
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Baccharis spp.
Colocasia esculenta
Lemna minor
Myrica cerifera
Panicum hemitomon
Salix spp.
Scirpus cubensis
Ceratophyllum demersum
Cyperus haspan
Cyperus odoratus
Cyperus polystachyos
Juncus debilis
Salvinia minima
Scirpus validus


Frequency (%)
100
100
80
80
70
70
60
60
50
50
40
40
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
10
10
10
10
10
10
10











Weohyakapka / Polk

Aquatic plant data collected on June 10, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 20 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
torpedograss*
pickerelweed
cat-tail
water primrose
duck-potato
willow
maidencane
water-pennywort
giant bulrush
floating water-hyacinth*
leconte sedge
spatterdock
smartweed
common salvinia
alligator-weed*
flatsedge
Egyptian paspalidium
soft stem bulrush
buttonbush
water hemlock
slender spikerush
club-rush
rush fuirena
banana-lily
wax myrtle
lemon bacopa
barnyard grass*
weak rush
tapegrass
red maple
manyspike flatsedge
fragrant water-lily
water-lettuce*
sand cordgrass
fanwort
swamp rosemallow
shore rush
large-headed rush


Plant Species
Panicum repens
Pontederia cordata
Typha spp.
Ludwigia spp.
Sagittaria lancifolia
Salix spp.
Panicum hemitomon
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Scirpus californicus
Eichhornia crassipes
Cyperus lecontei
Nuphar luteum
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Salvinia minima
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Cyperus odoratus
Paspalidium geminatum
Scirpus validus
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Cicuta mexicana
Eleocharis baldwinii
Eleocharis cellulosa
Fuirena scirpoidea
Nymphoides aquatica
Myrica cerifera
Bacopa caroliniana
Echinochloa crusgalli
Juncus debilis
Vallisneria americana
Acer rubrum
Cyperus polystachyos
Nymphaea odorata
Pistia stratiotes
Spartina bakeri
Cabomba caroliniana
Hibiscus grandiflorus
Juncus marginatus
Juncus megacephalus


Frequency (%)
90
90
85
65
65
65
60
55
55
50
40
40
40
40
35
35
35
35
30
25
25
25
25
25
20
15
15
15
15
10
10
10
10
10
5
5
5
5


0.0
0.0
2.4
0.9
1.4
421.5
2.1











Weohyakapka / Polk


Common Name
path rush
baby-tears
three-square


Plant Species
Juncus tenuis
Micranthemum umbrosum
Scirpus americanus


Frequency (%)
5











Jesup / Seminole

Aquatic plant data collected on June 25, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 20 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
common reed
floating water-hyacinth*
alligator-weed*
water-pennywort
bald cypress
southern water-hemp
buttonbush
water-lettuce*
smartweed
common duckweed
American cupscale
common salvinia
swamp rosemallow
spatterdock
swamp tupelo
willow
red maple
salt-bush
elephant-ear*
hydrilla*
water primrose
wax myrtle
Egyptian paspalidium
three-square
giant bulrush
sesbans
sand cordgrass
fire flag


Plant Species
Phragmites australis
Eichhornia crassipes
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Taxodium distichum
Amaranthus australis
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Pistia stratiotes
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Lemna minor
Sacciolepis striata
Salvinia minima
Hibiscus grandiflorus
Nuphar luteum
Nyssa sylvatica
Salix spp.
Acer rubrum
Baccharis spp.
Colocasia esculenta
Hydrilla verticillata
Ludwigia spp.
Myrica cerifera
Paspalidium geminatum
Scirpus americanus
Scirpus californicus
Sesbania spp.
Spartina bakeri
Thalia geniculata


Frequency (%)
100
70
45
45
35
30
30
25
25
20
20
20
15
15
15
15
10
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5


0.0
0.0
4.8
3.2
0.1
1941.3
1.5











Panasoffkee / Sumter

Aquatic plant data collected on August 6, 2009

Percent area covered with aquatic vegetation (PAC, %)
Percent of lake's volume filled with vegetation (PVI, %)
Average emergent plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average floating-leaved plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average submersed plant biomass (kg wet wt/m2)
Average width of emergent and floating-leaved zone (ft.)
Average lake depth (m)

Frequency that plant species occur in 15 evenly spaced transects around the lake.
* Indicates non-native plant species


Common Name
southern water-hemp
coontail
duck-potato
willow
water-pennywort
cat-tail
tapegrass
pickerelweed
red maple
buttonbush
swamp rosemallow
fragrant water-lily
common salvinia
smartweed
giant bulrush
southern naiad
water-lettuce*
bald cypress
alligator-weed*
hydrilla*
sawgrass
common duckweed
flatsedge
floating water-hyacinth*
American cupscale
barnyard grass*
maidencane
azolla
water hemlock
swamp tupelo
musk-grass
elephant-ear*
water spikerush
wax myrtle
torpedograss*
swamp bay
common reed
marsh fleabane


Plant Species
Amaranthus australis
Ceratophyllum demersum
Sagittaria lancifolia
Salix spp.
Hydrocotyle umbellata
Typha spp.
Vallisneria americana
Pontederia cordata
Acer rubrum
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Hibiscus grandiflorus
Nymphaea odorata
Salvinia minima
Polygonum hydropiperoides
Scirpus californicus
Najas guadalupensis
Pistia stratiotes
Taxodium distichum
Alternanthera philoxeroides
Hydrilla verticillata
Cladium jamaicense
Lemna minor
Cyperus odoratus
Eichhornia crassipes
Sacciolepis striata
Echinochloa crusgalli
Panicum hemitomon
Azolla caroliniana
Cicuta mexicana
Nyssa sylvatica
Chara spp.
Colocasia esculenta
Eleocharis elongata
Myrica cerifera
Panicum repens
Persea palustris
Phragmites australis
Pluchea spp.


Frequency (%)
93
93
93
93
73
73
73
67
60
60
60
60
60
53
53
47
47
47
40
40
33
33
27
27
27
20
20
13
13
13
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7


69.0
36.6
9.2
5.1
7.9
226.6
1.3











Panasoffkee / Sumter


Common Name
Illinois pondweed
common arrowhead
sesbans
sand cordgrass
bladderwort


Plant Species
Potamogeton illinoensis
Sagittaria latifolia
Sesbania spp.
Spartina bakeri
Utriculariafoliosa


Frequency (%)
7
7
7
7
7

































Appendix C: Water chemistry data for all lakes sampled in 2009 as part of the long
term monitoring program.












Lochloosa (Alachua County)
LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary

Location: Latitude 29031'2.6", Longitude 82o7'22.5"

Period of record: 143 sampling dates; 9/3/93 to 2/23/10

Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 5648.7 acres / 2286 hectares

Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08)

Geologic formation (Brooks 1981):
The geology is dominated by phosphatic sand, silty sand, and clay of the Hawthorne Formation

Physiographic region (Brooks 1981):
The lake lies in the Alachua Prairies subdivision of the Northern Peninsual Plains division of the Ocala Uplift District


Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida.
Data reported are means from 7 sampling dates:


pH
Conductance (gS/cm @ 25 C)
Chloride (mg/L)


Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3)
Color (Pt-Co units)


Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data

Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 143 months sampled:


Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term Secchi depth (ft)


Minimum
23
750
9


Average
68
2234
92
1.8


Maximum
180
6460
349
5.0


2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data

Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 4 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, gg/L),
total nitrogen (TN, gg/L), chlorophyll (CHL, gg/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009:


Date
1/27/09
2/26/09
3/31/09
4/28/09
6/23/09
7/16/09
8/27/09
9/22/09
10/29/09
2009 Average


TP (gg/L)
59
71
72
58
23
60
60
54
45
56


TN (Lg/L)
3343
3110
3860
1380
1498
1558
1555
1443
1440
2132


CHL (Ig/L)
113
108
184
16
31
57
54
46
41


SECCHI (ft)
0.5
0.6
0.5
3.5
4.0
2.4
2.3
2.5
2.5













Newnan (Alachua County)
LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary

Location: Latitude 29037'55.9", Longitude 82o13'20.2"

Period of record: 121 sampling dates; 9/10/93 to 5/30/09

Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 7427 acres / 3006 hectares

Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08)

Geologic formation (Brooks 1981):
The geology is dominated by phosphatic sand, clayey fine sand, and clay of the Bone Valley Formation, and by the phosphatic
sand, silty sand, and clay of the Hawthorne Formation

Physiographic region (Brooks 1981):
The lake lies in the Newnans Lake Basin subdivision of the Northern Peninsual Plains division of the Ocala Uplift District


Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida.
Data reported are means from 5 sampling dates:


pH
Conductance (gS/cm @ 25 C)
Chloride (mg/L)


Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3)
Color (Pt-Co units)


Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data

Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 121 months sampled:


Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term Secchi depth (ft)


Minimum
58
1250
19
0.4


Average
146
3378
194
1.1


Maximum
348
11500
493
2.5


2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data

Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, gg/L),
total nitrogen (TN, gg/L), chlorophyll (CHL, gg/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009:


Date
1/31/09
2/28/09
3/31/09
4/29/09
5/30/09
2009 Average


TP (gg/L)
205
258
280
277
179


TN (Lg/L)
3833
4667
4967
4690
3747
4381


CHL (g_/L)
158
169
203
218
203
190


SECCHI (ft)
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8











Orange (Alachua County)
LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary

Location: Latitude 29027'49.9", Longitude 82o10'52"

Period of record: 140 sampling dates; 9/3/93 to 2/23/10

Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 13859.8 acres / 5609 hectares

Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08)

Geologic formation (Brooks 1981):
The geology is dominated by terrace deposits of surface sand over clayey sand and clay with basal deposits of limestone of the
preglacial Pleistocene

Physiographic region (Brooks 1981):
The lake lies in the Alachua Prairies subdivision of the Northern Peninsual Plains division of the Ocala Uplift District


Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida.
Data reported are means from 4 sampling dates:


pH
Conductance (gS/cm @ 25 C)
Chloride (mg/L)


Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3)
Color (Pt-Co units)


Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data

Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 140 months sampled:


Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term Secchi depth (ft)


Minimum
22
955


Average
72
1796
50
2.5


Maximum
303
5483
308
7.0


2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data

Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 4 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, gg/L),
total nitrogen (TN, gg/L), chlorophyll (CHL, gg/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009:


Date
1/27/09
2/26/09
3/31/09
4/28/09
6/23/09
7/16/09
8/27/09
9/22/09
10/29/09
2009 Average


TP (gg/L)
39
45
45
43
33
34
60
32
34


TN (g/L)
1658
1748
2008
1983
1738
1853
2685
1863
1650
1909


CHL (Ig/L)
20
21
28
25
35
37
83
26
22
33


SECCHI (ft)
2.7
2.6
2.0
2.0
3.2
2.0
1.7
2.5
3.5
2.5












Santa Fe (Alachua County)
LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary

Location: Latitude 29044'19.2", Longitude 824'20.1"

Period of record: 263 sampling dates; 8/16/86 to 3/1/10

Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 4970 acres / 2011 hectares

Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Upper Santa Fe Flatwoods (75-03)

Geologic formation (Brooks 1981):
The geology is dominated by deeply weathered clayey sand and granular sand of the Hawthorne Formation

Physiographic region (Brooks 1981):
The lake lies in the Perched Lake and Prairies division of the Central Lake District


Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida.
Data reported are means from 7 sampling dates:


pH
Conductance (gS/cm @ 25 C)
Chloride (mg/L)


Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3)
Color (Pt-Co units)


Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data

Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 263 months sampled:


Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term Secchi depth (ft)



2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data


Minimum


Average
12
478


Maximum
39
997
37
17.5


Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, gg/L),
total nitrogen (TN, gg/L), chlorophyll (CHL, gg/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009:


Date
1/25/09
2/25/09
3/30/09
4/29/09
5/27/09
6/29/09
7/29/09
9/29/09
11/29/09


TP (gg/L)
34
19
20
24
32
24
26
20
30


2009 Average


TN (Lg/L)
997
637
617
547
827
767
847
823
890
772


CHL (Ig/L)
34
11
12
12
37


SECCHI (ft)
4.8
5.1
4.6
5.0
4.0
4.0
3.8
4.0
4.8











Wauberg (Alachua County)
LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary

Location: Latitude 29031'48.4", Longitude 8218'1.74"

Period of record: 222 sampling dates; 3/31/90 to 7/25/09

Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 370.6 acres / 150 hectares

Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Central Valley (75-08)

Geologic formation (Brooks 1981):
The geology is dominated by clayey sand and clay with sandy to clayey limestone of the Hawthorne Formation

Physiographic region (Brooks 1981):
The lake lies in the Fairfield Hills subdivision of the Marion Hills division of the Ocala Uplift District


Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida.
Data reported are means from 10 sampling dates:


pH
Conductance (gS/cm @ 25 C)
Chloride (mg/L)


Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3)
Color (Pt-Co units)


Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data

Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 222 months sampled:


Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term Secchi depth (ft)


Minimum
54
1153
30


Average
126
1931
97


Maximum
317
3240
240
3.5


2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data

Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, gg/L),
total nitrogen (TN, gg/L), chlorophyll (CHL, gg/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009:


Date
1/26/09
2/28/09
3/21/09
4/29/09
5/25/09
6/20/09
7/25/09
2009 Average


TP (gg/L)
125
126
134
128
116
127
126
126


TN ([L/L)
2087
2037
2500
2083
1830
2283
2550
2196


CHL (Ig/L)
57
56
86
61
94


SECCHI (ft)
2.5
2.3
2.0
2.0
2.0











Deer Point (Bay County)
LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary

Location: Latitude 3017'24.18", Longitude 85035'30.05"

Period of record: 84 sampling dates; 1/10/90 to 2/9/10

Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 5000 acres / 2024 hectares

Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Gulf Coast Lowlands (75-01)

Geologic formation (Brooks 1981):
The geology is dominated by fine sand and silt with lenses of gravel and clay of the Apalachicola paleo-cuspate delta and
alluvial plain

Physiographic region (Brooks 1981):
The lake lies in the Delta Plain division of the Apalachicola Delta District


Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida.
Data reported are means from 5 sampling dates:


pH
Conductance (gS/cm @ 25 C)
Chloride (mg/L)


Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3)
Color (Pt-Co units)


Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data

Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 84 months sampled:


Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term Secchi depth (ft)


Minimum
3
70
0


Average
8
255
2


Maximum
30
673
7
12.0


2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data

Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, gg/L),
total nitrogen (TN, gg/L), chlorophyll (CHL, gg/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009:


Date
1/20/09
2/24/09
4/21/09
6/26/09
8/25/09
11/17/09
2009 Average


TP (gg/L)
7
8
9
12
11
10
9


TN (g/L)
413
253
330
240
167
293
283


CHL (Ig/L)

2
2
7


SECCHI (ft)
8.0











Sampson (Bradford County)
LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary

Location: Latitude 29055'32.3", Longitude 8211'25"

Period of record: 125 sampling dates; 4/16/99 to 9/20/09

Surface Area (LAKEWATCH): 1865.6 acres / 755 hectares

Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Upper Santa Fe Flatwoods (75-03)

Geologic formation (Brooks 1981):
The geology is dominated by deeply weathered clayey sand and granular sand of the Hawthorne Formation

Physiographic region (Brooks 1981):
The lake lies in the Perched Lake and Prairies division of the Central Lake District


Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida.
Data reported are means from 5 sampling dates:


pH
Conductance (gS/cm @ 25 C)
Chloride (mg/L)


Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3)
Color (Pt-Co units)


Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data

Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 125 months sampled:


Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term Secchi depth (ft)


Minimum
5


Average
23
724
7


Maximum
67
1393
34
11.3


2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data

Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, gg/L),
total nitrogen (TN, gg/L), chlorophyll (CHL, gg/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009:


Date
1/28/09
2/22/09
3/24/09
4/27/09
5/26/09
6/25/09
7/26/09
9/20/09
2009 Average


TP (gg/L)
17
16
18
16
22
25
24
22
20


TN (Lg/L)
880
817
780
890
683
1080
970
953
882


CHL (Ig/L)
5


SECCHI (ft)
5.3












Poinsett (Brevard County)
LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary

Location: Latitude 28020'23.7", Longitude 8050'10.4"

Period of record: 38 sampling dates; 2/18/93 to 1/29/10

Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 4334 acres / 1754 hectares

Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Eastern Flatlands (75-10)

Geologic formation (Brooks 1981):
The geology is dominated by dune sand and shell with silty sand, silt, and clay of the Princess Ann Formation

Physiographic region (Brooks 1981):
The lake lies in the St John's Wet Prairie division of the Eastern Flatwoods District


Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida.
Data reported are means from 4 sampling dates:


pH
Conductance (gS/cm @ 25 C)
Chloride (mg/L)


7.7
785
204.3


Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3)
Color (Pt-Co units)


Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data

Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 38 months sampled:


Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term Secchi depth (ft)


Minimum
39
1043
2


Average
110
2216
20


Maximum
355
4543
83
3.5


2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data

Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, gg/L),
total nitrogen (TN, gg/L), chlorophyll (CHL, gg/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009:


Date
1/26/09
2/24/09
3/16/09
4/20/09
5/18/09
6/23/09
7/28/09
8/24/09
9/23/09
10/27/09
11/23/09
12/28/09
2009 Average


TP (gg/L)
53
101
65
178
71
279
158
116
104


TN (Lg/L)
2397
3137
1987
1740
1997
2210
2140
1750


CHL (Ig/L)
17
31
17
83
22
8


SECCHI (ft)
1.9
0.9
1.4
0.5
1.2
1.6


2170











Conservation Area 3 (Broward County)
LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary

Location: Latitude 25055'20.1", Longitude 80034'38.82"

Period of record: 29 sampling dates; 7/19/07 to 11/16/09

Surface Area : acre / hectare

Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Everglades (76-01)

Geologic formation (Brooks 1981):
The geology is dominated plastic and shell deposits of the Fort Thompson Group Formation

Physiographic region (Brooks 1981):
The station lies in the Pompano-Fort Lauderdale Gap subdivision of the Southern Atlantic Coastal Strip division of the Gold
Coast-Florida Bay District


Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida.
Data reported are means from. sampling dates:


pH
Conductance (gS/cm @ 25 C)
Chloride (mg/L)


Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3)
Color (Pt-Co units)


Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data

Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 29 months sampled:


Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term Secchi depth (ft)


Minimum
5
1107
1
3.5


Average
10
1677
5
6.9


Maximum
34
2103
45
11.1


2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data

Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, gg/L),
total nitrogen (TN, gg/L), chlorophyll (CHL, gg/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009:


Date
1/16/09
2/14/09
3/17/09
4/16/09
5/18/09
6/18/09
7/17/09
8/17/09
9/17/09
10/14/09
11/16/09
2009 Average


TP (gg/L)
8
5
11
12
34
16
7
9
11
11
11


TN (g/L)
1753
1530
1760
2083
2103
1927
1443
1453
1577
1667
1590
1717


CHL (Ig/L)
2
4


SECCHI (ft)
9.5
10.7
7.9












Trafford (Collier County)
LAKEWATCH Water Chemistry Summary

Location: Latitude 26o25'18.95", Longitude 8129'36.47"

Period of record: 32 sampling dates; 5/15/01 to 11/12/09

Surface Area (Shafer et al. 1986): 1494 acres / 605 hectares

Lake Region (Griffith et al. 1997): Immokalee Rise (75-37)

Geologic formation (Brooks 1981):
The geology is dominated plastic and shell deposits of the Fort Thompson Group Formation

Physiographic region (Brooks 1981):
The lake lies in the Corkscrew Swamp division of the Southwestern Flatwoods District


Supplemental, unpublished water chemistry data, University of Florida.
Data reported are means from 3 sampling dates:


pH
Conductance (pS/cm @ 25 C)
Chloride (mg/L)


Total alkalinity (mg/L as CaCO3)
Color (Pt-Co units)


110.8
48


Long-term Florida LAKEWATCH Data

Numbers reported below are the minimum, average and maximum value for the 32 months sampled:


Long-term total phosphorus concentrations (gg/L)
Long-term total nitrogen concentrations (pg/L)
Long-term total chlorophyll concentrations (pg/L)
Long-term Secchi depth (ft)


Minimum
68
983
16


Average
239
2971
46


Maximum
505
5563
108
2.4


2009 Florida LAKEWATCH Data

Numbers reported below are monthly averages calculated from 3 mid-lake stations for total phosphorus (TP, pg/L),
total nitrogen (TN, pg/L), chlorophyll (CHL, pg/L) and Secchi depth (SECCHI, ft) during 2009:


Date
1/15/09
2/17/09
3/14/09
4/17/09
5/21/09
6/15/09
7/15/09
8/18/09
9/16/09
10/18/09
11/12/09
2009 Average


TP (gg/L)
394
316
370
377
320
323
361
211
290
229
248


TNLpg@
TN (ug/L)
2640
2207
983
2630
3120
2670
2043
1820
2827
3263
3163
2488


CHL (Ig/L)
17
34
21
47
45
30
28
61
108
78
64


SECCHI (ft)
1.8
1.7
1.9
1.2
1.0
1.2
1.4
1.9
2.4
1.0
1.1




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