• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 From the director
 An overview
 Philosophy and mission stateme...
 '98-'99 summary and highlights
 Fiscal review
 Administration
 Financial aid advising
 Financial aid programs
 Special areas
 Support services
 Technical systems & processing
 Staff & professional activitie...
 Back Cover






Group Title: Annual report, University of Florida Office of Student Financial Affairs
Title: Annual report 1998-1999
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Title: Annual report 1998-1999
Series Title: Annual report
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Office for Student Financial Affairs, University of Florida
Publisher: University of Florida Office of Student Financial Affairs
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1998-1999
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Subject: University of Florida.   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
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Bibliographic ID: UF00087105
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    From the director
        Page 1
    An overview
        Page 1
    Philosophy and mission statement
        Page 2
    '98-'99 summary and highlights
        Page 2
    Fiscal review
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Administration
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Financial aid advising
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Financial aid programs
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Special areas
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Support services
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Technical systems & processing
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Staff & professional activities
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Back Cover
        Page 36
Full Text






A annual Report

1998-1999
















Office for Student Financial Affairs
S-103 Criser Hall, P. O. Box 114025
Gainesville, FL 32611-4025
" UNIVERSITY OF
-., FLORIDA









annual report

office for student
financial affairs




july 1, 1998-june 30,

1999

Karen Fooks
Director

Rick Wilder
Associate Director

Elaine Stuckman
Associate Director

Susan Mickelberry
Editor



University of Florida
Office for Student Financial Affairs
S-107 Criser Hall
P. O. Box 114025
Gainesville, FL 32611-4025
(352) 392-1275
(352) 392-1272 (V/TDD)
FAX (352) 392-2861

This document is available upon request in alternative formats
for individuals with documented, print-related disabilities.
Hearing-impaired individuals may call the Office for Student
Financial Affairs' telephone line for students with disabilities.


Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution











table of


contents

Table of C ontents............................................................. ............................ iii
From the D director ............................................................. ....................... 1
A n O overview ..................................................................... .......................1
Philosophy and Mission Statement ............................ ......................2
'98-'99 Summary and Highlights .................................. .......................2
Fiscal R review .................................. .......................................................... 3
A dm inistration ........................... .............................................................. 5
Financial A advising ........................................................... ....................... 7
Customer Service ................................... ... .......................8
Special Programs....................................................9
Satellite Offices ...................................... .......................10
Financial Aid Programs .......................... ....................... 11
G ran ts ...................................................................... ..............................12
Scholarships ....................................... .......................13
State Programs.......................... ...............................14
Student Employment ............................... .............................15
Loan Certifications................... .......... .......................16
Special A areas ................................................................... ....................... 18
Academic Progress .................... ..... ..............................19
Quality Assurance....................... ........ .......................19
Verification .............................................................. ....................... 20
Support Services ............................................................. ....................... 21
Outreach and Training .................................. .............................22
Information/Publication Services .............................................23
Technical Systems & Processing......................... ....................... 24
Systems and Programming .............................. .....................25
D ata Entry ............................................................... ....................... 25
Disbursements and Fund Reconciliation ............................................. 28
Document Editing........................... ............................29
Manual Awarding ........................................................29
Records & Optical Scanning..............................................30
Staff & Professional Activities .................................. .....................31
SFA Staff .................................................................. ....................... 32
Professional Activities ........................................................34



ii










SFA experienced another challenging year,
as staff worked industriously to institute
new requirements mandated by the Higher
Education Amendments of 1998, including
implementation of the new Federal Direct
Loan Master Promissory Note, as well as to
enhance our web presence within ISIS,
institute bar-coding of our major forms,
participate in the federal Access America
pilot program, and complete our Year 2000
software conversion and testing. Our goal,
as always, is first-rate services to UF
students and prospective students.
Karen Fooks
Director








IrcSm dhee r


Tam pleased to present the 1998-99
Annual Report of the Office for Student
Financial Affairs (SFA). This report
provides detailed information on the
major activities and events that have
occurred in the reporting period
beginning July 1998 and continuing
through July 1999, as well as information
on the general state of the office.
SFA experienced another challenging
year as staff worked industriously to
institute new requirements mandated
by the Higher Education Amendments
of 1998, including implementation of
the new Federal Direct Loan Master
Promissory Note. In its third year, the
Florida Bright Futures Scholars
program continued its phenomenal
growth. The total value of state
scholarships received by UF students,
and consequently processed by SFA,
increased dramatically.
We wound up our year 2000 conversion
efforts, enhanced our web presence
within ISIS, instituted bar-coding of our
major forms, and participated in the
federal Access America Pilot Program
New this year, we created an MBA
adviser position in conjunction with the
Warrington College of Business
Administration to accommodate the
increase in non-traditional MBA
Programs. We also created a new SFA
Student Resource Center to help UF
students research and apply for aid.
Not surprisingly, we experienced a surge
in E-Mail Hotline Stats. In our fourth year
of operation, the number of inquiries to
our E-Mail Adviser increased from 752
to 3,090, up by 300% from last year.
We continued our participation in the
federal National Student Loan Data
Systems, the Ford Federal Direct Loan
Program, and the federal "America
Reads" program.
SFA staff are committed to providing
financial assistance to all students who
wish to achieve their educational goals at
the University of Florida. As we grow
and evolve, we continue our efforts to
meet the changing needs of our students.
On behalf of SFA staff, we welcome any
questions or comments regarding the
contents of this report.


M overmAsw


ver the years, Student Financial
Affairs (SFA) continues to enhance
the quality of its financial aid services
and delivery capacity. The University of
Florida (UF) is one of the country's
leaders in providing financial aid to
students. UF is frequently one of the
few schools selected by the federal
government to participate in
experimental programs. This year, SFA
delivered more than $241 million in
student aid from federal, state,
institutional, and private sources to
37,000-plus UF students.

Role
The primary role of SFA is to provide
financial resources to students who
would be unable to receive a post-
secondary education without assistance.
SFA offers eligible students financial aid
packages consisting of scholarships,
grants, loans, and part-time
employment.

What exactly is "financial
aid"?
Financial aid is defined as money
provided to students and their families
as either "gift aid" or "self-help" to
assist in paying college costs. "Gift aid,"
as the name implies, is free money such
as scholarships and grants, which
students do not have to repay. "Self-
help" programs include loans and
employment and are so named because
students must repay loans and work
for money awarded through
employment programs. Awards to
students consist of scholarships, grants,
loans, and work, singly or as a package.

The important factors...
SFA awards aid to students according
to financial need, defined as the
difference between a student's current
educational costs and what the student
and the student's family can afford to
pay toward these costs. UF uses a
federally mandated need analysis
formula provided by Congress to
evaluate a student's financial need from
family information provided on the
student's financial aid applications.
Students and parents have the primary
responsibility for paying students'


expenses. When the funds available from
family, job income, savings, and other
resources are insufficient to cover all
educationally related expenses, SFA
makes every effort to meet the student's
remaining financial need.

Beyond the dollar signs...
In addition to providing assistance to
eligible students, SFA offers financial
aid advising services throughout the
year, comprehensive financial aid
publications, and state-of-the-art
technical support, including such
features as a continually updated home
page on the Web, provision of financial
aid information to the university's
Integrated Student Information System
(ISIS) on the Web, and SFA TIPS, a
touchtone dial-in voice response unit.
Advising services include personal
interviews, orientation workshops,
budget and debt management
counseling, and financial planning. SFA
also provides access to alternative
resources to help students who do not
qualify for financial aid, or who need
more assistance than SFA can provide.

Facilities
The environment of the Marshall M.
Criser Student Services Center,
established in 1991, provides the ideal
setting for convenient and efficient
delivery of financial assistance to
students. The Criser center also houses
the Admissions Office, the Office of the
University Registrar, University
Financial Services, Student Services,
and the University Counseling Center,
providing students easy access to all
student services. The Criser Center is
accessible to students with disabilities.


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99








IrcSm dhee r


Tam pleased to present the 1998-99
Annual Report of the Office for Student
Financial Affairs (SFA). This report
provides detailed information on the
major activities and events that have
occurred in the reporting period
beginning July 1998 and continuing
through July 1999, as well as information
on the general state of the office.
SFA experienced another challenging
year as staff worked industriously to
institute new requirements mandated
by the Higher Education Amendments
of 1998, including implementation of
the new Federal Direct Loan Master
Promissory Note. In its third year, the
Florida Bright Futures Scholars
program continued its phenomenal
growth. The total value of state
scholarships received by UF students,
and consequently processed by SFA,
increased dramatically.
We wound up our year 2000 conversion
efforts, enhanced our web presence
within ISIS, instituted bar-coding of our
major forms, and participated in the
federal Access America Pilot Program
New this year, we created an MBA
adviser position in conjunction with the
Warrington College of Business
Administration to accommodate the
increase in non-traditional MBA
Programs. We also created a new SFA
Student Resource Center to help UF
students research and apply for aid.
Not surprisingly, we experienced a surge
in E-Mail Hotline Stats. In our fourth year
of operation, the number of inquiries to
our E-Mail Adviser increased from 752
to 3,090, up by 300% from last year.
We continued our participation in the
federal National Student Loan Data
Systems, the Ford Federal Direct Loan
Program, and the federal "America
Reads" program.
SFA staff are committed to providing
financial assistance to all students who
wish to achieve their educational goals at
the University of Florida. As we grow
and evolve, we continue our efforts to
meet the changing needs of our students.
On behalf of SFA staff, we welcome any
questions or comments regarding the
contents of this report.


M overmAsw


ver the years, Student Financial
Affairs (SFA) continues to enhance
the quality of its financial aid services
and delivery capacity. The University of
Florida (UF) is one of the country's
leaders in providing financial aid to
students. UF is frequently one of the
few schools selected by the federal
government to participate in
experimental programs. This year, SFA
delivered more than $241 million in
student aid from federal, state,
institutional, and private sources to
37,000-plus UF students.

Role
The primary role of SFA is to provide
financial resources to students who
would be unable to receive a post-
secondary education without assistance.
SFA offers eligible students financial aid
packages consisting of scholarships,
grants, loans, and part-time
employment.

What exactly is "financial
aid"?
Financial aid is defined as money
provided to students and their families
as either "gift aid" or "self-help" to
assist in paying college costs. "Gift aid,"
as the name implies, is free money such
as scholarships and grants, which
students do not have to repay. "Self-
help" programs include loans and
employment and are so named because
students must repay loans and work
for money awarded through
employment programs. Awards to
students consist of scholarships, grants,
loans, and work, singly or as a package.

The important factors...
SFA awards aid to students according
to financial need, defined as the
difference between a student's current
educational costs and what the student
and the student's family can afford to
pay toward these costs. UF uses a
federally mandated need analysis
formula provided by Congress to
evaluate a student's financial need from
family information provided on the
student's financial aid applications.
Students and parents have the primary
responsibility for paying students'


expenses. When the funds available from
family, job income, savings, and other
resources are insufficient to cover all
educationally related expenses, SFA
makes every effort to meet the student's
remaining financial need.

Beyond the dollar signs...
In addition to providing assistance to
eligible students, SFA offers financial
aid advising services throughout the
year, comprehensive financial aid
publications, and state-of-the-art
technical support, including such
features as a continually updated home
page on the Web, provision of financial
aid information to the university's
Integrated Student Information System
(ISIS) on the Web, and SFA TIPS, a
touchtone dial-in voice response unit.
Advising services include personal
interviews, orientation workshops,
budget and debt management
counseling, and financial planning. SFA
also provides access to alternative
resources to help students who do not
qualify for financial aid, or who need
more assistance than SFA can provide.

Facilities
The environment of the Marshall M.
Criser Student Services Center,
established in 1991, provides the ideal
setting for convenient and efficient
delivery of financial assistance to
students. The Criser center also houses
the Admissions Office, the Office of the
University Registrar, University
Financial Services, Student Services,
and the University Counseling Center,
providing students easy access to all
student services. The Criser Center is
accessible to students with disabilities.


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99











mission s~a~se~


r he University of Florida's (UF) Office
for Student Financial Affairs (SFA) is
a service organization with a primary
responsibility to help students secure the
funds necessary to pursue their
educational goals at UF SFA is
committed to providing students with
the resources and information they need
to become fiscally responsible and to
understand the rights and responsibilities
incurred when they receive financial aid.

* The staff of SFA assume a proactive
role, reaching out to students and
potential students to educate them about
the benefits of higher education and the
availability of financial aid.

* SFA believes that no student should be
denied the opportunity to attend UF and
successfully pursue degree objectives
because of financial reasons and is
committed to maximizing the resources
available to its students.

* SFA recognizes that each student's
financial situation is unique and makes
every effort to develop policies and
procedures which treat each student
fairly and equitably and take unusual
circumstances into account.

* SFA has the responsibility of educating,
motivating, and empowering staff and
each other. SFA's management team
members believe in the importance of
listening to each other, inspiring those in
subordinate positions, and rewarding
dedication, competence, hard work, and
positive attitudes. SFA managers will
make every effort to develop managerial
plans that promote leadership that will
benefit and be appreciated by all staff.

T he iiai'u iing i/,ii o-/iihyi of SFA is to
award aid to students as a part of the
means by which they can attend college.
While students and parents have the
primary responsibility for paying the
student's expenses, our goal is to fill the
financial gap that may exist between the
cost of the individual student's education
and money available from the students
family, job income, savings, and other
resources.


8-R9 svwm




n 1998-99 SFA had another challenging
year. Staff stretched their combined
imaginations and threw in a lot of hard
work to institute requirements mandated
by the Higher Education Amendments
of 1998. Most SFA departments were
involved in revising our systems and
procedures to facilitate the new
requirements. Meanwhile, we adapted to
the increased awarding, processing, and
disbursement needs of the expanding
Florida Bright Futures Scholars Program
and an increase in the number of private
and outside scholarships received by UF
students. We also enhanced our web
presence within ISIS, instituted bar-
coding of our major forms, participated
in the federal Access America pilot
program, and completed our Year 2000
software conversion and testing. An
MBA adviser position was created
together with the Warrington College of
Business Administration to
accommodate the quick growth in the
number of non-traditional MBA
programs. We also created an SFA
Student Resource Center to help UF
students research and apply for aid. Staff
were fully engaged meeting these
demanding goals.
The Higher Education Amendments
of 1998 instituted a number of
regulatory amendments. Implementing
these changes, which affected most
SFA departments, required extensive
systems and processing changes and
testing, plus many staff hours for
development and training:
Institution of a Master Promissory
Note (MPN), under which borrowers
receive loans for multiple academic
years. Complementary to this was a
mandated notification/confirmation
process by which borrowers must
either be notified of their loan
information or required to return a
confirmation form to the school
before disbursement.
Origination fees for '99-2000 Federal
Direct Stafford Loans and Federal
Direct Unsubsidized Staffords were
reduced from 4% to 3%.
Unsubsidized Stafford loan limits
increased for some health-related
programs (dentistry, medicine,
pharmacy, veterinary medicine).


* In its third year, the Florida Bright
Futures Scholars program continued
its phenomenal growth. As the state
put more funds into this program, the
total value of state scholarships
received by UF students, and
consequently processed by SFA,
increased dramatically. The increase of
more than $8 million in funds
disbursed to UF students in 1997-98
was repeated in 1998-99 by another
increase of nearly $7 million.
* SFA enhanced our web presence
within Eagle and ISIS. The new
enhancements allow students to keep
track of their aid file by providing
information such as their aid awards,
the status of their aid file, documents
they still need, their deferment status,
and their disbursement status.
* Bar-coding of SFA forms. The
introduction of bar-coding of Master
Promissory Notes, NSLDS, verification,
and other processing documents
greatly enhanced and expedited the
application tracking process.
* Access America. UF's participation in
the federal Access America Pilot
program required extensive
programming by the Systems area.
* Year 2000. Software conversion and
testing was completed. SFA's Systems
area worked steadily on this project to
be fully converted and tested by June
'99. Year 2000 Tracking and Award
systems were brought online.
* Custodial awards received by UF
students rose by more than $3
million. A number of factors may have
contributed to this increase, including
the rising academic level of incoming
UF students, availability of more free
scholarship searches through the
internet, and SFA's continued emphasis
upon scholarship availability through
efforts such as the SFA Electronic
Scholarship Bulletin Board.
* New SFA Student Resource Room.
SFA created a Student Resource Room
off our main lobby, featuring four
computers, brochure racks, and
continual staffing. The room will help
students research and apply for
financial aid by providing access to the
FAFSA on the Web and other student
aid web pages, e-mail, ISIS, the online


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99











mission s~a~se~


r he University of Florida's (UF) Office
for Student Financial Affairs (SFA) is
a service organization with a primary
responsibility to help students secure the
funds necessary to pursue their
educational goals at UF SFA is
committed to providing students with
the resources and information they need
to become fiscally responsible and to
understand the rights and responsibilities
incurred when they receive financial aid.

* The staff of SFA assume a proactive
role, reaching out to students and
potential students to educate them about
the benefits of higher education and the
availability of financial aid.

* SFA believes that no student should be
denied the opportunity to attend UF and
successfully pursue degree objectives
because of financial reasons and is
committed to maximizing the resources
available to its students.

* SFA recognizes that each student's
financial situation is unique and makes
every effort to develop policies and
procedures which treat each student
fairly and equitably and take unusual
circumstances into account.

* SFA has the responsibility of educating,
motivating, and empowering staff and
each other. SFA's management team
members believe in the importance of
listening to each other, inspiring those in
subordinate positions, and rewarding
dedication, competence, hard work, and
positive attitudes. SFA managers will
make every effort to develop managerial
plans that promote leadership that will
benefit and be appreciated by all staff.

T he iiai'u iing i/,ii o-/iihyi of SFA is to
award aid to students as a part of the
means by which they can attend college.
While students and parents have the
primary responsibility for paying the
student's expenses, our goal is to fill the
financial gap that may exist between the
cost of the individual student's education
and money available from the students
family, job income, savings, and other
resources.


8-R9 svwm




n 1998-99 SFA had another challenging
year. Staff stretched their combined
imaginations and threw in a lot of hard
work to institute requirements mandated
by the Higher Education Amendments
of 1998. Most SFA departments were
involved in revising our systems and
procedures to facilitate the new
requirements. Meanwhile, we adapted to
the increased awarding, processing, and
disbursement needs of the expanding
Florida Bright Futures Scholars Program
and an increase in the number of private
and outside scholarships received by UF
students. We also enhanced our web
presence within ISIS, instituted bar-
coding of our major forms, participated
in the federal Access America pilot
program, and completed our Year 2000
software conversion and testing. An
MBA adviser position was created
together with the Warrington College of
Business Administration to
accommodate the quick growth in the
number of non-traditional MBA
programs. We also created an SFA
Student Resource Center to help UF
students research and apply for aid. Staff
were fully engaged meeting these
demanding goals.
The Higher Education Amendments
of 1998 instituted a number of
regulatory amendments. Implementing
these changes, which affected most
SFA departments, required extensive
systems and processing changes and
testing, plus many staff hours for
development and training:
Institution of a Master Promissory
Note (MPN), under which borrowers
receive loans for multiple academic
years. Complementary to this was a
mandated notification/confirmation
process by which borrowers must
either be notified of their loan
information or required to return a
confirmation form to the school
before disbursement.
Origination fees for '99-2000 Federal
Direct Stafford Loans and Federal
Direct Unsubsidized Staffords were
reduced from 4% to 3%.
Unsubsidized Stafford loan limits
increased for some health-related
programs (dentistry, medicine,
pharmacy, veterinary medicine).


* In its third year, the Florida Bright
Futures Scholars program continued
its phenomenal growth. As the state
put more funds into this program, the
total value of state scholarships
received by UF students, and
consequently processed by SFA,
increased dramatically. The increase of
more than $8 million in funds
disbursed to UF students in 1997-98
was repeated in 1998-99 by another
increase of nearly $7 million.
* SFA enhanced our web presence
within Eagle and ISIS. The new
enhancements allow students to keep
track of their aid file by providing
information such as their aid awards,
the status of their aid file, documents
they still need, their deferment status,
and their disbursement status.
* Bar-coding of SFA forms. The
introduction of bar-coding of Master
Promissory Notes, NSLDS, verification,
and other processing documents
greatly enhanced and expedited the
application tracking process.
* Access America. UF's participation in
the federal Access America Pilot
program required extensive
programming by the Systems area.
* Year 2000. Software conversion and
testing was completed. SFA's Systems
area worked steadily on this project to
be fully converted and tested by June
'99. Year 2000 Tracking and Award
systems were brought online.
* Custodial awards received by UF
students rose by more than $3
million. A number of factors may have
contributed to this increase, including
the rising academic level of incoming
UF students, availability of more free
scholarship searches through the
internet, and SFA's continued emphasis
upon scholarship availability through
efforts such as the SFA Electronic
Scholarship Bulletin Board.
* New SFA Student Resource Room.
SFA created a Student Resource Room
off our main lobby, featuring four
computers, brochure racks, and
continual staffing. The room will help
students research and apply for
financial aid by providing access to the
FAFSA on the Web and other student
aid web pages, e-mail, ISIS, the online


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99











hscod revfsw


student job list, and free scholarships
searches, including SFA's new
electronic Scholarship Bulletin Board.
* SFA Electronic Scholarship Bulletin
Board. The Bulletin Board, available in
the new Resource Room, lists
scholarship information mailed to SFA
by outside sources.
* Huge surge in SFA E-Mail Hotline
Stats. In our fourth year of operation,
the number of inquiries to our E-Mail
Adviser increased from 752 to 3,090,
a 300% increase from last year.
* New MBA Adviser. As a result of an
increase in the number of non-
traditional MBA programs, the College
of Business elected to help fund a
position to help process financial aid
for students in these unique programs.
The number of programs rose from
three to five this year, and the number
of enrolled students from 124 to 174.
* Concurrent enrollment, transient
student, and distance learning
programs and participation continue
to grow. The number of students at
the UF/PJC-Milton enrollment rose
by more than 100% this year.
Concurrent enrollment programs
offered at UF Institute of Food and
Agricultural Services (IFAS) extension
locations in Fort Lauderdale and Fort
Pierce also rose.
* We continued to participate in the
National Student Loan Data System
(NSLDS), a centralized federal data
bank that provides a complete
history of a student's Title IV aid
disbursements, loan default
information, overpayments of Pell or
SEOG, and any active bankruptcy.
* UF continued as an "experimental
site" in the Ford Federal Direct Loan
Program, which allows UF exemption
from federal requirements such as
mandatory multiple disbursements for
single-term loans and a 30-day delay
in first-time borrowers disbursements.
* SFA's Website. We continued to
enhance our site on the web. New this
year is our Scholarship Central
selection, where we pulled together all
the scholarship information on the site
into one handy place.


The Office for Student Financial
Affairs (SFA) functioned with a
$2,947,161 operating budget in 1998-99.
Funding for the operating budget is
provided from state "education and
general" (E & G) funds, an
administrative allowance for
administration of federal financial aid
programs, and student financial aid
fees. State E & G fund allocations
provided about 74 percent of the total
budget, with the administrative
allowance and financial aid fees
making up the remaining 26 percent.


paid eligible employees a bonus
ranging from $1,000 to $2,000 each.

Operating expenses are up significantly
in the areas of travel, training, and
office supplies.
"Other capital outlay" (OCO)
purchases consisted mainly of
enhancements to our computer
systems.


Staffing for 1998-99 remained fairly
stable at 64.75 FTE, compared to 62.75
as of June 1998.

In 1998-99, salary increases were due to
annual raises. A significant increase in
OPS is largely due to a one-time
productivity award program, which








components of the office operating budget
BUDGET CATEGORY 1998-99 1997-98 1996-97

Salary $2,306,149 $2,112,753 $2,051,271

Operating Expense 250,510 239,864 185,430

Other Personnel Services (OPS) 108,577 30,058 26,695

Other Capital Outlay (OCO) 91,377 79,206 45,974

Federal Work-Study Salaries 190,548 182,258 203,679


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99








administration

financial aid advising
-customer service
-special programs
-satellite offices

financial aid

programs
-grants
-scholarships
-state programs
-student employment
-loan certifications

special areas
-academic progress
-quality assurance
-verification

support services
-outreach & training
-information/publication services

technical systems &
processing
-systems & programming
-data entry
-disbursement & fund
reconciliation
-document editing
-manual awarding
-records/optical scanning












"The University of Florida Office for
Student Financial Affairs (SFA) remains
at the forefront of universities in shaping
financial aid policy issues that affect
students nationwide. As college costs
persist in rising, SFA continues in its
efforts to develop new and innovative
programs for funding postsecondary
educational expenses."

Rick Wilder
Associate Director













A s federal and state funding of
student education grants continues
to decrease and borrowing continues to
rise, effective distribution by the
financial aid office of funds available to
qualified students becomes increasingly
important. The administrative staff of
Student Financial Affairs (SFA),
including the director and associate
directors, are responsible for ensuring
such distribution, while also
guaranteeing equal access to all
prospective students to the University
of Florida (UF). The smooth and
efficient administration of financial aid
programs and systems necessary for
awarding and distributing program
funds is the charge of SFA's
administration. The Director's office
manager and the accounting and word
processing staff provide all necessary
support services.

Director's Office
The Director of SFA is responsible for
the overall administration of financial
aid programs at UF. She also
represents the University statewide
and nationally, helping to shape long-
range policies and goals. The
Director's Office is responsible for all
personnel matters within the office,
and the office manager administers
personnel, payroll, and coordinates
travel paperwork.


Associate Directors
Student Financial Affairs has two
associate directors. One is responsible
for customer service, loan processing,
and satellite offices in the Colleges of
Dentistry, Law, Medicine, and Health
Professions, which includes supervising
six assistant directors and/or student
affairs coordinators and their respective
areas of responsibility. The other
associate director oversees technical
areas and student employment, which
includes supervising one assistant
director and two student affairs
coordinators. Additionally, both
coordinate all data processing requests
with the systems coordinator in charge
of the Systems and Programming area,
supervise funds management and
research, coordinate the delivery
systems, and are responsible for all
federal, state, and institutional audits.

Accounting
Student Financial Affairs' accounting
staff maintain all departmental
accounting and fiscal activities. The
accountant and the fiscal assistant are
responsible for all phases of purchasing
and handling accounts receivable for
federal administrative allowance funds
and private donations. This office
prepares financial and compliance
reports for federal, state, and
institutional donors and helps the
director and associate directors with
special fiscal projects. Internal control
duties include maintaining
departmental ledgers and preparing the
departmental operating budget.
Accounting also supervises building
services such as telephones, equipment,
repairs, and custodial and safety
maintenance.


Word Processing
The primary responsibility of the word
processing area is to produce and
maintain quality control of all outgoing
and in-house office correspondence; to
process in-house forms and maintain a
central forms catalogue system for each
section within SFA; and to lend
secretarial and telephone support for
the director and associate directors,
with secondary responsibilities to the
assistant directors and other staff
members. The word processing staff
also respond to requests from parents
and students for general financial aid
information materials and applications.
Word processing staff are supervised by
the Director's office manager.


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99


~dmi~~k~~i~~











"Customer Service advisers strive to provide
students and parents with comprehensive
assistance by coordinating all aspects of the
financial aid process. This includes educating
students about program eligibility
requirements, informing them of their rights
and responsibilities as regards the aid they
are receiving, and helping them make
prudent decisions."

Rodlee Ritter
Student Af.rt ,, Coordinator











SFA's Customer Service Section is the
initial point of contact for all students
who apply for aid or who need
assistance with the financial aid
application process. Our personal
financial aid advisers are experts in the
field of financial aid and continue their
efforts to make the University of
Florida's (UF) financial aid office a
national leader in the administration of
financial aid.

Customer Service is staffed with a
Student Affairs Coordinator III
(Assistant Director), four Student Affairs
Coordinator IIs, four Student Affairs
Coordinator Is, one Clerical Supervisor,
one Senior Clerk, and one Clerk.

Customer Service Advisers
All UF students and aid applicants are
assigned to one of four, two-member
financial aid advising teams according to
the last two digits of students' social
security numbers. Each advising team
consists of a Student Affairs Coordinator
II and a Student Affairs Coordinator I.

Customer Service advisers provide
service to students via several methods:
(1) on a regular walk-in basis, (2) by
personal office appointments, (3) by
telephone, or (4) by written
communication.

In addition, Customer Service is
responsible for handling all incoming
phone calls to the non-administrative
financial aid departments. The
Customer Service telephone bank is
now staffed by three, full-time USPS
clerical personnel and complement of
as many as 12 student assistants. The
phone bank handles all general
financial aid inquiry calls and is trained
to provide assistance for basic status
inquiries. Complex financial aid
questions are routed to a member of the
student's financial aid advising team
for assistance or resolution. During the
1998-99 academic year, the customer
service telephone bank handled 44,324
telephone calls.
Customer Service advisers are
responsible for assisting UF aid
applicants, prospective applicants, and
their families with financial aid
application procedures and all other


financial aid-related functions. This
includes case-by-case award revisions
for students whose financial situation
or other eligibility criteria change
during the academic year.

Special Programs
A number of special financial aid
programs come under the
responsibility of the Customer Service
section. These include: the summer
Achievements in Mainstreaming (AIM)
Program, overseas study programs,
financial aid for State University
System (SUS) transient students,
concurrent enrollment programs,
revision petitions, the SFA Student Info
e-mail service, and a growing number
of MBA non-traditional, low-residency
programs requiring special processing
and tracking.

* Summer AIM Program
During the Summer B term, SFA works
closely with the Admissions Office and
the AIM Program Office to process
financial aid for students admitted
through this summer special
admissions program. In 1998-99, 677
students were admitted as AIM
program participants. Applications
were processed in accordance with AIM
program guidelines for financial aid
consideration by our office. Of the 677
admitted students, 375 enrolled and 326
received a total of more than $678,000 in
various types of grant assistance to
meet the total costs of the summer
program. These figures represent an
increase of 32 financial aid recipients
and over $90,000 in financial aid
expenditures from last year.

* Overseas Study Students with Aid
The trend in increased participation in
UF-sanctioned overseas studies
programs continues. During the 1998-99
academic year, the number of students
attending such programs increased
from 808 in 1997-98 to 928 in 1998-99.
Likewise, the increase in student
overseas program attendance resulted
in a corresponding increase in financial
aid recipients. A total of 511 UF students
who participated in overseas study
programs received financial aid from
200 different programs. Regular


financial aid packages were
supplemented with Federal Direct
Stafford Loans, Federal Direct
Unsubsidized Stafford Loans, or Federal
Direct PLUS Loans to help offset the
increased costs of studying abroad.

* Extenuating Circumstances Reviews
Customer service advisers are
responsible for counseling students
about the petition process. Students
have the right to, and are given the
opportunity to, petition parental
contributions, student contributions,
and dependency status if they have
extenuating circumstances not reflected
in the initial evaluation of their financial
aid eligibility. A total of 203 petitions
were received for the 1998-99 year, and
of this number 128 were approved.
Although this was a decrease of 56
petitions from the previous year, the
approval rate increased from 57% to
63%. As a result of a strong economy
over the past few years, the number of
petitions have been on the decline.

* Consortium Programs
Established during the 1994-95
academic year, the New World School
of the Arts (NWSA) program was the
first formally recognized concurrent-
enrollment program established at UF
for UF students taking courses at off-
site locations. Although enrolled off-site,
these students apply for financial aid
through our office. Most of these
students are involved in completing a
portion of their curriculum
requirements at "partner" institutions, in
addition to taking UF coursework.
Students attending NWSA typically
take their associate degree course
requirements through Miami-Dade
Community College and their upper-
division courses through UF. The fifth
year's total of students enrolled in the
NWSA program was 89. Thirty-four of
these students received financial aid
through our office.

In the Fall 1995 term, the UF/Pensacola
Junior College (PJC) at Milton program
was established to allow students to
receive a degree from UF while taking
UF coursework on the PJC campus in
addition to taking lower-division PJC
credits and University of West Florida


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99











credits concurrently. The fourth year's
total for students enrolled in the
UF/PJC-Milton program was 30. Our
office processed financial aid for 17 of
these students.

During the 1998-99 school year, our
office established procedures for
processing financial aid for students
enrolled in two additional concurrent
enrollment programs offered at UF
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Services (IFAS) extension locations in
Fort Lauderdale and Fort Pierce. Eight
students participating in the Fort
Lauderdale program had financial aid
funds processed and paid through our
office, as compared to two last year.
Financial aid was processed for two
concurrently enrolled students attending
the Fort Pierce program. Last year no aid
was processed for students in the Fort
Pierce program.
Financial aid awarded to a UF student
who elects to attend another SUS school
as a transient student may be processed
here and sent to the other institution.
Each of these situations must be
monitored individually to ensure that all
required conditions have been met and
documentation has been received before
financial aid can be disbursed. For the
1998-99 award year UF processed
financial aid for 63 students participating
as SUS transients.

Before financial aid can be disbursed to
students in concurrent enrollment or
transient programs, consortium
agreements must be completed for each
student to account for the hours he/she
may be taking concurrently at the
partner institutions) and to ensure that
financial aid is not also being received
from the other institutions.

* Non-Traditional MBA Programs

As a result of the dramatic increase in
the number of non-traditional MBA
programs, the College of Business
elected to fund one-half of a Student
Affairs Coordinator II position to assist
with the processing of financial aid for
students enrolled in these unique
programs. Because these programs do
not follow the standard UF semester
format, the progress of these students


must be manually tracked, taking care
to process the appropriate type of aid
for which the student is eligible, based
on the program. During the 1998-99
award year, there were a total of 174
students enrolled in five different non-
traditional MBA programs, an increase
of 50 from those enrolled in similar
programs during 1997-98. Our office
processed private loan applications for
66 of these students, up from 53
processed applications last year.

*SFA Student Info E-Mail Service

SFA's Student Info E-mail Hotline was
established in September, 1995, to
enable students to ask general financial
aid questions without having to come
to Criser Hall. Due to confidentiality
regulations, we cannot respond to
specific requests about individual
financial aid files, but we can provide
helpful, general information about the
financial aid process as well as program
availability and eligibility
requirements. In our fourth year of
operation, we received 3,090 inquiries.
This represents a 300% increase over
the number received during the
previous award year (752).

Looking Ahead
Emphasis will again be placed on
looking for ways to improve our
automated information systems. With
the implementation of the computer
requirement for all UF students,
electronic methods for providing
financial aid information is becoming a
preferred method of communication.
Students will be able to access their
financial aid records in the comfort and
privacy of their own homes, helping to
alleviate the need for routine visits or
phone calls to the financial aid office.


FA administers a number of special
programs onsite in Criser Hall to
administer to needs of specific groups
of students by financial aid
professionals with specialized
knowledge of federal, state, or UF
requirements relating specifically to
these groups. These include an adviser
to athletes and an adviser to veterans.

Adviser to Athletes
A Financial Aid Coordinator
specializing in both financial aid and
NCAA/SEC guidelines coordinates
and administers financial aid for
student athletes. The Athletes Adviser
works with the University Athletic
Association (UAA) to coordinate
athletic scholarships with other
financial aid, to complete required
NCAA reports, to counsel athletes
about financial aid and about their
rights and responsibilities, and to
assure compliance with both federal
and NCAA regulations. The Athletes
Adviser is located in Criser Hall, and
also counsels student athletes at the
Office of Student Life in the Academic
Advisement Center.

VA Work-Study/Tutorial
Assistance Adviser
The position for the adviser for the
federal VA Work-Study and VA
Tutorial Assistance programs is
funded by the federal government to
provide VA Work-Study and VA
Tutorial Assistance to veterans who
are enrolled students. VA Work-Study
is available for veterans to work in
positions at UF up to 25 hours a week
making $5.15 an hour, tax-free. The VA
Tutorial Assistance Program allows
veterans to be reimbursed for the costs
of tutorial assistance needed in the
course of their education. The VA
Work-Study Adviser, who counsels
students on both of these programs, is
located in S-107G Criser Hall.


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99








sate/te offices


student Financial Affairs (SFA)
supports four professional-level
positions designed to accommodate
special needs, housed at sites away
from the main financial aid office.
These positions were created at the
request of, and with financial support
from, colleges and agencies whose
students have particular difficulty
coming to the aid office because of
distance and class schedules, or who
have other special needs.

The satellite offices are jointly funded
and operated by SFA and the
sponsoring organizations: the College
of Dentistry, the College of Law, the
College of Medicine, and the Colleges
of Health Professions, Nursing,
Pharmacy, and Veterinary Medicine.
Since the initiation of these outreach
programs, students have reaped the
benefits of (1) having an SFA
representative with knowledge of their
specialized needs who can also provide
comprehensive knowledge of financial
aid programs and procedures as they
pertain to students from the individual
organization and (2) the convenience
and time saved by not having to leave
their academic areas when requiring
financial aid advising. All concerned
have been pleased with the results and
the advantages gained from this
outreach effort.

College of Dentistry
The College of Dentistry financial aid
office serves D.M.D. dental students,
postdoctoral dental students, and F.T.D.
(Foreign Trained Dentists) students,
administering Title IV loan programs,
Title VII loans and scholarships, and
various outside scholarship funds. A
Financial Aid Coordinator is
responsible for all aspects of financial
aid at the College of Dentistry: financial
aid presentations for dental admission
days, assisting students through the
application process, debt management,
daily walk-in counseling, and exit
interviews for graduating seniors. The
office is located in the UF Health
Sciences Center in the Dental Tower,
D3-#17A.


Colleges of Health
Professions, Nursing,
Pharmacy, and Veterinary
Medicine

Serving the Colleges of Health
Professions, Nursing, Pharmacy, and
Veterinary Medicine, the Health
Sciences Center Financial Aid
Administrator is responsible for the
coordination of all financial aid services
for each college. These services include
awarding, aid packaging, and debt
counseling for a population of more
than 1900 students. Further, the HSC
aid administrator provides the
appropriate colleges with the financial
data needed to aid in their awarding of
scholarships. The office coordinates all
financial aid services and assists in
awarding and packaging all college-
based loans and scholarships. Emphasis
is placed on counseling students to
reduce student loan debts and on
providing up-to-date information about
federal aid programs and requirements.
The Health Sciences Center Financial
Aid Office is located in the UF Health
Sciences Center in room CG-96.

College of Law
Of the approximately 1,160 law
students at UF, about 80% receive some
form of financial aid. During the 1998-
99 academic year, more than $14,000,000
in federal loans were paid to 895
students. The Law School Aid Financial
Office, located in 164 Holland Law
Center, is administered by a Financial
Aid Coordinator. This coordinator is
responsible for guiding students
through the financial aid application
process, from completing financial aid
applications to explaining procedures
for disbursements. Private loan
applications, including Bar Exam Loans
and Bar Study Loans, from The Access
Group and Law Loans, are certified by
this office. The law school adviser also
serves as a member of the law school
financial aid committee, prepares
meeting materials, and awards and
disburses all College of Law
scholarships based on committee
decision. Two hundred thirty-eight


students received $629,744 from these
funds during 1998-99. In addition,
approximately $1.6 million in state
grants and scholarships were
administered to minority students
through this office.

College of Medicine
The College of Medicine comprises
more than 780 medical, graduate, and
physician assistant students. More than
500 students are financial aid award
recipients. The medical school adviser is
a Financial Aid Coordinator responsible
for all aspects of financial aid involving
College of Medicine students-such as
counseling new admissions and giving
application assistance by providing
consumer information, debt
management counseling, and exit
interviews. The College of Medicine aid
office administers 50 loans and
scholarships and, in 1998-99, paid out
$7,000,000 in student loans and over
$1,000,000 in scholarships.


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99












"SFA added several programs and
continued to expand the types and number
of services provided to UF students in
1998-99. We renew our commitment to
providing the highest quality of service,
financial aid information, and delivery of
aid funds to UF students."
Rick Wilder
Associate Director














What makes up a financial
aid package?

Financial aid comes in many forms.
Financial aid packages are combinations of
aid made up of funds from the following
programs: grants, scholarships, state
programs, loans, and student employment.









wr2s


Grants are gift aid (no repayment
required) awarded to students
who show financial need. At the
University of Florida (UF), Student
Financial Affairs (SFA) administers the
following programs: Federal Pell
Grants, Federal Supplemental
Educational Opportunity Grants,
Florida Student Assistance Grants, the
Lottery Trust Grant, and institutional
grants such as I. D. Turner Grants.

Programs
The Pell Grant Section focuses on
efficient delivery of Pell Grants to
students. Federal Supplemental
Educational Opportunity Grants,
Turner Grants, and Lottery Grants are
also awarded to undergraduate
students with exceptional need as part
of a comprehensive aid package.

Federal Pell Grant
The Federal Pell Grant program
provides grants designed to assist those
students with the greatest financial
need. Pell Grants are the foundation
upon which all other need-based aid
programs are built.
The government grants awards
according to students' financial need as
determined by a federally established
need analysis formula. Need for other


aid is based upon and determined
around the student's eligibility for a
Federal Pell Grant.
The total dollar amount of Pell Grants
disbursed to students increased from
$12,600,263 in 1997-98 to $14,549,374 in
1998-99. The number of Pell Grant
recipients increased from 7,218 to 7,571.
This increase represents a welcome
growth in these funds for UF students.

Federal Supplemental
Educational Opportunity
Grant (FSEOG)
This federal grant program is a campus-
based grant available to all
undergraduates who show exceptional
financial need. Campus-based means
that, although federally funded, the
selection of the recipients and award
amounts are determined by SFA.
Funding for FSEOG remains relatively
stable, with a slight upward trend the last
few years. The 1997-98 figures for FSEOG
funding and recipients at UF have
increased somewhat from last year. The
amount of dollars disbursed increased
from $2,854,792 in the 1997-98 academic
year to $2,930,080 in 1998-99. This
increase is in conjunction with an
increase in the number of recipients,
which went from 2,710 in 1997-98 to
2,847 this year.


Turner Grants
Institutional grants are university-
administered programs awarded by
SFA to students who show exceptional
financial need. The Turner Grant is
funded by student fees. Grants are
funded by the state Educational Trust
Fund Lottery. During the 1998-99 award
year, a total of $5,981,195 in Turner
Grant funds was disbursed to 3,328
recipients.

Florida Student Assistance
Grant (FSAG)
FSAG is a state-funded, need-based
financial aid program awarded by the
State of Florida Office of Student
Financial Assistance, but coordinated at
UF by SFA. In 1998-99, UF students
received 3,249 awards totalling
$3,196,544. More information about this
grant can be found in the State
Programs section of this report.


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99


$15,000,000

$10,000,000 -


$5,000,000-

$0
1998-99 1997-98 1996-97

Pell Grant Dollars Disbursed


8,000-
7,000
6,000
5,000
4,000 -
3,000 -
2,000
1,000
0
1998-99 1997-98 1996-97

No. of Pell Grant Recipients












Scholarships are coordinated by
several offices at the University of
Florida (UF), including Student
Financial Affairs (SFA), the Admissions
Office, and individual colleges and
departments within the university.
Additionally, the state of Florida,
private organizations, and corporate
sponsors provide significant financial
support to UF students.

SFA's Scholarship Section coordinates
and administers numerous college-
awarded scholarships. Private donor
and UF-endowed scholarships are also
available to students and are awarded
by SFA to full-time, undergraduate
students who meet the specified
requirements of donors and/or the
endowment funds.


Custodial Awards
A review of statistics on custodial
awards received by UF students reveals
an area of significant growth in recent
years. A modest increase of $663,000
occurred from 1996-97 to 1997-98.
However, the increase from 1997-98 to
1998-99 was over $3 million. This can
probably be attributed to several
factors, including the higher academic
performance level of our students.
Academically able students tend to
apply for and receive more
scholarships. Also, our new Student
Financial Affairs Resource Room, with
its electronic Outside Scholarship
Bulletin Board, has brought more
scholarships to the attention of
students. Further, our advertising of
and the availability of more free
scholarship searches on the internet has
undoubtedly encouraged more
students to pursue donor scholarships.


Statistics
The following statistics include all
scholarships paid to students through
the office for Student Financial Affairs
,. i,1,.1;, tuition fee waivers, State of
Florida scholarships, and custodial
awards. The total dollars paid out
through the Scholarships Section in
1998-99-$13,394,806-demonstrates an
increase of more than $1 million from
the previous year.


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99


$14,000,000-
$12,000,000-
$10,000,000-
$8,000,000-
$6,000,000-
$4,000,000-
$2,000,000-


Scholarship Dollars Disbursed
*Excludes State Scholarships and waivers


1998-99 1997-98 1996-97


No. of Scholarship Awards
*Excludes State Scholarships and waivers


schoqrships








stt priwCpw


The Florida Department of
Education offers a variety of
student assistance programs that are
administered by the State of Florida
Office of Student Financial Assistance
in Tallahassee, Florida. These state
programs, excluding loans, support
18,569 awards to students enrolled at
UF, who received a total of $33,467,439
this year. Applications and information
on these programs are provided to
students primarily by high school
guidance counselors or the Florida
Office of Student Financial Assistance.

SFA's State Programs Section is the
University of Florida (UF) liaison with
the Office for Student Financial
Assistance in Tallahassee and is the
campus administrator for most state-
funded student scholarships and
grants.

The State Programs staff monitors
student eligibility for state aid,
processes information from a state
computer data base, maintains records
of each transaction, and arranges for
disbursement of state funds through
UF's University Financial Services.


Programs
Major state of Florida programs
administered through this section
include:

SChildren of Deceased or Disabled
Veterans or Children of Servicemen
Classified as Prisoners of War or
Missing in Action Scholarship

* Florida Student Assistance Grant

* Florida Teacher Scholarship and
Forgivable Loan

* Florida Academic Scholarship*

* Florida Merit Scholarship*

* Florida Gold Seal Vocational
Scholarship*

* Jose Marti Scholarship Challenge
Grant

* Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship

* Rosewood Family Scholarship

* Occupational Therapist and
Physical Therapist Scholarship Loan

* Top Scholars Award*

* Part of the Florida Bright Futures
Scholarship Program.


Statistics
The State of Florida has continued its
basic support of higher education at
UF, as seen in the following graphs.
The total amount disbursed through
state programs this year represents an
increase of about 3,000 awards and
nearly $7,000,000 over the previous
year. This tremendous increase is
basically the result of the creation of the
Florida Bright Futures Scholarship
program. Many more UF students
qualified for state academic
scholarships this year than previously
because of the expanded state funds
available through this program.

Summary
The State of Florida programs, and most
especially the Florida Bright Futures
Scholars program, have continued their
phenomenal growth. As the academic
level of performance of our students has
increased and the state puts more funds
into the academic-based Florida Bright
Futures program, the total value of state
scholarships received by UF students,
and consequently processed by SFA, has
increased dramatically. The increase of
more than $8 million in funds received
by UF students from academic year
1996-97 to 1997-98 has been followed by
another large increase of nearly $7
million from 1997-98 to 1998-99.


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99


1998-99 1997-98 1996-97

State Program Dollars Disbursed


20,000

15,000

10,000- -

5,000

0
1998-99 1997-98 1996-97

No. of State Program Recipients









S4dswF oypfims'n


Student Financial Affairs' (SFA)
Student Employment Office
continues to serve as a clearinghouse
for all on- and off-campus employment
activity. Part-time employment
continues to be a valuable source for
students needing funds to help pay
educational expenses. Student
employment on campus contributes
greatly to the operation of the
university, while providing students
with valuable work experience, often in
their major fields of study.
Student Employment acts as
coordinator for all student jobs at the
University of Florida (UF). As such,
Student Employment communicates
employment policies and procedures to
UF offices and conducts annual
training sessions for departmental
employment coordinators.
Student Employment processes all
paperwork required to appoint students
to campus jobs and enter them into the
university payroll system; develops and
updates forms; monitors student
earnings; maintains and posts job listings
from on- and off-campus employers;
provides job counseling to students; and
issues UF Work-Permits, offering the Dial-
Up Work-Permit Request Service, which
allows students to request work permits
by phone.

Programs
Student Employment coordinates the
following programs: Federal Work-
Study (FWS), including the Federal
Community Service (FCS) component;
and Other Personnel Services (OPS).


* Federal Work-Study (FWS)
FWS is funded 75% by the federal
government and 25% by the institution.
Awards are based on financial need as
determined from information students
provide on the Free Application for
Federal Student Aid. To be eligible
students must maintain a minimum 2.0
GPA. Jobs pay at least minimum wage.

* Federal Community Service
(FCS)
In fall 1994, Student Employment
implemented the FCS program, a new
component of FWS. FCS allows
students to work with various
community agencies dedicated to
improving community living,
especially for low-income individuals.

* Other Personnel Services (OPS)
Jobs
OPS is a state-funded campus student
work program which is not based on
financial need. To be eligible, students
must maintain a minimum 2.0 GPA.
Jobs pay at least minimum wage.

* Off-Campus Jobs
The Student Employment Office acts
as a referral agent, helping to link job-
seeking students with potential
employers. Off-campus employers list
their jobs, which are not based on
need, with Student Employment for
posting. Wages vary by employer.


Statistics
During the year 1998-99, 7,237
students were employed on campus
through FWS (including FCS) and
OPS, earning a total of $10,279,191.
This represents a steady increase over
previous years.

Job Bulletin Boards

FWS, FCS, OPS, and Off-Campus job
boards are located at various campus
locations. The job board outside SFA in
the Criser courtyard is updated daily.
The boards located at Norman Hall,
McCarty Hall, G-1 Reitz Union, 305
Reitz Union, and the Health Sciences
Center are updated on Tuesdays and
Thursday. In cooperation with SFA's
Information/ Publication Services, the
up-to-date job lists are also maintained
online on the World Wide Web.

Publications
In conjunction with the
Information/Publications Section,
Student Employment publishes the
Student Employment Coordinator, a
periodic newsletter for campus
employment coordinators. Other
publications produced with
Information/Publications include the
Student Employers Handbook, for UF
departmental student employment
administrators, and Student Financial
Affairs' Student Employee Handbook,
which explains policies and procedures
to SFA student assistants. These
publications are maintained online on
the SFA website at:
www.ufsa.ufl.edu / sfa/


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99


FWS OPS FWS OPS FWS OPS


$10,000,000
$8,000,000

$6,000,000
$4,000,000
$2,000,000
$0


1998-99 1997-98 1996-97


Dollars Disbursed through Employment


1998-99 1997-98 1996-97
No. of Students Employed











The goal of the Loan Certification
department is to use today's
technology to develop a loan process
that is efficient and correct and can be
accessed and reviewed by the student.
The University of Florida (UF)
continues to participate in the Ford
Federal Direct Loan Program (FFDLP).
The 1998-99 academic year was UF's
fifth year of participation. FFDLP differs
substantially from the Federal Family
Education Loan Program (FFEL) in that
private lenders are no longer involved.
The Federal Department of Education
acts as both lender and guarantor for
FFDLP loans, so that only two agencies
are involved: the federal government
and the university. The university
originates loans, processes promissory
notes, and disburses students' loan
funds when they have been approved.
When it is time for repayment,
payments are made to the Department
of Education's Federal Loan Servicer.
The Loan Certification Department is
responsible for monitoring the Federal
Direct Loan automated application
process, the promissory note program,
the correction program, and various
cancellation programs to ensure that
they run correctly and efficiently. This
year, because of SFA staff
reorganization, Loans was given
editing responsibilities for all
promissory notes.This department is
also responsible for certifying private
loans from various lending institutions.
The staff consists of a Financial Aid
Coordinator III, an Assistant Director, a
Financial Aid Coordinator, a Financial
Aid Officer, and a Program Assistant.

Regulatory Changes
On October 7, 1998, President Clinton
signed the Higher Education
Amendments of 1998. Below are some
amendments that affected the Direct
Loan Programs, with other regulatory
changes initiated during 1998-99.
1. A Master Promissory Note (MPN) was
developed under which borrowers
would receive loans for multiple
academic years.
2. Along with the MPN came a mandate
that a notification or confirmation
process replace the requirement that
borrowers sign a new note for each


academic year. UF chose a passive
confirmation process for Subsidized
Stafford Loans (students are notified
of their loan information but not
required to return a formal acceptance
before disbursement of funds) and an
active confirmation for Unsubsidized
Stafford Loans (students must return
an acceptance form to the school
before disbursement). Preparations for
implementing the MPN for 99-00 were
extensive and required numerous staff
hours for development and training.
The new process affected most SFA
departments, including Loan
Certification, Disbursements,
Customer Service, Systems,
Publications, and the Mail Room.
3. Schools with cohort default rates of
less than 10 percent for each of the
three most recent fiscal years were
exempted from requirements for
multiple loan disbursements and the
30-day delayed delivery of
disbursements for first-time, first year
borrowers. Because UF has been
participating as an "experimental site"
since 1995, we were already exempt
from both requirements. The new
provisions served to remind schools
how important it is to create good
default reduction measures and to
ensure that all students are aware of
their responsibilities as borrowers.
4. The origination fee for 1999-2000
Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized
Loans except for Direct PLUS loans
was reduced from 4% to 3%. Direct
PLUS Loans remained at 4%. This
revision required extensive system
changes to prepare for 1999-2000.
6. Revised federal regulations also
increased the amount of additional
Unsubsidized Stafford Loan that some
health-related programs (dentistry,
medicine, pharmacy, and veterinary
medicine) students could borrower for
99-00. These loan limit revisions
required extensive system changes
and testing in summer 1998.

Programs
Loan Certifications administers FDLP
programs-including Federal Direct
Stafford Loans (FDSL), Federal Direct
Unsubsidized Stafford Loans (FDUSL),
and Federal Direct PLUS Loans
(FDPLUS)-and processes private loans


through various lenders.

* Federal Direct Stafford
Loans/Federal Direct
Unsubsidized Stafford Loans
FDSL loans are need-based, federally
insured loans that can be repaid after
graduation. Interest does not accrue on
the subsidized loan until the grace
period expires, which is 6 months after
the student leaves school or graduates.
The Higher Education Amendments of
1992 created FDUSL, a non-need-based
program. FDUSL was developed to meet
the educational costs for middle-income
students who do not qualify, in whole or
in part, for FDSL
"Unsubsidized" means the interest is not
deferred while the student is in school.
Because unsubsidized loans are not
need-based, students may borrow funds
over and above their eligibility for
subsidized Direct Stafford funds, either
up to their cost of education minus other
aid, or up to Federal Stafford Loan
program limits, whichever is less.

* FDSL & FDUSL Statistics
While FDSL/FDUSL funds paid to
students rose from $108,061,346 in 1997-
98 to $114,319,072 in 1998-99, a
substantial increase of $6,257,726, the
total number of recipients decreased by
800. One reason for the increases can be
attributed to the number of students
choosing to process an FDUSL in excess
of their need. The number of students
studying abroad increased again, and
certain colleges now require students to
have computers and specialized
software to complete their degrees.
These factors contribute to the increased
demand for loans. The high number of
loans and ever-increasing loan amounts
awarded continues to worry financial
aid administrators, since students reach
their aggregate loan maximums faster.


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99












35,000

30,000 "

25,000

20,000
1998-99 1997-98 1996-97
No. of Stafford Loan Recipients
Another reason for the increase in
student loans is that credit checks for the
FDPLUS Loan are stringent. When
parent borrowers are denied PLUS
funds, dependent students can become
eligible for an unsubsidized loan as well
as a subsidized loan.
For the period July 1, 1998, through June
30, 1999, the FDSL/FDUSL interest rate
was set at 6.86 percent. FDSL/FDUSL
loans are capped at 8.25 percent.

SFederal Direct Plus Loans
(FDPLUS)
The FDPLUS program was designed to
help parents meet the expected family
contribution toward students'
educational expenses, with loans not to
exceed the student's cost of attendance.
FDPLUS does not require students or
families to demonstrate need. For the
period July 1, 1998 through June 30,
1999, the variable interest rate for
FDPLUS was set at 8.26 percent and
capped at 9 percent.

FDPLUS borrowing by parents again
increased. From 1997-98 to 1998-99, total
FDPLUS dollars borrowed increased
from $4,148,187 to $5,352,597. The
number of recipients increased by 44,
and the dollar amount borrowed
increased by more than $1 million.

*Private Loans
A number of private lenders and
companies offer loans that allow a
student to borrow funds equal to their
cost of attendance minus any other
resources. These loans do not fall within
federal guidelines when determining
awards or distributing funds. In most
cases, however, the student and/or the
parent must be verified as creditworthy.

In 1998-99, 439 private loans were
processed for UF students for a total of
$2,724,768. The number of private loans
awarded at UF increased substantially
from last year. One reason is that some


students reach their yearly maximums
before the end of the academic term,
causing them to seek alternative loan
resources for the additional term.
Another reason is the increase in the
number of graduate programs UF offers.


FDPLUS Dollars Disbursed

1,150-
1,100o
1,050oo
1,000 1jfl
950-

1998-99 1997-98 1996-97
_No. of FDPLUS Recipients

new graduate programs do not fall
within federal guidelines for term length,
causing their students to become
ineligible for federal aid. Additionally,
certain private lenders have designed
loans specifically for purchasing a
computer. In most cases, private loans
cannot exceed the cost of attendance.
*Loan Default
UF's Federal Direct Loan Program's
1997 Cohort Default Rate was 5.3
percent, well below the national
average and the threshold of 20 percent
that mandates default reduction
measures. Nevertheless, both SFA and
University Financial Services continued
to stress the need to avoid unnecessary
borrowing and to make sure students
are aware of their rights and
responsibilities when contracting for a
student loan. Customer service staff and
SFA's Information/Publications section
emphasize this through personal
student contact, in loan application
materials, and on the SFA web site.
Information/Publications provides a
web brochure on debt responsibility:
Student Loans and Debt Management.

*Technological Services
In the 98-99 school year UF began
participating in the federal "Access
America for Students" pilot program.


The purpose of this initiative was to
provide postsecondary students with a
common electronic access to numerous
government services (Internal Revenue
Service, Labor Department, Social
Security Administration, US postal
Service, Department of Education,
Veteran's Administration, Office of
Management and Budget, Treasury, and
recreational agencies).
Throughout 1998-99, Loan Certifications
prepared and tested both internally and
with the Direct Loan Origination Center
to make sure the transition into Year
2000 (Y2K) would go smoothly.
UF web services to students continued
to improve. Students were provided
visual access to their award data via the
web as well as the ability to print
numerous forms online.
Loans worked with systems staff to
develop a correction screen to replace
the correction area on the loan screens.
The new screen enabled staff to view
more correction information and to send
more corrections to the LOC at a time.

*Planning for the Future
Continue to refine the automated
loan system to ensure it is accurate,
user-friendly, and will accommodate
the need for individual coding for new
specialty programs developed yearly.
Prepare for National Student Loan
Data Systems (NSLDS) changes
currently being discussed federally
that will affect our current policies.
Continue to interact with the Federal
Direct Loan Origination Center and
the Department of Education,
recommending improvements to
ensure that all changes are workable
for mainframe schools as well as for
the PC-based EOE Express.
Enhance the correction file and
screen to make it more user-friendly.
Continue system modifications to
accommodate the Master Promissory
Note process.
Develop an electronic confirmation
process students can access via the
web.
Develop more ways students can
interact with Loan Certifications
electronically.


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99













"Student Financial Affairs' professional and
support staff strive to ease each student
through the complex financial aid process.
Quality service is our commitment."

Peggy Myers
Assistant Director








Acdem Prmogff

o comply with federal regulations,
the University of Florida (UF) must
ensure that all federal aid recipients
continue to maintain satisfactory
academic progress. Students who fail
to meet these standards are suspended
or terminated from financial aid
eligibility. Students are notified of the
academic progress policy via several
sources of consumer information: the
University of Florida Undergraduate
Catalog, Student Financial Affairs'
Gator Aid Handbook, and in an
enclosure they receive with their
original financial aid award letter.

Monitoring Progress
Academic progress guidelines require
that students make progress toward
their degree by maintaining a
satisfactory qualitative standard
(grade point average-GPA) and a
quantitative standard (such as credit
hours earned or terms of aid received).
Monitoring academic progress is a
department-wide responsibility. Three
times a year (at the end of each
semester) a financial aid academic
progress program is run which
generates letters to students who are
failing to meet required standards. The
financial aid academic progress officer
coordinates notification of these
students and counsels them about
academic progress and the academic
progress petitions procedure.
Customer service advisers also counsel
students on the academic progress
policy and direct students toward the
petitioning progress when
appropriate.

Petitions Procedure
A petitions procedure is in place for
students who believe their failure to
maintain satisfactory progress is due
to extenuating circumstances. The
academic progress officer is in charge
of processing all academic progress
petitions filed by students. number of
petitions is proportional to the
increase in aid recipients.
The major academic progress
quantitative standard causing students
to petition for extension of aid during
this time was receipt of maximum aid.


Statistics
More than 2,847 petitions were
reviewed during the 1998-99 academic
year, an increase of 699 from the 1997-
98 school year. The increase in the
number of petitions is proportional to
the increase in aid recipients and the
new state requirement that State of
Florida program recipients adhere to
the school's academic policy.
The major academic progress
quantitative standard causing students
to petition for extension of aid during
this time was receipt of maximum
terms of aid.
The greatest number of students who
petitioned this year because of
deficiencies in their qualitative
standard (GPA) were transfer students,
largely because the UF grade point
average is used to measure progress.
More petitions are received during
spring semesters than in fall or
summer semesters. This can be
attributed to transfer students with
more than 60 credit hours not
achieving a 2.0 GPA during their first
semesters at UF. The federal
government requires that students
maintain a minimum cumulative 2.0
GPA by the end of their second year. A
high percentage of these students who
petition are conditionally reinstated
and successfully raise their GPA after
the next period of attendance.


Qviy Asswwce


Tn July 1989, the University of Florida's
(UF) Office for Student Financial
Affairs (SFA) was selected to participate
in the Department of Education's
Institutional Quality Control Pilot
Project, which began in 1985. This
project, now called the Federal Quality
Assurance Program, is a management
experiment to test the feasibility of
giving institutions more discretion in
designing policies and procedures that
will result in quality administration of
Title IV student financial aid. This was
one of the first initiatives on the part of
the federal government to involve
institutions in developing internal
controls, rather than mandating them
from the federal level.
As a participating institution, UF is
exempt from certain verification
requirements as long as it remains
actively involved in conducting
quality assurance activities. The
university develops and implements
its own verification program,
customizing it to reflect its own
unique institutional setting and
student population.
At SFA the Quality Assurance (QA)
Section was established to administer
this program. A major goal of QA is to
identify potential student application
errors and establish ways to prevent
them from happening in the future. A
tandem goal is to identify potential
weaknesses or error-prone processes
within the office and to target those
for improvement. QA continually
evaluates and reviews all aspects of
financial aid processing with the goals
of streamlining the process and
reducing errors.
In 1994-95, the QA and Verification
Sections consolidated staff resources,
and the verification staff performed QA
document collection and data analysis.
The additional human resources
expedited QA document collection, as
well as exposing the verification staff to
the QA methodology and philosophy.
The arrangement resulted in a much
faster completion rate of QA files. This
structure continued to operate
efficiently in 1998-99.


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99












Quality Assurance Procedure
A special Quality Assurance random
sample group is selected in the fall of
each year. Students in this group are
required to provide special
documentation to verify the
information they have reported on
their Free Applications for Federal
Student Aid. Receipt of aid is
contingent upon submission of
requested information.

Corrective Action Procedure
QA uses the data returned by students
in the sample to determine areas for
corrective action. Areas chosen for
corrective action are those with the
largest variance, measured in dollars,
between what students in the QA
sample originally received and what
they should have received, based on
current federal and university policies
and procedures.
The 1998-99 sample consisted of 266
students, of which 258 completed all of
the requirements of the QA study,
providing a 97% completion rate.

Statistics
Based on review of the dollar
variances measured annually from
1990-91 through 1998-99, the total
dollar variance amount (for all errors)
has dropped significantly. While
pleased with the continued decline of
variances in the areas targeted, SFA
believes in continuous quality
improvement. The QA staff will
continue to evaluate all aspects of
office organization and procedures,
looking for ways to reduce errors and
potential audit liabilities, simplify
processes, and improve customer
service.


Verification is a review process
established to confirm the
accuracy of information reported on
financial aid documents. Because the
University of Florida participates in
the Federal Quality Assurance
Program, it designs its own
verification criteria to best target error-
prone items among its unique
applicant population. This is done in
lieu of verifying students selected by
the federal processor.

During 1998-99, as in the previous
year, items selected for verification
were:

* Parents' and students' adjusted
gross income

Amount of federal income tax paid

Nontaxable income reflected on tax
returns and W-2 forms

Household size and number of
persons in college
Our efforts to streamline the process of
selecting files for verification continued
through design of very specific criteria,
each component of which must be met
in order for selection to occur. These
criteria are constructed based on
results from the prior year's in-depth
quality assurance study. Applications/
data elements that appear to be most
error-prone in the quality assurance
study are selected for special review in
the following year.


In 1994-95, the Verification Department
and the QA Section consolidated staff
resources, and since then the
verification staff has continued to
perform QA document collection and
data analysis. The consolidation of staff
expedited QA document collection, and
at the same time, exposed the
verification staff to the QA
methodology and philosophy.

Statistics
For 1998-99, 5,863 student files were
selected for verification. Of that total,
4,838 students completed the process,
yielding a completion rate of 82.5%,
which is slightly higher than that for
1997-98.


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99


Verif atO













"Money Matters, SFA's summer freshman-
orientation program was presented many
times during summer 1998. The program
included a multi-media presentation and
humorous game show format. Designed to
brief students about financial aid programs
before they enter the university, Money
Matters was seen by more than 15,000
parents, students, and guests. SFA's
outreach and publications sections provide
a great variety of formats for students to
access financial aid information and
services."

Bob Lynn
Student A\rt.: Coordinator














The Outreach and Training Section
is responsible for coordinating and
delivering all outreach activities to
parents, students, and high school and
community groups, as well as
coordinating an ongoing training
program for Student Financial Affairs
(SFA) staff and student assistants.

Outreach
In January and February of 1999, SFA
sponsored its annual financial aid
workshops to distribute applications,
explain the financial aid process, and
answer questions. These workshops
targeted all students interested in
processing applications for financial aid:
five were held at local area high schools,
two at University of Florida (UF)
residence halls, and three at the J.
Wayne Reitz Union. Presentations were
also made for professional students in
the colleges of Medicine, Dentistry,
Veterinary Medicine, and Law by the
respective staff members of those areas.
Workshop dates were included in
application packets, an article was
published in the Independent Florida
Allig itOr posters were displayed in the
Student Financial Affairs lobby, and
advertising ran on the campus housing
channel.
Additional outreach presentations
were made to special-interest groups
and high schools bringing the financial
aid message to large numbers of
students, parents, and college
administrators. Presentations were
made to high school guidance
counselors, UF admissions officers,
and UF academic advisers (CLAS).
The following outreach sessions were
also requested and presented: Upward
Bound, Minority Graduate Student
Recruitment, Phi Theta Kappa
Recruitment Day, and a session at
Gainesville High School on student
loans, debt, and consumer issues.
SFA also continued its participation in
Preview, the summer freshman-
orientation program. Our presentation,
entitled "Money Matters," was
presented 19 times during Summer


1999. Because of a change in the
Preview agenda, Money Matters was
changed from a slide show to a Q & A
session. The presentation, designed to
brief students about financial aid
programs before they enter the
University of Florida, was seen by more
than 15,000 parents, students, and
guests. Each student received a copy of
the Gator Aid Handbook.
During this summer's Preview sessions,
the "red zone"-online, on-site manual
updating-was successfully tested as a
means to update student files. SFA
outreach staff collected and input data
about outside scholarships from
Additional Aid Forms from Day One
Preview participants. As a result, this
information was already showing
online during Day Two visits by
families to SFA. Information gathered
from the Additional Aid Forms provided
notice to SFA of more than one million
dollars in outside scholarships to
incoming freshmen. These scholarships
are included as part of students' aid
when awarding the complete package.
Outreach and Training also participated
in all regular student orientations
throughout the year to accommodate
lower- or upper-division transfer
students. As at PREVIEW, each student
;ft, ",.; ". received a copy of the Gator Aid
Handbook.
The Outreach Coordinator represented
UF at various conferences and
meetings for the Florida Association of
Student Financial Aid Administrators
this year. Presentations included: High
Tech, High Touch; Developing
Attention-Getting Financial Aid
Workshops; and Financial Aid Wheel
of Fortune for New Aid Officers.

Training
Because of the large number of
financial aid programs administered
by SFA, the complexity of the financial
aid process, and the need for
compliance with federal and state
regulations, on-going staff training is
critical to maintaining a successful
operation.


* Macintosh computer training

All professional staff members have
access to the SFA Macintosh network.
Specific individual training sessions
are held periodically to ensure
employees' familiarity with the
functions and capabilities of the
Macintosh network. In addition, staff
members may access a videotape
training library to seek direction on a
particular application problems.
Members of the systems staff provide
essential training.

* E-mail training sessions

A three-part, required series on e-mail,
including technical, legal, and
practical usage of the SFA email
system was made available to all staff.

* Weekly counselor training
sessions

The training staff coordinate 30-
minute training sessions on timely
subject matter that are held
immediately after the weekly
counseling staff meeting. These
sessions are presented by an SFA staff
member or representative from
another UF department or agency and
generally deal with technical training,
updates on specific areas of program
responsibility, and/or information that
will help our staff function efficiently
with other UF offices and
departments.


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99


O0 raxh fd

Tm7"










SeRvtes~Z~


SFA's Information/Publications
Services Section is responsible for
the office's consumer information
program, including comprehensive
financial aid publications, maintaining a
home page on the world wide web, a
news release program, and audio-visual
presentations. The Coordinator of
Publications & Information Services
who administers this section, composed
of a full-time Computer Support
Specialist and a paraprofessional staff
of three to six Federal Work-Study
students, coordinates with SFA's
director, associate directors, and
assistant directors to assure compliance
with federal consumer information
dissemination regulations.
Information/Publications is also
responsible for inhouse training
materials and reports.

Major elements of the information
program are: producing annual cost-
effective financial aid publications,
including the Gator Aid Handbook, the
annual Gator Aid Application Guide,
newsletters, brochures, slide
presentations, in-house training
materials, and the SFA Annual Report;
producing student application and
award materials that facilitate efficient
processing and meet federal
information dissemination regulations
while communicating the application
process and program requirements in
terms understandable by students; and
interfacing with the director and
associate directors to produce timely
news releases.

Information/Publications also
provides annual updates to SFA
information contained in university
catalogs and publications, maintaining
the NEXUS Tapes information series,
and contributing semesterly articles to
the tri-annual newsletter, the Student
A t., : Update.

This year we have continued produce
our brochures series, revising,
updating, and reprinting as necessary.

Info/Publications continued to issue
news releases on important financial
aid activities and information. Widely


publicized this year was: SFA's
participation in UF's Integrated
Student Information System (ISIS) by
making students' financial aid file
information available through this
online web application; the state's
Florida Bright Futures Scholarship
Program; the availability of online
access for students to complete first-
time borrowers entrance orientations;
and the increased emphasis on
availability of electronic financial aid
application programs on the web.

In 1998-99 Info/Publications
continued to enhance and expand
SFA's web site. The Computer Support
Specialist in charge of the site moved
from Peabody Hall into Criser Hall
this year, and continued to streamline
and improve the quality of the site's
organization and content. The site
provides comprehensive application
and program information, information
on receiving aid, and services. Late-
breaking news is maintained under a
News & Updates feature. Our forms
area that provides printable forms in
PDF format continued to expand,
Scholarship Central was created, and
the Who's My Counselor selection
expanded to provide information on
concurrent enrollment/transient
programs and the VA Work-Study
adviser. Online SFA publications such
as the SFA Newsletter, Student
Employer's Handbook, and all SFA
brochures are also available. As
everywhere around campus, the
numbers of hits to our website grew at
phenomenal rates, indicating that our
student population grows more
computer savvy by leaps and bounds,
making our knowledgable use of this
particular media ever more critical.

Info/Publications also provides
ongoing support to other SFA
departments, including designing and
producing newsletters, reports/report
covers, slide shows, posters, flyers, etc.
The annual Student Employment C'Oti ,
Employers' Handbook and the Student
Employment Coordinator (a university-
wide newsletter to campus employers)
were produced to support Student


Employment Office activities. Using
PowerPoint, a slide presentation
program, Info/Publications students
revised a program of slides to support
Training & Development's annual
Summer PREVIEW production.

Publications
n SFA World Wide Web site

n 1998-99 Gator Aid Handbook

n 1998-99 Gator Aid Application Guide

n SFA News-a spring and fall edition
newsletter to students

n SFA TIPS/World Wide Web wallet
cards

n Brochures: First-Time Applicant's
Guide to Gator Aid, Florida Bright
Futures Scholarship Program, Looking
for Scholarships & Financial Aid, a
Student Opinion Survey, and
Welcome to the C'lft-; for Student
Financial At.-,, : 1st-Time Borrowers
Entrance Orientations, Florida Prepaid
College Program, SFA TIPS, We're on
the WEB, Direct Deposit, Student
Employment, Financial Aid for
Students with Disabilities,
International Student Aid, and
Studying Abroad & Financial Aid.

n Student Employer's Handbook

n Student Employment Coordinator

n 1997-98 Student Financial A -rt,,
Annual Report

n 1998-99 Student Employee Handbook


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99












"The Systems and Programming area continues to
provide students access to financial aid information
in traditional ways, as well as through technology.
This year we made financial aid file information
available to students via the university's ISIS
system and worked with the University Bookstore
to initiate a book deferment program, a valuable
benefit to many students. We greatly expanded our
student services through the internet and our
World Wide Web site and continued to offer
financial aid information to students via SFA TIPS
(Touchtone Interactive Phone System), our
telephone voice response unit."
Tony Gordon
Systems Coordinator









S~m&


Systems and Programming (S & P)
develops and maintains the
computer software systems needed for
automated delivery of student
financial aid at the University of
Florida (UF). The Student Financial
Affairs (SFA) computer system is a
fully functioning, automated system
comprising numerous files/modules,
involving both batch and online
processing. Among the staff's many
responsibilities are designing and
maintaining the online terminal
display system and coordinating
electronic data exchange with federal,
state, and local agencies to gather all
information required to process
students' financial aid.
S & P's staff consists of eight, full-time
systems analysts and programmers. S
& P staff are responsible for
maintaining the records of more than
30,000 financial aid applicants.

Responsibilities and
Activities
The primary activities of S & P are as
follows:

Batch processing and
maintenance:
S & P is responsible for the scheduled
batch production of 1,500 programs
and for maintenance of those modules
as needed.

Online processing and
maintenance:
S & P is responsible for scheduled
online processing of 28 plus screens
and integration and maintenance of
those modules as needed. The section
is also responsible for the online, real-
time, updatable interface with
University Financial Services (UFS) for
student award and disbursement data
and read-only access to all registrar
files, student loan collections, accounts
receivable, payroll files, etc.


Nightly interfaces:
S & P is responsible for nightly
production interfaces with UF's
Registrar's Office, UFS, and student
payroll files to: pick up changes in
enrollment status, in academic and
financial flags, and in payroll earnings;
receive payment status information;
and exchange student fee deferment
and award information. Nightly
production also involves interfaces
within SFA files to trigger or halt the
next step of financial aid processing.

Electronic telecommunication:
* Federal Department of Education.
Systems & Programming is
responsible for scheduling and
monitoring the daily, two-way,
electronic transmission of student
records to and from the federal
processor (currently Electronic Data
Systems). The records are then
loaded into the SFA database for
continued processing as needed.
* Macintosh Network. Systems &
Programming is responsible for
daily and ongoing maintenance of
the network, determining hardware
and software purchase
requirements, and training users in
hardware and software use.

Programming updates and
development:
Since students must apply for financial
aid annually, a minimum of two years
of data must be maintained and
processed simultaneously.
Additionally, because of changes in
federal, state, and institutional laws
and policies, virtually all programs
must be modified at least once
annually to reflect these required
changes. Many of the more volatile
programs, such as the Federal Direct
Stafford Loan Program and the
verification modules, must be
modified more frequently. Program
modification and development of new
programs and modules are completed
as needed.


Federal and state reporting:
S & P is responsible for the scheduled
production and maintenance of federal
reports as needed. Annual and
quarterly reports such as the federal
Fiscal Operations/Application for Funds
report, the Pell Grant Quarterly
Institutional Payment Summary Reports,
and the Board of Regents data file
reports are part of scheduled
production. Other reports are
generated by request.
Statistical reporting:
Systems & Programming is
responsible for production and
maintenance of statistical reports on
an "as-needed" basis. Annual and
quarterly reports are part of scheduled
production. Other statistical reports
are generated by request.


D O Effry
The Data Entry staff has been reduced
to two, full-time employees due to the
introduction of our new bar-coding
system that has reduced the amount of
required data entry. The Data Entry
area has also been relocated to a more
central area. The primary activities of
the Data Entry Section are data entry
of all documents received from
students or generated inhouse during
the process of applying for financial
aid. There are two general categories
of documents-"batch" and "online."
"Batch" documents are keyed and
stored throughout the day and the
data applied to the SFA production
files during the evening computer
production run. "Online" documents
are keyed throughout the day, and the
data is applied to the SFA production
files as the data is keyed.

Relationships with Outside
Departments/Agencies
SFA's S & P Section is involved in
many ongoing and necessary
relationships both within and outside
the university. Among the
departments and agencies that this
unit serves and from which it receives
services are:


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99











University Information Services (UIS): SFA's online
award file is updatable and directly linked to the UFS net
check system (administered by UIS); payments are read
into SFA's files daily. Nightly interfaces with UFS's files
are an integral part of financial aid processing, so
production schedules must be carefully coordinated
between these two units. UIS and SFA also share use of
hardware as needed (primarily high speed printers).
Registrar: SFA's online computer screens are a subsystem
of the Office of the University Registrar's GATA system.
As such, S & P staff maintain ongoing communication
with the registrar's staff to keep abreast of all changes to
the GATA operating systems, feedback problems and
suggestions, and ensure system security. Further,
interfaces with the registrar's files nightly are an integral
part of financial aid processing, so production schedules
must be carefully coordinated between these two units.
Northeast Regional Data Center (NERDC): S & P works
closely with NERDC staff for maintenance and updates
to SFA's online line modules, to programming language
changes and updates, and to systems security.
Additionally, NERDC houses the storage of all SFA data
files.
Federal Department of Education: S & P staff work
closely with federal Department of Education contractors
to ensure proper transmission and receipt of electronic
student aid records. This includes scheduling and
monitoring transmissions, annual testing, and installation
of program updates.
Florida Information Resource Network (FIRN): Receipt
and transmission of electronic, online loan application
processing between UF and the state contractor takes
place over the FIRN network. Periodic communication
with FIRN staff is required to keep abreast of changes
and to resolve transmission problems.
Knott Data Center: State processing for automated
financial aid grant and scholarship systems is handled
through the Knott Data Center in Tallahassee. Periodic
communication is required to schedule and monitor
electronic record transmissions and resolve transmission
and programming problems.
Board of Regents (BOR): S & P staff work closely with
BOR systems staff to provide statistical reports as needed
and to transmit the annual financial aid database file.
Vice Presidents: S & P staff interact with the vice
presidents' offices, particularly the Office of the Vice
President of Student Affairs, to provide statistical
information or data processing support as needed.
Additionally, S & P staff are informally called upon to
assist the Vice President of Student Affairs' and Student
Services' offices with Macintosh network installation,
training, problems, and special projects.
Faculty and Staff: S &P staff interact with UF faculty and
staff to provide statistical information as necessary, assist


in resolving problems, provide or limit access to and
interpret SFA records, and act as an informal resource for
Macintosh PC questions or problems.

Continuing Goals
* Continue to work toward a "paperless" office by: (1)
increasing electronic data transmission of student
information and electronic completion and
transmission of federal, state, and institutional
reports, (2) investigating the feasibility of an
electronic student application process, and (3) adding
new ways of capturing data.
* Increase and improve students' access to their
financial aid records via such techniques as the World
Wide Web, access via modem, and an IBM Voice
Response Unit.
* Develop online training modules on the Macintosh
PC network for in-service and pre-service training for
staff and student assistants.
* Adapt and enhance existing systems to remain in
compliance with federal and state regulations as
program statutes change.

Systems Activities for 1998-99
S & P experienced another challenging year, continuing
with ongoing projects and system maintenance while
absorbing many new projects and changes. Areas of
change, primarily in personnel, hardware, and the
financial aid delivery system fall into five categories:
personnel, ongoing projects, system maintenance, new
acquisitions, and new projects.
Personnel: S & P has continued to experience an extreme
personnel shortage throughout this year, because of a
large increase in the workload.

Ongoing projects: S & P continues to have a long list of
ongoing projects geared toward creating a more unified
and efficient work environment. This year S & P has
continued to refine Student Affairs' and SFA's presence
on the World Wide Web. S & P also continues to be
responsible for programming and maintenance of
statistics on the Rolm phone switch located in the Criser
Student Services Center.
System maintenance: Financial aid software is in a
continual state of flux due to changes in federal
regulations and the need to stay in compliance with
federal, state, and university regulations and guidelines.
This requires continual modification to aid award and
disbursement programs.
New acquisitions: S & P continues to upgrade our
desktop computers to the Power PC standard as funds
permit. This year we have continued to replace older
equipment.


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99











New projects: The year has been filled
with new challenges and
responsibilities.
* This year we completed the year
2000 software conversion and
testing.
* Year 2000 Tracking and Award
systems were brought online.
* In June, Systems wrote the 99-2000
University Bookstore deferment
system for the new academic year.
* We enhanced our web presence
within Eagle and ISIS, adding
student access to financial aid
information. The new access allows
students to keep track of their aid
file by providing information such
as their aid awards, the status of
their aid file, documents they still
need, their deferment status, and
their disbursement status.
* Systems staff spent many hours
writing extensive programming to
facilitate UF's participation in the
federal Access America Pilot
program.


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99








Disbwvemr & Fmd


The Disbursements Department
monitors and controls the automated
disbursement systems and works with
University Financial Services (UFS) to
ensure that the batch disbursement
programs run correctly and efficiently.
The staff consists of a Financial Aid
Coordinator III, who develops the
program specifications for the numerous
automated systems; a Financial Aid
Coordinator II, responsible for
implementing regulatory requirements
mandated by the federal and state
governments and supervising an OPS
worker helping in daily quality control
review of reports; and a Program
Assistant who supervises a student
worker assisting in manually processing
paper checks. The staff monitor checks
from private lenders, state issuing
agencies, and donors, and code and file
all checks.
Disbursements is in charge of final
review of student eligibility for loans,
scholarships, and campus-based aid
before disbursement of these funds.
Disbursements receives both paper
checks from various scholarship donors
and private lenders and electronic draw-
downs for federal funds. These monies
are for direct disbursement to students,
or for deposit with UFS for
disbursement to students. The staff also
returns to donors funds for which
students are ineligible.
Disbursements also handles monthly
and per academic year fund
reconciliation between the university
and the federal government for all
Federal Direct Loan funds. This process
involves transmitting and reconciling all
disbursement data, as well as award-file
adjustment, and transmission and
reconciliation of data for all loan funds
returned by students-either voluntarily
or due to obligatory repayment.

In Review
Much of 98-99 was consumed in
preparation for the upcoming 99-00
academic year due to various federal
regulations requiring implementation of
new or revised procedures. Some of
these are mentioned below.


* Master Promissory Note (MPN) for
Stafford loans: 1998-99 saw intense
preparation to implement the new
federal MPN requirement for
academic year 1999-00. Preparations
included trips to Washington, D.C.,
for critical meetings; extensive
reprogramming of our Direct Loan
computer system and writing much
new code to handle the complexities
incurred by switching to the MPN;
modifying computer screens and files
to accommodate new data; and
months of testing and refining.
* Unsubsidized Stafford loan
acceptance by students: In concert
with the new MPN, we prepared for a
significant procedural change in the
upcoming year. The Unsubsidized Loan
Acceptance Form, developed so
students could "accept"unsubsidized
loan(s) awarded to them, was mailed
with MPN's in summer 1999. Students
were required to sign and return the
form before Unsubsidized Stafford
funds could be released to them.
There was concern students would
overlook or disregard the new
requirement, delaying payment of
their unsubsidized loans.
* The federal "Access America for
Students," a pilot program in 1998-
99: Access America, via interfacing
databases, gives U.S. citizens online
benefits, such as: access to their
personal data across multiple
categories (including state financial
aid), application for passports,
registration for the Selective Service,
contact with members of the U.S.
congress, etc. As a pilot participant,
UF participated in key meetings held
in Washington, D.C., and provided the
government institutional feedback in
the financial aid sphere after
scrutinizing flowcharts, specifications,
technical manuals, etc.
* Federal Direct Loan Origination
Center (LOC): our third year working
with the LOC in Montgomery proved
smoother than ever for loan
originations, disbursements,
reconciliation, and problem resolution.
The LOC was not brought up to speed
on anticipated MPN changes and


processing until late, so was unable to
support UF's needs in that area during
our critical preparation time.
* Reconciliation of Direct Loan data
with the federal government: In fall
1999 UF instituted a new reconciliation
process designed by the Federal Direct
Loan Task Force for Direct Loan
schools. Responsibility for
matching/reconciling data now lies
with the institution rather than, as
previously, with the federal agency. UF
provided recommendations and
feedback to the Direct Loan
administration. Some were
implemented in the current academic
year, and we anticipate more
modifications next year.
* National Student Loan Data System
(NSLDS): We participated in our
second year using this national system
to assess students' loan totals and
other Title IV aid totals. We continue
to refine our in-house system for using
NSLDS, so we can provide the most
reliable determination of students'
current eligibility for aid. Changes are
forthcoming from the federal level as a
result of much feedback and concern
from the financial aid community.
* Y2K: Preparations and testing
continued to allow the best defense
against possible problems
transitioning into the new millennium.
Testing this year occurred not only in-
house, but in conjunction with other
UF offices, and with federal entities.
* Extra $ for health-related degrees: Per
federal regulation, additional
unsubsidized Stafford funds were
made available in AY 99-00 to some
health-related degree programs
including medicine, pharmacy,
veterinary medicine, and dentistry.
The change required new coding and
testing in all areas of loan processing,
transmission, and disbursements, in
preparation for fall term 1999.
* Creation of new Batch Bypass holds:
SFA created a hold field to allow the
systems department or individual staff
to hold a student's entire financial aid
award from disbursement. The holds
proved invaluable for system


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99














efficiency at the beginning of each
term, when waivers, FL Prepaid,
ROTC and athletic scholarships, and
other types of aid are frequently
added to student files, changing their
eligibility for other awards, and
affecting how their fees are paid. The
new holds allow us to key all relevant
data and necessary changes before
funds are disbursed.
* Loan origination fee reduced: The
federal government announced late in
the year that the origination fee for
Stafford loans (excluding PLUS) must
be changed from 4% to 3% for all 99-
00 loans. This ruling required a quick
response by Systems, Loans, and
Disbursements to accommodate the
revised percentage in our system.
Students nationwide have benefited
from this fee reduction, so it was
welcome from that perspective.
* More on-line data for students: In
1998-99, students were given visual
access to their financial aid award file
through ISIS on the web, allowing
them to see which awards have been
paid, and when.
* Out of crisis...come better controls:
Due to a disbursement problem
experienced by University Financial
Services (UFS), SFA, UFS, and
Systems staff held meetings to discuss
better controls on all sides for our
automated check runs that occur three
times each week. The controls and
reports established were effected in
1999, providing an extra layer of
checks and balances as we continue to
disburse large volumes of student aid.

Statistics
In 1998-99, Disbursements staff
monitored and authorized disbursement
of $30,001,372 in grant funds,
$65,417,337 in scholarships, and an
unprecedented $128,382,981 in student
loan funds. The total amount authorized
through this section was $241,817,366.

New Year Objectives
* Continue our goal to close out the
previous year's Direct Loan
reconciliation significantly before the
federal deadline. Academic year 1997-


98 saw us close with an ending
balance of only $5, and 1998-99 was
even better with a closing balance of
$0 (out of $119 million disbursed
Direct Loan dollars).
* Continue monitoring use of NSLDS,
particularly in the areas of NSLDS
post-screening updates, MYTR (mid-
year transfer), and SUTR (summer
transfer) complexities.
* Continue system modifications to
accommodate Master Promissory
Note processing as MPN's transition
into a multi-year, multi-school
document for academic year 00-01.
* Prepare for loan confirmation via the
web by students for both subsidized
and unsubsidized Stafford loans, by
term, to be implemented for academic
year 00-01. Students will also be able
to reduce their loan amounts if they
choose, through the same website.
* Extensive changes were made during
the current year providing expanded
online staff capability for certain data
input, to replace paper documents
routed to Data Processing. This has
been very beneficial, but we must
continue to monitor errors associated
with these privileges to provide even
better safety edits in the system.
* Continue to brainstorm upgrades to
scholarship processing methods,
including newer technology such as
scanners in place of photocopying.
* New PWD's and more: continue to
research and insure compliance for
new Reauthorization regulations
signed into law October 7, 1998,
including upcoming post-withdrawal
disbursements (PWDs). This new
feature constitutes an office-wide
policy change and will include
tracking students' dates of
withdrawal, calculations of PWD
eligibility, tracking notifications to
students and their response time, etc.
* Prepare for conversion from the
current data transmission network,
TIVWAN, to sole use of the Internet.
Although the conversion had been
targeted by ED for March 1999, the
changeover has not yet occurred.


D ocwrer Ed"

The Document Editing Section is
where the application processing
cycle begins. The staff, comprised of a
financial aid coordinator and a clerical
supervisor, are also responsible for the
mail room.
The staff of this section receive, sort,
date-stamp and distribute all incoming
mail and date and edit incoming
application forms for problems. They
then forward all forms and documents
to the data entry section to be keyed
into the system. Document Editing also
coordinates incoming and outgoing
financial aid transcript activities,
requesting financial aid transcripts
from other institutions for all schools
listed on students' aid applications and
honoring similar requests from other
institutions. Most major mailouts are
also handled by this area, including
mailing of financial aid award letters,
student loan promissory notes, and
bulk financial aid application packet
mailings to Florida high schools and
community colleges at the beginning of
every application year.
This year a major physical
reconstruction and reconfiguration of
the application processing area
provided expanded workspace for the
staff. The mail room was extended,
incorporating one of the small rooms
off the customer service lobby,
providing more mail consolidation
assembly area. More room was also
allocated for document editing.
Application Statistics
SFA receives Federal Student Aid Reports
(FSARs) electronically from the federal
processor. In 1998-99, SFA received a
total of 37,708 FSARs online.
This year, the introduction of bar-
coding of Master Promissory Notes,
NSLDS, verification, and other
processing documents greatly enhanced
and expedited the application tracking
process.


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99









Rerds & Oprtd


ScmrN


Manual Awarding, comprised of
two Financial Aid Coordinators,
processes all award revisions. Requests
for revisions to students' awards
generally come from customer service
staff when students' enrollment,
residency, or housing statuses change;
when they receive additional outside
funds; and/or when they request
revisions to their financial aid awards
for which they are eligible. Awarding
also processes Additional Aid Forms,
which are distributed to students with
their initial award letters and which
students use to report additional
outside resources.
Awarding staff are also responsible for
adjusting students' awards in situations
where their need has been "overmet."
The receipt of outside resources
(scholarships, fellowships, etc.) by
students after their need has been met
produces a large volume of the work for
this area. Before the first disbursement
of aid in the fall, a program known as
"rolling revisions" automates any file
adjustments necessary because of
overmet student need. After the first fall
semester disbursement of aid, files are
manually reviewed and adjusted.
Awarding also monitors and documents
students' repayments of aid funds
when required. When students whose
need is overmet have repaid required
amounts, the staff update the SFA
award file to reflect corrected amounts.
Mid-year status changes (under-
graduate to graduate, out-of-state
student to Florida resident, etc.) also
require a manual review and
documentation of the file. In addition,
awarding completes the approved
Budget Revision Petitions that revise a
student's cost of attendance figures,
sometimes changing the student's
award maximum.
The Awarding Section also coordinates
"withdrawal" information between
University Financial Services, the Office
of the University Registrar, and SFA's
Customer Service Department in
situations when a student withdraws
from school during a semester when
that student is receiving aid.
In 1998-99, staffing, workload,
resources, and responsibilities increased
marginally in this department.


S FA's Records/Optical Scanning
Section maintains an accurate, up-
to-date system of records consisting of
more than 128,000 active and inactive
files. This section, including an office
manager, a clerical supervisor, a senior
clerk, and a staff of work-study
students, optically scans all records
using the MARS (Multi-User Archival
Retrieval System) system, purges the
file system once a year, and merges
current files with those of previous
years' applications.

MARS (Multi-user Archival
Retrieval System) System
In August 1992, SFA purchased an
optical imaging record processing
system from Micro Dynamics called
MARS. Before this time, all required
financial aid documents were retained
on microfiche. Filming statistics for the
1991-92 year recorded a total of
542,476 images filmed. The half-
million image mark for scanning was
passed in August 1995. To date more
than one million documents have been
scanned.
After completing conversion of all
student financial aid records to the
MARS system, Records converted all
paper files of private scholarship
donor records to the system.
Conversion included all donor records
from the 1992-93 academic year to the
current year. This project was
completed in February 1999.

Statistics
Documents generally are scanned
within two to four working days after
their receipt. The general downward
trend in numbers of documents
scanned continued. Factors
contributing to this may include
students making fewer errors on their
applications due to better instructions
and the increasing computerization of
the entire application process.

Following are statistics on documents
received and scanned by Records
between July 1998 and July 1999:
Verification Checklists, 33,947; student
employment (SP-100) forms, 17,599;
electronic data changes from the
FAFSA, 7,234; and Financial Aid


Transcripts, 2,502. The majority of
documents were received between
June and September. In the single
week of June 12, 1999, 16,076
documents were received. The total
number of documents received and
scanned during the year was 147,276.

The substantial decrease in FATs that
needed scanning was due to UF's
participation in the National Student
Loan Data System (NSLDS). For more
information on NSLDS, see the Loan
Certification Section.


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99


AWd7*g













"Membership in various professional
organizations affords our staff numerous
opportunities to increase their base of
knowledge about financial aid issues."

Anne Newman
COrti-, Manager








SFA Staff


Administration


Karen Fooks
Rick Wilder
Elaine Stuckman
Tony Gordon
Gordon Andrews
Donna Fowler
Bob Lynn

Peggy Myers

Rodlee Ritter
Rita Rygler
Terri Wilder
Betty Holt
Anne Newman
Loriann Hunter
Jane-Ann Norton


Special Programs
Dexter Smith Financial Aid Coordinator, Athletes
Ray Dixon VA Work-Study/Tutorial Assistance Adviser
Bill Watson Financial Aid Coordinator, MBA


Satellite Offices
Ron Anderson

Eileen Parris


Financial Aid Programs
Scholarships and State Programs
Brenda Langley Financial Aid Coordinator
Ruben Lopez Program Assistant

Student Loans
Marina Cloud Financial Aid Coordinator
Luis Betancourt Financial Aid COt-t. ,
Shelia Pons Program Assistant

Student Employment
Ruth Strawder Financial Aid Coordinator
Pat Bush Senior Clerk
Birdella Williams Senior Clerk


Student Financial A4., : Coordinator, Health Professions,
Nursing, Pharmacy, & Veterinary Medicine
Student Financial 4A -t. Coordinator, Medical Center


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99


Director
Associate Director
Associate Director
Computer Applications Coordinator
Assistant Director, Scholarships and State Programs
Student A4 t. : Coordinator, Loan Certifications and Disbursements
Student A4. i,, : Coordinator, Academic Progress, Document Editing,
Records/Optical Scanning, Publications/Information Services
Student A4ti., : Coordinator, Pell Grant, Manual Awarding, '.'iltr Control,
Verification
Student A) t Coordinator, Customer Service
Assistant Director, Loans
Senior Accountant
Senior Fiscal Assistant
COt-;., Manager
Word Processing Supervisor
Word Processing Operator
Customer Service
Wanda Burke Senior Clerk
Debbie Coleman Financial Aid Coordinator
Chansone Durden Financial Aid Coordinator
Jack Graham Financial Aid Coordinator
Cindy Jensen Financial Aid Coordinator
Chiney Jones Clerical Supervisor
Cecile Kamath Financial Aid Coordinator
Connie Reed Financial Aid Coordinator
Laura McNamara Financial Aid Coordinator
Mike Menefee Financial Aid Coordinator
Ashanta Simmons Clerk












Technical Processing and Support

Data Processing
Lisa Nelson Data Processing Center Specialist
Trencia Jenkins Data Processing Operator Supervisor
Sherrie McIver Data Processing Operator

Disbursements
Sharon Oliver Financial Aid Coordinator
Denise Flinchum Program Assistant

Document Editing
Steve Swanson Financial Aid Coordinator
Eloise Trucano Clerical Supervisor

Manual Awarding
Richard Brauning Financial Aid Coordinator


I J R '...i .' I,/', ; ... Services
Susan Mickelberry Coordinator, Information/Publications Services
Michael Daube Computer Support Specialist


. i. ,:ir Assurance
Susan Bragg


Financial Aid Coordinator


Records/Optical Scanning
Berta Atkinson C't-t.. Manager
Gail Hilliard Clerical Supervisor
Rubenia Ellis Senior Clerk

Systems and Programming


Sharon Brown
Darius Cauthen
Mike Dugger
Norma Kuhr
Cathy Murray
Richard Omer
Raleigh Pickard
Susan Smith


Susan Bragg
Larry Moore
Stacey Bush


Computer Programmer Analyst
Computer Programmer
Computer Programmer Analyst
Computer Programmer Analyst Manager
Senior Computer Programmer Analyst
Senior Computer Programmer Analyst
Senior Computer Programmer Analyst
Senior Computer Programmer Analyst


Financial Aid Coordinator
Financial Aid Coordinator
Financial Aid Coordinator


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99







Prowfss1iona Ac dttes


Karen Fooks Director
memberships: National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA): Board of Directors; Southern
Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (SASFAA): President; Florida Association of Student Financial Aid
Administrators (FASFAA); Coalition of State University Aid Administrators (COSUAA): Steering Committee; National
Coalition for Direct Lending: Steering Committee
UF committees: Financial Aid Committee; Undergraduate Advising Council, UAA Steering Committee

Rick Wilder Associate Director
memberships: NASFAA; SASFAA; FASFAA: Executive Board, Conference Committee, Membership Services, Minority
Recruitment and Retention Council; President, Past President

Elaine Stuckman Associate Director
memberships: NASFAA, SASFAA, FASFAA: Executive Board, Membership Services

Tony Gordon Coordinator of Computer Applications
memberships: NASFAA, SASFAA, FASFAA: Executive Board, WEB Site/Electronic Communications Chair

Ron Anderson Student Financial Affairs Coordinator
Health Professions, Nursing, Pharmacy, & Veterinary Medicine
memberships: NASFAA, SASFAA; FASFAA

Gordon Andrews Assistant Director
Scholarships, State Programs, Student Employment, and Short-Term Loans
memberships: NASFAA, SASFAA, FASFAA
UF committees: University Payroll/Personnel Council

Donna Fowler Student Affairs Coordinator
Loan Certifications and Disbursements
memberships: NASFAA, SASFAA, FASFAA: Federal Direct Loan Committee

Tom Kolb Student Financial Affairs Coordinator
College of Dentistry
memberships: SASFAA; FASFAA: Multi-Cultural Concerns Committee; Association of American Dental Schools;
Association of College Greek Advisors; Association of Black Faculty and Staff
UF committees: Association of Black Faculty and Staff (AFBS) Fundraising Committee

Bob Lynn Student Affairs Coordinator
Academic Progress, Document Editing, Information/ Publications Services, Outreach,
Records/ Optical Scanning, and Training & Development
memberships: NASFAA, FASFAA, SASFAA

Susan Mickelberry Coordinator, Information/Publication Services
memberships: University of Florida Communications Network (UFCN), Student Affairs Computer Users Group
UF committees: Student A.,. Update Committee


Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99










Peggy Myers Student Affairs Coordinator
Pell Grant, Awarding, Verification, Quality Assurance, and Athletes
memberships: SASFAA, FASFAA

Eileen Parris Student Financial Affairs Coordinator
Medical Center
memberships: NASFAA, SASFAA, FASFAA, Association of American Medical Schools Committee on Student
Financial Affairs (COSFA)
UF committees: College of Medicine Financial Aid Committee; College of Medicine ADA Committee

Rodlee Ritter Student Affairs Coordinator
Customer Service
memberships: NASFAA, SASFAA, FASFAA

Rita Rygler Assistant Director
Loan Certifications
memberships: NASFAA; SASFAA; Florida A & M University Alumni Association; Pi Lambda Theta

Dexter Smith Financial Aid Coordinator
Athletes
memberships: Educational Law Association, National Association of Black Public Administrators, Black Graduate Student
Organization, University of Florida Alumni Association, Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.

Trish Varnes Student Financial Affairs Coordinator
Law School
memberships: NASFAA; SASFAA; FASFAA; ACCESS GROUP Conference
UF committees: College of Law Financial Aid Committee; Student Affairs Volunteer Committee (SAVE)

Bill Watson Student Financial Affairs Coordinator
MBA
memberships: SASFAA; FASFAA

















Student Financial Affairs Annual Report 1998-99




















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