• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Title Page
 Letter of transmittal
 Foreword
 Table of Contents
 Congressional documents
 Government documents
 Books, pamphlets, and research...
 Periodicals
 Newspaper articles and editori...
 State laws relating to employment...














Title: Illegal aliens and alien labor
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087214/00001
 Material Information
Title: Illegal aliens and alien labor a bibliography and compilation of background materials (1970-June 1977) : prepared at the request of the Committee on the Judiciary, U.S. House of Representatives
Series Title: Illegal aliens and alien labor
Physical Description: vii, 58 p. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Library of Congress -- Congressional Research Service
United States -- Congress. -- House. -- Committee on the Judiciary
Publisher: U.S. Govt. Print. Off.
Place of Publication: Washington
Publication Date: 1977
 Subjects
Subject: Alien labor -- Bibliography -- United States   ( lcsh )
Aliens -- Bibliography -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by the Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, Ninety-fifth Congress, first session.
General Note: At head of title: 95th Congress, 1st session. Committee print no. 9.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087214
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 03891992
lccn - 78600537

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Letter of transmittal
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Foreword
        Page v
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Congressional documents
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Government documents
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Books, pamphlets, and research studies
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Periodicals
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Newspaper articles and editorials
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    State laws relating to employment of illegal aliens
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
Full Text



95t Cession COMMITTEE PRINT No. 9




Illegal Aliens and Alien Labor:

A Bibliography and Compilation

of Background Materials

(1970-June 1977)



PREPARED AT THE REQUEST OF THE
COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY
U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
BY THE
CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
NINETY-FIFTH CONGRESS


FIRST SESSION







AUGUST 1977


93-032


Printed for the use of the Committee on the Judiciary

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON : 1977

















COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY

PETER'W. RODINO, JR., New Jersey, Chairman


JACK BROOKS, Texas
ROBERT W. KASTENMEIER, Wisconsin
DON EDWARDS, California
JOHN CONYERS, JR., Michigan
JOSHUA EILBERG, Pennsylvania
WALTER FLOWERS, Alabama
JAMES R. MANN, South Carolina
JOHN F. SEIBERLING, Ohio
GEORGE E. DANIELSON, California
ROBERT F, DRINAN, Massachusetts
BARBARA JORDAN, Texas
ELIZABETH HOLTZMAN, New York
ROMANO L. MAZZOLI, Kentucky
WILLIAM J. HUGHES, New Jersey
SAM B. HALL, Jr., Texas
LAMAR GUDGER, North Carolina
HAROLD L. VOLKMER, Missouri
HERBERT E. HARRIS II, Virginia
JIM SANTINI, Nevada
ALLEN E. ERTEL, Pennsylvania
BILLY LEE EVANS, Georgia
ANTHONY C. BEILENSON, California


ROBERT McCLORY, Illinois
TOM RAILSBACK, Illinois
CHARLES E. WIGGINS, California
HAMILTON FISH, JR., New York
M. CALDWELL BUTLER, Virginia
WILLIAM S. COHEN, Maine
CARLOS J. MOORHEAD, California
JOHN M. ASHBROOK, Ohio
HENRY J. HYDE, Illinois
THOMAS N. KINDNESS, Ohio
HAROLD S. SAWYER, Michigan


ALAN A. PARKER, General Counsel
GARNER J. CLINE, Staff Director
FRANKLIN G. POLE, Assoeiate Counsel


SUBCOMMITTEE ON IMMIGRATION, CITIZENSHIP, AND INTERNATIONAL LAW

JOSHUA EILBERG, Pennsylvania, chairman


ELIZABETH HOLTZMAN, New York
SAM B. HALL, JR., Texas
HERBERT E. HARRIS II, Virginia
BILLY LEE EVANS, Georgia


HAMILTON FISH, JR., New York
HAROLD S. SAWYER, Michigan


GARNER J. CLINE, Counsel
ARTHUR P. ENDRES, .r., Counsel
ALEXANDER B. Cook, Associate Counsel














Letter of Transmittal


THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS,
CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE,
Washington, D.C., June 30, 1977.
Hon. PETER W. RODINO, Jr.,
Chairman, Committee on the Judiciary,
U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.
DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: I am pleased to submit the accompanying
document, entitled "Immigration: Illegal Aliens and Alien Labor,
1970-June, 1977," which was prepared by the Congressional Research
Service at the request of the Committee on the Judiciary. It consists of
a compilation of background materials, including a comprehensive
bibliography, State laws relating to the employment of illegal aliens,
and brief summaries of U.S. Supreme Court cases relating to aliens
during the period covered, 1970 to date.
This document was prepared by the Education and Public Welfare
Division (EPW), the American Law Division (ALD), the Congres-
sional Reference Division (CRD), and the Library Services Division
(LSD). The project was coordinated by Joyce Vialet (EPW). Other
major contributors were Marsha Cerny (LSD), Scott Christenson
(EPW), Laurie McManus (ALD), and Vincent Treacy (ALD).
We appreciate this opportunity to be of assistance to the Com-
mittee in its continued deliberations on this important national issue.
Sincerely yours,
GILBERT GUDE, Director.












Foreword
During the 1970's, the major issue before the Congress in the area
of immigration has been illegal aliens. Illegal aliens are persons who
have violated the provisions of the Immigration and Nationality
Act, either by clandestine entry or by violation of the terms of legal
entry. In fiscal year 1976, the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization
Service (INS) apprehended 875,915 deportable-or illegal-aliens,
compared to 161,608 such apprehensions in fiscal year 1967. In recent.
years, the number of deportable aliens located by INS has been
about double the number of immigrants legally admitted for per-
manent residence. Unknown numbers escape apprehension and dis-
appear into an underground population beyond the reach and pro-
tection of the law.
This wholesale violation of the immigration law has been a matter of
great concern to the Committee on the Judiciary and its Subcom-
mittee on Immigration, Citizenship and International Law. During
the past three Congresses, no other issue has occupied the Subcom-
mittee more than the need to control the flow of illegal aliens, par-
ticularly across our Southern border, and to insure the orderly process
of immigration as determined by law. Beginning in 1971, extensive
hearings have been held on the subject, and have been published in
seven volumes. The Committee has three times reported legislation
relating to the problem, and the House has acted favorably on it twice,.
during the 92d and 93d Congresses.
The committee remains convinced that violation of the law on this
scale cannot and should not be tolerated. Further, we share the wide-
spread concern about the negative impact of the illegal entry of aliens
on, among other things, the U.S. labor market, the Hispanic-American
community, and the aliens themselves. Accordingly, this problem will
continue to receive top priority from the Committee on the Judiciary
and the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, and International
Law until we have arrived at a satisfactory legislative solution.
The seriousness of the illegal alien problem during the 1970s has
been matched only by its complexity. This document, prepared at the
request of the committee by the Congressional Research Service, is a
compendium of reference materials. It reflects the widespread concern
about and extensive exploration of the illegal alien issue by the Con-
gress, the executive branch, State and local governments, the press,
the legal profession, and academics. The Committee believes that the
information presented herein will be useful to the Congress in its.
continuing consideration of the illegal alien problem.
PETER W. RODINO, Jr.,
Chairman, Committee on the Judiciary.




















CONTENTS
Page
Foreword----___----____- __------__------------ v
I. Congressional documents ---------- ---------------- 1
A. Hearings, reports, committee prints, and debates_ 1
B. Other Congressional Record statements --------- 5
II. Government documents ----------------------------- 13
A. Federal ------------------------------------- 13
B. State andlocal------------------------------ 16
III. Books, pamphlets, and research studies ----------------- 16
IV. Periodicals ----------------------------------------- 20
V. Newspaper articles and editorials---------------------- 30
A. Newspaper articles --------------------------- 30
B. Editorials ----------------------------------- 48
VI. State laws relating to employment of illegal aliens -------- 51
VII. U.S. Supreme Court decisions relating to aliens---------- 54
(VII)














I. CONGRESSIONAL DOCUMENTS
A. HEARINGS, REPORTS, COMMITTEE PRINTS, AND DEBATES I
Amending the Immigration and Nationality Act. [Debate and vote in the House]
Congressional Record, v. 119, May 3, 1973: 14179-14209.
H.R. 982, relating primarily to illegal aliens, passed the House by a record
vote of 297 yeas to 63 nays.
-- Amending the Immigration and Nationality Act. [Debate and vote in
the House] Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 122, Sept. 29, 1976: H11682-
H11685.
House passage by voice vote of H.R. 14535, relating primarily to Western
Hemisphere immigration; enacted as P.L. 94-571.
- Amendment of the Immigration and Nationality Act. [Vote in the Senate]
Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 122, Oct. 1, 1976: S17692.
Senate passage by voice vote of H.R. 14535, relating primarily to Western
Hemisphere immigration; enacted as P.L. 94-571.
Immigration and Nationality Act amendments. [Debate and vote in the House]
Congressional Record, v. 118, Sept. 12, 1972: 30153-30186.
H.R. 16188, relating primarily to illegal aliens, passed the House by voice vote
after a motion to recommit was defeated by a vote of 53 yeas to 297 nays.
Immigration and Nationality Act Amendments of 1973. [Debate and vote in the
House] Congressional Record, v. 119, Sept.25, 1973: 31358-31368; Sept. 26, 1973:
31454-31478.
H.R. 981, relating primarily to Western Hemisphere immigration, passed the
House by a record vote of 336 yeas to 30 nays.
U.S. Congress. House. Committee on Appropriations. Subcommittee on the
Departments of State, Justice, and Commerce the Judiciary, and Related
Agencies. Departments of State, Justice, and Commerce, the Judiciary and
related agencies appropriations for 1971. Hearings, 91st Cong., 2d sess. Wash-
ington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1970. 1143 p.
Part 1-the Judiciary, Department of Justice; U.S. Immigration and Natural-
ization Service: 787-865.
--- Departments of State, Justice, and Commerce, the Judiciary, and related
agencies appropriations for 1972. Hearings, 92d Cong., 1st sess. Washington,
U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1971. 1322 p.
Part 1-The Judiciary, Department of Justice; U.S. Immigration and Natu-
ralization Service: 775-841.
---- Departments of State, Justice, and Commerce, the Judiciary, and related
agencies appropriations for 1973. Hearings, 92d Cong., 2d sess. Washington,
U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1972. 1234 p.
Part 1-The Judiciary, Department of Justice; U.S. Immigration and Natu-
ralization Service: 945-973.
----Departments of State, Justice, and Commerce, the Judiciary, and re-
lated agencies appropriations for 1974. Hearings, 93d Cong. 1st sess. Washing-
ton, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1973, 1106 p.
Part 1-The Judiciary, Department of Justice; U.S. Immigration and Natu-
uralization Service: 887-918.
--- Departments of State, Justice, and Commerce, the Judiciary, and related
agencies appropriations for 1975. Hearings, 93d Cong., 2d sess. Washington,
U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1974. 1140 p.
Part 1-The Judiciary, Department of Justice; U.S. Immigration and Natu-
uralization Service: 574-633.
---- Departments of State, Justice, and Commerce, the Judiciary, and related
agencies appropriations for 1976. 94th Cong., 1st sess. Washington, U.S.
Govt. Print. Off., 1975. 974 p.
Part 2-Department of Justice; U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Serv-
ice: 876-974.

1 Joyce Vialet, Education and Public Welfare Division.
(1)
93-032-77---2









U.S. Congress. House. Departments of State, Justice, and Commerce, the Judici-
ary, and related agencies appropriations for 1977. 94th Cong., 2d sess. Washing-
ton, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1976. 1143 p.
Part 4-Department of Justice; U.S. Immigration and Naturalization
Service: 628-719.
--- Departments of State, Justice, and Commerce, the Judiciary, and related
agencies appropriations for 1978. 95th Cong., 1st sess. Washington, U.S. Govt.
Print. Off., 1977. 1314 p.
Part 5-Department of Justice; U.S. Immigration and Naturalization
Service: 707-819.
- Committee on Education and Labor. Subcommittee on Agricultural
Labor. Oversight hearing on Department of Labor certification of the use of
offshore labor. Hearing, 94th Cong., 1st sess. Mar. 20, 1975. Washington, U.S.
Govt. Print. Off., 1975. 460 p.
"Hearings . to review the laws, regulations, and procedures for the
Labor Department's certification of the use of foreign labor for the harvesting
of certain crops in this country."
-- Committee on Government Operations. Interim report on Immigration
and Naturalization Service regional office operations; twentieth report to-
gether with separate views. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1974. 59 p.
(93d Cong., 2d sess. House. Report no. 93-1623).
"The Legal and Monetary Affairs Subcommittee conducted this study to
determine whether operational and managerial weaknesses on the part of INS
might be responsible for the tremendous growth in illegal aliens presence in the
United States in recent years," and concluded they were major contributing
factors. Based on hearings entitled "Immigration and Naturalization Service
regional office operations," pts. 1-4.
- Law enforcement on the Southwest border (problems of coordination
between Immigration and Naturalization Service and Customs Service);
twenty-fifth report. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1974. 30 p. (93d
Cong., 2d sess. House. Report no. 93-1630)
Illegal aliens are not the focus, but are characterized as "far more pressing at
this time than problems in interagency relationships at or between borders";
see pp. 26-27, pp. 29-30. "Based on a study by the Legislation and Military
Operations Subcommittee."
- Legal and Monetary Affairs Subcommittee. Immigration and Naturaliza-
tion Service regional office operations (part 1). Hearings, 93d Cong., 1st sess.
Mar. 27, Apr. 3 and 10, 1973. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1973. 155 p.
- Immigration and Naturalization Service regional office operations (part 2).
Hearings, 93d Cong., 1st sess. May 18, June 18 and 28, 1973. Washington, U.S.
Govt. Print. Off., 1973. 157-231 p.
- Immigration and Naturalization Service regional office operations (part 3).
Hearings, 93d Cong., 1st sess., Sept. 17 and 18, 1973. Washington, U.S. Govt.
Print. Off., 1973. 233-347 p.
- Immigration and Naturalization Service regional office operations (part 4).
Nov. 13 and 14, 1973. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1973. 349-448 p.
-- Immigration and Naturalization Service regional office operations (part 5).
Hearings, 93d Cong., 2d sess. Aug. 13; Sept. 12, 17, 18; Oct. 9, 1974. 449-616 p.
Primarily oversight hearings on Operation Clean Sweep, a Justice Department
investigation into allegations of corruption within INS.
--- Legislation and Military Operations Subcommittee. Law enforcement on
the Southwest border (review of Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1973 and related
developments). Hearings, 93d Cong., 1st sess. July 10, 11, 16; Aug. 14, 1974.
Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1974. 315 p.
Includes discussions of control of illegal aliens in the context of Justice and
Treasury Department law enforcement efforts at the SW border. See report,
"Law enforcement on the Southwest border."
-- Committee on the Judiciary. Amending the Immigration and Nationality
Act, and for other purposes; report together with individual views to accom-
pany H.R. 16188. [Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off.] 1972. 15 p. (92d Cong.,
2d sess. House. Report no. 92-1366)
H.R. 16188 was the first in a series of bills reported by the House Judiciary
Committee making it unlawful to hire "illegal aliens" and establishing a three-
step penalty structure for violation. Based on the 5-part hearings on illegal
aliens held by Subcommittee No. 1 during the 92d Congress. Passed the House
of Representatives with amendment Sept. 12, 1972.







3

U.S. Congress. House. Committee on the Judiciary. Amending the Immigration
and Nationality Act, and for other purposes; report together with additional
views to accompany H.R. 982. [Washington, UiS. Govt. Print. Off.] 1973.
28 p. (93d Cong., 1st sess. House. Report no. 93-108)
Second in a series of "illegal alien" bills reported by the House Judiciary
Committee. Passed House of Representatives with amendments May 3, 1973.
--- Amending the Immigration and Nationality Act, and for other purposes;
report together with additional, supplemental, and dissenting views to accom-
pany H.R. 8713. [Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off.] 1975. 41 p. (94th Cong.,
1st sess. House. Report no. 94-506)
Third in a series of "illegal alien" bills reported by the House Judiciary
Committee. Did not receive House action.
---- Illegal aliens: analysis and background. Prepared for the use of.the Com-
mittee by the Education and Public Welfare Division, Congressional Research
Service, Library of Congress. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1977. 73 p.
At head of title: 95th Cong., 1st sess. Committee print.
--- Immigration and Nationality Act Amendments of 1973; report together
with additional views to accompany H.R. 981. [Washington, U.S. Govt.
Print. Off.] 1973. 49 p. (93d Cong., 1st sess. House. Report no. 93-461)
Legislation aimed primarily at amending the immigration law as it applied
to the Western Hemisphere to make it similar to that governing the Eastern
Hemisphere. Included amendments relating to labor certification and, in-
directly, to illegal aliens. Passed House Sept. 26, 1973.
-- Immigration and Nationality Act Amendments of 1976; report including
cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office to accompany H.R. 14535.
Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1976. 37 p. (94th Cong., 2d sess. House.
Report no. 94-1553)
Legislation relating primarily to the Western Hemisphere. Includes amend-
ments relating to illegal aliens. Enacted Oct. 20, 1976 (P.L. 94-571).
The "Immigration and Nationality Act Amendments of 1976" (P.L.
94-571); a summary and explanation. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off.,
1976. 10 p.
At head of title: 94th Cong., 2d sess. Committee print. Legislation focusing
primarily on the Western Hemisphere includes provision barring adjustment
of status by nonimmigrants who have illegally accepted employment (pp. 8-9).
--- Immigration and Nationality Act, with amendments and notes on related
laws and summaries of pertinent judicial discussions. 6th edition, revised
through May 1, 1969. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1969. 258 p.
Committee print.
-- Report of Special Study Subcommittee of the Committee on the Judiciary
to review immigration, refugee, and nationality problems. Washington, U.S.
Govt. Print. Off., 1973. 36 p.
At head of title: 93d Cong., 1st sess. House. Committee print. Includes
review of Department of Defense use of alien labor in Guam. See hearings,
"Alien Labor Program in Guam."
-- Special Study Subcommittee. Alien labor program in Guam. Hearings,
93d Cong., 1st sess., on H.R. 981. Aug. 9, 1973. Serial no. 15. Washington,
U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1973. 210 p.
---- Subcommittee No. 1. Illegal aliens. Hearings, 92d Cong., 1st sess. Part 1.
Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1971. 281 p.
Hearings held in Washington, D.C., May 5 and June 3, 1971; Los Angeles,
Calif., June 19 and 21, 1971. Following this series of hearings, H.R. 16188 was
reported and passed by the House.
-- Illegal aliens. Hearings, 92d Cong., 1st sess. Part 2. Washington, U.S.
Govt. Print. Off., 1971. 283-681 p.
Hearings held Denver, Colo., June 24 and 25, 1971; El Paso, Tex., July 9
and 10, 1971.
--- Illegal aliens. Hearings, 92d Cong., 1st sess. Part 3. Washington, U.S.
Govt. Print. Off., 1972. 683-1007 p.
Hearings held Chicago, Oct. 22 and 23, 1971; Detroit, Jan. 21, 1972.
-- Illegal aliens. Hearings, 92d Cong., 2d sess. Part 4. Washington, U.S. Govt.
Print. Off., 1972. 1009-1253 p.
Hearings held in New York, Mar. 10 and 11, 1972.
---- Illegal aliens. Hearings, 92d Cong., 2d sess. Part 5. Mar. 22, 23 and 24,
1972. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1972. 1255-1528 p.









Of the five-part investigative and legislative hearings, it was subsequently
noted: "This comprehensive investigation of the nature and impact of the
illegal alien problem has been the foundation for the continuing examination of
the illegal alien problem by this Committee" (H. Rept. no. 94-506, p. 3).
-U.S. Congress. House. Illegal aliens; a review of hearings conducted during
,the 92d Congress (serial no. 13, pts. 1-5). Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off.,
1973. 27 p.
At head of title: 93d Cong., 1st sess. Committee print. Itemizes 14 findings
'based on investigative and legislative hearings on illegal aliens held during
"92d Congress.
-- Illegal aliens. Hearings, 93d Cong., 1st sess. Mar. 7 and 8, 1973. Serial
no. 1. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1973. 85 p.
Following these hearings, H.R. 982 was reported and passed by the House.
--- Immigration. Hearings, 91st Cong., 2d sess. on H.R. 9112, H.R. 14092,
H.R. 17370. July 16 . Aug. 6, 1970. Serial no 32. Washington, U.S. Govt.
Print. Off., 1970. 233 p.
Hearings "to consider various aspects of Western Hemisphere immigration
and the operation of the preference system on the Eastern Hemisphere,"
following the major 1965 amendments. Some consideration of alien labor.
Western Hemisphere immigration. Hearings, 93d Cong., 1st see., on H.R.
:981. Mar. 28 . June 14, 1973. Serial no. 8. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print Off.
1973. 358 p.
Following these hearings, H.R. 981 was reported and passed by the House.
-- Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship and International Law. Alien
labor problems in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Hearings, 94th Cong., 2d sess.,
on H.R. 11261. Mar. 11 and 31, 1976. Serial no. 50. Washington, U.S. Govt.
Print Off., 1976. 111 p.
"A bill to establish procedures for the granting of permanent residence
to certain nonimmigrant aliens in the Virgin Islands of the United States."
-- Illegal aliens. Hearings, 94th Cong., 1st sess., on H.R. 982 and related
bills. Feb. 4 . Mar. 19, 1975. Serial no. 22. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print.
Off., 1975. 450 p.
Following these hearings a clean bill, H.R. 8713, was introduced and reported.
-- Immigration and Naturalizatioh Service oversight. Hearings, 93d Cong.,
2d sess. Apr. 3 and June 25, 1974. Serial no. 37. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print.
Off., 1974. 55 p.
Testimony by newly appointed INS Commissioner Leonard F. Chapman,
including assessment of the illegal alien problem.
-- Nonimmigrant alien labor program on the Virgin Islands of the United
States; a special study. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off. 1975. 77 p.
At head of title: 94th Cong., 1st sess. Committee print.
-- Nonimmigrant visas: requirements and procedures. Hearings, 94th Cong.,
2d sess. Apr. 7-8, and May 20, 1976. Serial no. 54. Washington, U.S. Govt.
Print. Off., 1976. 226 p.
Includes discussion of work-related nonimmigrant categories, including H
and L; as well as of the illegal alien problem, primarily in the context of non-
immigrant visa violators.
--- Review of the administration of the Immigration and Nationality Act.
Hearings, 93d Cong., 1st sess. July 26 . Sept. 20, 1973. Serial no. 22. Wash-
ington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1973. 296 p.
Includes discussions of illegal aliens.
- Review of immigration problems. Hearings, 94th Cong., 1st and 2d sess.
June 11 . Dec. 10, 1975; and July 28, 1976. Serial no. 62. Washington,
U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1976. 159 p.
"Immigration and Nationality Act waivers, foreign students, consular
functions abroad, and immigration benefits to illegitimate children."
-- Waiver of nonimmigrant visas. Hearing, 94th Cong., 1st sess., on H.R.
190, H.R. 2771, and H.R. 8059. Sept. 10, 1975. Serial no. 23. Washington,
U.S. Govt. Print Off., 1975. 72 p.
Legislation liberalizing visa requirements was opposed by Administration
witnesses, in part because of the illegal alien problem.
-- Western Hemisphere immigration. Hearings, 94th Cong., 1st and 2d sess.,
on H.R. 367, H.R. 981, and H.R. 10323. Sept. 25, 1975 . Mar. 18, 1976.
Serial no. 34. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1976. 397 p.
Following the hearings, a clean bill, H.R. 14535, was introduced, reported
passed, and enacted (P.L. 94-571). Includes provision barring adjustment of
status by nonimmigrants who illegally accepted employment.







5

U.S. Congress. Senate. Committee on Appropriations. Departments of State,
Justice, and Commerce, the Judiciary, and related agencies appropriations
for fiscal year 1977. Hearings, 94th Cong., 2d sess. Part 1. Washington, U.S.
Govt. Print. Off., 1976. 1038 p.
Includes testimony on INS appropriations, as do Senate appropriation
hearings for preceding years.
-- Committee on the Judiciary. Subcommittee on Immigration and Nat-
uralization. Immigration 1976. Hearings, 94th Cong., 2d sess., on S. 3074. Mar.
17. . Apr. 8, 1976. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1976, 274 p.
S. 3074 was an omnibus immigration reform bill including provisions relating
both to Western Hemisphere immigration, similar to those enacted as P.L.
94-571; and to the illegal alien problem.
--- Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. Subcommittee on Migratory
Labor. Migrant and seasonal farmworker powerlessness. Hearings, 91st Cong.,
1st and 2d sess., on border commuter labor problems. May 21 and 22, 1969. Part
5-A and Part 5-B. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1970. 2 v.
Select Committee on Small Business. Economic problems of small business
in the Northeast United States. Hearing, 94th Cong., 1st sess. Washington,
U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1976. 80 p.
Hearing held in Presque Isle, Me., Nov. 8, 1976. Includes discussion of alien
labor in New England.
- The effects of proposed legislation prohibiting the employment of illegal
aliens on small business. Hearings, 94th Cong., 2d sess. Nov. 22-23, 1976.
Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1977. 380 p.
U.S. Laws, statutes, etc. Title 8-Aliens and Nationality, United States Code.
1970 edition, Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1971 [plus supplements].
B. OTHER CONGRESSIONAL RECORD STATEMENTS 2
Abdnor, James. Illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of James Abdnor. Congres-
sional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, Apr. 21, 1977: E2379-E2380.
Includes an editorial entitled, Congress should act on illegal alien problem
from the Sioux Falls, S.D. Argus-Leader, Apr. 17, 1977.
Abzug, Bella S. Illegal aliens. Remarks in the House. Congressional Record [daily]
ed.] v. 119, Apr. 3, 1973: H2384-H2386.
Includes a report by the Committee on Immigration and Nationality Law,
entitled, Palmer raids revisited.
Allen, James B. Closing loopholes in the Immigration and Nationality Act.
Remarks in the Senate. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 122, Apr. 13, 1976:
S5599-S5600.
-- Employment for citizens. Remarks in the Senate. Congressional Record
[daily ed.] v. 122, June 16, 1976: S9596-S9601.
Anderson, Glenn M. High unemployment-illegal aliens are a cause. Extension
of remarks of Glenn M. Anderson. Congressional Record, v. 117, Dec. 3, 1971:
44704.
-- Reimbursement to local governments for treatment given illegal aliens.
Extension of remarks of Glenn M. Anderson. Congressional Record [daily
ed.] v. 123, Feb. 24, 1977: E956-E957.
Includes a letter from Pete Schabarum, County Supervisor, Los Angeles,
and minutes of the Board of Supervisors, County of Los Angeles.
Annunzio, Frank. National Can Corp. initiates drive to insure against hiring
illegal aliens. Remarks in the Senate. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 121,
May 21, 1975: H4555-H4556.
Includes a letter and press release from National Can Corp.
- The Statue of Liberty should blush. Remarks in the House. Congressional
Record [daily ed.] v. 121, Mar. 26, 1975: H2423.
Includes an article by Andrew Greeley entitled, The crime of pushing mop.
Ashbrook, John M. Congress must deal with illegal alien problem. Extension of
remarks of John M. Ashbrook. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, June 14,
1977: E3725.

SMercedes Allain, Alfred Christensen, Judith Frazier, Jay Hadlock, Robyn Levine,
Margaret Melun, Congressional Reference Division; Scott Christenson, Education and
Public Welfare Division.










Ashbrook, John M. Farm Bureau speaks out on illegal alien legislation. Extension
of remarks of John M. Ashbrook. Congressional Record, v. 121, Mar. 10, 1975:
5969.
Includes article by the American Farm Bureau Federation entitled, Employ-
ment of illegal aliens.
Badillo, Herman. American Civil Liberties Union opposes H.R. 8713, the illegal
alien legislation. Extension of remarks of Herman Badillo. Congressional Record
[daily ed.] v. 121, Oct. 29, 1975: E5637:
Includes a letter from the ACLU dated Oct. 2, 1975 by Aryeh Neier.
- Bicentennial amnesty for unregistered aliens. Remarks in the House.
Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, Mar. 2, 1977: H1643-H1645.
The continuing illegal alien controversy. Extension of remarks of Herman
Badillo. Congressional Record, v. 118, May 22, 1972: 18334-18335.
Includes an article by Christopher Norwood entitled, Illegal aliens: the
Latin peril.
--- The continuing plight of illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of Herman
Badillo. Congressional Record [daily edj v. 120, Jan. 30, 1974: E318-E319.
Includes an article by Mark Day entitled, Illegal immigrants-a view from
the Barrio.
---- Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, the Judiciary, and related
agencies appropriation bill, fiscal year 1976. [debate on the bill] Remarks in the
House. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 121, June 26, 1975: H6222-H6224.
Includes articles by Lawrence Meyer entitled, Illegal entrants flock to
U.S.-aliens hard to count, from the Washington Post of Feb. 2, 1975.
--- Growing opposition to H.R. 8713, the illegal alien legislation. Extension
of remarks of Herman Badillo. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 121, Oct.
28, 1975: E5606.
Includes an editorial from the Dallas Times Herald of Aug. 6, 1975, entitled,
Good intentions, but. ...
- Illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of Herman Badillo. Congressional
Record, v. 118, Mar. 23, 1972: 10007-10009.
Includes a statement by Rene Anselmo, Executive Vice President, Spanish
International Network.
---- Illegal aliens convenient scapegoats for present economic ills. Extension of
remarks of Herman Badillo. Congressional Record, v. 118, Apr. 25, 1972:
14341-14343.
Includes an article by Clay Steinman entitled, Illegal aliens: scapegoats of
unemployment.
---- Illegal immigration: a Mexican viewpoint. Extension of remarks of Herman
Badillo. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, May 26, 1977: E3348-E3349.
Includes an article by Alan Riding entitled, Mexican says United States
invites disaster on illegal aliens.
--- Immigration and Naturalization Service cautious when describing "num-
ber of illegal aliens" in our country. Extension of remarks of Herman Badillo.
Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 122, Feb. 26, 1976: E884-E885.
Includes a letter from Vincent P. Barabba, Director, Bureau of the Census.
---- Immigration and Naturalization Service fanning fires. Extension of remarks
of Herman Badillo. Congressional Record, v. 121, Mar. 13, 1975: 6649-6650.
Includes an article by Frank del Olmo entitled, Why citizen Chicanos fear
turmoil.
---- Justice Department official takes a realistic view of Hispanic presence in
the United States. Extension of remarks of Herman Badillo. Congressional
Record [daily ed.] v. 122, Apr. 14, 1976: E2072-E2073.
Includes an article by Ernest Holsendolph entitled, Official urges national
assessment as Hispanic American population rises sharply, New York Times,
Apr. 9, 1976.
---The legislative priorities of New York's Hispanic community. Remarks in
the House. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, Apr. 27, 1977: H3701-H3703.
Includes an article by Father Jose L. Alvarez entitled, Undocumented immi-
grations in the United States.
- The persistent illegal alien controversy. Remarks in the House, Congres-
sional Record [daily ed.] v. 120, July 23, 1974: E4967.
Biaggi, Mario. Another look at the illegal alien problem. Extension of remarks
of Mario Biaggi. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 122, Aug. 3, 1976: E4314-
E4315.
Includes an article by Harriet van Horne entitled, Indentured servants.
The cataclysmic illegal alien problem in the United States. Remarks in
the House. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 120, Nov. 26, 1974: H11130.









Biaggi, Mario. The illegal alien impact examined. Extension of remarks of Mario
Biaggi. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, Apr. 22, 1977: E2405-E2406.
Includes an article by Harriet van Horne entitled, The illegal aliens.
--- Illegal alien problems subject of major feature by newspaper. Extension
of remarks of Mario Biaggi. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 121, Dec. 8,
1975: E6531-E6532.
Includes an article by Neal Travis entitled, The un-Americans.
-- Major drug ring involving illegal aliens uncovered in Queens, New York.
Extension of remarks of Mario Biaggi. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 121,
June 10, 1975: E3057-E3058.
Includes an article by Arthur Browne entitled, Cocaine racket bigs are boro
illegal aliens.
-- National Can Co. proposes new ban on hiring of illegal aliens. Extension
of remarks of Mario Biaggi. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 121, June 3,
1975: E2810.
Includes a press release issued by National Can Corp. on Apr. 11, 1975.
-- On the need for new illegal alien legislation. Extension of remarks of
Mario Biaggi. Congressional Record, v. 121, Jan. 23, 1975: 1284.
Includes an article by William V. Shannon entitled, The illegal immigrants.
--- On the need for new illegal alien legislation. Extension of remarks of Mario
Biaggi. Congressional Record, v. 121, Jan. 23, 1975: 1282-1283.
Includes an article by Deborah Orin entitled, Illegal aliens-throw them out
or let them stay?
-- On the need for new illegal alien legislation. Extension of remarks of
Mario Biaggi. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 121, Feb. 21, 1975: E638-E639,
Includes an article by Nathan M. Adams entitled, Our mounting wave of
illegal immigrants, from Reader's Digest, Dec. 1973.
-- On the need for new illegal alien legislation. Remarks of Mario Biaggi.
Congressional Record, v. 121, Mar. 10, 1975: 5957.
Includes an editorial from Stars and Stripes, The National Newspaper for
Veterans, entitled, Illegal aliens.
- U.S. Supreme Court decision banning employment of illegal aliens. Re-
marks in the House. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 122, Feb. 26, 1976:
H1324.
Cranston, Alan. Illegal immigrants. Remarks in the Senate. Congressional Record
[daily ed.] v. 120, Aug. 22, 1974: S15682.
Curtis, Carl T. Illegal aliens in America. Remarks in the Senate. Congressional
Record [daily ed.] v. 121, Feb. 7, 1975: S1674-E1675.
Danielson, George E. Alleviate unemployment by halting the employment of
illegal aliens. Remarks in the House. Congressional Record, v. 117, Oct. 21, 1971:
37247-37248.
de Lugo, Ron. Eilberg's approach is best. Extension of remarks of Ron de Lugo.
Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 122, Mar. 18, 1976: E1384.
Includes editorial from the Virgin Islands Daily News, entitled, Eilberg's
approach is best.
Dent, John H. Illegal alien problem. Extension of remarks of John H. Dent. Con-
gressional Record [daily ed.] v. 121, May 22, 1975: E2702.
Includes a letter from F. W. Considine, President, National Can Corp.
Domenici, Peter V. An alien employment act, S. 1928. Remarks in the Senate.
Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 121, July 30, 1975: S14437-514438.
---- Controlling illegal immigration. Remarks in the Senate. Congressional
Record [daily ed.] v. 123, May 4, 1977: 87010-S7011.
Includes an editorial from the Washington Post of May 2, 1977, entitled,
Controlling illegal immigration.
-- S. 1928, Alien Employment Act. Remarks in the Senate. Congressional
Record [daily ed.] v. 121, July 29, 1975: S14121-S14122.
Drinan, Robert F. Illegal alien bill perpetuates injustices against citizens of
Hispanic origin. Extension of remarks of Robert F. Drinan. Congressional Record
[daily ed.] v. 121, Oct. 3, 1975: E5230-E5231.
Includes article by Frank del Olmo entitled, Immigration Service halts Barrio
sweeps.
Eastland, James. A bill to amend the Immigration and Nationality Act. Remarks
in the Senate. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 122, Mar. 4, 1976: S2800-
S2802.
Edwards, Don. When the door is closed to illegal aliens, who pays? Extension of
remarks of Don Edwards. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123 June 1, 1977:
E3442-E3443.







8

Includes an article by Wayne A. Cornelius entitled, When the door is closed
to illegal aliens, who pays?
Eilberg, Joshua. AFL-CIO supports illegal alien legislation. Extension of remarks
of Joshua Eilberg. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 121, Dec. 3, 1975: E6433.
Includes an article from AFL-CIO News, Nov. 29, 1975, entitled, Illegal alien
bill pressed in Congress.
-- Annual report of the Immigration and Naturalization Service. Remarks in
the House. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 120, Mar. 12, 1974: H1699-H1700.
- Five thousand from Saudi Arabia and Kuwait in this country illegally.
Remarks in the House. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 122, Apr. 1, 1976:
H2704.
-- Gaeta urges city curb on illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of Joshua
Eilberg. Congressional Record, v. 119, Feb. 27, 1973: 5730.
Includes an article by John Toscano entitled, Gaeta urges city curb on illegal
aliens.
-- Illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of Joshua Eilberg. Congressional
Record [daily ed.] v. 121, Nov. 7, 1975: E5939.
Includes an article by John M. Goshko entitled, Study finds 8 million aliens
here, from the Washington Post, Nov. 7, 1975, and a letter from the American
Federation of Government Employees.
-- Illegal aliens, Extension of remarks of Joshua Eilberg. Congressional
Record [daily ed.] v. 122, June 1, 1976: E3017.
Includes address by Leonard F. Chapman, Jr., Commissioner, Immigration
and Naturalization Service.
-- Illegal aliens and fraudulent marriages. Extension of remarks of Joshua
Eilberg. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 121, Oct. 29, 1975: E5635.
Includes an article by Judith Kronholz entitled, Uncle Sam seeking to undo
marriages not made in heaven, from the Wall Street Journal, Oct. 29, 1975.
-- Illegal immigration to the United States. Extension of remarks of Joshua
Eilberg. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, Jan. 19, 1977: E236.
Includes an article by James Reston entitled, What kind of America?, and
a copy of his bill.
Proposed legislation concerning illegal aliens. Remarks in the House.
Congressional Record, v. 119, Feb. 6, 1973: 3615-3617.
- The Supreme Court and illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of Joshua
Eilberg. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 122, Feb. 26, 1976: E894.
Fish, Hamilton. A bill to prohibit issuance of social security numbers to illegal
aliens and to prohibit any form of welfare for such aliens. Remarks in the
House. Congressional Record, v. 118, Sept. 13, 1972: 30511.
Fong, Hiram. Immigration and Nationality Act Amendments of 1976. Remarks
in the Senate. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 122, Mar. 17, 1976: S3607-
S3612.
Gaydos, Joseph M. More jobs for Americans. Extension of remarks of Joseph M.
Gaydos. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 122, Mar. 18, 1976: E1407.
Gonzalez, Henry B. The serious problem of employing illegal aliens. Extension
of remarks by Henry B. Gonzales. Congressional Record, v. 119, May 17, 1973:
16164-16165.
Hamilton, Lee H. The silent invasion. Extension of remarks of Lee H. Hamilton.
Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, June 15, 1977: E3785.
Holtzman, Elizabeth. Dealing with illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of Eliza-
beth Holtzman. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, June 2, 1977: E3465-
E3466.
Includes an article by Wayne Cornelius entitled, When the door is closed to
illegal aliens, who pays? from the New York Times, June 1, 1977.
- H.R. 8713, a bill to penalize employers of illegal aliens. Remarks in House.
Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 121, Nov. 4, 1975: E5823-E5824.
Hruska, Roman L. Illegal aliens not exclusively a border problem: they are
everywhere in the United States. Remarks in the Senate. Congressional Rec-
ord [daily ed.] v. 121, Apr. 7, 1975: S5349-S5351.
Includes an article by David Tishendorf entitled, The tide of illegal aliens
lapping at Midlands, from Omaha World Herald, Mar. 30, 1975.
Hubbard, Carroll, Jr. The flood of illegal aliens that may soon overwhelm us.
Extension of remarks of Carroll Hubbard, Jr. Congressional Record [daily ed.]
v. 123, May 3, 1977: E2716.
Includes an article by Robert T. Barnard entitled, Flood of illegal aliens that
may soon overwhelm us.







9

Keating, William J. Illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of William J. Keating.
Congressional Record, v. 119, Feb. 27, 1973: 5708-5709.
Kennedy, Edward M. Immigration hearings. Remarks in the Senate. Congres-
sional Record [daily ed.] v. 122, Mar. 17, 1976: S3666.
- Immigration reform. Remarks in the Senate. Congressional Record [daily
ed.] v. 122, Mar. 25, 1976: S4260-S4261.
-- S. 3827, a bill to provide for the adjustment of status of certain aliens
under the Immigration and Nationality Act. Remarks in the Senate. Con-
gressional Record, v. 120, July 29, 1974: 25403-25405.
-- S. 561, a bill to provide for the adjustment of certain aliens under the
Immigration and Nationality Act. Remarks in the Senate. Congressional
Record [daily ed.] v. 121, Feb. 5, 1975: S1436-S1438.
Ketchum, William M. Illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of William M. Ketchum.
Congressional Record, v. 119, Oct. 2, 1973: 32633-32634.
Includes article entitled, Arrests of illegal valley aliens up 61 percent in 6
months, from the Bakersfield Californian.
Koch, Edward I. Reappraising the illegal aliens problem. Remarks in the House.
Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 122, May 11, 1976: H4258-H4260.
Includes correspondence with James B. Cardwell, Commissioner of Social
Security.
Lagomarsino, Robert J. Alien riddle: another stumper. Extension of remarks of
Robert J. Lagomarsino. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, May 11, 1977:
E2902.
Includes an editorial from the Ventura Star Free Press.
Lederer, Raymond F. Mr. Eilberg's committee faces issue of illegal aliens. Ex-
tension of remarks of Raymond F. Lederer. Congressional Record [daily ed.]
v. 123, May 23, 1977: E3181-E3182.
Includes an article from the Congressional Quarterly, Apr. 30, 1977, entitled,
Illegal aliens: Carter prepares his bill.
Leggett, Robert L. Curing the cause and not the symtom-illegal aliens. Ex-
tension of remarks of Robert L. Leggett. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v.
123, June 23, 1977: E4041.
Includes an article by Mel Zikes entitled, Aid suggested-a way to cut flow
of aliens, from the Sacramento Union, June 9, 1977.
-- Let's not treat the immigration system lightly. Extension of remarks of
Robert L. Leggett. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 122, Oct. 1, 1976: E5472.
Lott, Trent. Immigration and Jobs Displacement Reform Act. Extension of
remarks of Trent Lott. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, Feb. 17, 1977:
E815-E816.
Madden, Ray J. Illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of Ray J. Madden. Congres-
sional Record [daily ed.] v. 121, Apr. 7, 1975: E1541.
Includes an editorial from the Hammond, Indiana Times, Mar. 30, 1975.
McClory, Robert. Coping with illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of Robert
McClory. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 122, Sept. 27, 1976: E5294-E5295.
Includes an editorial entitled, Coping with illegal aliens, from the Chicago
Tribune, Sept. 23, 1976.
McClure, James A. S. 1604, a bill to provide that the availability of citizens for
agricultural employment as a prerequisite for the certification of temporary
alien workers shall be determined by the Governor of each respective State.
Remarks in the Senate. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, May 25, 1977:
S8649-S8650.
McDonald, Jack H. Alien smugglers. Extension of remarks of Jack H. McDonald.
Congressional Record, v. 117, Dec. 2, 1971: 44375-44376.
Court rulings on illegal aliens threaten economic crisis. Extension of re-
marks of Jack H. McDonald. Congressional Record, v. 117, Dec. 16, 1971: 47540.
-- Departing illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of Jack H. McDonald.
Congressional Record, v. 117, Dec. 8, 1971: 45668-45669.
Illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of Jack H. McDonald. Congressional
Record, v. 117, Dec. 2, 1971: 44443.
-- Illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of Jack H. McDonald. Congressional
Record, v. 117, Dec. 7, 1971: 45241.
--- Illegal aliens. Extension of remarks by Jack H. McDonald. Congressional
Record, v. 117, Dec. 7, 1971: 45247.
S-- Illegal aliens find it easy to get social security cards. Extension of remarks
of Jack H. McDonald. Congressional Record, v. 117, Dec. 17, 1971: 47907.


93-032-77--3






10

McDonald, Jack H. Illegal aliens potential health menaces. Extension of remarks
Sby Jack H. McDonald. Congressional Record, v. 117, Dec. 17, 1971: 47901.
-- Illegal immigration. Extension of remarks of Jack H. McDonald. Congres-
sional Record, v. 117, Nov. 16, 1971: 41622-41624.
Includes two articles from the Scripps-Howard newspapers by Richard
Starnes.
-- Illegal immigration grows. Extension of remarks of Jack H. McDonald.
Congressional Record, v. 117, Nov. 29, 1971: 43349.
-- Investigation of INS. Extension of remarks of Jack H. McDonald. Congres-
sional Record, v. 118, Feb. 18, 1972: 4705.
- Laws on illegal aliens not adequately enforced. Extension of remarks of
Jack H. McDonald. Congressional Record, v. 117, Dec. 17, 1971; 47923-47924.
---- Loose wording in law protects illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of Jack
H. McDonald. Congressional Record, v. 117, Dec. 11, 1971: 46493.
- Marriage "American Style" and illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of
Jack H. McDonald. Congressional Record, v. 117, Dec. 16, 1971: 47466.
- A new boost for illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of Jack H. McDonald.
Congressional Record, v. 117, Dec. 15, 1971: 47246-47247.
--- Ways of aliens to enter the United States. Extension of remarks of Jack H.
McDonald. Congressional Record, v. 117, Dec. 6, 1971: 45028.
McFall, John J. Accusations at hearings denied by employer. Extension of remarks
of John J. McFall. Congressional Record, v. 117, July 8, 1971: 24390-24391.
Includes statement of Enoch Christoffersen, Mayor of Turlock, Cal. and
press accounts in the Turlock Journal of June 21, 1971 and the Modesto Bee of
June 22, 1971.
Montoya, Joseph M. National assessment of the Hispanic populations in the
United States. Remarks in the Senate. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 122,
May 13, 1976: S7224.
Includes an articles by Ernest Holsendolph from the New York Times, Apr. 9,
1976, entitled, Official urges national assessment as Hispanic-American popula-
tion rises sharply.
--- S. 3412, a bill to establish a temporary National Commission on Alien
Labor. Remarks in the House. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 120, May 1,
1974: S6739-S6740.
Murphy, Morgan F. Illegal aliens. Extension of remarks. Congressional Record
[daily ed.] v. 123, June 2, 1977: E3459-E3460.
Includes an article the Congressman wrote for his weekly news column,
entitled, The silent invasion of illegal aliens.
Packwood, Bob. Alien Employment Act. Remarks in the Senate. Congressional
Record [daily ed.] v. 123, Mar. 14, 1977: S4088-S4090.
-- The Alien Employment Act of 1975. Remarks in Senate. Congressional
Record [daily ed.] v. 121, July 24, 1975: S13526-S13527.
-- Employment of illegal aliens. Remarks in the Senate. Congressional Record
[daily ed.] v. 122, Mar. 2, 1976: S2604-S2605.
-- Illegal alien employment. Remarks in the Senate. Congressional Record
[daily ed.] v. 123, June 9, 1977: S9343-S9344.
-- Population policy. Remarks in the Senate. Congressional Record [daily ed.]
v. 123, June 23, 1977: S10516-S10517.
Rodino, Peter W., Jr. Amendments to the Immigration and Nationality Act.
Remarks in the House. Congressional Record, v. 118, May 4, 1972: 15811-15814.
---- How many illegal aliens in the United States? Remarks in the House.
Congressional Record, v. 117, Sept. 30, 1971: 34371-34373.
Includes a series of articles from the New York Daily News by Edward Benes,
Frank Faso and Henry Lee.
--- Illegal aliens. Remarks in the House. Congressional Record, v. 118, Feb. 29,
1972: 6098-6100.
-- Illegal aliens-A national crisis. Remarks in House. Congressional Record
[daily ed.] v. 121, Jan. 29, 1975: H356-H357.
-- Illegal alien hearings to be held in Detroit. Remarks in the House. Con-
gressional Record, v. 118, Jan. 18, 1972: 43.
Rogers, Paul G. Illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of Paul G. Rogers. Congres-
sional Record [daily ed.] v. 121, July 29, 1975: E4222.
Includes a statement issued by the National Can Corp. on Apr. 11, 1975.
Rooney, John J. More about illegal aliens. Remarks in the House. Congressional
Record, v. 117, Oct. 12, 1971: 35890.
Rosenthal, Benjamin S. Illegal alien crisis-emergency action needed. Extension
of remarks of Benjamin S. Rosenthal. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 121,
Oct. 21, 1975: E5500-E5501.









Rosenthal, Benjamin S. Illegal alien problem requires government reorganization.
Extension of remarks of Benjamin S. Rosenthal. Congressional Record [daily
ed.] v. 123, May 2, 1977: E2672-E2674.
S Illegal alien problem requires reorganization. Extension of remarks of
Benjamin S. Rosenthal. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, Feb. 7, 1977:
E574-E575.
- Illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of Benjamin S. Rosenthal. Congres-
siona ]Record [daily ed.] v. 121, July 29, 1975: E4231-E4233.
-- Illegal aliens: restricting employment is only partial solution. Extension
of remarks of Benjamin S. Rosenthal. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 122,
Mar. 1, 1976: E920.
---- New agency to enforce immigration laws. Remarks in the House. Congres-
sional Record [daily ed.] v. 121, July 29, 1975: E4231-E4233.
Rousselot, John H. Resolutions of the National Association of Pro America.
Extension of remarks of John H. Rousselot. Congressional Record [daily ed.]
v. 122, Sept. 28, 1976: E5323-E5325.
Includes Pro America resolutions with a section on illegal aliens.
Roybal, Edward R. Comments on H.R. 8713. Extension of remarks of Edward R.
Roybal. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 121, Oct. 9, 1975: E5363-E5364.
Includes letters from the U.S. Catholic Conference, California Catholic
Conference, the Capuchins, and an editorial from the Los Angeles Times of
Oct. 2, 1975.
--- Illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of Edward R. Roybal. Congressional
Record [daily ed.] v. 121, Oct. 28, 1975: E5591-E5592.
Includes letters from Anti-Defamation League, International Longshore-
men's and Warehousemen's Union, Local 213, L.A. Leather, Luggage, and
Handbag Workers Union, and the United Farm Workers.
-- Introduction of comprehensive immigration legislation. Extension of
remarks of Edward R. Roybal. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, Apr. 5,
1977: E2088-E2089.
Russo, Martin A. National Can Co. moves on illegal alien problem. Extension
of remarks of Martin A. Russo. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 121, July 18,
1975: E3961-E3962.
Includes a letter by F. W. Considine, President, National Can Co.
Ryan, Leo J. H.R. 982 to amend the Immigration and Nationality Act. Extension
of remarks of Leo J. Ryan. Congressional Record, v. 119, May 9, 1973: 15105-
15106.
Schmitz, John G. Mrs. Romana Banuelos. Extension of remarks of John G.
Schmitz. Congressional Record, v. 117, Nov. 12, 1971: 40968.
Includes an editorial entitled, The Banuelos case, from the Los Angeles
Herald-Examiner, Oct. 19, 1971.
- Red Chinese aliens in America-I. Extension of remarks of John G. Schmitz.
Congressional Record, v. 118, Jan. 24, 1972: 998-999.
- Red Chinese aliens in America-II. Extension of remarks of John G.
Schmitz. Congressional Record, v. 118, Jan. 27, 1972: 1593-1594.
Schweiker, Richard S. S. 1601, a bill to amend the Immigration and Nationality
Act to protect American workers from the adverse impact of illegal alien em-
ployment. Remarks in the Senate. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123,
May 25, 1977: S8648-S8649.
Simon, Paul. When the door is closed to illegal aliens, who pays? Extension of
remarks of Paul Simon. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, June 2, 1977:
E3457.
Includes an article by Wayne A. Cornelius entitled, When the door is closed
to illegal aliens, who pays? from the New York Times of June 1, 1977.
Sisk, B. F. Illegal aliens being referred for jobs by U.S. Employment Service.
Remarks in the House. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, June 1, 1977:
H5229-H5230.
Includes copies of two letters by Mr. Sisk to the Administrator of the U.S.
Employment Service and the Governor of California.
-- Illegal alien problem. Remarks in the House. Congressional Record [daily
ed.] v. 123, Mar. 9, 1977: H1902-H1903.
-- The illegal alien problem-are we now listening? Extension of remarks of
B. F. Sisk. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, May 16, 1977: E3029-
E3030.
Includes two articles by James Reston entitled, Is anybody listening? and
Public policy on illegal aliens.









Sisk, B. F. Our new immigration chief could benefit from on-the-job training.
Extension of remarks of B. F. Sisk. Congressional Record [daily ed..] v. 123,
May 26, 1977. E3387.
Stennis, John C. Illegal aliens in America. Remarks in the Senate. Congressional
Record [daily ed.] v. 121, May 13, 1975: S7929.
Symms, Steven D. Illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of Steven D. Symms.
Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, May 9, 1977: E2850-E2851.
Includes statement of Hans F. Sennholz, Secretary-treasurer on the Con-
servative Caucus Shadow Cabinet.
Talcott, Burt L. Illegal aliens. Remarks in the House. Congressional Record
[daily ed.] v. 122, Mar. 2, 1976: H1470.
- Talcott introduces legislation to enable employers to deal effectively
with the illegal alien problem. Remarks in the House. Congressional Record
[daily ed.] v. 121, May 21, 1975: H4543-H4544.
-- Talcott proposes comprehensive legislation program to deal with illegal
alien problem. Remarks in the House. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 121,
May 19, 1975: H4215-H4216.
---- Talcott reveals affects of illegal aliens on 16th District jobs and public
services. Extension of remarks of Burt L. Talcott. Congressional Record [daily
ed.] v. 121, May 20, 1975: E2562-E2563.
Tunney, John V. Illegal searches and seizures. Remarks in the Senate. Congres-
sional Record [daily ed.] v. 119, Sept. 26, 1973: S17812-S17813.
Includes letters from the Los Angeles Trial Lawyers Association.
Van Deerlin, Lionel. Emergency medical assistance to illegal aliens. Remarks in
the House. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 121, Feb. 27, 1975: E757.
-- HIow to halt the tide of illegal aliens. Remarks in the House. Congres-
sional Record, v. 120, July 11, 1974: 22981-22982.
Includes findings of Grand Jury no. 74-1 of the southern district of California.
Whalen, Charles W. The illegal alien situation. Remarks in the House. Con-
gressional Record [daily ed.] v. 121, Nov. 10, 1975: H10896.
Includes a letter from Stanley Mailman, President, Association of Immigra-
tion and Nationality Lawyers.
White, Richard C. Illegal aliens. Remarks in the House. Congressional Record,
v. 117, Oct. 5, 1971: 34913-34915.
-- The illegal alien problem. Remarks in the House. Congressional Record, v.
120, Aug. 20, 1974: 29396.
Includes a memo prepared by an intern, William L. Wubbena, Jr., in the
Congressman's office.
Immigration Act Amendments. Remarks in the House. Congressional
Record [daily ed.] v. 121, Apr. 10, 1975: H2664-H2666.
Wilson, Bob. The illegal alien situation. Remarks in the House. Congressional
Record [daily ed.] v. 123, Mar. 23, 1977: H2526.
-- Reimbursement to medical treatment facilities for care provided to indi-
gent illegal aliens. Remarks in the House. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v.
123, Feb. 17, 1977: H1130.
Wilson, Charles H. Illegal aliens: victims and victimizers. Extensions of remarks of
Charles H. Wilson. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, Feb. 24, 1977: E970.
Wolff, Lester L. Illegal aliens. Remarks in the House. Congressional Record [daily
ed.] v. 121, Feb. 26, 1975: E733.
Wylie, Chalmers P. Criminal penalty for employer knowingly hiring illegal
aliens. Remarks in the House. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 121, Mar. 25,
1975: H2307.
-- To provide criminal penalty for employer knowingly hiring illegal alien.
Remarks in the House. Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, Jan. 31, 1977:
H616.
-- To provide criminal penalty for employer knowingly hiring illegal aliens.
Remarks in the House. Congressional Record [daily ed.] 121, Mar. 25, 1975:
H2307.
Young, C. W. Bill. Illegal aliens. Extension of remarks of C. W. Bill Young.
Congressional Record [daily ed.] v. 123, Feb. 22, 1977: E864.









II. GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS
A. FEDERAL
Federal Register, v. 42, Jan. 18, 1977: 3440-3451.
Revised regulation published by the Department of Labor, Employment and
Training Administration, on the granting of labor certifications on behalf of
aliens who seek to work permanently within the United States. Redesignated
as 20 CFR Part 656; 29 CFR Part 60 is deleted.
U.S. Bureau of the Census. Letter from Vincent P. Barabba, Director, to Hon.
Herman Badillo, Dec. 29, 1975. In Remarks of Herman Badillo. Congressional
Record [daily ed.] v. 122, Feb. 26, 1976: E884-E885.
Letter in response to a request for an examination of the estimates of the cur-
rent illegal Mexican alien population in the U.S. by Lesko Associates (cited
below). "In our opinion the estimates of the current illegal alien population
shown in the study are based on weak and untenable assumptions, and add very
little to our knowledge of the illegal alien population."
U.S. Bureau of Security and Consular Affairs. 1975 report of the Visa Office.
Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1976. 84 p.
Annual report of the Visa Office includes summary and statistical coverage of
State Department activities relating to immigration, and specifically the is-
suance of visas. Similar information is included in annual reports for the pre-
ceding years.
U.S. Commission on Population Growth and the American Future. Population and
the American future, final report. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1972.
186 p.
Chapter 13 is concerned with legal and illegal immigration. The Commission
recommends civil and criminal sanctions for the employment of aliens in illegal
status and increased resources for the appropriate agencies.
U.S. Department of Labor. Manpower Administration. Immigrants and the
American labor market [by] David North. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off.,
1974. 76 p. (U.S. Dept. of Labor. Manpower research monograph no. 31)
"This study sought answers to several questions about how immigrants be-
have in the U.S. labor market. What kinds of skills did these immigrants bring
with them. How were these skills being used? How did the immigrants adjust
to the labor market?" This is a summary of a report with the same title, listed
in the following section.
U.S. Domestic Council Committee on Illegal Aliens. Preliminary report. [Wash-
ington] 1976. 257 p.
Report of Cabinet-level committee established in January 1975 by President
Ford, chaired by Attorney General Edward H. Levi. Reviews illegal alien
problem in the contexts of "international push-pull factors" and U.S. immigra-
tion law and policy, considers its domestic impact and the characteristics of
illegal aliens, and concludes that "illegal immigration is significant and grow-
ing." Recommends amnesty, penalties for knowing employment, and increased
resources for INS and State Department activities aimed at prevention.
U.S. Foreign Service Institute. Eighteenth Session Senior Seminar in Foreign
Policy. The illegal alien, case study by John E. Karkashian. [Washington]
1975-1976. 42 p.
". . a review of the illegal alien problem in the U.S. focused on its impact
on the economy and measures to control the problem after the alien enters the
U.S."
- Sixteenth Session Senior Seminar in Foreign Policy. The illegal immigrant
to the United States, case study by Loren E. Lawrence. [Washington] Apr.
1974. 24 p.
Study attempts to relate "the rapidly growing number of illegal immi-
grants . with common demographic, economic and sociological conditions in
the country of origin of the illegal immigrant; to theorize reasons for this de-
velopment; and to remark on the great similarly of techniques utilized by the
potential illegal in circumventing United States statutes administered by the
Foreign Service."
1 Joyce Vialet, Education and Public Welfare Division.






14

U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. Illegal alien study. Part 1: Fraudu-
lent entrants study. [Washington] Sept. 1976. 34 p.
Based on the results of searches for fraudulent entrants by INS inspectors
relieved of customary time pressures at selected high-volume air and land ports,
it was estimated that more than 500,000 malafide entries had been made through
the studied ports in FY 1975 (450,000 at Southwest land ports, 50,000 at inter-
national airports). The number of malafide applicants denied admission was
12-14 times the number denied during routine operations.
-- Illegal alien study design. Washington, Linton & Co., Inc., May 1975. 3 v.
Vol. I, by David North, is entitled "Final Report outlining a rationale for
and a preliminary design of a study of the magnitude, distribution, flow, charac-
teristics and impact of illegal aliens in the United States"; it includes a discussion
of the significance of the influx of the aliens (183 p.). Vol. II is "an annotated
bibliography of recent and related literature on the subject of illegal aliens,
1968-1975" (54 p.). Vol. III, by David North and entitled "Research Design",
"contains a detailed methodology for seven separate studies on the subject"
(81 p.).
The three-volume study was supported by a contract from the U.S. Law
Enforcement Assistance Administration.
-- Report of the Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization. Washing-
ton, U.S. Govt. Print. Off. [1976] 139 p.
The INS annual report includes summary and extensive statistical coverage
of activities during fiscal year 1975, including information on deportable aliens
located. Similar information is included in annual reports for preceding years.
U.S. Library of Congress. Congressional Research Service. Analysis of Supreme
Court decisions relating to extended border searches for illegal aliens [by]
E. Jeremy Hutton. Aug. 22, 1975. [Washington] 1975. 26 p.
Multilith 75-188-A.
Discusses a series of border search cases beginning with Almeida-Sanchez v.
United States, 413 U.S. 266 (1973).
-- Critique of the estimates of the number of illegal aliens in the United
States made by Lesko Associates [by] Dennis Little, Daniel Melnick, and
Joyce Vialet. Jan. 23, 1976. 33 p.
Memo to Hon. Herman Badillo in response to a request for a critique of the
estimates of the illegal alien population made by Lesko Assoc. (cited below).
CRS found the estimates to be "open to criticism on a significant number of
points", including several of the basic underlying assumptions and the way in
which the Delphi process was used.
-- Illegal aliens: analysis and background [by] Joyce Vialet. Feb. 16, 1977.
[Washington] 1977. 147 p.
Multilith 77-47-ED
"This paper is intended as a review and analysis of a number of issues relating
to the illegal alien problem, as background for the legislative debate which may
be expected to continue during the 95th Congress." Contents.-Numbers,
origins, and characteristics of illegal aliens.-Impact of illegal aliens.-Existing
legislation and recent Congressional and Federal action.-Historical develop-
ment and background.-Current issues: pro and con.
-- Immigration: illegal aliens [by] Joyce Vialet. [Washington] (continuously
updated), 1977. 6 p. (Issue Brief Number IB74137)
A brief review of the illegal alien issue, including background and policy
analysis, a summary of past and current major legislation, and lists of hearings,
reports, other Congressional documents, and additional reference sources.
U.S. National Archives and Records Service. Office of the Federal Register. Code
of Federal Regulations. Title 8, Aliens and Nationality, revised as of January 1,
1977. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off. 255 p.
Chapter I contains regulations promulgated by the Immigration and Natural-
ization Service. Department of Justice, pursuant to the Immigration and
Nationality Act, as amended.
SCode of Federal Regulations. Title 22, Foreign Relations, revised as of
Apr. 1, 1976. Washington, U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1976, 604 p.
State Department regulations pertaining to visas, nationality, and passports
are contained in 22 CFR Chapter I, Subchapters E and F.
U.S. President, 1974-1977 (Ford). Domestic Council Committee on Illegal Aliens.
Weekly compilation of Presidential documents, v. 11, Jan. 13, 1975: 26.







15

The President's memorandum for members of the Domestic Council, Jan. 6,
1975, announcing establishment of the Cabinet-level Committee on Illegal
Aliens.
--- Immigration and Nationality Act Amendments of 1976. Weekly compila-
tion of Presidential documents, v. 12, Oct. 25, 1976: 1548.
Statement by the President on signing H.R. 14535 into law, Oct. 21, 1976
(Public Law 94-571, Act of Oct. 20, 1976).
U.S. Special Study Group on Illegal Immigrants from Mexico. Final report-
A program for effective and humane action on illegal Mexican immigrants.
[Washington] Jan. 15, 1973. 51 p.
"The Study Group finds that the large and rapidly rising number of illegal
immigrants from Mexico constitute a serious national problem," and recom-
mends a series of "interrelated Government actions," including strengthened
border control, penalties for knowing employment, and a limited amnesty
program. Chaired by Roger C. Cramton, U.S. Justice Department, and com-
monly referred to as the Cramton Commission report. A companion report was
issued by the Mexican counterpart group.
U.S. General Accounting Office. Administration of the alien labor certification
program should be strengthened, Department of Labor, Department of Justice,
Department of State; report to the Committee on the Judiciary, House of
Representatives by the Comptroller General of the United States. [Washington]
1975. 84 p.
"MDW-75-2, May 16, 1975."
--- Aliens are illegally entering the U.S. mainland through Puerto Rico and
the U.S. Virgin Islands, Immigration and Naturalization Service, Department
of Justice; United States General Accounting Office. [Washington] 1975. 7 p.
"GGD-76-5, Sept. 8, 1975."
-- Better controls needed to prevent foreign students from violating the
conditions of their entry and stay while in the United States, Department of
Justice, Department of State; report to the Congress by the Comptroller General
of the United States. [Washington] 1975. 68 p.
"B-125051, Feb. 4, 1975."
- Immigration-need to reassess U.S. policy, Departments of Justice and
State; report to the Congress by the Comptroller General of the United States.
[Washington] 1976. 70 p.
"GGD-76-101, Oct. 19, 1976."
"Deals with matters ranging from an inability to control large scale illegal
entry to an inequity in the existing immigration law which unfairly allows
illegal entrants to later obtain immigration benefits while bona fide immigrants
are deemed early admission." ummary ot six prior UAU reports on U.'S.Tmi-
gration problems.
---- More needs to be done to reduce the number and adverse impact of illegal
aliens in the United States, Immigration and Naturalization Service, Depart-
ment of Justice; report to the Congress by the Comptroller General of the
United States. [Washington] 1973. 76 p.
"B-125051, July 31, 1973."
"This report deals with the illegal alien problem, its impact on INS enforce-
ment operations, and the coordination of INS activities with those of other
Government agencies to help relieve some of the burdens caused by illegal
aliens."
---- Need for improvements in management activities of the Immigration and
Naturalization Service, Department of Justice; by the Comptroller General of
the United States. [Washington] 1973. 27 p.
"B-125051, Aug. 14, 1973."
--- Need to reduce public expenditures for newly arrived immigrants and
correct inequity in current immigration law, Department of Justice, Department
of State; report to the Congress by the Comptroller General of the United
States. [Washington] 1975. 63 p.
"GGD-75-107, July 15, 1975."
Includes review of various means by which aliens illegally in the United
States may qualify for legal entry.
-- Smugglers, illicit documents, and schemes are undermining U.S. controls
over immigration, Departments of Justice and State; report to the Congress by
the Comptroller General of the United States. [Washington] 1976. 63 p.
"GGD-76-83, Aug. 30, 1976."







16

B. STATE AND LOCAL
California. Department of Social Welfare. State Social Welfare Board position
statement. Issue: aliens in California. [Sacramento] Jan., 1973. 54 p.
A review of the "alien problem" in California, focusing primarily on the
illegal alien and his impact on public assistance, medical care, public education,
and employment. The impact of immigrants and temporary workers is also
considered.
Illinois. General Assembly. Legislative Investigating Commission. The Illegal
Mexican alien problem. Chicago, 1971. 44 p.
Based on a three-month investigation in 1971 of the illegal alien problem
in Illinois, the Commission concluded that it primarily involved Mexican
nationals, and further, "that employment of illegal Mexican aliens in Illinois is
against the public welfare. Employers of unskilled laborers are well aware of
their illegal status. . It would appear most advisable for Illinois to amend
its laws to curtail such employment."
San Diego County, California. A Study of the socioeconomic impact of illegal
aliens on the County of San Diego. San Diego, County of San Diego Human
Resources Agency, Jan. 1977. 206 p.
"Based on the data of six selected areas of study [impact on the local labor
market, law enforcement, health care, welfare, education, and Chicano com-
munity concerns] the San Diego County Immigration Council concludes
that . that illegal aliens do impact local social services by an approximate
yearly cost of $21,00000, and it is further estimated that illegal aliens contribute
an approximate yearly total of $48,000,000 in taxes from wages earned locally."
Texas. Good Neighbor Commission of Texas. 'exas Migrant Labor Ann'ua Report
1975. Austin [1976] 72 p.
Section IV, entitled "Alien Labor and Immigration," reviews the illegal
alien problem primarily from a national viewpoint. It includes brief discussions
of bills enacted in Texas barring illegal alien children from the public schools,
and creating a special comniR ee n o5erTraEsTlincldTourism t I vsgafe
alleged undue hindrance of trade in the border area.
Washington. Inter-agency Task Force for Agricultural Workers. Investigative
study of the impact of illegal aliens on farmworkers in the State of Washington.
Preliminary report, Dec. 1974.

III. BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, AND RESEARCH STUDIESI
Acuna, Rodolfo. Occupied America: the Chicano's struggle toward liberation.
San Francisco, Canfield Press, 1972. 2 2 p.
. the experience of Chicanos in the United States parallels that of other
Third World peoples who have suffered under the colonialism of technologically
superior nations. Thus, the thesis of this monograph is that Chicanos in the
United States are a colonized people." Includes sections discussing the history
of Mexican immigration and the Bracero program.
Briggs, Vernon M., Jr. Chicanos and rural poverty. Baltimore, Johns Hopkins
University press, 1973. 81 p. (Policy studies in employment and welfare, no. 16)
Includes an analysis of, among other factors, the impact of the bracero
program, illegal aliens, and commuters on the Chicano population in the rural
Southwest.
---- Mexican migration and the U.S. labor market: a mounting issue for the
seventies. Austin, University of Texas, 1975. 37 p. (Studies in human resources
development, no. 3)
"Analyzes the effects of U.S. labor, immigration, and border policies, along
with their enforcement, on employment and labor problems of the seventies
and suggests alternative courses of action", including criminal sanctions
against employers who hire illegal aliens, increased resources for INS, and
financial and technical aid to Mexico.
---- The Mexico-United States border: public policy and Chicano economic
welfare. Austin, University of Texas, 1974. 28 p. (Studies in human resource
development, no. 2)
"This study . shows how the economically depressed status of the low-
income and particularly the Chicano population on the U.S. side of the Mexican
border results in part from present U.S. border labor and immigration policies."

1 Joyce Vialet, Education and Public Welfare Division.









Colby, C.B. Border Patrol: how U.S. agents protect our borders from illegal
entry. New York, Coward, McCann & Geoghegan, Inc., 1974. 48 p.
"In this book you will learn about the training of Border Patrol agents,
what types of checking they do to find aliens, how they spot aliens attempting
to cross or already over the border, and what tricks the smugglers use to try
to slip aliens through our thousands of miles of open boundary." Contains
numerous photographs.
Controversy over proposals to reduce the number of illegal aliens in the U.S.:
pro and con. Congressional digest, v. 54, Jan., 1975: whole issue.
Includes statements by Rep. Peter Rodino, Rep. Frank Annunzio, Rep.
Joshua Eilberg, Rep. William Keating, Rep. Edward Roybal, Rep. Robert
Price, and Rep. Herman Badillo.
Cornelius, Wayne A. Illegal migration to the United States: recent research
findings, policy implications, and research priorities. Center for International
Studies. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Migration and development
study group, C/77-11, May 1977.
-- and Juan Diez-Canedo. Mexican migration to the United States: the view
from rural sending communities. Center for International Studies, Massachusetts
Institute of Technology, Migration and development study group, C/76-12,
June 1976.
"The original focus of the project was on internal migration, but we soon
discovered that at least 40 percent of the out-migration from the communities
under study was movement to the U.S. rather than to other localities in Mexico.
We estimate that about 70 percent of this movement to the United States is of
an illegal nature."
"The research reported here has been supported by the International Program
for Population Analysis, Smithsonian Institution, and the Center for Population
Research, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development." D
Craig, Richard B. The Bracero program: interest groups and foreign policy.
Austin, University of Texas press, 1971. 233 p.
Over the twenty-two year period of its existence, 1942-1964, "the bracero
program never ceased to be a controversial issue. At one systInieeTvlor anot er"
it was perpetually involved in a vortex of political conflict. It is this conflict and
its group combatants which provide the focal point of this study."
Dominguez, Virginia R. From neighbor to stranger: the dilemma of Caribbean
people in the United States. New Haven, Antilles Research Program, Yale
University, 1975. 177 p. (ARP Occasional papers 5)
"This book, the outgrowth of a report submitted to the Ford Foundation,
is intended primarily as compilation of data on Caribbean populations residing
on the United States mainland," including legal and illegal immigrants, refugees,
and citizens. The author states, "The fact is that the number of illegal Caribbean
residents in this country is high."
Fragomen, Austin T., Jr. The illegal alien: criminal or economic refugee? Staten
Island, N. Y., Center for Migration Studies, 1973.
Gordon, Charles, and Harry N. Rosenfield. Immigration law and procedure.
Rev. ed. 3 v. (loose-leaf). New York, Matthew Bender, 1977.
A detailed analysis of current immigration law and procedure, including
discussion of relevant court decisions and background on the development
of the law.
Grebler, Leo, Joan W. Moore, and Ralph C. Guzman. The Mexican-American
people: the nation's second largest minority. New York, the Free Press, 1970.
775 p.
". .the result of a study designed by the Mexican-American Study Project
at the University of California, Los Angeles. ... Our objective is . to
present a portrait of the Mexican-American minority in relation to the dominant
society that is comprehensive enough in geographic coverage to lift this study
from the confines of localism, and inclusive enough in content to articulate
interrelationships between such matters as economic status and cultural values,
style of life, education attainment, family structure, or political participation,
and between current socioeconomic conditions and their historical antecedents."
Includes a chapter on Mexican immigration, and references to it throughout.
Harper, Elizabeth J. Immigration laws of the United States, third edition. In-
dianapolis, Bobbs-Merrill Co., Inc., 1975. 756 p.
Assisted by Roland F. Chase; first and second editions by Frank L. Auer-
bach. "A textbook integrating statutes, regulations, administrative practices
and leading court and administrative decisions, with a comprehensive index and
bibliography."
93-032-77---






18

Immigration and Naturalization Institute, Ninth Annual. New York, Practicing
Law Institute, 1976. 416 p. (Commercial law and practice course handbook
series, no. 157)
A handbook on various aspects of immigration and naturalization law, includ-
ing labor certification and visa petitions for permanent and temporary alien
workers, prepared for use at the 9th annual institute, Dec. 9-10, 1976. Similar
handbooks have been published for the preceding institutes.
Kentucky. University. Social Welfare Research Institute. Minorities in the labor
market, vol. I, Spanish Americans and Indians in the labor market (247 p.);
vol. II, Orientals in the American labor market (199 p.), by George L. Wilber,
Daniel E. Jaco, Robert J. Hagan, Alfonso C. del Fierro, Jr. Lexington, Uni-
versity of Kentucky, 1975.
Study supported by a grant from the Manpower Administration, U.S.
Department of Labor. "This study is aimed at understanding differences in
achievements of minorities in the labor market .... Spanish, Indians and
blacks are generally among the most disadvantaged, whereas Orientals have
been relatively successful in matching the accomplishments of the white ma-
jority in recent years."
Lesko Associates. Final report: basic data and guidance required to implement a
major illegal alien study during fiscal year 1976. Oct. 15, 1975. 60 p.
Estimated the mid-1975 Mexican illegal alien population at 5,222,000 and,
using the Delphi process, the total illegal alien population at 8,180,000. (See
discussions by the U.S. Bureau of the Census, and the U.S. Library of Congress,
Congressional Research Service.)
Prepared for the Office of Planning and Evaluation, Immigration and Na-
turalization Service, U.S. Department of Justice.
Los Angeles County Bar Association. Report on the deportation and removal of
aliens. Los Angeles, 1976. 35 p.
The report of the Los Angeles County Bar Association Special Committee
on the Deportation and Removal of Aliens, appointed in 1974, and charged
with "conducting an objective study and making recommendations concerning
law, procedures, and representation by counsel during deportation or removal
proceedings which so vitally affect the lives of the aliens involved," as well as
considering "ways in which the Association can assist immigration authorities
in carrying out their statutory functions."
Meier, Matt S. and Feliciano Rivera, eds. Readings on la raza. the twentieth
century. New York, Hill and Wang, 1974. 277 p.
"These selections from available period literature provide a chronologically
and topically balanced information source for Chicano history in the twentieth
century. . Appearing throughout its six sections are a number of selections
dealing with immigration. While this movement of Mexicans north from Mexico
is not the only important factor in Chicano history, we feel that it is sufficiently
significant to be dealt with in considerable detail."
National Council on Employment Policy. Illegal aliens: an assessment of the issues;
a policy statement and conference report with background papers. Washington,
1976. 76 p.
Concludes that U.S. must "try to avoid the admission of workers who either
would directly compete with legal residents or are likely to become a permanent
underclass of workers unable to protect themselves." Recommends it be made
illegal to hire illegal aliens, rigorous enforcement of the law against illegal immi-
gration, strengthening of the labor certification process, special efforts to recruit
native workers, and amnesty for certain illegal aliens.
Includes a summary of a conference sponsored by the National Conference on
Employment Policy, May 13-14, 1976, entitled "Public Policy Perspectives on
Alien Workers"; and background papers, cited individually in the following
section.
Nelson, Eugene, comp. Pablo Cruz and the American dream: the experiences of
an undocumented immigrant from Mexico. With an introd. by Julian Samora.
Peregrine Smith, 1975. 171 p.
A first-person account, based on transcribed interviews with a former illegal
entrant from Mexico.
Norquest, Carroll. Rio Grande Wetbacks: Mexican migrant workers. Albuquer-
que, University of New Mexico press, 1972. 159 p.
"These stories are about the Mexican wetbacks I've known and worked with
over the years."
North, David S. Alien workers: a study of the labor certification program. Wash-
ington, TransCentury Corp., Aug., 1971. 198 p.







19

Analyzes and evaluates labor certification under the Immigration and
Nationality Act (sec. 212(a)(14)) as amended in 1965, against the background
of U.S. immigration policies and operations, and the impact of aliens on the
U.S. labor market. Concludes that labor certification has been an interesting
if limited, experiment in social engineering, but that an alternative approach
appears to be needed.
Prepared for the Manpower Administration, U.S. Department of Labor.
- The Border crossers: people who live in Mexico and work in the United
States. Washington, TransCentury Corp., Apr., 1970. 319 p.
A study of the generally adverse labor market impact of the legally sanctioned
"daily influx of Mexican residents who come to work in the border areas of
Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California." Also examines the origins of
the commuter practice, the controversies about it, participation of commuters
in Federal programs, and characteristics of commuters.
Prepared for the Manpower Administration, U.S. Department of Labor.
-- Interactions between illegal aliens and the Social Security tax collection
system: some preliminary findings. Washington, New TransCentury Founda-
tion, July, 1976. 26 p.
Based on the assumption that 1 million illegal aliens are employed, the
author estimates that illegals and their employers are contributing more than
half a billion dollars a year to the Social Security Trust Fund, and should con-
tribute an additional $150 million.
"This paper is based on a Department of Labor funded study of the role of
illegal aliens in the U.S. labor market," and "was written to fulfill the New
TransCentury Foundation's portion of a data exchange agreement" between
the author and the Assistant Commissioner of the Social Security Administration.
North, David S., and Marion F. Houstoun. The Characteristics and role of
illegal aliens in the U.S. labor market: an exploratory study. Washington,
Linton & Co., Inc., Mar., 1976. 181 p.
"The purpose of this study was to gather, for the first time, information on
the demographic characteristics, country of origin, employment history,
wages and participation in public services of illegal aliens in the U.S., and to
examine the manpower policy implications of an analysis of the data on illegals."
Based on interviews with 793 illegals, the report concluded that "the major
immediate impact of illegals in the U.S. today is probably on the labor market."
Prepared for the Employment and Training Administration, U.S. Depart-
ment of Labor.
North, David S., and William G. Weissert. Immigrants and the American labor
market. Washington, TransCentury Corp. 1973. 208 p.
"PB 221 200" "Prepared for Department of Labor."
"The principal findings of the study are that immigrants made a substantial,
but uneven, impact on the labor market, that this impact is greater than pre-
viously supposed, and that immigrants are now closer to the American norm,
in demographic terms, than they were fifty and sixty years ago . The
crucial variable of job success is the command of the English language."
Reisler, Mark. By the sweat of their brow: Mexican immigrant labor in the
United States, 1900-1940. Westport Conn., Greenwood press, 1976. 298 p.
"This study concentrates on those Mexicans who entered the United States
in pursuit of work during the early decades of the century and on the reception
they received in American society." The author notes that, "Perhaps as much
as 10 percent of Mexico's population, approximately 1.5 million people, mi-
grated to the United States during the first three decades of the twentieth
century" and, further, that this significant aspect of U.S. immigration has
generally been neglected in historical studies of immigrant labor.
Rischin, Moses, ed. Immigration and the American tradition. Indiana, The
Bobbs-Merrill Co., Inc., 1976. 456 p. (The American heritage series, AHS-79)
"To include as wide a variety of selections as possible so as to do justice to
the all-embracing theme, Immigration and the American Tradition, is the
challenge of this collection." Part Four, of 12 parts, is entitled "The Labor
Question".
Samora, Julian. Los Mojados: the wetback story. Notre Dame, University of
Notre Dame press, 1971. 205 p.
With the assistance of Jorge A. Bustamante F., and Gilbert Cardenas.
An in-depth analysis of the illegal alien problem, including its history, rela-
tion to U.S. immigration policy, and impact on the U.S., Mexico, and the indi-
viduals involved. The author concludes that the "wetback" was created by









both countries, "and both governments must seek a solution to the problem ...
For the U.S. this neanTiis ffiing fi-PTioyer'bTfi'eg-l a-iffs7-','Vnl-g'T rlltions
concerning social security cards, establishing minimum wages and a citizenship
card, expanding the Immigration and Naturalization Service, restricting labor
certification, more effective prosecution of aliens and smugglers of aliens, and
restricting the issuance of border-crossing permits as well as keeping a record
of their use."
Schroeder, Richard C. Illegal immigration [Washington] Editorial Research
Reports, 1976. 909-925 p. (Editorial research reports, 1976, v. 2. no. 22)
Partial contents.-Impacts of illegal aliens in U.S.-Approaches to immigra-
tion problems.-Search for realistic solutions.
Tomasi, S. M., and Charles B. Keely. Whom have we welcomed?: the adequacy
and quality of United States immigration data for policy analysis and evalua-
tion. Staten Island, N. Y., Center for Migration Studies [1975] 96 p.
"The original purpose of the project on which this report is based was to
develop a methodology to estimate the effects of legislative changes on the
demographic characteristics of future immigrants. . The task proved to be
an impossible one. The major difficulties revolve around the availability and
quality of data. This report, then, focused on legislative analysis and the data
problem." Chapter 3 is entitled "The 'Illegal Alien' Question and Immigration
Policy".
Tyler, Gus, ed. Mexican-Americans tomorrow: educational and economic perspec-
tives. Albuquerque, University of New Mexico press, 1975. 208 p.
Chapter III, "Mexican Immigration" by Julian Samora, includes a chrono-
logical review of Mexican immigration, and discussions of the U.S.-Mexican
border region, and illegal aliens.
Weaver, Thomas and Theodore E. Downing. Mexican migration. Tucson, Ariz.,
University of Arizona, 1976. 241 p.
"This report represents the United States' portion of a binational project
funded jointly by the National Science Foundation and Mexico's Consejo
National de Ciencia y Techologia. The purpose of the project was to establish a
comprehensive view of migration of Mexicans. We investigated the patterns of
movement of migrants within Mexico (between states and regions) and between
Mexico and the United States and the social and economic factors correlated
with these movement which might assist in predicting future migrations."
IV. PERIODICALS 1
Abrams, Elliot, and Franklin S. Abrams. Immigration policy-who gets in and
why? Public Interest, no. 38, winter 1975: 3-29.
Provides a general discussion of United States immigration policies. Within
the discussion is a section on illegal aliens in which the authors define "illegal
aliens", discuss the problems accompanying the various categories of illegal
aliens, and evaluate the claimed effects illegal aliens have in the labor market,
indicating that their adverse impact appears to be exaggerated.
Alien labor certification. Minnesota Law Review, v. 60, May 1976: 1034-1060.
Comment concludes that "decisions regarding whether to certify an alien
laborer for immigration are presently a plethora of ad hoc and often inconsistent
resolutions based on imprecise data." Examines the Immigration and Nation-
ality Act; reviews certain court decisions; and outlines a set of standards for
guiding agencies in determining labor certification.
Anderson, Jervis. A reporter at large: the Haitians of New York. New Yorker,
v. 51, Mar. 31, 1975: 50-75.
Discusses the colonies of Haitians in New York City. Provides background
on their nationality through a brief history of Haiti, and describes their inter-
action with other New Yorkers. Includes a discussion of Haitians illegally in
the United States.
Bauer, David. The foreign-born and U.S. manpower supplies. Conference Board
Record, v. 7, Feb. 1971: 15-20.
"Estimates indicate that during the 1970's roughly 1 out of every 10 new
members of the U.S. labor force will be foreign-born, a ratio approximating that
of the 1960's. Moreover, since immigration laws have recently been revised to
encourage the entry of professional and technical personnel, a significant portion
of the increase in this country's reservoir of skilled manpower can be traced
directly to the inflow of workers from abroad."

1 Scott Christenson, Education and Public Welfare Division.









Benke, Patricia D. The doctrine of preemption and the illegal alien: a case for
State regulation and a uniform preemption theory. San Diego Law Review, v.
13, Dec. 1975: 166-174.
Analyzes the "doctrine of preemption" in connection with two California
Court of Appeals decisions which declared that State regulation of employment
of illegal aliens was unconstitutional. "This article is intended to explore the
propriety of those rulings and suggest the feasibility of a uniform doctrine of
preemption."
Biffle, Christopher. Illegal aliens: "late on a moonless night." Nation, v. 220,
Jan. 25, 1975:79-81.
Narrates a personal experience in which the author with a group of three
others travel to a home where over forty illegal aliens roomed. Describes the
conditions which they had to endure.
Bolen, Hal H., II, and David S. Tenzer. The alien commuter after Saxbe v.
Bustos. University of California, Davis Law Review, v. 8, 1975: 33-61.
Examines the Supreme Court decision Saxbe v. Bustos, and considers the
historical foundations for alien commuters. Also, focuses on the provisions in the
Immigration and Nationality Act under which they are sanctioned, and possible
alternatives available to Congress in light of the Court's decision.
Bonaparte, Ronald. The Rodino bill: an example of prejudice towards Mexican
immigration to the United States. Chicano Law Review, v. 2, summer 1975:
40-50.
Argues that the Rodino bill, if enacted, might indirectly lead to an increase
in illegal immigration from Mexico. Includes a discussion of the present immigra-
tion system, changes in the present system as proposed by the Rodino measure,
and the possible adverse effect of the Rodino bill upon immigration from
Mexico to the U.S.
Briggs, Vernon M., Jr. Illegal immigration and the American labor force: the use of
"soft" data for analysis. American Behavioral Scientist, v. 19, Jan.-Feb. 1976:
351-363.
Inquires into the evidence on illegal immigration and its impact on the U.S.
labor force.
-- Mexican workers in the United States labour market: a contemporary
dilemma. International Labour Review, v. 112, Nov. 1975: 351-368.
"Believing that the present situation, which harms United States workers as
well as the immigrants themselves, could soon become uncontrollable, the author
suggests a number of reforms Washington might introduce to assist in the
smooth integration of legal immigrants, to combat illegal immigration far more
vigorously and to reduce the push effect by helping to strengthen Mexican
industry."
Bustamante, Jorge A. The historical context of undocumented Mexican immigra-
tion to the United States. Atzlan, v. 3, fall 1973: 257-281.
Discusses early United States immigration history, including immigration
from Ireland, Germany, Southern and Eastern Europe, China, Japan, and
Mexico; argues that while immigrants were welcomed, they were relegated to
the worst jobs and an inferior status in society, and that in the case of illegal
Mexican workers, the U.S. has institutionalized exploitation of cheap labor by
not discouraging the use of illegal Mexican workers through sanctions directed
against the employer who knowingly hires them.
- Structural and ideological conditions of the Mexican undocumented immi-
gration to the United States. American Behavioral Scientist, v. 19, Jan.-Feb.
1976: 364-376.
Outlines basic Marxian theory regarding "labor power" and "surplus value",
and applies it to explain historically the conditions of immigrants in the United
States, focusing particularly on the Mexican undocumented alien.
Cardenas, Gilberto. United States immigration policy toward Mexico: an his-
torical perspective. Chicano Law Review, v. 2, summer 1975: 66-91.
Discusses the problem of illegal aliens in light of past U.S. immigration
policy towards Mexico and Mexican workers. Provides historical background
for the period prior to 1930, the depression, the period of the bracero program,
and the post-bracero period.
Castelli, Jim. Special report: the year of the immigrant. Christian Century, v. 92,
Nov. 12, 1975: 1031-1033.
Outlines the various perspectives of those who contribute to the discussion of
illegal aliens. Discusses the "civil rights nightmare", amnesty, and the problems
the administration is having in its attempts to suggest a solution.







22

Chapman, Leonard F., Jr. Illegal aliens-a growing population. Immigration and
Naturalization Reporter, v. 24, fall 1975: 15-18.
Discusses how many illegal aliens there are in the U.S., where they come
from and settle, what types of jobs they obtain, and the dangers of population
growth with the influx of illegals. Advocates the passage of strict laws against
employers who knowingly hire illegal aliens.
- Illegal aliens: time to call a halt. Reader's Digest, Oct. 1976: 188-192.
Defines the problem of illegal aliens, and suggests possible solutions including
enactment of legislation prohibiting the hiring of illegal aliens and establishing
penalties for violation.
Chapman, Robert S., and Robert F. Kane. Illegal aliens and enforcement: present
practices and proposed legislation. University of California, Davis Law Review,
v. 8, 1975: 127-161.
Analyzes the "Fourth Amendment limitations on the power of INS officials
to locate illegal aliens"; discussesthe -"constHfutil nal and statutory prohibitions
which should limit the power of local officials to seek out and arrest illegal
aliens"; and examines current Congressional legislation.
Commuters, illegals and American farmworkers: the neied for a broader approach
to domestic farm labor problems. New York University Law Review, v. 48,
June 1973: 439-492.
Examines "the effectiveness of present Federal programs in resolving the
major problems of domestic farmworkers," the nondomestic causes of the
problems created by illegal aliens and commuters, and the efficacy of proposed
legislation.
Conrad, Jane Reister. Health care for indigent illegal aliens: whose responsi-
bility? University of California, Davis Law Review, v. 8, 1975: 107-126.
Discusses the problem of who should be responsible for providing health care
services to illegal aliens. Analyzes the Federal, State and county responsibilities
under the various programs which provide health care.
Coombs, Orde. Illegal immigrants in New York: the invisible subculture. New
York, v. 9, Mar. 15, 1976: 33-41.
Follows the daily routine of a West Indian illegal alien in New York City
through his work, social life, spending habits, and social milieu. Describes his
feelings and motivations.
Corwin, Arthur F. Mexican emigration history, 1900-1970: literature and research.
Latin American Research Review, v. 8, summer, 1973: 3-24.
Explores in a bibliographic essay studies by U.S. historians and social scien-
tists, the Mexican side of emigration literature, and research opportunities in
Mexican emigration studies. Provides bibliographic aids citing other biblio-
graphic aids citing other bibliographies on the subject.
Cowan, Rachel, For Hispanos it's still the promised land. New York Times
Magazine, June 22, 1975: 9-10, 39, 46-48, 50.
Narrates anecdotes about the Hispanic communities in New York City,
claiming that they are expanding because of the influx of illegal aliens from the
Latin American countries including the Carribean. Explains how illegals get
jobs, receive welfare, and adjust their status to permanent residential aliens.
Dagodag, W. Tim. Source regions and composition of illegal Mexican immigration
to California. International Migration Review, v. 9, winter 1975: 499-511.
The author argues that fundamental to the formulation of policy in regard to
illegal aliens is the determination of where the illegal immigrants originate. This
study reviews basic regional problems, and through the use of a case study
focusing In California, generates a profile of illegal immigrants.
Day, Mark. Sweeping up the aliens. Nation, v. 224, Feb. 5, 1977: 146-148.
Recounts the implications of charges against the Manzo Area Council for
aiding undocumented immigrants.
del Olmo, Frank. The invasion of illegals. Race relations reporter, v. 4, Sept. 1973:
20-25.
'Persons without documents' are producing stress along the border, legis-
lation, corruption and a potential split in the Chicano movement."
Downes, Richard. The future consequences of illegal immigration. Futurist, v. 12,
Apr. 1977: 125-127.
Constructs two scenarios indicating what the future might hold for the
United States if illegal aliens continue to migrate across the border.
Ericson, Anna-Stina. The impact of commuters on the Mexican-American border
area. Monthly Labor Review, v. 93, Aug. 1970: 18-27.
"A study of the commuter system examines the problems attributed to 'green
carders' and explores some solutions."









Fitzhugh, David. The silent invasion. Foreign Service Journal, v. 53, Jan. 1976:
7-10, 26.
Discusses problems which illegal aliens cause when they work in the United
States, such as taking jobs from U.S. citizens or collecting benefits from Social
Security both in the U.S. and in their native country when they return; explains
the various means by which an illegal alien may adjust his status to that of an
immigrant; and suggests that a national identification card might alleviate the
problem.
Fragomen, Austin T., Jr. Constitutional rights of aliens upon arrest. Inter-
national Migration Review, v. siprTj g 973- 67-71
Examines the problem of not violating the rights of individuals who are
present in the United States, while at the same time regulating the flow of aliens.
Addresses the separate questions of arrest without warrant, and border
searches.
-- Permanent resident status redefined. International Migration Review,
v. 9, spring 1975: 63-68.
Discusses the possible ramifications of Saxbe v. Bustos, a court case which held
that permanent resident aliens residing abroad and commuting to work in the
U.S. are entitled to maintain their status as permanent residents.
-- Regulating the illegal aliens: legislative and judicial developments. Inter-
national Migration Review, v. 8, winter 1974: 567-572.
Discusses the provisions of S. 3827, a bill Senator Kennedy introduced on
July 29, 1974. The bill would regularize the status of certain aliens and impose
sanctions upon employers of aliens not legally authorized to work.
-- Searching for illegal aliens: the Immigration Service encounters the Fourth
Amendment. San Diego Law Review, v. 13, Dec. 1975: 82-124.
Poses the problem of enforcing the immigration laws in the interest of society
as a whole without infringing on the rights of individuals. Discusses the Supreme
Court's decisions regarding border -seares nd the Fourth Amendment, the
Fourth Amendment rFourth Amendment ritsFourth Amendment limits on interrogation
procedures, and the constitutinait of urban "a-lien- serc-h"procedures.
Suggests potssibTe liture poTicy.
Frisbie, Parker. Illegal migration from Mexico to the United States: a longitudinal
analysis. International Migration Review, v. 9, spring 1975: 3-13.
Analyzes the factors involved in illegal migration, and concludes that the
"los mojados have not been so much attracted to the U.S. as they have been
forced out of Mexico by an inimical economic situation."
Gallivan, Melissa. Immigration-a State may prohibit the employment of illegal
aliens. Vanderbuilt Journal of Transnational Law, fall 1976: 907-914.
Explanation of the case of DeCanas v. Bica decided by the U.S. Supreme
Court, allowing a State to regulate employment of illegal aliens according to
local requirements. Author discusses tests used by the court to determine if
State is infringing on right of Congress to regulate immigration.
Getting their slice of paradise. Time, v. 190, May 2, 1977: 26-27, 30, 32.
Describes the ease with which illegal immigrants cross the border, obtain
social security cards, and work. Provides accounts of the abuses illegals suffer,
and outlines how the Carter administration plans to deal with the problem.
Gordon, Charles. Powers and responsibilities of immigration officers. American
Bar Association Journal, v. 59, Jan. 1973: 64-67.
Outlines immigration officers' duties, responsibilities, authority, and restric-
tions. Cites the law, regulations, and court decisions which provide the legal
basis for their action.
Gottron, Martha V. Illegal alien curbs: House action stalled. Congressional
Quarterly, v. 34, Mar. 20, 1976: 637-641.
Provides a synopsis of House action on H.R. 8713 (94th Cong.), summarizes
two Immigration and Naturalization Service studies which examined the
impact of illegal aliens, discusses the bill and its aims, and cites the arguments
of both the proponents and opponents of the bill.
Greene, Sheldon L. Public agency distortion of Congressional will: Federal
policy toward non-resident alien labor. George Washington Law Review, v. 40,
Mar. 1972: 440-463.
"This article [sketches] the record of the Immigration and Naturalization
Service in carrying out the will of Congress with respect to the admission of
aliens who enter the country to find work in competition with the resident labor
force and suggests] remedies for the specific problem of unlawful alien entry
and the general problem of public agency unresponsiveness to the mandate of
the legislature." Specifically, discusses illegal aliens and green card commuters.









4a Hager, Barry M. Illegal aliens: Carter prepares his bill. Congressional Quarterly
Weekly Report, v. 35, Apr. 30, 1977: 822-823, 832-833.
Outlines the five key elements under consideration by President Carter
at that time: civil fines for employers who knowingly hire illegal aliens, amnesty,
stricter enforcement of existing statutes to minimize the employer's incentive
( v to hire illegal aliens, tougher enforcement at the border, and development of
a foreign policy aimed at relieving pressures in other countries to immigrate
t \ illegally. Reviews past legislation which Congress has considered, and discusses
the outlook for this Congress.
Hohl, Donald. U.S. immigration legislation-prospects in the 94th Congress.
International Migration Review, v. 9, spring 1975: 59-62.
Summarizes the efforts in the 92nd and 93rd Congresses to enact legislation
dealing with the problem of illegal immigration. Assesses the prospects for
legislation in the 94th Congress.
and Michael G. Wenk. Legislative and judicial developments: the illegal
alien and the Western Hemisphere immigration dilemma. International Migra-
tion Review, v. 7, fall 1973: 323-332.
Discusses the principal issues raised by the House Subcommittee on Im-
migration and Nationality in the 93rd Congress. Provides analysis of H.R. 982
as passed by the House which imposed sanctions on employers who knowingly
hire illegal aliens and of the issue of Western Hemisphere immigration, including
a discussion of a preference system for the Western Hemisphere and cross-
border commuters.
How illegal aliens rob jobs from unemployed Americans. Nation's Business, v.
63, May 1975: 18-20, 22, 24.
Examines the illegal alien problem in relation to unemployment, focusing on
legislation that would make it illegal for any public agency or official to approve
or provide public services to illegal aliens.
Huss, John D., and Melanie J. Wirken. Illegal immigration: the hidden population
bomb. Futurist, v. 12, Apr. 1977: 114-120.
After defining the problem of illegal aliens and analyzing their impact on the
United States, particularly on population growth, the authors outline the
various policy options and suggest solutions.
Illegal aliens with American families: the scope of the statutory waiver of de-
portation in cases of fraudulent entry after Reid v. Immigration and Naturali-
zation Service. Northwestern University Law Review, v. 70, Sept.-Oct. 1975:
673-698.
Comment presents "a critical analysis of the Court's holding in Reid that
section 241 (f) does not apply to aliens claiming citizenship at entry and that, in
fact, such conduct by aliens is conclusive evidence of the deportable offense
of entering without inspection."
Immigration and naturalization-the alien commuter fiction-actual residence
test applied to exclude entry into the United States. New York University
Journal of International Law & Politics, v. 5, spring 1972: 139-154.
Discusses various methods of immigration that permits entry to foreign
labor and the discretionary abuses relevant to each type of immigration.
"Invasion" by illegal aliens, and the problems they create. U.S. News & World
Report, v. 75, July 23, 1973: 32-35.
"A million a year pour into U.S.-aliens who manage to elude all barriers.
Their impact on jobs, schools, welfare is generating rising hostility."
Jackson, Charles M. Recent decisions: immigration. Vanderbuilt Journal of
Transnational Law, v. 8, fall 1974: 231-238.
In Reid v. Immigration and Naturalization Service, United States Court of
Appeals for the second circuit held that aliens who gain entry into the U.S. by
falsely claiming to be U.S. citizens, thereby avoiding inspection as aliens, are
not saved from deportation by section 241(f) of the Immigration and Nationality
Act.
Jacoby, Susan. The struggle to be legal immigrants from Mexico. New Leader, v.
58, Apr. 28, 1975: 14-16.
Narrates the story of one illegal Mexican immigrant, describing the process
he went through to become a legal resident alien. While the story is of one man,
many generalizations are made citing his story as an example of the lot of many
other illegal Mexican immigrants.
Jones, Lamar B. Alien commuters in the United States labor markets. Inter-
national Migrant Review, v. 4, spring 1970: 65-86.
Posits the views that alien commuters contribute to the high unemployment,
low wages, and extreme poverty suffered in the border regions. Discusses the
commuter system, evaluating the present quantitative evidence about the








system. Discusses various proposals to limit the system, and offers suggestions
for its reform.
Katz, Jerome C. Extended border searches by immigration officers: United States
v. Thompson (5th cir, 1973). Columbia Journal of Transnational Law, v. 13,
1974: 143-154.
Case note discusses reasonable suspicion in border searches, focusing on the
double role of immigration/customs officers in a routine immigration border
search involving the discovery of narcotics.
Keely, Charles B. Effects of the Immigration Act of 1965 on selected characteristics
of immigrants to the U.S. Demography, v. 8, May 1971: 157-169.
The effects of the policy changes found in the 1965 Immigration Act on two
characteristics of immigrants-their country of origin and occupational levels-
are traced. Some effects of the policy changes and the changes in population
characteristics on the American social and political scene are briefly outlined.
---- Effects of U.S. immigration law on manpower characteristics of immi-
grants. Demography, v. 12, May 1975: 179-191.
Surveys the manpower elements of immigration law, assesses the effects of the
changes in the 1965 Act, and determines "the impact of those provisions on the
labor characteristics of immigrants."
-- Immigration composition and population policy. Science, v. 185, Aug. 16,
1974: 587-593.
Analyzes the problem of zero population growth in light of United States
immigration policy and the special group of immigrants, illegal aliens. Reviews
present immigration policy, the effects of that policy on demographic and eco-
nomic characteristics of recent immigrants, and the quality of data on immigra-
tion.
Keller, Ken. Border searches revisited: the constitutional propriety of fixed and
temporary checkpoint searches. Hastings Constitutional Law Quarterly, v. 2,
winter 1975: 251-275.
"This note will include a brief discussion of alien immigration [specifically,
illegal immigration] and related law enforcement problems, the border search
exception, the Almeida-Sanchez decision, and, finally, an evaluation of the analy-
ses of those courts which have considered the con tionait of order earhes
,conducted at fixed and temporary checkpoints inland from the border. In so
doing it will attempt to determine whether the provisions of the Fourth Amend-
ment are applicable to such inland checkpoint searches."
Kelly, Orr. Border crisis: illegal aliens out of control? U.S. News & World Report,
v. 82, Apr. 25, 1977: 33-39.
"As millions flood into the U.S., charges abound that these 'invaders' milk
welfare, take jobs from citizens and turn to crime. New studies are challenging
many of these ideas, but all agree something must be done."
Kirsch, Jonathan. California's illegal aliens: they give more than they take. New
West, v. 2, May 23, 1977: 26-28, 31-35.
Examines how illegal Mexican aliens who have come to the United States
seeking the good life integrate into and contribute to society.
Lando, Barry. The Mafia and the Mexicans: crooked justice from the INS.
Washington Monthly, v. 5, Apr. 1973: 16-21.
Cites evidence to support the contention that the Immigration and Naturali-
zation Service was a corrupt and politically controlled government agency. The
evidence includes accounts of INS officials aiding Mafia people, who were ille-
gally in the United States, obtain legal status, Congressmen putting pressure
on INS to review certain immigration cases favorably, and the lack of sup-
port from INS superiors when the border patrol discovered politically sensitive
information.
Legal problems of agricultural labor. University of California, Davis Law Review,
v. 2, 1970: 55-69.
Discusses the problems of job competition and wage depression caused by the
influx of illegally entering Mexican farm workers. The article surveys current
efforts to "stem the steady 'invasion' of the illegal entrants, and concludes that
there are no meaningful penalties to discourage such conduct."
Mailman, Stanley. "Illegal aliens"-a view of the employer's rights and risks.
Interpreter Releases, v. 54, Jan. 3, 1977: 1-9.
Answers negatively the question: "Does the employment of a given alien
involve a wrong, crime or risk of legal sanction?"
Manulkin, Gary H., and B. Robert Maghame. A proposed solution to the problem
of the undocumented Mexican alien worker. San Diego Law Review, v. 13,
Dec. 1975: 42-68.
93-032-77--5








"Over 90 percent of all problems facing the Immigration and Naturalization
Service emanate from illegal-entrant alien workers. The purpose of this article
is to illustrate failures of the present laws, consider proposed remedies, and
offer an alternative route for alleviation of the problem. The authors' proposal
is directed toward further economic research, sociological studies and com-
prehensive political analyses to propose a legislative package which would com-
pletely supplant the present Act."
Marshall, Ray. Employment implications of the international migration of work-
ers. National Council on Employment Policy, Oct. 1976: 52-65.
Discusses the various factors involved in Mexico-U.S. immigration, citing
as the main cause of workers migrating from country to country the inter-
national disparities in economic conditions and job opportunities; describes the
"European experience"; and analyzes general conclusions which can be made
about the international movement of workers.
Martinez, Vilma S. Illegal immigration and the labor force: an historical and
legal view. American Behavior Scientist, v. 19, Jan.-Feb. 1976: 335-350.
The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with an insight into the
illegal alien problem from the perspective of a Mexican-American. The thesis
is that the traditional method of dealing with illegal immigration by apprehend-
ing and deporting illegals oses serious constitutional questions regarding legal
immigrants of a particular ethnic group iica re exican-American.
Mazon, Miauricio. ITegaTali6en surrogates: a psycho-historical interpretation of
group stereotyping in time of economic stress. Aztlan, v. 6, summer 1975:
305-321.
Attempts to explain anti-alien sentiment through psycho-analytical theory,
claiming that "these reactions [stem] from deep seated unresolved conflicts
that consciously take the form of moral, social, political, and economic justi-
fications for the apprehension, deportation, and surveillance of illegal aliens."
McLellan, Andrew C., and Michael D. Boggs. Illegal aliens: a story of human
misery. AFL-CIO American Federationist, v. 81, Aug. 1974: 17-23.
This article provides historical background to the illegal aliens problem.
Messrs. McLellan and Boggs critique the immigration policy of the U.S.
in terms of how the United States dealt with alien workers in the past and what
the consequences of those policies are today. A major portion of the paper
includes a history of the Bracero program. As representatives of the AFL-CIO
they also endorse certain legislative changes.
Munoz, Peter S. The right of an illegal alien to maintain a civil action. California
Law Review, v. 63, May 1975: 762-800.
"Comment will examine both the extent to which these people, although
illegally present in the country, are guaranteed the right to maintain a civil
action by the fifth and fourteenth amendments, and the extent to which
government agencies, notaDly 1. .i., must recognize the concomitant right
of an alien to remain in this country as long as his presence is essential for the
effective exercise of the right to sue."
Nafziger, James A. H. A policy framework for regulating the flow of undocumented
Mexican aliens into the United States. Oregon Law Review, v. 56, no. 1, 1977:
63-106.
Assesses the nature and extent of the illegal alien problem "with particular
reference to the prevailing mythology." Also identifies "salient public policy
to guide relevant United States immigration laws," clarifies "international
law considerations," discusses "alternative proposals" and advances "a set of
recommendations for further action."
North, David S. The immigration of non-professional workers to the United States.
International Migration Review, v. 6, spring 1972: 64-72.
Discusses the trends over several years in the immigration of non-professional
alien labor to the U.S. Examines who the non-professionals are, their origin,
and how the United States has attempted to restrict their employment. Also
includes an evaluation of the labor certification process administered by the
Department of Labor.
-- and Marion F. Houstoun. A summary of recent data on and some of the
public policy implications of illegal immigration. National Council on Em-
ployment Policy, Oct. 1976: 36-51.
Describes what we know about illegal immigration in terms of two basic
questions: how many are there and what are their characteristics? Analyzes
the impact of illegal immigration, and discusses eight policy recommendations.
-- and William Weissert. The new immigrants: study shows recent arrivals
have high skills and strong work ethic. Manpower, v. 5, Dec. 1973: 25-31.






27

Summarizes the findings of a two year follow-up study of immigrants who
entered the U.S. in 1970. Emphasizes the fact that many of the initial statements
made on the immigrants' applications regarding employment were found to be
different from their actual employment status two years later. Includes recom-
mendations for an immigration system more sensitive to the labor market.
Oretla, Joe C. Plight of the Mexican wetback. American Bar Association Journal /
v. 58, Mar. 1972: 251-254.
Discusses the risks and deprivations a "wetback" experiences because he is
without leal status having entered the U.S. illegally. mentions e deal
due process in deportation proceedings e a vant a es a en- emp rs -'who
utilize threat of deportation, and cTheac oTene Ts w 7iikma T's coimEpensatioii,
unemployment compensation access to public education) available to tlie wet-
,back. Suggestutiiii~ U.N.Unieal Declaration of Human Rgl s a
legal basis foimprovemenieifeTi7EfgioTle 'TMexiaeTnIlegLa"
Orton, Eliot S. Changes in the skill differential: union wages in construction, 1907-
1972. Industrial and Labor Relations Review, v. 30, Oct. 1976: 16-24.
"Although the author's model predicts a narrowing of the skill differential
since the early 1960's, the differential has remained essentially unchanged in
recent years, leading the author to conclude that the increasing level of illegal
immigrants, not recorded in official statistics, has served to retard the expected
decrease in the premium paid to skilled workers."
Piore, Michael J. Illegal immigration in the United States: some observations and
policy suggestions. National Council on Employment Policy, Oct. 1976: 25-35.
Argues that industrial nations generally have jobs which the domestic labor
force rejects and which foreign laborers are willing to accept. Outlines certain
problems illegal immigrants cause in light of the above process; argues for
institutionalization of temporary work visas; explores the structures necessary
to implement the goals; and describes the present institutional structures and
their shortcomings.
-- The illegals: restrictions aren't the answer. New Republic, v. 172, Feb. 22,
1975: 7-8.
Recounts, in summary, findings of a study he did in which he attempted to
answer the question, "why did a massive migration of aliens (including illegals)
suddenly begin in the late 1960s and early 1970s and not two or three decades
earlier?" In light of his findings he claims that enactment of sanctions against
employers who hire illegals will only "shift the balance of risk in favor of
ignoring all Federal labor regulations."
- Impact of immigration on the labor force. Monthly Labor Review, v. 98,
May 1975: 41-44.
Suggests that the increase in immigration to the United States, both legal
and illegal, in recent years is due to the lack of labor unbzlJ wdary
sector", a term use to characterize jobs which tend to have low wages, poor
working conditions, instability, little opportunity for advancement, and few
skill requirements.
A plan to slow the flood of illegal aliens. Business Week, no. 2393, Aug. 11, 1975:
67-68.
Explains a plan which Frank W. Considine, President of National Can, has
introduced, in which business takes the leadership role in aiding INS apprehend
illegal aliens. National Can routinely invites INS to inspect its plants for illegal
aliens.
Portes, Alejandro. Return of the wetback. Society, v. 11, Mar.-Apr. 1974: 40-46.
Discusses the present day problem of illegal Mexican aliens migrating to the
United States in the context of a brief history and description of the "wet-
backs"; explores the various methods of and motives for illegal migration;
outlines how the Immigration and Naturalization Service deals with the prob-
lem; and argues that the illegal migration stems not only from the economic
disparity which exists between the United States and Mexico, but also more
importantly from the fact that Mexico is in transition from a feudal land-bound
peasant society to an industrial one, resulting in a great exodus of the peasantry
to the cities including those in the United States.
Pray, Francis X. Preemption in the field of immigration: DeCanas v. Bica.
San Diego Law Review, v. 14, Dec. 1976: 282-300.
Examines the Supreme Court decision, DeCanas v. Bica; analyzes the Court's
reasoning; discusses the implications of the case to the employer, alien, the
State and the Congress.
Rich, Cynthia Jo. Life and death in the Florida cane fields. Race Relations
Reporter, v. 5, Feb. 4, 1974: 1-4.









Focuses on conditions among Jamaican sugarcane cutters in south Florida,
especially with respect to a highway accident on Jan. 9 in which 86 workers
were hospitalized and one killed.
Rios, Omar G. The chronic Mexican-alien immigration offender. Federal Proba-
tion, v. 34, Sept. 1970: 57-60.
Attempts to explain deviant and criminal behavior of illegal Mexican aliens
in socio-psychological terms.
Rising flood of illegal aliens: how to deal with it. U.S. News and World Report,
v. 78, Feb. 3, 1975: 27-30.
Summarizes statistics estimating the number of illegal aliens migrating to the
United States, and discusses the impact of the illegal in various cities such as
New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles and Houston.
Robinson, Dianne. State regulation of the employment of illegal aliens: a constitu-
tional approach. Southern California Law Review, v. 46, Mar. 1973: 565-584.
Discusses the State regulation of illegal aliens in connection with a proposed
amendment to California State labor laws posited a- .i .l -lution to the constitu-
tional question of preemption.
Rodino, Peter W., Jr.VThe imTpact of immigration on the American labor market.
Rutgers Law Review, v. 27, winter 1974: 245-274.
Articles by the Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee reviews the
statutory basis for the labor certification program and its legislative history;
its administration by the U.S. Department of Labor; its scope and impact;
recent legislative developments; and concludes that "further modification of the
labor certification program is unquestionably required," and that it must be
"a joint administrative and legislative effort."
Rodriguez, Jacobo. Alienation of a new generation of Chicanos. Aztlan, v. 4,
spring 1973: 147-154.
Advises that it "is moral and rational to expedite legalities and give per-
mnnent resident visas to all those who are now living in this country without
documents in order for them to take care of their families. Otherwise, the
system is again creating the alienated generation of tomorrow."
Rosenthal, Paul. Border searches: beyond Almeida-Sanchez. University of Cali-
fornia, Davis Law Review, v. 8, 1975: 163-190.
Discusses customs and immigration searches near or on the border prior to
the Almeida-Sanchez decision, and analyzes Almeida-Sanchez and subsequent
cases.
Rubin, Edwin R., and Mark A. Mancini. An overview of the labor certification
requirement for intending immigrants. San Diego Law Review, v. 14, Dec. 1976:
76-110.
Discusses the statutory foundation of the labor certification requirement,
analyzes the Department of Labor's regulations including the tests and stand-
ards used by the Department in judging an applicant, points out inadequacies,
and examines both administrative and judicial review of the labor certification
process.
Salerno, Victor. Alien checkpoints and the troublesome tetralogy: United States
v. Martinez-Fuente. San Diego Law Review, v. 14, Dec. 1976: 257-281.
Reviews the Supreme Court decision which held that Border Patrol agents
may search and question border-crossers at various fixed checkpoints in-
discriminately, in conjunction with the problem of illegal aliens.
Salinas, Guadalupe, and Isaias D. Torres. The undocumented Mexican alien: a
legal, social, and economic analysis. Houston Law Review, v. 13, July 1976:
863-917.
Includes discussions of characteristics of the undocumented Mexican alien;
the effect of Federal immigration legislation on Mexican immigration patterns;
impact on American society from the economic, social, and political perspectives;
State and Federal efforts to regulate illegals; bills before Congress; and suggested
remedies.
Schneiderwind, Barry. Constitutional law-immigration law-State regulation
of employment of illegal aliens is not per se preempted by Federal conTrotTover
immigration or by the immigration and Nationali Ac..- eCanas vBREca, 424
TTS-'U:.g~"5ITlT76TTl"TesTnTr-itnaiiLaWTi'rl -' 12, winter 1977: 87-96.
As a law journal note, analyzes th6 legal process and thought behind the
Supreme Court's decision in DeCanas v. Bica. Cites arguments from each side,
and the issues the Court dealt with in its decision.
Schulte, Jeffrey L. Area search warrants in border zones: Almeida-Sanchez
and Camara. Yale Law Journal, v. 84, Dec. 1974: 355-372.









Comment contends "that the analogy between alien searches in border zones
andTadministrativeintections is unpersuasive, sohat procedures whichrender -
administrative inspections constitutional fail to justify alien searches."
Schwartz, Teresa M. State discrimination against Mexican aliens. George
Washington Law Review, v. 38, July 1970: 1091'1113.
"The general subject of this note is statutory discrimination against aliens,
particularly as it affects Mexican aliens, the largest alien group living in the
United States as permanent residents; the focus will be on the Southwest, to
which approximately 87 percent of the resident Mexican nationals have mi-
grated. The purpose of the note is to outline the general problems posed by this
discrimination [in licensing, public em!plomejt, jand sint lJeafo ,p. Q grarm ...
and to suggest a egal approach for its resolution."
Severe, Richard. The flight of the wetbackks. E 6w York Times Magazine, Mar. 10,
1974: 17, 77-84.
Describes the smuggling operations of the "polleros" and "coyotes", border
patrol activities, problems with corruption, the conditions in both the United
States and Mexico which encourage Mexicans to immigrate illegally, and the
views of the United Farm Workers and other unions.
Shafer, Wilfred A. Forei n-born children of illegal immigrants: a growing problem.
ntegate ucation, v Nov.-De. : l ant a growing problem.
Demonstrates through court cases that alien childrenaiL.fllegaLalien parents- ...
cannot be denied the right to attend school, and states further that the Federal
government has two obligations: to alleviate the problem by preventing ~J '
illegal entry and to fund States if they are unable to meet the added burden
alien children place on their system. 0
Sherman, Jeremy P. Alien certification proceedings: the personal preference L j,
doctrine and the burden of persuasion. George Washington Law Review,
v. 43, Mar. 1975: 914-935.
Comment discusses recent judicial approaches to the Labor Dept.'s imple-
mentation of the "able, willing, qualified, and available" requirement pur-
suant to considering alien labor for admission to the U.S. under the Immigration
and Nationality Act.
Shinoff, Paul. Sweated home industry: Delancy Street in Los Angles. Nation,
v. 220, Mar. 1, 1975: 240-243.
Discusses the problems of the labor-intensive garment industry in California
with emphasis on the problems created by "homeworkers" as well as the
conditions endured by them. Argues that the illegal aliens comprise a major
labor supply for the "homeworkers", and that one way to combat the problem
of "homeworkers" is to pass legislation imposing criminal penalties rather than
the civil penalties presently in effect on those employing "homeworkers."
Smith, Barton, and Robert Newman. Depressed wages along the U.S.-Mexico
border: an empirical analysis. Economic Inquiry, v. 15, Jan. 1977: 51-66.
"This paper analyzes the degree to which the labor market in [south Texas]
is depressed. The results presented here tend to verify hypotheses suggested
by several other authors but indicate that the magnitude of the problem as
reflected by low wages along the border is much less severe than generally
believed."
Stoddard, Ellwyn R. A conceptual analysis of the "alien invasion": institu-
tionalized support of illegal Mexican aliens in_ theULS. International Migration
Review, v. 10, summer 1976: 157-189.
Analyzes the forces within our own society which contribute to the support
of the illegal Mexican alien problem even while we publicly condemn it.
-- -Illegal Mexican labor in the borderlands: institutionalized support of an
unlawful practice. Pacific Sociological Review, v. 19, Apr. 1976: 175-210.
Includes sections on the conceptualization of the problem, an outline of
various perspectives which are considered in U.S. policy decisions, a history of
Mexican-U.S. border migration, the factors which affect illegal immigration
from the perspectives of Mexico and the United States, the types of illegal
Mexican aliens in the U.S., and a case study of illegal Mexican aliens in a
border community which explores the networks set up to supply illegal aliens
and to support them once they have arrived.
Sutis, Robert W. The extent of the border. Hastings Constitutional Law Quar-
terly, v. 1, spring 1974: 235-250.







30

"In Almeida-Sanchez v. United States the Supreme Court found iUegl _an
automobile search made by a roving unit ofthe United States Border Patrol
without warrant or probable cause. [In this article] the author examins4tfhe
decision and concludes that Justice Powell's middle approach best protects the
rights of individuals while allowing the government to effectively curb the flow
of illegal aliens and contraband across the borders."
Talmadge, Deborah M. Videotape depositions: an alternative to the incarceration
of alien material witnesses. California Western International Law Journal,
v. 5, winter 1975: 376-398.
In regard to United States v. Mendez-Rodriguez, in which the defendant was
accused of smuggling aliens across the border, this comment examines "the
plight of the alien material witness and [proposes] the use of videotape deposi-
tions, which through proper procedures would protect the rights of the accused
while providing for the early release of the alien witness."
Thomas, Robert W. Criminal procedure-search and seizure-aliens and "ex-
tended" border inspections. Wayne Law Review, v. 20, July 1974: 1141-1153.
Comment'examines the notion of reasonable suspicion in border searches.
Westoff, Leslie Aldridge. A nation of immigrants: shouTd we Jpuffup the gang-
plank? New York Times Magazine, Sept. 16, 1973: 14-15, 78-80, 82, 84-86.
Discusses the motives for illegal immigration, immigration policy in connec-
tion with zero population growth, the effects of tightening immigration quotas,
and suggestions for control of immigration, particularly illegal aliens.
What illegal aliens cost the economy. Business Week, no. 2487, June 13, 1977:
86-88.
Reviews the impact of illegal aliens on the United States economy in three
areas: working standards and wages, unemployment, and public services. Also
discusses the Carter administration proposals, and outlines policy statements of
several authorities in the field of immigration.
V. NEWSPAPER ARTICLES AND EDITORIALS
A. NEWSPAPER ARTICLES
1970
Andronicos, Bill. INS Chief says illegal aliens cost Americans dollars and jobs.
Federal Times, Aug. 12, 1970: 1, 12.
Belair, Felix, Jr. Immigration unions ask Congress for more staff. New York
Times, Mar. 17, 1970: 17.
Chief of relocation named to succeed suspended official. New York Times, Sept. 25,
1970: 35.
Crime groups said to smuggle hundreds of Sicilians into U.S. New York Times,
Dec. 5, 1970: 12.
Electronic sensors on Mexican border. New York Times, July 18, 1970: 5.
14 accused of attempting an illegal entry into U.S. New York Times, June 5,
1970: 9.
Hebald, Anne. Can the alien pursue the American dream too? Potomac [Wash-
ington Post] Mar. 1, 1970: 9-11, 13-15, 21.
Onis, Juan de. Job-hunting Dominicans devise methods to enter the U.S. illegally.
New York Times, June 1, 1970: 18.
Poverty on Mexico border is attributed to U.S. policy. New York Times, Aug. 2,
1970: 20.
Ranzel, Edward. Indicted official suspended by city. New York Times, July 25,
1970: 1, 34.
7 Chinese jump ship; one is captured on L.I. New York Times, Jan. 10, 1970: 62.
U.S. aids alien workers drawn to Virgin Islands. New York Times, Aug. 18, 1970:
24.
Williams urges probe of lawyer fees on bills. Washington Star, Aug. 26, 1970: E15.
1971
Austin, Danforth W. Increase in wetbackss' entering from Mexico stirs concern
in U.S. Wall Street Journal, Sept. 29, 1971: 1, 26.
Bancroft, Bill. Many area aliens tread a tightrope. Washington Post, Oct. 30,
1971: B1, B3.
Barnes, Bob. Deportation set for aliens in county. Washington Post, Dec. 8,
1971: C1.
Benes, Edward, Frank Faso, and Henry Lee. [Series on illegal aliens] New York
Daily News, Sept. 27, 1971: 3, 29; Sept. 28, 1971: 3, 27; Oct. 4, 1971: 40; Oct. 5,
1971: 3; Oct. 8, 1971: 2. 28; Oct. 10, 1971: 4; Oct. 11, 1971: 3; Oct. 13, 1971:
2; Oct. 16, 1971: 3; Oct. 28, 1971: 3, Oct. 29, 1971: 3, 67.
2 Marsha Cerny, Library Services Division.









Ching, Frank. Drive seeks end to Chinese restaurant raids. New York Times,
Mar. 12, 1971: 39.
Clawson, Ken W. Illegal alien worked briefly at San Clemente. Washington Post,
Oct. 7, 1971: A2.
-- U.S. nominee's firm raided. Washington Post, Oct. 6, 1971: Al, A6.
Cremer, Lee G. Illegal aliens. Washington Post, Nov. 13, 1971: A15.
Letter to the editor from the president, National Council of Immigration and
Naturalization Service Locals.
Goodwin, Irwin. Crackdown launched in Virgin Islands. Washington Post, Mar.
7, 1971: A2.
-- Illegal Dominican immigrants fly to N.Y. Washington Post, Nov. 14, 1971:
Fl, F2.
Heller, Jean, and Mark Brown. Spying, drug traffic linked to Chinese illegally
in U.S. Washington Post, Nov. 16, 1971: A3.
Holles, Everett R. California law seeks to curtail a heavy influx of illegal aliens.
New York Times, Nov. 21, 1971: 51.
Illegal aliens charged with taking U.S. jobs. Washington Post, May 6, 1971: A2.
Illegal aliens said to raise jobless rate. Washington Post, Oct. 13, 1971: A7.
Isaacs, Stephen. Alien struggle in 'paradise'. Washington Post, Nov. 7, 1971:
Al, A3.
-- N.Y. flooded by aliens listed as Puerto Rican. Washington post, Oct. 19,
1971: Al, A8.
Kandell, Jonathan. Illegal status of Dominicans shaping their lives in city. New
York Times, Nov. 9, 1971: 43, 52.
Kovach, Bill. Lawyer tells of own illicit aid to aliens. New York Times, May
29, 1971: 17.
Levine, Jo Ann. Illegal aliens draw union fire. Christian Science Monitor, Nov.
16, 1971: 1, 3.
Lubasch, Arnold H. U.S. court backs alien's morality. New York Times, Dec.
5, 1971: 56.
Magazine links tip to Banuelos raid. New York Times, Oct. 11, 1971: 39.
Malloy, Michael. Human wave of Mexicans splashes across border. National
Observer, Oct. 16, 1971: 4.
Meyers, Robert. Illegal aliens on coast: no jobs, no aid. Washington Post, Nov.
28, 1971: A22.
Montgomery, Paul L. Illegal aliens pose ever-deepening crisis. New York Times,
Oct. 17, 1971: 1, 58.
Mrs. Banuelos sees politics behind raid. New York Times, Oct. 7, 1971: 1, 79.
Ousted city aide cleared of fraud in immigrant case. New York Times, June 6,
1971: 50.
Overbea, Luix. Alien problems in Bay State pointed up in Brooke letter. Christian
Science Monitor, Dec. 11, 1971: 7.
Porter, Frank C. Controls tightened on jobs for aliens. Washington Post, Feb. 5,
1971: A2.
Roberts, Steven V. Chicano leaders upset over raid. New York Times, Oct. 8,
1971: 17.
Seizing vehicles used in alien smuggling urged. New York Times, Oct. 31, 1971:
36.
Shandler, Philip. Illegal aliens at Arts Center. Washington Star, Nov. 9, 1971: C1.
Sitomer, Curtis J. Mexican wetbacks sow seeds of woe. Christian Science Monitor,
Nov. 17, 1971: 1, 18.
Staff aid urged by Immigration. Federal Times, May 19, 1971: 12.
Starnes, Richard. Illegal aliens stir new crisis. Washington Star-News, Nov. 11,
1971: 25.
Strout, Richard L. Island of affluence? Christian Science Monitor, Nov. 5, 1971:
16.
Tell of rise in illegal aliens here. Chicago Tribune, Oct. 23, 1971, pt. 2: 12.
Tomasson, Robert E. Ousted city aide will be rehired. New York Times, Nov. 6,
1971: 32.
Treasurer nominee denies she knew of illegal aliens. New York Times, Nov. 30,
1971: 48.
26 aliens found holding DOT jobs. Washington Post, Oct. 22, 1971: A10.
Ungar, Sanford J. Court upholds Federal raids for illegal Chinese entrants.
Washington Post, Mar. 24, 1971: A3.
U.S. raid nets 36 illegal aliens in Treasurer-designate's plant. New York Times,
Oct. 6, 1971: 1, 27.
U.S. tells Chinese of new plan for illegal-alien searches here. New York Times,
Nov. 7, 1971:46.









Waldron, Martin. Captures fail to deter illegal Mexican immigrants. New York
Times, Sept. 20, 1971: 43.
1972
Arrests of illegal aliens rise nearly 500% in last 5 years. Los Angeles Times,
Nov. 9, 1972, pt. 2: 1.
Baskerville, Tim. The border game: trapping the illegal alien. West [Los Angeles
Times] Sept. 17, 1972: 16-17, 19, 22.
Bernstein, Harry. Banuelos firm cited for aliens. Washington Post, Nov. 22, 1972:
A15.
-- Illegal alien job law: many turn selves in. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 25,
1972, pt. 2: 1, 10.
Bishop, Barry. Mexicans flock illegally to U.S.-'promised land'. Chicago Tribune,
Apr. 3, 1972, pt. 1: 18.
Burks, Edward C. Immigration aides raid a Catskill farm at dawn. New York
Times, Sept. 27, 1972: 35.
Del Olmo, Frank. Chicanos divided by sympathy for aliens, fear for own jobs.
Los Angeles Times, Mar. 25, 1972, pt. 2: 1, 10.
-- Crossing the border-'I paid $200 for a green card'. Los Angeles Times,
Dec. 17, 1972, pt. C: 1, 2, 4.
Greene, Sheldon. The employer should pay a penalty for hiring illegal aliens.
Los Angeles Times, May 25, 1972, pt. 2: 7.
Hiring of illegal aliens could be Federal crime under House measure. Wall Street
Journal, Sept. 13, 1972: 14.
House drive begun for minimum pay and HEW bills. Washington Post, Sept. 13,
1972: A10.
Hunter, Marjorie. Social security card in 1st grade asked. New York Times, Mar.
3, 1972: 13.
Huth, Tom. Maryland sojourn ends for 15 aliens. Washington Post, Mar. 13, 1972:
C1, C6.
Illegal aliens here on welfare said to cost millions. New York Times, Feb. 22,
1972: 26.
Janson, Donald. Prosecution of employers urged to halt the flow of illegal aliens.
New York Times, May 19, 1972: 34.
Judge to rule on legality of importing cane cutters. New York Times, Sept. 24,
1972: 52.
Kent, Francis B. Most caught, but wetbacks keep trying. Los Angeles Times,
Nov. 12, 1972, pt. E: 3.
Kistler, Robert. Trackers of men try to check alien traffic. Los Angeles Times,
Dec. 17, 1972, pt. C: 1, 2, 3.
Mexicans break U.S. entry ring. Washington Post, Sept. 13, 1972: A27.
Montgomery, Paul L. Illegal aliens here called public-services burden. New
York Times, Mar. 11, 1972: 58.
-- Proposed alien-hiring bill opposed. New York Times, Mar. 12, 1972: 36.
-- U.S. streamlines alien deportation. New York Times, Jan. 29, 1972: 31, 58.
More aliens caught in Banuelos job. Washington Post, Dec. 9, 1972: A20.
Rich, Spencer. Identity plan eyed in Senate. Washington Post, Mar. 4, 1972:
Al, A16.
Ross, Nancy L. Hire 'illegal' chefs or serve mediocre food? Washington Post,
Feb. 10, 1972: D3.
U.S. destroyed data on illegal aliens. Washington Post, Feb. 19, 1972: A16.
U.S. President, 1969-1974 (Nixon). Transcript of the President's news conference
emphasizing domestic matters. New York Times, June 23, 1972: 14.
Waldron, Martin. Wide abuses alleged in Texas border control. New York Times,
Dec. 19, 1972: 38.
Welles, Benjamin. U.S. roundup of Detroit aliens stirs protests from 2 senators.
New York Times, Apr. 3, 1972: 6.
1973
Aliens reportedly get $100 million in welfare. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 27, 1973,
pt. 1: 22.
Andelman, David A. U.S. implanting an electronic 'fence' to shut Mexican border
to smuggling. New York Times, July 14, 1973: 1, 23.
Andronicos, Bill. Illegal alien problem growing, GAO says. Federal Times, Aug. 29,
1973: 2.
Article on removal of aliens from U.S. creates furor in Mexico. New York Times,
May 4, 1973: 12.









Barkdoll, Robert. Supreme Court limits roving border patrols. Los Angeles Times
June 22, 1973, pt. 1: 3.
Bernstein, Harry. Kissinger, Mexico discuss its request to revive bracero pact.
Los Angeles Times, Nov. 28, 1973, pt. 1: 1, 36.
-- 60,000 phony immigration cards seized at L.A. bus depot. Los Angeles
Times, Jan. 13, 1973, pt. 2: 1.
Blake, Gene. U.S. roundup of suspected aliens hit in suit. Los Angeles Times,
June 23, 1973, pt. 2: 1.
Blau, Eleanor. Dioceses oppose a bill on aliens. New York Times, Mar. 21, 1973:
28.
Border roundup nets 1,000 aliens. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 4, 1973, pt. 1: 2.
Border service accused of discriminatory policy. New York Times, June 23, 1973:
34.
Buder, Leonard. Illegal aliens found in city schools. New York Times, June 12,
1973:28.
Calderon, Carlos. L.A. rally protests deportations. Guardian, June 27, 1973: 7.
Chapman, William. Mexican 'illegals' now seek U.S. cities. Washington Post,
Dec. 9, 1973: Al, A16.
Cars kill three aliens trying to elude patrol. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 9, 1973,
pt. 2: 8.
Charlton, Linda. Alien smuggling charged on coast. New York Times, July 10,
1973: 31.
Critics see aliens bill as biased. Federal Times, Apr. 4, 1973: 6.
Currie, William. Anglos tied to traffic in illegal aliens. Chicago Tribune, Jan. 13,
1973, pt. 1:2.
Data shows increase in illegal aliens in U.S. Federal Times, Jan. 24, 1973: 15.
Del Olmo, Frank. Chavez union does turnabout, opposes alien worker bill. Los
Angeles Times, Mar. 27, 1973, pt. 1: 3.
-- 600 arrested in roundup of illegal aliens. Los Angeles Times, May 24, 1973,
pt. 2: 4.
-- 600 more aliens rounded up in continuing L.A.-area raids. Los Angeles
Times, May 30, 1973, pt. 2: 1, 5.
Dye, Lee. Immigration laws failing, officers contend; massive overhaul urged.
Los Angeles Times, Jan. 14, 1973, pt. 1: 3.
Enstad, Robert. Ripoffs, arrest-a fearful world for the illegal alien. Chicago
Tribune, Dec. 30, 1973, pt. 1: 19.
Four charged upstate in plot to cheat aliens seeking jobs. New York Times, May 2,
1973: 16.
400 illegal aliens seized as coast roundup goes on. New York Times, June 10,
1973: 21.
Goodman, Mike. Epidemics a barrio specter: TB, typhoid, hepatitis linked to
illegal immigrants. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 16, 1973, pt. 2: 1, 8.
Gupte, Frank. Is the 'dragnet' necessary? New York Times, Mar. 25, 1973, pt.
4: 3.
Illegal alien flow 'out of control'. Chicago Tribune, Aug. 6, 1973, pt. 2: 17.
Illegal aliens rounded up. New York Times, Sept. 4, 1973: 25.
INS tells of 'war' on illegal aliens. Federal Times, Apr. 11, 1973: 12.
Keeler, Bob. Illegal Latin 'turistas' live in fear of detection. Washington Post,
Jan. 21, 1973: El, E7.
Keen, Harold, and Robert Kistler. $3-million-a-year Mexican alien smuggling
ring broken. Los Angeles Times, July 10, 1973, pt. 1: 1, 22.
Kumbula, Tendayi. Bill on illegal aliens called 'discriminatory'. Los Angeles
Times, Feb. 4, 1973, pt. 1: 16.
Liddick, Betty. A critical game of hide and seek: plight of the foreign domestic.
Los Angeles Times, June 8, 1973, pt. 4: 1, 4, 5, 6.
Manulkin, Gary H. The vicious circle in the illegal alien hiring ban. Los Angeles
Times, Jan. 23, 1973, pt. 2: 7.
Mathews, Linda. U.S. asks high court to upset ruling barring alien workers.
Los Angeles Times, Aug. 17, 1973, pt. 1: 3.
Mosqueda, John, and Frank Del Olmo. Roundup of illegal aliens stirs angry
charges. Los Angeles Times, June 27, 1973, pt. 2: 1, 4, 5.
125 attend a rally to aid 117 Haitians. New York Times, July 29, 1973: 37.
Palladino, Ralph. 600 to 1,000 Chicanos arrested in L.A. by Immigration every-
day. Los Angeles Free Press, June 22, 1973: 22, 34.
Police right to hold suspected aliens affirmed. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 29, 1973,
pt. 2: 1, 3.
Report on moving of aliens from U.S. stirs Mexico. New York Times, May 4,
1973: 16.







34

Riding, Alan. Poor Mexicans flock to jobs in U.S. Christian Science Monitor,
July 5, 1973: 4.
Sandoval, Alicia. The real wetbacks. Los Angeles Free Press, Oct. 12, 1973: 5.
Shaffer, Ron. 2 in Md. indicted in mail fraud case. Washington Post, July 6, 1973:
Cl, C6.
600 illegal aliens seized. Chicago Tribune, May 25, 1973, pt. 1: 3.
Smothers, Ronald. Study is urged here of 'raids' to turn up illegal Latin aliens.
New York Times, Jan. 13, 1973: 14.
Sterba, James P. Electronic vigil fails to stem Mexican alien influx. New York
Times, July 22, 1973: 1, 39.
Thomas, Nick. Patrolling the border between U.S., Canada is a haphazard affair.
Wall Street Journal, Jan. 18, 1973: 1.
Torgoff, Stephen. 'Alien' roundup in L.A. Guardian, June 20, 1973: 5.
25 accused in entry of aliens. Washington Post, July 10, 1973: A20.
U.S. official backs alien 'dragnets'. New York Times, Feb. 11, 1973: 33.
U.S. visas ordered for Mexican help. New York Times, Apr. 17, 1973: 21.
Walsh, Denny. G.A.O. finds illegal-aliens problem worsened by lax enforcement.
New York Times, June 25, 1973: 28.
-- Ousted Mexicans pay off to stay close to U.S. jobs. New York Times,
Apr. 15, 1973: 1, 46.
SU.S. moves to curb fraud by aliens. New York Times, Sept. 19, 1973: 50.
Wechsler, Philip. Illegal aliens: thousands fear risk of exposure. New York Times,
Mar. 4, 1973: 73.
Well, Martin. Court orders visas for alien farmhands. Washington Post, Apr. 17,
1973: A13.
1974
Alien and drug seizures up in Pacific Southwest area. New York Times, Aug. 18,
1974:37.
Alien arrests climb in San Joaquin Valley. Los Angeles Times, June 9, 1974, pt. 2:4.
Aliens eluding border patrol-with U.S. taxpayers' help. Los Angeles Times,
Oct. 11, 1974, pt. 1: 3, 25.
Aliens on payroll in Texas project. New York Times, Dec. 15, 1974: 12.
Aliens take million jobs, Saxbe charges. Chicago Tribune, Oct. 31, 1974, pt. 1: 3.
Aliens taking 1.2-million jobs in nation, House member says. New York Times,
Dec. 11, 1974:32.
Arrests of illegal aliens in, around Vacaville ended. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 16,
1974, pt. 1: 3, 29.
Attack on illegal aliens under a Federal inquiry. New York Times, Feb. 14, 1974:
54.
Baker, Donald P. U.S. gets tough on jobs for aliens. Washington Post, May 19,
1974: B3.
Belskus, John. L.A. rally backs 'illegals'. Guardian, Sept. 11, 1974: 6.
Bernstein, Harry. Illegal alien hiring ban struck down. Los Angeles Times, July 27,
1974, pt. 1: 1, 19.
-- Illegal aliens, not commuters, hurt labor, U.S. official says. Los Angeles
Times, Nov. 28, 1974, pt. 1: 3, 34.
-- Laws sought to counter anti-alien proposals. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 3,
1974, pt. 1: 3, 30.
Biffle, Christopher. Drudgery and squalor in the fields of California: an inside
view of the illegals' lot. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 22, 1974, pt. 2: 7.
Bracero need gone, S. Texas study shows. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 21, 1974,
pt. 1: 14.
Chapman, L. F., Jr. 'Shrillness from the Attorney General.' Los Angeles Times,
Nov. 14, 1974, pt. 2: 6.
Letter to the editor from the Commissioner, Immigration and Naturaliza-
tion Service.
Chapman urges legislation for curbing illegal aliens. New York Times, Nov. 17,
1974: 6.
Chavez again hits illegal alien use. Los Angeles Times, July 19, 1974, pt. 2: 3.
Chavez seeks a halt to nation's 'worst' influx of illegal aliens. New York Times,
July 23, 1974: 11.
A Chicano leader says Saxbe makes aliens scapegoats. New York Times, Nov. 10,
1974: 52.
Chriss, Nicholas C. Aliens are using marriage to gain admission to U.S. Washing-
ton Post, July 14, 1971: E15.
-- U.S. struggles to control fake alien wedding racket. Los Angeles Times,
July 7, 1974, pt. 1: 1, 18.






35

County asks,$8 million in alien aid repayment. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 28, 1974,
pt. 1: 3.
Court limits sites of border patrol searches. Los Angeles Times, May 11, 1974,
pt. 2: 1.
Court tightens rules on border patrol searches. Los Angeles Times, May 11, 1974,
pt. 2: 1.
Court to review U.S. ban on hiring aliens. Los Angeles Times, June 11, 1974,
pt. 1: 15.
CSC jobs open to aliens. Federal Times, May 22, 1974: 19.
Dallas attorneys say police cannot arrest Mexican aliens. New York Times, Aug.
20, 1974: 15.
Del Olmo, Frank. Alien detention center at El Centro stirs up criticism. Los
Angeles Times, Feb. 24, 1974, pt. 2: 1, 6.
-- Chicanos criticize Saxbe on alien deportation proposal. Los Angeles Times,
Nov. 8, 1974, pt. 2: 1, 8.
--- Ford's top Chicano aide raps Saxbe. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 17, 1974,
pt. 1: 28.
- Probe of Immigration Service will reopen. Los Angeles Times, June 18,
1974, pt. 1: 22.
--- Suit asks curb on questioning of suspected illegal aliens. Los Angeles Times,
June 21, 1974, pt. 1: 3.
-- 600,000 illegal aliens apprehended by U.S. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 17,
1974, pt. 2: 1.
-- 321 cases investigated in long U.S. border corruption inquiry. Los Angeles
Times, July 5, 1974, pt. 1: 3.
--- U.S. refuses to repay county's alien health bill. Los Angeles Times, Aug.
15, 1974, pt. 1: 1, 25.
-- U.S. taxes lost in illegal aliens' income estimated at $100 million. Los
Angeles Times, June 15, 1974, pt. 1: 25.
-- U.S. will assign 550 more agents to Mexico border duty. Los Angeles Times,
Sept. 28, 1974, pt. 2: 1.
Ecuadorians had the will, but no way. New York Times, Aug. 18, 1974: 6.
Farber, M. A. Illegal aliens in the New York metropolitan area. New York
Times, Dec. 29, 1974: 1, 28; Dec. 30, 1974: 1, 12; Dec. 31, 1974: 26.
Farm union strikers patrol border to cut illegal alien flow. Los Angeles Times,
Oct. 8, 1974, pt. 1: 3, 18.
Ford meeting Echeverria at Mexican border today. New York Times, Oct. 21,
1974: 1, 10.
47,000 aliens seized in West. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 11, 1974, pt. 1: 2.
George, Emmett. Chicanos contest illegal alien hunt. Chicago Tribune, Dec. 1,
1974, pt. 1: 36.
--- Pilsen alien 'spy post' protested. Chicago Tribune, Nov. 24, 1974, pt. 1: 22.
Gentry, Margaret. Aliens buy marriage to avoid deportation, U.S. finds. Wash-
ington Post, Dec. 26, 1974: C20.
Goldman, Ari L. Illegal aliens living in Queens are assailed at hearing. New York
Times, Nov. 24, 1974: 106.
Herbers, John. Mexico's new oil for world sale, Echeverria says. New York Times,
Oct. 22, 1974: 1, 14.
Hess, John L. Fraudulent marriages increase as aliens seek to circumvent immi-
gration laws here. New York Times, Feb. 26, 1974: 39, 60.
Hoenig, Gary. The poor and huddled now come from South America. New York
Times, Aug. 18, 1974: E6.
Holles, Everett R. Border patrol shifts focus to alien-smuggling rings. New York
Times, Dec. 24, 1974: 22.
Illegal-alien funds sought. New York Times, Aug. 8, 1974: 25.
Illegal aliens fight backed by AFGE units. Federal Times, Oct. 23, 1974: 3.
Illegal aliens flooding U.S. Los Angeles Times, May 26, 1974, pt. lA: 2.
Illegal aliens hold 11,500 jobs. Washington Post, Nov. 15, 1974: A10.
Illegal aliens seen taking citizens' jobs. Washington Post, Sept. 19, 1974: C2.
Illegal entry charged to 29. New York Times, Sept. 27, 1974: 44.
'Illegal immigration: a global problem'. Washington Post, Nov. 22, 1974: A25.
Letters to the editor.
Immigration laws called 'bankrupt'. Los Angeles Times, July 24, 1974, pt. 1: 2.
INS vs. illegal aliens. Federal Times, May 15, 1974: 7.
Irwin, Don. U.S.-paid lawyers for illegal aliens proposed. Los Angeles Times,
July 6, 1974, pt. 1: 14.
Job rise is linked to curb on aliens. New York Times, Sept. 22, 1974: 52.







36

Keen, Harold. Alien-smuggler crackdown urged. Los Angeles Times, July 9, 1974,
pt. 1: 1, 20.
Kiernan, Laura A. 5 deported aliens sue for Va. wages. Washington Post, Sept.
23, 1974: C1, C2.
Kuttner, Bob. Saxbe urges new plan on illegal aliens. Washington Post, Oct. 31,
1974: A5.
Lawyer is accused in scheme to fake marriage for aliens. New York Times, Nov.
21, 1974: 45.
LeVelie, Mike. What the inscription fails to mention. Chicago Tribune, Sept. 17,
1974, pt. 2: 6.
MacKenzie, John P. High court allows aliens to commute to U.S. jobs. Washing-
ton Post, Nov. 26, 1974: A8.
-- Ruling may open U.S. jobs to resident aliens. Washington Post, Feb. 17,
1974: 11.
Mathews, Linda. Supreme Court mired in alien labor case. Los Angeles Times,
Oct. 18, 1974, pt. 1: 3, 26.
SU.S. Supreme Court to rule on aliens checks. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 16,
1974, pt. 1: 3, 29.
Maxwell, Evan. Latest ruling for checkpoints evens division of judges. Los
Angeles Times, Oct. 9, 1974, pt. 2: 1, 2.
-- Second frontier: the final hurdle for illegal aliens in U.S. Los Angeles
Times, Aug. 19, 1974, pt. 2: 1, 2.
Meisler, Stanley. Echeverria expected to press Ford today on bracero issue. Los
Angeles Times, Oct. 21, 1974, pt. 1: 1, 12.
-- Mexico drops goal of migrant pact with U.S. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 24,
1974, pt. 1: 25.
Meyers, Robert. Illegal aliens flood country in search of jobs. Washington Post,
Aug. 11, 1974: All.
More agents on the border. Federal Times, Oct. 30, 1974: 7.
Mouat, Lucia. Illegal aliens vs. jobless. Christian Science Monitor, Oct. 22, 1974:
1, 4.
SOn deporting illegal aliens. Christian Science Monitor, Nov. 6, 1974: 3.
Murphy, John. Banana boat carries cargo of stowaways. Chicago Tribune,
Aug. 14, 1974, pt. 1:5.
N. Y., Chicago rallies hit deportations. Guardian, Sept. 11, 1974: 6.
90 stow away in hold of ship. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 14, 1974, pt. 1: 13.
95 illegal aliens seized. Chicago Tribune, Mar. 1, 1974, pt. 1A: 2.
No detention facilities, so illegal aliens go free. New York Times, Aug. 19, 1974: 26.
1,000 protest deportations. Los Angeles Times, Sept. 1, 1974, pt. 2: 4.
Ostrow, Ronald J. Saxbe calls illegal aliens U.S. crisis. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 31,
1974, pt. 1: 1, 8.
Police seize 22 aliens-provide food. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 11, 1974, pt. 2: 3.
Posting 'keep out' signs for illegal aliens. Christian Science Monitor, June 24,
1974: 1, 5.
Press, Robert M. U.S. alien crackdown sparks criticism. Christian Science
Monitor, Nov. 25, 1974: 5A.
Raid ends Pole's hope for U.S. life. Chicago Tribune, Dec. 1, 1974, pt. 1: 38.
Rally hits Saxbe on 'aliens'. Guardian, Dec. 11, 1974: 2.
Rawitch, Robert. Alien witnesses-many go to jail. Los Angeles Times, May 27,
1974, pt. 2: 1, 2, 3.
-- Sentencing of 5 ends alien smuggling trial. Los Angeles Times, June 19,
1974, pt. 1: 35.
--- Woman alien freed after 37 days in jail. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 18, 1974,
pt. 1: 3, 26.
Reasons, George, and David Rosenweig. Aliens steered to ring by Mexican con-
sulate. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 22, 1974, pt. 1: 1, 20.
Riding, Alan. U.S. rejects Mexico's proposal to renew migrant agreement. New
York Times, Aug. 8, 1974: 39.
Rotman, Richard E. Illegal alien curb pressed. Washington Post, June 30, 1974:
A5.
Sandoval, Alicia. Blind Anglo justice. Los Angeles Free Press, May 24, 1974:
21, 38.
-- Sybil Brand sequel. Los Angeles Free Press, June 7, 1974: 19, 30.
Satchell, Michael. The illegal aliens. Washington Star-News, Nov. 16, 1974: Al,
A8; Nov. 17, 1974: Al, A12; Nov. 18, 1974: Al, D9; Nov. 19, 1974: Bl, B4.
-- Illegal entries threaten quality of U.S. life. Chicago Tribune, Nov. 24,
1974, pt. 2: 2.









Saxbe urges $50-milllion for guards to halt aliens. New York Times, Oct. 31, 1974:
24.
Searches of cars for aliens ruled illegal. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 8, 1974, pt. 1: 19.
Simons, Marlise. Mexican note attacks U.S. 'wetback' policy. Washington Post,
June 21, 1974: A38.
67 illegal aliens seized at racetrack. Los Angeles Times, May 3, 1974, pt. 2: 3.
Smith, Dave. 100 gypsies from Europe smuggled into U.S., robbed. Los Angeles
Times, Feb. 27, 1974, pt. 1: 3, 18.
Social Security offices used to tip off U.S. on illegal aliens. Los Angeles Times,
June 20, 1974, pt. 1: 3.
Some aliens will marry about anyone to stay. Washington Star-News, Nov. 19,
1974: B4.
Study of alien welfare ruling on county's finances sought. Los Angeles Times,
Dec. 27, 1974, pt. 2: 3.
Support aliens' legal residency bill, group asks. Chicago Tribune, Sept. 23, 1974,
pt. 1: 4.
12 illegal aliens arrested here. Chicago Tribune, Mar. 23, 1974, pt. 1: 2.
20 seized on L.I. as illegal aliens. New York Times, June 18, 1974: 43.
U.S. alien seizures double '73 figures. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 23, 1974, pt. 1: 25.
U.S. opens probe of crash that killed 12 aliens, driver. Los Angeles Times, Mar.
10, 1974, pt. 1: 3, 23.
U.S. to seek review of alien-jobs ruling. Washington Post, Apr. 7, 1974: B7.
Waldron, Martin. Detention centers last U.S. stop for thousands of Mexican
aliens. New York Times, July 13, 1974: 16.
Walsh, Denny. House panel estimates U.S. and states lose $115-million a year
in taxes that illegal aliens escape. New York Times, June 13, 1974: 35.
-- Illegal aliens called duped by lawyers. New York Times, July 7, 1974: 30.
War on illegal aliens blunted by funds denial. Federal Times, July 24, 1974: 4.
Weaver, Warren, Jr. Court, 5-4, upholds aliens commuting for U.S. jobs. New
York Times, Nov. 26, 1974: 67.
Welfare aid for illegal aliens backed by court. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 26, 1974,
pt. 1: 3, 31.
West, Richard. 13 killed in crash of immigration van. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 9,
1974, pt. 1: 1, 21.
Winder, David. Chicano jobless resent illegal aliens working. Christian Science
Monitor, Dec. 6, 1974: 3.
Zeman, Ray. Refund for illegal alien medical care sought. Los Angeles Times,
June 26, 1974, pt. 2: 1, 4.
-- Schabarum to push claim on alien care. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 27, 1974,
pt. 2: 8.
1975
Aarons, Leroy F. Illegal entrance. Washington Post, Feb. 2, 1975: Al, A8.
-- Patrol can't keep aliens out. Washington Post, Feb. 3, 1975: Al, A6.
Aguilar, Eloy O. 'A matter of raw economics.' Washington Post, Apr. 20, 1975:
L10.
Alien care suit, filed in error, is killed by counsel. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 20, 1975,
pt. 1: 28.
Aliens given social security numbers. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 6, 1975, pt. 1: 9.
Aliens said to have bogus voting cards. New York Times, June 15, 1975: 59.
Assembly passes bill to curb hiring of illegal aliens. New York Times, Feb. 11,
1975: 83.
Auerbach, Alexander. IRS eases retirement fund transfers. Los Angeles Times,
Dec. 23, 1975, pt. 3: 6, 7.
Barber, Bob. 'Alien' I.D. cards to be issued. Guardian, Dec. 10, 1975: 7.
Beliefs on illegal aliens die. Washington Post, Nov. 28, 1975: F3.
Bernstein, Harry, and Mike Castro. Bid to give illegal aliens' jobs to Americans
failing. Los Angeles Times, July 3, 1975, pt. 1: 1, 32.
Biaggi asks parley on illegal aliens. New York Times, May 25, 1975: 48.
Binder, David. False identities costly to nation. New York Times, Apr. 11,
1975: 7.
Blocking of jobs for illegal aliens urged. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 5, 1975, pt. 1:
3, 17.
Braden, Tom. Illegal aliens: a choice of evils. Washington Post, Apr. 18, 1975:
A19.
Carter, Donna. Rodino bill protest draws 800. Guardian, Dec. 10, 1975: 2.









Catholic group urges U.S. amnesty for illegal aliens. Chicago Tribune, Mar. 4,
1974, pt. 1: 12.
Catholic official urges Hill to vote bill on illegal aliens. Washington Post, Mar.
14, 1975: D14.
Catholics criticize bill to curb aliens. New York Times, Aug. 22, 1975: 32.
Catholics seek to defend illegal aliens. New York Times, Mar. 17, 1975: 16.
Chapman, L. F., Jr. 'Jobs and illegal aliens'. Christian Science Monitor, Apr. 28,
1975: 28.
Letter to the editor from the Commissioner, Immigration and Naturaliza-
tion Service.
Chavez, Cesar. Chavez on 'illegals'. Washington Post, Feb. 14, 1975: A31.
Letter to the editor.
Chriss, Nicholas C. Lack of funds virtually halts alien deportation. Los Angeles
Times, Jan. 16, 1975, pt. 1: 14.
Coast union aids 17 illegal aliens. New York Times, Feb. 16, 1975: 36.
Conine, Ernest. The flood of illegal aliens: what to do? Los Angeles Times, June
13, 1975, pt. 2: 7.
Cook, David T. Tallying cost of illegal immigrants. Christian Science Monitor,
Dec. 30, 1975: 14.
Crackdown on employers of illegal aliens announced. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 6,
1975, pt. 1: 3.
Day, Mark. Making scapegoats of the humble. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 23, 1975,
pt. 5: 5.
Del Olmo, Frank. Airlift of aliens under scrutiny. Los Angeles Times, May 25,
1975, pt. 1: 3, 31, 32.
-- Alien arrests to be resumed. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 12, 1975, pt. 1: 23.
--- Amnesty for illegal aliens in U.S. for 3 years urged. Los Angeles Times,
Aug. 21, 1975, pt. 2: 1, 8.
- Amnesty for illegal aliens urged by Latin leaders. Los Angeles Times,
May 23, 1975, pt. 2: 2.
-- Bill would offer amnesty to some aliens. Los Angeles Times, July 12, 1975,
pt. 1: 20.
---- Collusion charged in arrest of aliens. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 7, 1975,
pt. 1: 29.
-- Cranston to give Senate speech on illegal aliens. Los Angeles, Times, July 2,
1975, pt. 3: 18.
-- Few aliens on welfare illegally, study shows. Los Angeles Times, July 1,
1975, pt. 2: 1, 6.
--- Illegal alien arrests drop in Southwest. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 12, 1975,
pt. 2: 1, 4.
--- Illegal aliens' earnings in county may top $1 billion yearly, study esti-
mates. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 26, 1975, pt. 2: 2.
---- Illegal aliens: no quick solution seen. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 10, 1975,
pt. 2: 8.
--- Illegal aliens target of union organizers. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 30, 1975,
pt. 2: 1, 5.
-- Immigration agency halts barrio raids. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 1, 1975,
pt. 1: 3, 22.
-- Immigration consultant receives prison sentence for defrauding illegal
aliens. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 25, 1975, pt. 1: 30.
-- Jury indicts father, son in alien case. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 4, 1975,
pt. 1: 31.
-- Minority projects face fund loss. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 20, 1975, pt. 1:
25.
-- State won't appeal ruling on welfare for illegal aliens. Los Angeles Times,
Feb. 5, 1975, pt. 2: 5.
--- Tipoff of raid denied by Immigration Service. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 8,
1975, pt. 1: 17.
--- Tunney to push bill on illegal alien jobs. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 5, 1975,
pt. 2: 1, 6.
--- 23 illegal aliens in van, driver seized. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 27, 1975,
pt. 1: 26.
Dorfman, Ronald. Illegals fair game for U.S. Chicago Tribune, Feb. 11, 1975,
pt. 1: 18.
11 indicted for bilking aliens. New York Times, June 11, 1975: 93.
Employer is indicted over illegal aliens. New York Times, Apr. 6, 1975: 10.









Enstad, Robert. National Can bans hiring of illegals. Chicago Tribune, Apr. 12,
1975, pt. 1: 13.
-- U.S. agents waging lonely battle against illegal aliens. Chicago Tribune,
Feb. 9, 1975, pt. 1: 34.
Entry of aliens from Caribbean stirs criticism. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 16, 1975,
pt. 1: 24.
Even illegal aliens can get social security cards. Christian Science Monitor, Mar. 10,
1975: 2.
Fitzpatrick, Tom. Chicago: the big roundup. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 18, 1975,
pt. 2: 7.
500 illegal aliens seized at Los Angeles factory. New York Times, May 17, 1975,
6.
Flint, Peter B. Rise seen in pay to illegal aliens in state. New York Times, Feb. 22,
1975: 58.
Flood of illegal aliens renews controversy. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 23, 1975,
pt. 5: 5.
Adapted from testimony of Deputy Attorney General Lawrence H. Silverman
before the House Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Immigration,
Citizenship, and International Law.
Funds restored in alien searches. New York Times, Mar. 16, 1975: 19.
Gates, Paul H., Jr. Illegal aliens turn up among migrants in N.Y. Christian
Science Monitor, Nov. 6, 1975: 17.
George, Emmett. Phony marriages probed. Chicago Tribune, Jan. 19, 1975, pt. 1:
39.
-- 106 aliens here face deportation. Chicago Tribune, Jan. 5, 1975, pt. 1: 32.
Gerstenzang, James. Where the illegal aliens are. Washington Post, Mar. 4,
1975: A9.
Gollobin, Ira. Aliens: scapegoat for crisis? Guardian, Feb. 5, 1975: 5.
Goshko, John M. Immigration Chief defends foolproof alien ID cards. Washington
Post, Nov. 20, 1975: A8.
-- Study finds 8 million aliens here. Washington Post, Nov. 7, 1975: A6.
Greeley, Andrew. The crime of pushing a mop. Chicago Tribune, Mar. 25, 1975: 15.
Hill urged to curb illegal immigration. Washington Post, Mar. 8, 1975: A6.
Houston, Paul. Only 50% of illegal aliens are Mexican, official says. Los Angeles
Times, Mar. 13, 1975, pt. 1: 1, 9.
Illegal aliens pay more in taxes than they reap, study concludes. Los Angeles
Times, Nov. 21, 1975, pt. 1: 8.
Illegal aliens plague Guam authorities. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 20, 1975, pt. 1A:9.
Illegal aliens send sizeable sums home. New York Times, Nov. 23, 1975: 32.
Illegal aliens with U.S. jobs. Christian Science Monitor, Mar. 11, 1975: 6.
Immigration Chief supports a curb on illegal aliens. New York Times, Sept. 26,
1975: 24.
Immigration head voices alarm over the problem of illegal aliens. New York
Times, Dec. 21, 1975: 27.
Immigration men find illegal aliens underfoot. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 4, 1975
pt. 1: 8.
INS has irons in fire for '75. Federal Times, Jan. 29, 1975: 13.
It may seem futile, but for Harry Heard the chase is serious. Wall Street Journal,
Jan. 8, 1975: 1, 25.
Jackal Team. 'Three nights later, they're back.' Los Angeles Free Press, Feb. 7,
1975: 5, 22.
Janson, Donald. Immigration aide accused of bribery in plot with aliens. New
York Times, July 1, 1975: 33.
Jobs ban asked for aliens. Federal Times, Jan. 29, 1975: 13.
Jones, Jenkin Lloyd. Our leaky borders. Washington Star-News, Jan. 11, 1975: A8.
Justice unit moves to bar illegal aliens from hiring in U.S. New York Times,
Feb. 5, 1975: 15.
Kelly, Otr. Levi skeptic on sweep of aliens. Washington Star-News, Mar. 27, 1975:
A3, A7.
--- New ID's to tighten U.S. watch on aliens. Washington Star, Nov. 20,
1975: A2.
Kennedy, Shawn G. 2 illegal aliens tell U.S. panel how they obtained jobs here.
New York Times, Feb. 4, 1975: 31.
Kiernan, Laura A. Caught up in marriage fraud game. Washington Post, May 15,
1975: B1, B10.
Kihss, Peter. Puerto Rico says aliens use it as path to U.S. New York Times,
Mar. 3, 1975: 35.









Kornholz, June. Uncle Sam seeking to undo marriages not made in heaven. Wall
Street Journal, Oct. 29, 1975: 1, 35.
Kremen, Jeff, and Jim Wasmuth. 'Alien' bill attacks minorities. Guardian, Oct. 15,
1975: 7.
Lindsay, Robert. Citrus growers hit by worker woes. New York Times, Nov. 20,
1975: 61, 72.
Los Angeles county suing U.S. for $8.1-million loss. New York Times, Feb. 23,
1975: 8.
MacKenzie, John P. U.S. asks court for curbs on aliens in civil service. Washington
Post, Jan. 14, 1975: A2.
-- Border patrol curbed on searches of autos, by John P. MacKenzie and
Stan Crock. Washington Post, July 1, 1975: All.
Mathews, Linda. Justices further curb searches for aliens. Los Angeles Times,
July 1, 1975, pt. 1: 1, 8.
- U.S. high court to rule on illegal alien hiring ban. Los Angeles Times,
June 24, 1975, pt. 1: 3, 18.
Meyer, Lawrence. Alien plan links jobs to citizenship. Washington Post, Feb. 5,
1975: A2.
-- Aliens hard to count. Washington Post, Feb. 2, 1975: Al, A12.
- Levi says gun study goes on. Washington Post, Apr. 4, 1975: A3.
More than 400 aliens seized in factory raid. Los Angeles Times, May 17, 1975,
pt. 2: 1, 12.
Mouat, Lucia. Dispute flares over jobs held by illegal aliens in U.S. Christian
Science Monitor, Feb. 5, 1975: 1, 4.
U.S. borders breached by tide of illegal aliens. Christian Science Moni-
tor, Oct. 22, 1975: 6.
Mullen, William. U. S. uses electronic sensors to catch Mexican aliens. Chicago
Tribune, Oct. 28, 1975, pt. 1: 8.
National Can seeks not to hire aliens. New York Times, Apr. 12, 1975: 37.
98 aliens arrested in Port Chester. New York Times, June 25, 1975: 47.
Oliver, Myrna. Court bars schools from naming illegal alien pupils. Los Angeles
Times, Sept. 18, 1975, pt. 1: 28.
-- Rejection of illegal aliens by schools hit. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 29, 1975,
pt. 1: 24.
170,000 aliens in Southwest arrested in '74. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 5, 1975,
pt. 1: 3, 17.
Ordin, Andrea Sheridan. Bar Assn. inquiry at midpoint. Los Angeles Times,
Feb. 23, 1975, pt. 5: 5.
Ostrow, Ronald J. Outgoing justice aide hits Levi criticism of ID plan. Los Ange-
les Times, Apr. 5, 1975, pt. 1: 2.
Panel opposes bills on hiring of illegal aliens. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 29, 1975,
pt. 1: 22.
Police giving aid to illegal aliens. New York Times, Mar. 23, 1975: 23.
Protests hit alien hysteria. Guardian, Jan. 15, 1975: 8.
Pruden, Wesley, Jr. The great mass migration. National Observer, Mar. 1, 1975: 4.
Puerto Rico says aliens use it as path to U.S. New York Times, Mar. 3, 197o: 35.
Pullen, Emma E. Court asked to uphold alien job law. Los Angeles Times, Dec. 15,
1975, pt. 1: 28.
-- Illegal alien problem inflated to aid 'racist' bill, Alatorre charges. Los
Angeles Times, Nov. 2, 1975, pt. 1A: 4.
Rehiring of illegal aliens charged. New York Times, Aug. 11, 1975: 31.
Reich, Kenneth. LAPD doesn't go after illegal aliens, Davis says. Los Angeles
Times, Sept. 27, 1975, pt. 2: 1, 12.
Residence plan opposed. New York Times, Apr. 4, 1975: 5.
Robinson, Timothy S. Woman is indicted in marriage plot. Washington Post,
Oct. 30, 1975: A12, A18.
Rothmeyer, Karen. Illegal aliens caught in job squeeze. Washington Post, Aug.
17, 1975: C4.
-- With jobs scarce, U.S. steps up efforts to seize illegal aliens. Wall Street
Journal, Aug. 12, 1975: 1, 25.
Satchell, Michael. Identity cards for citizens argued before panel. Washington
Star-News, Feb. 5, 1975: E8.
Shannon, Don. Penalties voted on hiring of illegal aliens. Los Angeles Times, July
31, 1975, pt. 1: 6.
Shannon, William V. The illegal immigrants. New York Times, Jan. 14, 1975: 33.
Silverman, Mike. 4 illegal aliens fighting a 3-front war. Los Angeles Times, Jan.
20, 1975, pt. 1: 19.
67 illegal aliens found at 2 plants. New York Times, Mar. 7, 1975: 75.









Skelton, George. Cranston proposes amnesty for aliens. Los Angeles Times, Oct.
18, 1975, pt. 1: 25.
Strong, James. Hiring of illegal aliens denounced. Chicago Tribune, Mar. 27, 1975,
pt. 7: 8.
Strout, Richard L. America shares its birthright. Christian Science Monitor, May
30, 1975: 27.
A Study is planned of illegal aliens. New York Times, Nov. 9, 1975: 4.
TB rise sparked by illegal aliens. New York Times, May 18, 1975: 34.
30,000 aliens seized in July. New York Times, Aug. 24, 1975: 51.
24 aliens found in truck. New York Times, Feb. 3, 1975: 14.
24 illegal aliens found hiding in truck in L.A. Washington Post, Feb. 3, 1975: A6.
21 illegal aliens seized. New York Times, May 21, 1975: 93.
U.S. funds lacking for jailed aliens. New York Times, Jan. 19, 1975: 42.
U.S. seeks crackdown on aliens. Chicago Tribune, Feb. 5, 1975, pt. 4: 14.
U.S. study says illegal aliens create $16 billion tax burden. New York Times,
Dec. 1, 1975: 55.
Waskel, Greg. 30 illegal aliens seized at ex-U.S. aide's plant. Los Angeles Times,
June 6, 1975, pt. 1: 3.
Wesley, Al. Protests hit alien hysteria. Guardian, Jan. 15, 1975: 8.
Where the illegal aliens are. Washington Post, Mar. 4, 1975: A9.
Willoughby, William. Catholics: forgive all aliens. Washington Star-News, Mar.
13, 1975: A16
Winder, David. Why it's hard to stop illegal aliens. Christian Science Monitor,
Mar. 6, 1975: 3B.
1976
Aliens said to cost U.S. jobs, taxes. Washington Post, July 18, 1976: A3.
All Nations, Inc. convicted under new alien fraud law. Los Angeles Free Press,
June 25-July 1, 1976: 3.
Axelrod, Susan. Arrests here crack illegal transport ring. Washington Star, Nov.
20, 1976: A3.
Ban on jobs for illegal aliens upheld. Chicago Tribune, Feb. 26, 1976, pt. 1: 6.
Barnes, Bart. 7 U.S. colleges probed on illegal alien entries. Washington Post,
Aug. 28, 1976: A4.
Barringer, Felicity. 58 Good Humor men nabbed. Washington Post, June 17,
1976: B6.
Blake, Gene. Illegal aliens denied rights, Bar says. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 5,
1976, pt. 2: 1.
Chapman, L. F., Jr. A serious problem. Wall Street Journal, July 19, 1976: 7.
Letter to the editor from the Commissioner, Immigration and Natural-
ization Service.
Coakley, Michael. Illegal Mexican aliens meet terror at the border. Chicago
Tribune, July 11, 1976, pt. 1: 1, 8.
-- Trial tests rights of illegal aliens. Chicago Tribune, Dec. 19, 1976, pt.
1:18.
Cowan, Edward. Washington & business: a new focus on jobs. New York Times,
Nov. 4, 1976: 63.
Crime surging over Mexican border into U.S. Chief Davis says. Los Angeles
Times, Oct. 24, 1976, pt. 1: 23.
Del Olmo, Frank. Ban on aid to aged illegal aliens hit. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 16,
1976, pt. 1:3.
Boy seeking new life in U.S. finds only tragedy: crippled by border thugs.
Los Angeles Times, Apr. 26, 1976, pt. 1: 3, 22, 23.
---- Chavez not impressed by ruling, says bias is issue. Los Angeles Times,
Feb. 26,1976, pt. 1: 11.
-- Echeverria criticizes U.S. on illegal aliens. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 16,
1976,pt. 2:4.
Emergency county aid to aged illegal aliens studied. Los Angeles Times,
Feb. 18, 1976, pt. 2:3.
Illegal aliens go home in style, U.S. pays tab. Los Angeles Times, July 27,
1976, pt. 1: 3, 15.
INS to investigate 'round-trip' deportations. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 17,
1976, pt. 2:1.
Key senator to sponsor bill to curb illegal aliens. Los Angeles Times,
Mar. 16, 1976, pt. 2: 1, 2.
-- Lack of planes, approval from Mexico stalls massive return of illegal
aliens. Los Angeles Times, May 13, 1976, pt. 2: 1, 5.
Mexico bars alien airlift. Los Angeles Times, June 1, 1976, pt. 1: 3, 21.






42

Del Olmo, Frank. Plan to curb illegal alien jobs opens. Los Angeles Times, June 2,
1976, pt. 2: 2.
---- 2,600 illegal aliens cut from county relief rolls. Los Angeles Times, July 7,
1976, pt. 1:3.
-- Union leader charges Senate bill would revive controversial bracero pro-
gram. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 11, 1976, pt. 1: 3.
-- U.S. seeks help in locating children of 2 illegal aliens. Los Angeles Times,
May 6, 1976, pt. 1: 32.
Dennis, Robert T. [Letter on illegal immigration] Washington Star, Feb. 7, 1976:
A10.
8 killed, 7 hurt in crash; most called illegal aliens. New York Times, Apr. 28,
1976: 8.
Eisen, Arlene. War builds against Latin workers. Guardian, Dec. 1, 1976: 8.
Farber, M. A. Immigration aides in New York area hail court's ruling. New York
Times, Feb. 26, 1976: 15.
Farr, William. Grand jury letter cites high cost of illegal aliens. Los Angeles Times,
May 15, 1976, pt. 1: 23.
Fetherling, Dale. Checkpoints open again. Los Angeles Times, July 11, 1976, pt. 1:
3, 19.
Fines of up to $5,000 are urged for employers of illegal aliens. New York Times,
Nov. 24, 1976: 32.
Ford orders civil service to continue barring aliens. Washington Post, Sept. 3,
1976: A23.
40 aliens are seized working at Lundy's. New York Times, Feb. 9, 1976: 34.
GAO: stop illegal aliens. Federal Times, Nov. 8, 1976: 11.
Goodsell, James Nelson. Mexican trek North unabated. Christian Science Monitor,
Aug. 4, 1976: 4.
Green, Wayne E. Top court backs curbing illegal aliens by placing burden on
their employers. Wall Street Journal, Feb. 26, 1976: 4.
Greer, Colin, and Marvin Surkin. Paving streets with his life. New York Times,
Nov. 6, 1976: 19.
Hey, Robert P. Crossing the border to fairer immigration laws. Christian Science
Monitor, Apr. 6, 1976: 1, 9.
High job rate seen for illegal aliens. New York Times, July 18, 1976: 20.
Hodge, Paul, and Louise A. Reid. Immigration told to end raids on aliens in parks.
Washington Post, Dec. 2, 1976: Cl, C16.
Holles, Everett R. Bandit gangs prey on Mexican aliens crossing border to seek
work in U.S. New York Times, June 6, 1976: 26.
-- U.S. airlifting Mexican aliens home. New York Times, July 25, 1976: 20.
Holsendolph, Ernest. Official urges national assessment as Hispanic-American
population rises sharply. New York Times, Apr. 9, 1976: 13.
Holt, Brad. Immigration officers may be disciplined. Washington Post, Dec. 4,
1976: C8.
House, Toni. The end of an American dream: St. Elizabeths psychiatrist faces
deportation after living a lie for 25 years. Washington Star, Oct. 16, 1976:
Dl, D2.
Illegal aliens linked to drain on the state's economy. New York Times, Dec. 5,
1976, pt. 11: 10, 11.
Jackson, Robert L. INS chief backs ban on hiring of illegal aliens. Los Angeles
Times, Mar. 18, 1976, pt. 1: 3, 28.
Janson, Donald. U.S. seizes 18 aliens working illegally. New York Times, Aug.
27, 1976: B20.
Johnson, Thomas A. Signatures sought in midtown to end influx of illegal aliens.
New York Times, Aug. 28, 1976: 11.
Jones, Jack. Illegal aliens become easy prey for thugs at U.S. border. Los Angeles
Times, Mar. 15, 1976, pt. 2: 1, 2.
Kendall, John. Bilking of thousands of aliens in L.A. told. Los Angeles Times,
Sept. 30, 1976, pt. 2: 1.
Legal aliens will receive 'counterfeit-proof' cards. New York Times, Nov. 5,
1976: 12.
Lewis, Alfred E., and Martin Weil. 27 aliens travel here in small vans; 17 seized.
Washington Post, Nov. 20, 1976: Bl, B7.
Lubasch, Arnold H. Court strikes down need of citizenship for alien teachers.
New York Times, July 22, 1976: 27.
McClintock, Wayne. Group would stem alien tide. National Observer, Mar. 13,
1976: 5.







43

MacKenzie, John P. Civil service rule rejected. Washington Post, June 2, 1976:
Al, A6.
-- Court backs California curb on hiring aliens. Washington Post, Feb. 26,
1976: A2.
-- Court voids Federal jobs ban on aliens. Washington Post, June 2, 1976:
Al, A6.
Markoutsas, Elaine. Neighbors insist 2 aliens 'belong'. Chicago Tribune, Apr. 18,
1976, pt. 1: 9.
Mathews, Linda. U.S. high court OKs border checkpoints. Los Angeles Times,
July 7, 1976, pt. 1: 3, 24.
--- Supreme Court voids ban on Federal jobs for aliens. Los Angeles Times,
June 2, 1976, pt. 1: 1, 14, 15.
Mexican press rips U.S. Chicago Tribune, July 23, 1976, pt. 1: 15.
Mexico rebukes U.S. on alien deportation. Washington Post, Aug. 13, 1976: A6.
Morrison, Patt. Nun, 3 others face trial for counseling illegal aliens. Los Angeles
Times, Nov. 23, 1976, pt. 2: 1, 3.
Mouat, Lucia. New solutions to illegal alien problem sought. Christian Science
Monitor, July 29, 1976: 7.
-- White-collar illegal aliens. Christian Science Monitor, Sept. 17, 1976: 2.
Murillo, David. New anti-'alien' plan unveiled. Guardian, Sept. 1, 1976: 8.
Oelsner, Lesley. Federal jobs ban for aliens upset. New York Times, June 2, 1976:
1, 22.
-- High court rules states may curb illegal aliens. New York Times, Feb. 26,
1976: 1, 15.
Official aims at aliens' employers. Washington Post, Nov. 24, 1976: C4.
Oliver, Myrna. Alien assistance firm accused. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 26, 1976,
pt. 1: 24.
-- Court blocks naming of illegal alien pupils, by Myrna Oliver and Mike
Castro. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 30, 1976, pt. 1: 3, 27.
110 illegal aliens seized. Los Angeles, Times, July 21, 1976, pt. 1: 15.
Organized crime linked to illegal alien smuggling. New York Times, Sept. 5,
1976: 40.
Policy on aliens opposed. New York Times, Feb. 16, 1976: 28.
Press, Robert M. More U.S. firms refusing to employ illegal aliens. Christian
Science Monitor, Apr. 1, 1976: 5.
Rackley, Lurma. 18 aliens arrested at restaurant. Washington Star, May 21,
1976: Bl.
Rawitch, Robert. Ring believed to be smuggling in Chinese. Los Angeles Times,
Oct. 14, 1976, pt. 1: 1, 31.
-- U.S. way of life lures 3 Red Chinese. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 20, 1976,
pt. 1: 3, 36.
Reich, Kenneth. Carter backs 'legitimate status' for nation's long-time illegal
immigrants. Los Angeles Times, July 2, 1976, pt. 1: 22.
Reid, Louise A. An illegal alien's story. Washington Post, Nov. 30, 1976: Al, AS.
--- Illegal aliens raid nets 26 suspects. Washington Post, Nov. 29, 1976: Cl,
Cll.
-- Life of an illegal alien: living with the constant fear 'they may find and
deport me'. Washington Post, Dec. 16, 1976: DC6.
- U.S. unit bars mass arrests of immigrants. Washington Post, Dec. 4, 1976:
Bl.
Residents aliens cleared to have Federal jobs. Wall Street Journal, June 2, 1976: 7.
Restaurateur held in scheme involving 14 Japanese aliens. New York Times,
July 22, 1976: 7.
Rowan, Carl T. What to do about the flood of illegal aliens? Washington Star,
Aug. 27, 1976: E3.
San Diego police unit to patrol border. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 10, 1976, pt. 1: 23.
Satchell, Michael. Job ban for illegal aliens: its time came, then faded. Washington
Star, Jan. 27, 1976: Al, B12.
Scheduled flights for illegal aliens to Mexico weighed. Wall Street Journal, June 4,
1976: 30.
Scott, Austin. N.Y. farmworkers group urges end of imports of apple harvesters.
Washington Post, Sept. 10, 1976: C30.
Selling of U.S. registration cards to illegal aliens is charged to 2. New York Times,
Sept. 9, 1976: 13.
17 on L.I. are held as illegal aliens. New York Times, May 30, 1976: 26.









Shannon, Don. Alien card test to begin in May. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 12, 1976,
pt. 1: 1, 6.
-- Immigration law complex and inflexible. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 3, 1976,
pt. 6: 3, 5.
Six illegal aliens attacked twice by border gangs. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 2,
1976, pt. 1:32.
Smyth, Jeannette. With this visa, I thee wed. Washington Post, Jan. 6, 1976:
Cl, C3.
Soccer raid backfires. Guardian, Dec. 22, 1976: 10.
Steps sought to stem flow of illegal aliens. Federal Times, Sept. 27, 1976: 16.
Stiff penalties urged for hiring illegal aliens. Chicago Tribune, Nov. 24, 1976,
pt. 4: 8.
Strout, Richard L. Allen problem increases. Christian Science Monitor, Dec. 14,
1976:3.
Sweeney, Louise. Recording new tide of immigrants. Christian Science Monitor,
Nov. 17, 1976: 5.
10 held as illegal aliens. New York Times, Oct. 13, 1976: 92.
3 are indicted here in visa conspiracy. New York Times, Jan. 7, 1976; 14.
Townsend, Dorothy. Illegal aliens seized in airport crackdown. Los Angeles Times,
Feb. 14, 1976, pt. 2: 1.
240,089 illegal aliens picked up in California. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 6, 1976,
pt. 1:22.
U.S. preparing a crook-proof alien ID card. Washington Post, Dec. 19, 1976: A26.
Valente, Judith. Ex-ambassador indicted in maid's illegal entry. Washington
Post, Nov. 4, 1976: Cl, C10.
Whittemore, L. H. Can we stop the invasion of illegal aliens? Parade [Washington
Post] Feb. 29, 1976: 10-12.
Wiedrich, Bob. U.S. can't handle Mexico's jobless. Chicago Tribune, Aug. 16,
1976, pt. 2: 4.
Williams, Juan. Illegal alien job ban bill protested. Washington Post, June 19,
1976: D4.
Work by illegal aliens. New York Times, Nov. 23, 1976: 72.
Young, Leah. Court says states can enact statutes prohibiting hiring of illegal
aliens. Journal of Commerce, Feb. 26, 1976: 8.
1977
Aliens: where they come from, what awaits them. New York Times, May 1, 1977:
3.
Contents-From Mexico to hard times in the Southwest U.S., by J. Sterba.
-From Colombia with skills and high hopes, by J. de Onis.-In New York,
they tend to stay together, by D. Vidal.
Amnesty is urged for illegal aliens. New York Times, Jan. 9, 1977, pt. 1: 34.
Anable, David. An endless task: chasing down illegal aliens. Christian Science
Monitor, June 7, 1977: 10.
Barger, Brian, and Jeff Kremen. Green card confiscated arbitrarily. Guardian,
May 11, 1977: 9.
Bell favors bar to hiring illegal aliens. Washington Post, Feb. 16, 1977: A10.
Bell may support ban on illegal alien hiring. Chicago Tribune, Feb. 16, 1977, pt. 1:
6.
Bernstein, Harry. Carter acts to solve illegal alien problem. Los Angeles Times,
Feb. 22, 1977, pt. 1: 5.
-- Panel to deal with illegal aliens is established by administration. Wash-
ington Post, Feb. 22, 1977: A18.
-- Thousands of illegal aliens freed of explosion threat. Los Angeles Times,
Apr. 15, 1977, pt. 1: 1, 29.
-- U.S. nearly ready with proposal on illegal aliens, by Harry Bernstein and
Ronald J. Ostrow. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 20, 1977, pt. 1: 1, 28.
Brumbach, Deborah. Alien files $1 million suit, alleges employment duress. Wash-
ington Post, Feb. 16, 1977: C2.
Braden, Tom. The illegal influx. Washington Post, Feb. 12, 1977: A15.
Bustamante, Jorge. Mexican immigration no threat to U.S .... Los Angeles
Times, Apr. 24, 1977, pt. 5: 2.
Chapman, Leonard F. Excerpts from an interview with Chapman. Los Angeles
Times, Jan. 9, 1977, pt. 1: 3, 26.
Cockburn, Alexander, and James Ridgeway. Carter and the Malthusians: the
coming crusade against aliens. Village Voice, Mar. 14, 1977: 33.









Cockburn, Alexander, and James Ridgeway. One Carter appointment that may
be good: can Immigration be run by a humane person? Village Voice, Apr. 25,
1977: 29.
Conine, Ernest. Illegals: a solution South of the border? Los Angeles Times, Mar.
21, 1977, pt. 2: 5.
Cornelius, Wayne A. When the door is closed to illegal aliens, who pays? New
York Times, June 1, 1977: A21.
Court curb of deportations leads to paralysis of investigations aimed at illegal
aliens. New York Times, May 31, 1977: 17.
Crewdson, John M. A night on patrol for illegal Mexican aliens. New York Times,
Apr. 22, 1977: Al.
-- Mexican pickers helping growers buy a little more time. New York Times,
June 26, 1977: 22.
Curtis, Tom. Labor secretary underscores thorny illegal alien problem. Wash-
ington Post, Apr. 18, 1977: A14.
Del Olmo, Frank. 'Guest workers' proposal defended. Los Angeles Times, May 28,
1977, pt. 1: 20.
---- Latins cool to Carter's plans on illegal aliens. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 23,
1977, pt. 1: 3, 18.
-- Legal aliens will get new ID cards. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 25, 1977,
pt. 1: 1, 3, 22.
- Mexico also seeks illegal alien solution, leader says. Los Angeles Times,
Apr. 25, 1977, pt. 1: 1, 22.
--- Mexico expert backs joint war on illegal immigration. Los Angeles Times,
Feb. 7, 1977, pt. 1: 3, 16.
-- U.S. border patrol will be beefed up. Los Angeles Times, May 20, 1977,
pt. 1: 3.
Dionne, E. J., Jr. Alien amnesty plan outlined by U.S. aide. New York Times,
May 14, 1977: 34.
Editorial Research Reports. U.S. law tougher on aliens. Christian Science Monitor,
Jan. 19, 1977: 13.
Eisen, Arlene. U.S. immigration plans revealed. Guardian, Apr. 13, 1977: 6.
Fialka, John. Aliens abuse SSI program, according to Sen. Percy. Washington
Star, Apr. 24, 1977: A2.
Fraser, C. Gerald. 2,000 protesters seek U.S. amnesty for illegal aliens. New York
Times, June 6, 1977: 51.
Gallup, George. Illegal aliens' job prohibition favored 6 to 1. Washington Post,
Apr. 24, 1977: A4.
Gelernter, Carey Quan. Deporting illegal aliens and American children legislative
overkill. Los Angeles Free Press, Apr. 1-Apr. 7, 1977: 26.
Gentry, Margaret. Cabinet unit weighs amnesty for longtime illegal aliens.
Washington Post, Apr. 7, 1977: A5.
Goshko, John M. Illegal alien study urges rethinking on immigration. Washington
Post, Jan. 9, 1977: Al, A9.
Greeley, Andrew, A welcome to illegal aliens. Chicago Tribune, Mar. 24, 1977,
pt. 3: 4.
Halloran, Richard. Cabinet panel urges Carter to let illegal aliens stay. New York
Times, Apr. 29, 1977: A14.
Handbook published on rights of aliens. New York Times, Feb. 27, 1977: 42.
Hazlett, Bill. 'Good guys' losing border crime war, Younger says. Los Angeles
Times, Apr. 23, 1977, pt. 1: 1, 22.
High court voids New York's ban on public works jobs for aliens. New York
Times, Jan. 11, 1977: 18.
Hispanic unit faults Carter alien plan. Washington Post, Apr. 30, 1977: A2.
Holles, Everett R. Hundreds of Mexican children cross border to engage in crime.
New York Times, Mar. 27, 1977: 26.
- New attacks on Mexican aliens feared as police 'decoys' are disbanded.
New York Times, Jan. 21, 1977: All.
---- Police are accused in wetback attacks. New York Times, Feb. 13, 1977: 26.
Holt, Pat M. Mexico's migrating millions. Christian Science Monitor, May 24,
1977: 31.
Houston, Paul. Carter tells of concern over illegal aliens issue. Los Angeles Times,
Feb. 10, 1977, pt. 1: 3.
High court voids New York's ban on public works jobs for aliens. New York
Times, Jan. 11, 1977: 16.
Illegal alien jobs opposed in survey. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 27, 1977, pt. 1: 3.
Illegal aliens estimated at 64,000 in grain belt. New York Times, Feb. 13, 1977: 31.









Illegal aliens' impact mixed, report says. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 7, 1977, pt. 1: 3.
Jacoby, Susan. Anti-immigration campaign begun. Washington Post, May 8,
1977: A5.
- How should we deal with illegal aliens? Washington Post, .May 22, 1977:
Fl, F5.
Johnston, Laurie. Peruvian girl, 13, living on L.I., fights deportation as an alien.
New York Times, June 6, 1977: 33.
Kendall, John. Border patrol agent sounds off. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 23, 1977,
pt. 1: 22.
- Enforcement of illegal alien job law urged. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 23,
1977, pt. 1: 3, 18.
-- Illegal aliens called 'runway problem' for U.S. Los Angeles Times, Feb.
16, 1977, pt. 1: 3, 25.
-- Influx of illegal aliens termed 'out of control.' Los Angeles Times, Jan. 9,
1977, pt. 1: 1, 3, 22, 24, 25.
-- L.A. to have million 'illegals' by '81 at present rate. Los Angeles Times,
Jan. 30, 1977, pt. 2: 1, 5.
--- U.S. may prohibit illegal-alien hiring. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 22, 1977,
pt. 2: 1, 8.
-- U.S. prodded to help on illegal alien influx. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 6,
1977, pt. 1: 3, 24.
Keppel, Bruce. Cranston to seek alien medical funds. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 13,
1977, pt. 1: 3.
Kihss, Peter. A.C.L.U. would allow licensing for aliens. New York Times, Jan. 16,
1977: 35.
--- Legal status urged for aliens after 5 years' U.S. residence. Washington Post,
May 1, 1977: A7.
Lindsey, Robert. A falling peso spurs illegal immigration. New York Times, Jan.
9, 1977, pt. 2: 43.
Lubasch, Arnold H. Residency requirement ordered reinterpreted by U.S. Ap-
peals Court. New York Times, Jan. 9, 1977: 51.
Mabley, Jack. Welcome, aliens! Need any money. Chicago Tribune, Apr. 20, 1977,
pt. 1:4.
Marro, Anthony. Carter aides question amnesty plan for illegal aliens. New York
Times, May 27, 1977: A8.
--- Carter aides to map new policy on aliens. New York Times, Apr. 4, 1977:
1, 22.
Maxwell, Evan. Border patrol notes rise in illegal aliens. Los Angeles Times, Mar.
15, 1977, pt. 2: 1, 5.
-- U.S.-Mexico smuggling: the buying and selling of humans. Los Angeles
Times, Feb. 22, 1977, pt. 1: 3, 22, 23.
--- Up the illegal alien trail. Washington Post, Feb. 27, 1977: Cl, C5.
-- Women rookies break illegal alien ring. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 31, 1977,
pt. 1: 1, 9, 10, 11.
Morales, Dionicio. Can't U.S., Mexico form a labor team? Los Angeles Times,
Jan. 28, 1977, pt. 2: 7.
Morrison, Patt. Good wages, bad jobs, constant fear. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 22,
1977, pt. 1: 1, 24, 25.
--- Illegal aliens blamed for increasing crimes. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 30,
1977, pt. 1: 1, 4.
-- U.S. drops charges against 4 accused in alien dealings. Los Angeles Times,
May 5, 1977, pt. 2: 8.
Nelson, W. Dale. U.S. fights silent tide of illegal aliens. Chicago Tribune, Jan. 2,
1977, pt. 1: 12.
New alien ID cards help INS fight fraud. Federal Times, Apr. 25, 1977: 12.
New Eilberg law challenged. Guardian, Feb. 2, 1977: 6.
Nordheimer, Jon. Bell promises to seek legislation to curb illegal border traffic.
New York Times, Apr. 22, 1977: A16.
Oppenheimer, Jerry. Bell urges action on illegal aliens. Washington Star, Feb. 16,
1977: A6.
Ostrow, Ronald J. Bell questions wisdom of special cards of workers. Los Angeles
Times, Feb. 25, 1977, pt. 1: 3, 22.
- Cabinet-level unit hits policy on aliens. Los Angeles Times, Jan. 9, 1977,
pt. 1: 3, 27.
-- Cabinet panel rules out mass roundup of aliens. Los Angeles Times,
Apr. 6, 1977, pt. 1: 1, 21.
-- Enforce job laws, Immigration Chief says. Los Angeles Times, June 5,
1977, pt. 1: 7.









Ostrow, Ronald J. Policy on illegal aliens snagged. Los Angeles Times, May 26,
1977, pt. 1: 3, 29.
- Roundup of illegal aliens ruled out. Washington Post, Apr. 6, 1977: B10.
Probe of aliens' aid benefits asked. Washington Post, Apr. 24, 1977: A10.
Putney, Michael. Illegal aliens: 'out of control'. National Observer, Mar. 19,
1977: 1, 13B.
R. Goldwater's farm uses illegal aliens, reporters say. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 21,
1977, pt. 1: 24.
Reston, James. A new Marshall plan? New York Times, Mar. 13, 1977: 23.
-- Coping with waves of illegal immigrants. Chicago Tribune, Jan. 9, 1977,
pt. 2: 6.
-- The silent invasion. New York Times, May 4, 1977: A23.
-- What kind of America? New York Times, Jan. 7, 1977: A21.
Revised immigration laws would reduce illegal aliens. Christian Science Monitor,
Apr. 11, 1977: 9.
Riding, Alan. Illegal migration to U.S. gives Mexico an economic 'safety valve'.
New York Times, June 19, 1977: 12.
-- Mexican says U.S. invites disaster on illegal aliens. New York Times,
May 26, 1977: A5.
Salomon, Mort. INS raid chills hospital union drive. Guardian, May 11, 1977: 9.
Sanctions against hiring illegal aliens backed. New York Times, Apr. 24, 1977: 36.
Satchell, Michael. How border patrolmen fail each working day. Washington Star,
May 22, 1977: Al, A12.
-- [Illegal aliens] Washington Star, May 22, 1977: Al, A12; May 23, 1977:
Al, A8; May 24, 1977: Al, A9.
Illegal aliens: a new solution? Washington Star, Jan. 9, 1977: A14.
Illegal aliens rush to beat 'deadline'. Washington Star, May 26, 1977:
Al, A9.
---- It's Carter's move on illegal aliens. Washington Star, Apr. 30, 1977: Al, A6.
--- Thousands of Mexican aliens find border patrol waiting. Washington Star,
May 23, 1977: Al, A8.
Schellhardt, Timothy D., and Walter S. Mossberg. U.S. proposal on illegal-alien
problem to call for sanctions against employers. Wall Street Journal, Apr. 25,
1977: 13.
Scott, Austin. Carter surveys Hill on alien bill options. Washington Post, June 22,
1977: A9.
--- U.S. considers new alien category. Washington Post, Juno 11, 1977: A6.
Seidenbaum, Art. Illegal aliens: help at source. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 21, 1977,
pt. 4: 1, 7.
Sen. Eastland's office requested halt to 1972 roundup of alien laborers. Wash-
ington Post, May 22, 1977: A6.
Shabecoff, Philip. Mexican workers being admitted after reported Carter inter-
vention. New York Times, June 21, 1977: 1, 13.
Siddon, Arthur. Percy asks probe of alien aid fraud. Chicago Tribune, Apr. 24,
1977, pt. 1: 3.
Starr, Mark. Aliens 'bounce back'. Chicago Tribune, May 29, 1977, pt. 1: 18.
Stepanek, Marcia. House votes to bar illegal aliens from jobs. Chicago Tribune,
Apr. 7, 1977, pt. 1: 3.
Sterba, James P. Aliens continue to flood U.S. Washington Star, Apr. 24, 1977:
A2.
-- Carter plan would give amnesty to illegal aliens already in U.S. New York
Times, Apr. 18, 1977: 1, 54.
-- Dollar drain laid to illegal aliens estimated in the billions annually. New
York Times, May 27, 1977: A9.
SIllegal aliens pose a growing problem. New York Times, Apr. 24, 1977: 21.
- 100 in border patrol rushed to California. New York Times, May 24, 1977:
14.
-- Open border strains U.S.-Mexico relations. New York Times, Apr. 3, 1977:
1, 44.
Strobel, Lee. More leeway in quizzing of Latinos. Chicago Tribune, Jan. 29, 1977,
pt. 1: 7.
Strout, Richaid L. America's 'silent invasion'. Christian Science Monitor, Feb.
17, 1977: 1, 6.
-- Carter aide minimizes aliens' 'silent invasion'. Christian ScienceMoni-
tor, Feb. 18, 1977: 3.
-- Carter team formulating policy to stem alien flow. Christian Science Mon-
itor, June 10, 1977: 4.









Strout, Richard L. Illegal aliens pouring in, U.S. warns. Christian Science
Monitor, Jan. 10, 1977: 3.
-- Illegal aliens present U.S. with problem of huge size. Christian Science
Monitor, May 16, 1977: 10.
-- The undocumented alien. Christian Science Monitor, Mar. 18, 1977: 27.
-- U.S. cranks up new moves to stem illegal immigration. Christian Science
Monitor, Apr. 19, 1977: 11.
Sweeney, Louise. Freshly arrived aliens get U.S. funds. Christian Science Monitor,
Apr. 25, 1977: 1.
Thatcher, Gary. 'Super sleuth' takes aim at smugglers. Christian Science Monitor,
Apr. 19, 1977: 3.
Unger, Arthur. Legal aliens may cost $500 million a year. Christian Science
Monitor, May 20, 1977: 3.
U.S. allowing Mexicans to aid in onion harvest. Washington Post, June 22, 1977:
A9.
U.S. giving aliens new card to avert frauds in identity. New York Times, Apr. 1,
1977: A12.
U.S. lifts ouster threat on 200,000 illegal aliens. Washington Post, Apr. 15, 1977:
A16.
'Unjustified assumptions and arbitrary criteria'; letters: on illegal immigrants.
New York Times, May 28, 1977: 18.
What to do about the aliens. New York Times, May 1, 1977, pt. 4: 2.

B. EDITORIALS (CHRONOLOGICAL)
Illegal aliens and the quality of mercy. Los Angeles Times, Apr. 21, 1974: pt. 8, p.2.
Paper comments on the difficulty with which the authorities prosecute accused
smugglers of aliens. Often the rights of these aliens are violated in order to bring
the smugglers to trial. While the paper recognizes that law enforcement is a
"hard task," people shouldn't be "treated like objects stored in a warehouse."
Illegal aliens and the law. Los Angeles Times, Aug. 5, 1974: 4.
Paper disagrees with the provision in the Rodino bill that imposes enforce-
ment responsibility on the employer. Rep. Roybal (D-Calif.) has tried unsuc-
cessfully to put through an amendment declaring that employers could demand
no more of an applicant than a Social Security card or other proof of legal status.
"We believe Roybal's amendment is fair. It places the responsibility where it
belongs-with the Immigration and Naturalization Service and the Social
Security Administration."
Dialogue with Mexico. New York Times, Oct. 24, 1974: 44.
"There is a drearily familiar ring about the 'New, revitalized joint commis-
sion' which the new Presidents (Ford and Echeverria of Mexico) agreed to set up'
to conduct yet another study of the illegal entry of Mexican workers into this
country. Here is a festering social and economic problem, affecting hundreds
of thousands of unfortunate people, that has long bedeviled American-Mexican
relations. Was it unreasonable to expect something beyond the traditional
diplomatic dodge of appointing a new body to investigate further "
Shrillness from the Attorney General. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 1, 1974: pt. 2, p. 6.
Paper disagrees with Atty. Gen. Saxbe's commitment to deport those who
"have burrowed more deeply into our society." It would be an injustice to
oust them after they have settled into constructive lives, the paper goes on to
explain. Solution will come about when the economic gap between the United
States and Mexico is narrowed.
Illegal immigration: a global problem. Washington Post, Nov. 13, 1974: A24.
"The legislation to punish those who hire illegal aliens-almost always at
depressed wages-should be passed." The newspapers also wants the legislation
against smuggling people strengthened. Real solution lies in redistributing the
wealth, especially the food supply, of the world. "The real solutions lie with the
government of the U.S. and those nations in a position to help the less developed
countries, with economic development and aid and measures to improve the
distribution of food and the means of producing food."
Illegal aliens: what to do? Los Angeles Times, Feb. 6, 1975: pt. 2, p. 4.
Paper claims Rodino legislation invites discrimination against workers
who, by speech or appearance, may be suspected of illegal status. Believes
the Justice Dept. proposals are fairer for they require affirmative action by
the employer to determine that each new employee is an American citizen
or an alien eligible for employment. Believes legislation should protect those
illegal aliens who are leading constructive lives.
1 Terri Hayles, Education and Public Welfare Division.







49

Illegal aliens: the 'good faith' solution. Washington Post, Mar. 1, 1975: 14.
In discussing the House Judiciary Committee bill: "This bill is aimed
squarely at the wholesale importation of farm labor into the border states
of the Southwest and the West. But we are not certain it will hit its target
and it is possible that in trying to do so it could on occasion do harm to un-
witting citizens. More important, it places the responsibility for enforcing
the immigration laws on employers and enforcement is a government function
and governmental obligation."
Illegal aliens should go. Chicago Tribune, Mar. 5, 1975: sec. 1, p. 10.
Paper calls for support of the Immigration and Naturalization Service
in its attempts to enforce the U.S. immigration law. "Approval of enforc-
ing the immigration laws does not mean approval of dragnet tactics, in which
looking Mexican precipitates questioning and further harassment." As the
problem grows pressure will mount for enforcement of the law against the
illegals and for depriving unscrupulous employers of a pool of exploitable
foreigners.
Jobs and illegal aliens. Christian Science Monitor, Mar. 20, 1975: 12.
Paper states: "Over the long run only a lessening of the economic gap be-
tween the U.S. and the countries the immigrants are fleeing will resolve the
problem." Criticizes the public tendency to make illegal aliens the scapegoats
for unemployment conditions. Mentions Rodino and Kennedy bills and sug-
gests they are improvements over the present laws. Disagrees with use of
identification cards to prove eligibility of employment.
Employers and illegal aliens. Chicago Tribune, Mar. 30, 1975: sec. 1, p. 16.
Paper advocates requiring job applicants to show proof of legal status
in this country. "The qualified would be little inconvenienced; qualified aliens
have a registration card to establish their eligibility. The unqualified, whose
presence represents a violation of law, cannot expect forever to be welcomed into
the U.S. labor force with no questions asked."
Rights reach to the border. Los Angeles Times, July 2, 1975: pt. 2, p. 6.
Paper agrees with the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to restrict the au-
thority of the Border Patrol to stop and investigate automobiles that the
agents suspect might be transporting aliens into the Southwest. "Even with
unbridled search authority, the immigration service had confronted an impos-
sible task in attempting to stop the flow of illegal aliens. . The Court has
fulfilled well its function under the Constitution to apply the Constitution's
safeguards. It is now for Congress to respond with appropriate legislation within
those limits."
Illegal immigration: first steps. Washington Post, Sept. 22, 1975: A22.
Paper criticizes the bill reported out by the House Judiciary Committee. It
disagrees with placing the burden of enforcement to a large extent on employers
(the bill requires employers to find out whether their prospective employees are
illegal aliens). Requests a review of the INS and its agents. Calls for hearings by
the Senate subcommittee on immigration to explore the House bill.
The sweeps: a dirty business. Los Angeles Times, Oct. 2, 1975: pt. 2, p. 6.
"The Immigration Service has done the right thing in terminating its barrio
sweeps for illegal aliens. And it has done the right thing in making public this
decision." The paper does not agree with the provision in the Rodino bill that
would hold employers liable for knowingly employing illegals. According to the
Times a better approach would be to make Social Security cards a secure iden-
tification of persons eligible to work.
A flawed law. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 1, 1976: pt. 2, p. 4.
Paper comments on the U.S. Supreme Court decision to allow a State to
police its own employed aliens. This could lead to discrimination against one
segment (i.e., Mexican/Spanish) of the illegal population. "No measure can
deal justly with the problem of illegal immigration unless it embraces generous
provisions for amnesty so that there is no danger of deportation for those
already established in the United States."
Illegal aliens' legal rights. Los Angeles Times, Mar. 9, 1976: pt. 2, p. 4.
"A special committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association has written
a bill of rights for illegal aliens, a long-overdue and constructive extension of the
Constitution and the rule of law to the illegals." Paper advocates that the
procedures against aliens should embrace the protection of the regular courts.
The illegal alien non-problem. Wall Street Journal, June 18, 1976: 8.
Paper advocates a solution to the problem of the burden illegal aliens place on
public services, and jobs-make them legal. Places blame for increase in illegals,
especially from Mexico, on the Western Hemisphere entry quotas enacted in
1965. They claim the penalties for hiring illegals would lead employers to refuse







50

jobs to any Hispanic-looking person; regardless of his status.. "The White
House has already submitted a bill to correct some other quirks in the Immigra-
tion Act, but it leaves the 120,000 Western Hemisphere quotas j r.,.:r. Why not
simply live up the American tradition and change the number th at is causing
the problem?"
The problem of illegal aliens. Chicago Tribune, July 25, 1976: sec. 1, p. 22.
Paper supports the Immigration and Naturalization Service in their efforts to
enforce the Immigration laws. The United States shouldn't' be "obliged to
welcome every foreigner who sneaks across the border. . For the United
States to quit trying to enforce reasonable immigration laws is no solution
at all."
Coping with illegal aliens. Chicago Tribune, Sept. 23, 1976: sec. 1, p. 7.
Paper advocates changes in the immigration laws to avoid such rampant viola-
tion. Discusses the GAO report to Congress which proposed laws prohibiting
employment of illegal aliens, alien identification cards, regulations to prevent
illegals from obtaining legal resident status, and deportation of aliens convicted
of muggling.
Of aliens and justice. Los Angeles Times, Nov. 26, 1976: pt. 2, p. 6.
Paper is speaking out against the Federal prosecution of some people who are
counseling illegal immigrants in Arizona. They point out the contradictions of
Federal law in which those that are helping aliens can be charged while those
who might exploit them (i.e., employers) are currently beyond the reach of the
law. Rights of illegals must be respected.
Mexico and the peso. Washington Post, Nov. 27, 1976: A14.
Paper discusses the effect the fall of the peso (with respect to U.S. dollars)
will have on the Mexican economy. "For Americans, the fall of the peso is another
example of the truth that the ups and downs of the American economy often
have far sharper effects abroad than here at home. A stable domestic economy
has to be regarded as, among other things, an essential element of American
foreign policy. The northward flow of illegal immigrants will serve, in the coming
months, as a constant reminder of that axiom."
Controlling America's illegal alien flood. Christian Science Monitor, Jan. 12,
1977: 28.
Paper states, "The obvious need is to curtail as quickly and firmly as pos-
sible this runaway influx of unlawful entrants." Mentioning the report by At-
torney General Levi and other cabinet officials put out by the Justice Dept.,
paper agrees with the limited amnesty program. It is a sensible alternative in
that it reduces the number of illegal aliens and avoids the need for a big roundup
of aliens for deportation.
Illegal immigration. Washington Post, Jan. 20, 1977: A14.
Notes the publication of the government's first comprehensive study on illegal
immigration by the inter-agency Domestic Council committee. Observes that the
problem involves "very difficult political and social choices"; and that, judging
by "Congress' demonstrated hesitancy," Americans are not "yet ready even to
hold employers responsible, civilly or criminally, for hiring illegals." States that
the Carter administration has "a special license, and a special responsibility, to
act."
Action with justice. Los Angeles Times, Feb. 23, 1977: 6.
Endorses program of Carter Administration as explained by Sec'y of Labor F.
Ray Marshall. Agrees that something must be done to stop the flow into the
country, that employers would be forced to upgrade many jobs if the illegals
were made unavailable as employees. Carter program provides for a work eli-
gibility card and an amnesty program for illegals in the country "for a reasonable
period of time."
Carter and illegal aliens. Christian Science Monitor, Apr. 7, 1977: 28.
Suggests progress will depend on elements such as: 1) a bilateral effort from
Mexico, 2) fairness to aliens already in the U.S., 3) fairness to employers, 4)
a fool-proof method of identification to prove eligibility for employment.
U.S. shouldn't ignore rights of those within its borders but should teach respect
for its laws.
Does anyone know a better way? Los Angeles Times, Apr. 13, 1977: 4.
Paper supports a liberal amnesty program to permit undocumented persons
already constructively established in the U.S. to become legal residents. Re-
futes many of the arguments against the use of an employment identification
card. Card would discourage harassment. The card would be made in such a
way that would discourage forgery and assure a better identification of the
person as eligible for work.







'51

Illegal aliens and scapegoats. Wall Street Journal, May 2, 1977: 12.
While the paper agrees with Carter's tentative amnesty plan, it finds the
proposal that would impose criminal penalties on employers who knowingly
hire illegal aliens "less sensible." This places the burden of enforcement on the
citizen. Also advocates correcting the economic differences between the U.S. and
Mexico to reduce the monetary incentive for crossing illegally.
Controlling illegal immigration. Washington Post, May 3, 1977: A18.
The unemployment rate has forced the public to accept the control of illegal
immigration. Since this turn in public opinion is a recent one, the administra-
tion is suffering from a lack of information. Suggests that the submission of
legislation at this point should be discovery proceeding.
Aliens ant the law. Washington Star, May 4, 1977: A20.
Newspaper believes most of the basic elements of Carter's proposals make
sense but is cautiously awaiting the final details. "Whatever the details, the
answer to the illegal-alien problem has to be a combination of legal firmness,
awareness of foreign sensitivities and humane consideration of people whose
only 'crime' is wanting to find a modest niche in American society."
Coping with the invisible immigrants. New York Times, May 16, 1977: 28.
Points out the reasons behind the migration to America, reasons that are
social in addition to being economic. Explains problems with some of Carter's
proposals, such as jobs lost in the U.S. by creation of jobs in poorer countries, and
discrimination against Spanish-speaking workers if employers are required to
sort out the illegals seeking work.
Caution: illegal aliens. Los Angeles Times, May 27, 1977: pt. 2, p. 6.
Supports President's Carter's "moving cautiously in the development of
new controls on the flood of illegal immigrants." Expresses support for a single
identification card, which Carter's Cabinet committee has abandoned, noting
that "the problem now is finding an alternative so that employers can be held
responsible for hiring illegal aliens" while avoiding discrimination against
Spanish-speaking people. Also endorses a generous amnesty provision.
Busy signals at immigration. Washington Post, June 22, 1977: A22.
The newspaper is suggesting that Immigration and Naturalization Service
reallocate some of its manpower from the Border Patrol to office help. This
would substantially improve service to legal aliens and citizens. "The effective
control of millions of illegal immigrants may be too much to ask of an agency
that can't even answer its phones."
Aliens politics instead of policy. New York Times, June 23, 1977: 26.
"By admitting 800 Mexican farm workers at the request of some Texas
onion growers, the White House has cast doubt on its own ability to deal con-
sistently with the tide of illegal aliens." Newspaper questions the rationale behind
this decision and wonders if the workers will indeed commute from Mexico or
will they "fade into the American scene as so many others have."
VI. STATE LAWS RELATING TO EMPLOYMENT OF ILLEGAL
ALIENS 1
1. Alabama: No provision found.
2. Alaska: No provision found.
3. Arizona: No provision found.
4. Arkansas: No provision found.
5. California: 2805. Alien employment; adverse effect on resident workers;
violation.
(a) No employer shall knowingly employ an alien who is not entitled to
lawful residence in the United States if such employment would have an
adverse effect on lawful resident workers.
(b) A person found guilty of a violation of subdivision (a) is punishable
by a fine of not less than two hundred dollars ($200) nor more than five
hundred dollars ($500) for each offense.
(c) The foregoing provisions shall not be a bar to civil action against the
employer based upon violation of subdivision (a). (Added by Stats. 1971,
c. 1442, p. 2847, 1.)
West's Calif. Labor Code 2805 (1977 Supp.)
6. Colorado: No provision found.
7. Connecticut: 31-51k. Employment of alien not entitled to residence.
(a) No employer shall knowingly employ an alien who is not entitled to
lawful residence in the United States.

i Vincent Treacy and Laurie McManus, American Law Division.









(b) Violation of the provisions of this section shall be punishable by a
fine of not less than two hundred nor more than five hundred dollars and,
for any subsequent offense, by the penalty for a class A misdemeanor.
(c) The labor commissioner shall, on or before October 1, 1972, promulgate
regulations specifying the procedure to be followed by each employer to
insure compliance with the provisions of this section. (1972, P.A. 275, 1
to 3, eff. May 24, 1972.)
Conn. Stat. Annot. 31-51K (1977 Supp.)
8. Delaware: 705. Illegal Aliens.
(a) No employer shall knowingly employ an alien who is not entitled to
lawful residence in the United States, if such employment would have an
adverse effect on lawful resident workers.
(b) Any person found guilty of a violation of subsection (a) of this section
shall be punished by a fine of not less than $200, nor more than $500 for each
offense.
(c) Subsections (a) and (b) of this section shall not be a bar to any civil
action against an employer based upon a violation of this section. (60 Del.
Laws, c. 517, 1.)
Del. Code Annot. 19-705 (1976 Supp.)
9. District of Columbia: No provision found.
10. Florida: No provision found.
11. Georgia: No provision found.
12. Hawaii: No provision found.
13. Idaho: No provision found.
14. Illinois: No provision found.
15. Indiana: No provision found.
16. Iowa: No provision found.
17. Kansas: 21-4409. Knowingly employing an alien illegally within the ter-
ritory of the United States.
(a) Knowingly employing an alien illegally within the territory of the
United States is the employment of such alien within the state of Kansas by
an employer who knows such person to be illegally within the territory of the
United States.
(b) Knowingly employing an alien illegally within the territory of the
United States is a class C misdemeanor. [L. 1973, ch. 140, 1; July 1.]
Kan. Stat. Annot. 21-4409 (1974).
18. Kentucky: no provision found.
19. Louisiana: no provision found.
20. Maine: no provision found.
21. Maryland: no provision found.
22. Massachusetts: 19C. Employment of aliens restricted; regulations;
penalty.
It shall be unlawful for any employer knowingly to employ any alien in
the commonwealth, who is a student or visitor or, who has not been admitted
to the United States for permanent residence, except those who are admitted
under a work permit, or unless the employment of such alien is authorized
by the attorney general of the United States. An employer shall not be
deemed to have violated this section if he has made a bona fide inquiry
whether a person hereafter employed or referred by him is a citizen or an
alien, and if an alien, whether he is lawfully admitted to the United States
for permanent residence, or admitted under a work permit, or is authorized
by the attorney general of the United States to accept employment.
This commissioner shall promulgate regulations specifying the procedure to
be followed by each employer to insure compliance with the provisions of this
section.
Any person who violates any provision of this section shall be punished by
a fine of not more than five hundred nor less than two hundred dollars.
Added by St. 1976, c. 452.
Mass. Gen. Laws Annot. 149-17 (1977-78 Supp.)
23. Michigan: No provision found.
24. Minnesota: No provision found.
25. Mississippi: No provision found.
26. Missouri: No provision found.
27. Montana: An Act entitled: An Act to prohibit the employment of aliens
not lawfully authorized to accept employment; providing a penalty; and creating
a civil cause of action.









Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Montana:
Section 1. Employment of aliens not lawfully authorized to accept employ-
ment prohibited. (1) No employer may knowingly employ an alien who is
not lawfully authorized to accept employment.
(2) A person convicted of violating this section shall be fined no more than
$300.
(3) The department of labor and industry or a person harmed by a viola-
tion of this section may sue to enjoin an employer from violating this section
and to gain other appropriate relief.
Montana Laws 1977, Chapter 56, approved, March 19, 1977 (House Bill
No. 290).
28. Nebraska: No provision found.
29. Nevada: No provision found.
30. New Hampshire:
(1) Employment of Illegal Aliens Prohibited. Amend RSA 275-A by
inserting after section 4 the following new section:
275-A:4-a Employment of Illegal Aliens Prohibited. No employer may
employ an alien whom the employer knows is not a citizen of the United
States and not in possession of Form 1-151, Alien Registration Receipt Card
or any other document issued by the United States Immigration and Nat-
uralization Service or the Attorney General of the United States which
authorizes him to work.
(2) Correction in Penalty Provision. Amend RSA 275-A:5 (supp) as
inserted by 1965, 130:1 as amended by striking out in line 2 the citation
"RSA 275-A:5" and inserting in place thereof the following (RSA 275-A)
so that said section as amended shall read as follows:
275-A:5 Penalties. Any person, partnership, agency, firm, or corporation
violating any provision of RSA 275-A is guilty of an offense and each day's
continuance of this infraction is considered a separate offense and he shall
be guilty of a misdemeanor for each such offense.
(3) Licensing and Employment of Aliens. Amend RSA 332-A by inserting
after section 1 the following new section:
332-A:2 Licensing and Employment of Aliens. No provision of RSA
Title XXX and no other provision of law requiring that a licensee, or any
employee of a licensee, be a citizen of the United States as a condition of
licensing to engage in any profession or occupation shall be applied to deny
an alien lawfully resident in the United States such license or employment.
(4) Effective Date. This act shall take effect 60 days after its passage.
Approved, May 26, 1976.
Effective, July 25, 1976.
New Hampshire Laws 1976, chapter 31.
31. New Jersey: No provision found.
32. New Mexico: No provision found.
33. New York: No provision found.
34. North Carolina: No provision found.
35. North Dakota: No provision found.
36. Ohio: No provision found.
37. Oklahoma: No provision found.
38. Oregon: No provision found.
39. Pennsylvania: No provision found.
40. Rhode Island: No provision found.
41. South Carolina: No provision found.
42. South Dakota: No provision found.
43. Tennessee: No provision found.
44. Texas: No provision found.
45. Utah: No provision found.
46. Vermont: No provision found.
47. Virginia: No provision found.
48. Washington: 74.04.062 Disclosure of information to police officer or immigra-
tion official.
Upon written request of a person who has been properly identified as an
officer of the law with a felony arrest warrant or a properly identified
United States Immigration official with a warrant for an illegal alien the
department shall disclose to such officer the current address and location of
the person properly described in the warrant. [Added by Laws 1973 Ch.
152 2.]









Rev. Code Wash. Annot. 74.04.062 (1976 Supp.).
49. Virginia: No provision found.
50. Wisconsin: No provision found.
51. Wyoming: No provision found.

VII. SUPREME COURT DECISIONS RELATING TO ALIENS'
1. Hellenic Lines Ltd. v. Rhoditis, 398 U.S. 306 (1970)
Question Presented: Whether a Greek seaman employed under a Greek con-
tract may obtain recovery under the Jones Act for injuries sustained on a ship of
Greek registry while in American territorial waters.
Holding: In the totality of the circumstances of the case, the Jones Act is
applicable, as the alien owner's substantial and continuing contacts with the
United States outweigh other factors against application of the Act.

2. Rosenberg v. Yee Chien Woo, 402 U.S. 49 (1971)
Question Presented: Whether a refugee from a Communist country who has
"firmly resettled" in another country may be granted asylum under section 203
(a) (7) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, which permits conditional entry
of refugee aliens into the United States.
Holding: Whether a refugee has already "firmly resettled" in another country
is relevant to determining the availability to him of the asylum provision of
Sec. 203(a) (7), since Congress did not intend to grant asylum to a refugee who
has found permanent shelter in another country, and the section 203(a)(7)(iii)
nationality requirement is no substitute for the "resettlement" concept.

3. Astrup v. Immigration and Naturalization Service, 402 U.S. 509 (1971)
Question Presented: Whether an alien who agreed to give up his right to become
an American citizen in exchange for exemption from military service, but was
subsequently subjected to the draft and found to be physically unfit, may later be
denied naturalization on the ground that he was debarred from citizenship.
Holding: An alien who requests an exemption from military service in exchange
for an agreement to relinquish all claims to naturalization is to be held to his
agreement only when the Government completely and permanently exempts him
from service in the armed forces. In this case, Congress, by repealing the law under
which the alien was exempted, reneged on its part of the bargain with him.

4. Graham v. Richardson, 403 U.S. 365 (1971)
Question Presented: Whether the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth
Amendment prevents a state from conditioning welfare benefits either (1) upon
the beneficiary's possession of United States citizenship, or (2) if the beneficiary
is an alien, upon his having resided in this country for a specified number of years.
Holding: State alien residency requirements that either deny welfare benefits
to non-citizens or condition them on longtime resiency are violate of l E ual
Protection Clause and encroach upon the exclusive federal power over the entrance
and residence of aliens.

5. Kleindienst v. Mandel, 408 U.S. 753 (1972)
Question Presented: Whether the provisions of the Immigration and Nationality
Act that certain aliens shall be ineligible to receive visas and shall be excluded
from admission to the United States unless the Attorney General, in his discretion,
upon recommendation by the Secretary of State or a consular officer, waives
inadmissability and approves temporary admission, are unconstitutional as
applied in this case in that they deprive American citizens of freedom of speech
guaranteed by the First Amendment.
Holding: In the exercise of Congress' plenary power to exclude aliens or pre-
scribe the conditions for their entry into this country, Congress in section 212(a)
(28) of the Act had delegated conditional exercise of this power to the Executive
Branch. When, as in this case, the Attorney General decides for a legitimate and
bona fide reason not to waive the statutory exclusion of an alien, courts will not
look behind his decision or weigh it against the First Amendment interests of
those who would personally communicate with the alien.

1 Vincent Treacy and Laurie McManus, American Law Division.










6. United States v. Campos-Serrano, 404 U.S. 293 (1971)
Question Presented: Whether possession of a counterfeit alien registration
receipt card is an act punishable under 18 U.S.C. section 1546, which prohibits,
inter alia, the counterfeiting or alteration of, or the possession, use, or receipt of
an already counterfeited or altered "immigrant or other document required for
entry into the United States."
Holding: Possession of a counterfeit alien registration receipt card is not
punishable under 18 U.S.C. section 1546. The primary purpose of an alien regis-
tration receipt card is for identification within the United States, and its merely
permissible re-entry function under an Immigration and Naturalization Service
regulation does not suffice to bring the card within the coverage of the statute.
There is a separate statutory provision specifically protecting the integrity of
alien registration receipt cards, indicating that the Congress did not intend them
to be covered by the more general language of section 1546.

7. Saxbe v. Bustos, 419 U.S. 65 (1974)
Question Presented: Whether the Immigration and Naturalization Service
conformed to the Immigration and Nationality Act when it approved the practice
under which certain aliens who lived in Mexico and Canada were permitted to
commute both daily and seasonally to work in the United States and were freed
from the usual requirements of documentation, numerical limits, and labor
certification.
Holding: Alien commuters are immigrants who are "lawfully admitted for
permanent residence," and are "returning from a temporary visit abroad" when
they enter the United States, and this "special immigrant" classification is
applicable to both daily and seasonal commuters. This has long been the ad-
ministrative construction of the statute in the context of alien commuters, a
factor which must be accorded great weight when, as here, Congress has considered
the subject and has not seen fit to alter the administrative practice.

8. Almeida-Sanchez v. United States, 413 U.S. 266 (1973)
Question Presented: Whether a warrantless search of the automobile of an
alien holder of a valid work permit which took place 25 air miles from the border,
and without probable cause or consent, was in violation of the Fourth Amendment
Holding: The search violated the Fourth Amendment.
(1) The search could not be justified on the basis of any special rules applicable
to automobile searches, as probable cause was lacking; nor could it be justified
by analogy with administrative inspections, as the officers had no warrant or
reason to believe that petitioner had crossed the border or committed an ottense,
and there was no consent by petitioner, and (2) the search was not a border search
or the functional equivalent thereof.

9. Reid v. Immigration and Naturalization Service, 420 U.S. 619 (1975)
Question Presented: Whether aliens who have accomplished their entry into
the United States by falsely asserting that they were citizens of this country are
deportable as aliens "who have entered the United States without inspection"
Holding: Aliens entering the United States who falsely represent themselves
to be citizens are not only excludable under section 212(a)(19), which excludes
aliens who seek to enter by fraud or by willfully misrepresenting a material fact
"but have also so significantly frustrated the process for inspecting incoming
aliens that they are" deportable as ones who have "entered the United States
without inspection" in violation of section 241(a)(2).

10. United States v. Brignoni-Ponce, 422 U.S. 873 (1975)
Question Presented: Whether the Fourth Amendment allows a roving patrol of
the Border Patrol to stop a vehicle near the Mexican border and question its
occupants about their citizenship and immigration status, when the only ground
or suspicion is that the occupants appear to be of Mexican ancestry.
Holding: The search was unconstitutional. Except at the border and its func-
tional equivalents, patrolling oticers may stop vehicles only i e are aware of
specic ticulable facts, together with rational inferences there rom, reason y
granting s picion t at the vehicles contain aliens who may be illegally in the
country.







56

Because of the important governmental interest in combating the illegal entry
of aliens at the border, the minimal intrusion of a brief stop, and the absence of
practical alternatives for policing the border, an officer, whose observations lead
him reasonably to suspect that a particular vehicle may contain aliens who are
illegally in the country, may stop the car briefly, question the driver and passengers
about their citizenship and immigration status, and ask them to explain suspicious
circumstances; but any further detention or search must be based on consent or
probable cause.
To allow roving patrols the broad and unlimited discretion urged by the Gov-
ernment to stop all vehicles in the border area without any reason to suspect that
they have violated any law, would not be "reasonable" under the Fourth
Amendment.
Assuming that Congress has the power to admit aliens on condition that they
submit to reasonable questioning about their right to be in the country, such
power cannot diminish the Fourth Amendment rights of citizens who may be
mistaken for aliens. The Fourth Amendment therefore forbids stopping persons
for questioning about their citizenship on less than a reasonable suspicion that
they may be aliens.

11. Laing v. United States, 423 U.S. 161 (1976)
Comment: This case is primarily a tax case. Alien status is only accidentally
involved in that plaintiff-taxpayer was a citizen of New Zealand.

12. DeCanas v. Bica, 424 U.S. 351 (1976)
Question Presented: Is California Labor Code Section 2805 which provides
criminal penalties for persons who "knowingly employ an alien who is not entitled
to lawful residence in the United States if such an employment would have an
adverse effect on lawful resident workers" unconstitutional because it is an
attempt to regulate immigration and nationalization or because it is pre-empted
under the Supremacy Clause by the Immigration and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C.
section 1101 et sec. (INA)?
Holding: (a) Not every state enactment which in any way deals with aliens is a
regulation of immigration preempted by the constitutional power. California has
sought to strengthen its economy by adopting federal standards in imposing
criminal sanctions against state employers who knowingly employ aliens who
have no federal right to employment in this country. Even if the regulation has
some speculative or indirect impact on immigration, it does not thereby become
a constitutionally proscribed regulation of immigration that Congress would be
powerless to authorize. (b) Pre-emption on the basis of congressional intent to.
"occupy the field" and thereby invalidate even harmonious state regulation is not
required in this case either because "the nature of the regulated subject matter
permits no other conclusion" or because "Congress has unmistakably so ordained"
that result. Florida Lime & Avacado Growers v. Paul, 373 U.S. 132, 142.
Sections 2805(a) is clearly within a State's police power to regulate the employ-
ment relationship so as to protect workers within the State, and it will not be
presumed that Congress, in enacting the INA, intended to oust state authority to
regulate the employment relationship covered by section 2805(a) in a manner con-
sistent with pertinent federal laws, absent any showing of such intent either in
the INA's wording or legislative history or in its comprehensive scheme for regu-
lating immigration and naturalization. Rather than there being evidence that
Congress "has unmistakably . ordained" exclusivity of federal regulation in
the field of employment of illegal aliens, the Farm Labor Contractor Registration
Act, whose provisions prohibiting farm labor contractors from employing illegal
aliens were enacted to supplement state action, is persuasive evidence that the
INA should not be taken as legislation expressing Congress' judgment to have
uniform federal regulations in matters affecting employment of illegal aliens, and
therefore barring state legislation such as section 2805(a). Hines v. Davidowitz,
312 U.S. 52; Pennsylvania v. Nelson, 350 U.S. 497, distinguished. (c) Remanded
to California courts to construe section 2085(a) and to decide in the first instance
whether and to what extent section 2085(a) as construed conflicts with federal
immigration laws and regulations.







57

13. Mathews v. Diaz, 426 U.S. 67 (1976)
Question Presented: May Congress condition an alien's eligibility for participa-
tion in a federal medical insurance program on continuous residence in the United
States for a five-year period and admission for permanent residence?
Holding: The statutory classification in section 1395o(2)(B) does not deprive
appellees of liberty or property in violation of the Due Process Clause of the Fifth
Amendment.
(a) Congress, which has broad power over immigration and naturalization and
regularly makes rules regarding aliens that would be unacceptable if applied to
citizens, has no constitutional duty to provide all aliens with the welfare benefits
provided to citizens; the real question here is not whether discrimination between
aliens and citizens is permissible, as it clearly is but whether the statutory dis-
crimination within the class of aliens is permissible. /
(b) The political branches of government have considerable flexibility in respond-
ing to changing world conditions, and judicial review of decisions made by the
Congress or the President in the area of immigration and naturalization is narrow.
The party challenging the constitutionality of the particular line Congress has
drawn has the burden of advancing principled reasoning that will at once invali-
date that line and yet tolerate a different line separating'some aliens from others.
(c) This case essentially involves only a claim that it w6uld have been more
reasonable for Congress to select somewhat different requirem&hts of the same
kind. The requirements chosen by Congress render eligible those aliens who may
reasonably be assumed to have a greater affinity with the United States and this
Court is especially reluctant to question such a policy choice of degree.

14. Hampton v. Mow Son Wong, 426 U.S. 88 (1976)

Question Presented: (1) Does a regulation of the United States Civil Service
Commission (CSC) that bans resident aliens from employment in the federal
competitive civil service deprive resident aliens of liberty without due process
of law in violation of the 'ifth Amendment?
Holding: (1) Overriding national interests may require a citizenship require-
ment in the federal service even though an identical requirement may not be
enforced by a State.
(2) When the Federal Government asserts an overriding national interest as
justification for a discriminatory rule which would violate the Equal Protection
Clause if adopted by a state, due process requires that there be a legitimate basis
for presuming the rule was actually intended to serve that interest. If the agency
which promulgates the rule has direct responsibility for fostering or protecting
that interest, it may reasonably be presumed that the asserted interest was the
actual predicate of the rule. Alternatively, if the rule were expressly mandated
by the President or Congress, there is a presumption that any interest which
might rationally be served by the rule did in fact give rise to its adoption.
(3) No evidence has been pointed to which requires a finding that either the
President or Congress mandated the CSC's policy of conditioning eligibility for
employment in the federal civil service on citizenship.
(4) The CSC relies on the following three justifications for its policy of excluding
aliens from positions in the federal civil service: (1) providing the President with
an expendable token for treaty negotiation purposes, (2) offering aliens an incen-
tive to become naturalized, and (3) administrative convenience. The first two
are not matters which properly concern the CSC. The third interest fails on two
accounts: (1) the CSC has not demonstrated that it would be particularly onerous
to develop job classifications for which citizenship is an appropriate requirement,
and (2) the public interest in avoiding wholesale deprivations of employment
opportunities outweighs an hypothetical justification that administrative con-
venience is served by the regulation.
(5) Since alien residents are admitted as a result of decisions made by Congress
and the President, implemented by the Naturalization and Immigration Service,
acting under the Attorney General, process requires that te d inn
deprive such residents of an important ibea c le
level of government, or if is pertteto be made by the CC that it be justified
by re soin cma re the proper concern of the agency.







58

15. Examining Board of Engineers v. Flores de Otero, 426 U.S. 572 (1976)
Question Presented: Does a Puerto Rican statute permitting only U.S. citizens
to practice privately as civil engineers deprive appellee of "rights, privileges and
immunities secured by the Constitution and laws" within the meaning of 42
U.S.C. section 1893?
Holding: The Puerto Rican statute is subject to "strict judicial scrutiny."
To be upheld it must be shown that its purpose is both constitutionally permissible
and substantial and that the classification made by the statute is necessary to
accomplish the statutory purpose. The following three justifications offered for
the citizenship classification do not satisfy the tests imposed by strict judicial
scrutiny: (1) to prevent the uncontrolled influx of Spanish-speaking aliens in the
engineer field in Puerto Rico; (2) to raise the Puerto Rican standard of living;
(3) to provide the client of a civil engineer an assurance of financial accountability
if a building for which the engineer is responsible collapses. Held unconstitutional.

O




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