• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 A Britisher's threat
 The Tory's purpose
 A desperate venture
 The struggle
 Sarah Dillard
 Greene's Spring
 At Watuga
 The prisoner
 King's Mountain
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Sarah Dillard's ride : a story of the Carolinas in 1780
Title: Sarah Dillard's ride
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087086/00001
 Material Information
Title: Sarah Dillard's ride a story of the Carolinas in 1780
Physical Description: 222, 27, 3 p., 6 leaves of plates : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Otis, James, 1848-1912
Davis, J. Watson ( Illustrator )
Burt, A. L ( Albert Levi ), 1843-1913 ( Publisher )
Publisher: A.L. Burt
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1898
 Subjects
Subject: Youth -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Courage -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Soldiers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Prisoners -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Husband and wife -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
War -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Loyalty -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Youth and death -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
History -- Juvenile fiction -- North Carolina -- Revolution, 1775-1783   ( lcsh )
History -- Juvenile fiction -- United States -- Revolution, 1775-1783   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1898   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre: Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by James Otis ; with six page illustrations by J. Watson Davis.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087086
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002394829
notis - ALZ9736
oclc - 57599894

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Preface
        Unnumbered ( 7 )
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    List of Illustrations
        List of Illustrations
    A Britisher's threat
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 6a
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    The Tory's purpose
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 32a
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    A desperate venture
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
    The struggle
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 90a
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Sarah Dillard
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 112a
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
    Greene's Spring
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
    At Watuga
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
    The prisoner
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 192a
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
    King's Mountain
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text































































The Baldwin Library
University
Foida





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Ag ___ """""_'

SWheel about, and march back to the house, or I shall shoot," said the Tory.
Page 153.







SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


A Story of the Carolinas in 1780.



BY JAMES OTIS.


- ~N t
N


With Six Page Illustrations by J. Watson Davis.


NEW YORK:
A. L. BURT, PUBLISHER,


































Copyrighted, 1898, by A. L. BuRT.

SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.
BY JES OTIs.











NOTE.


"THEY were men admirably fitted by their
daily pursuits for the privations they were
called upon to endure. They had neither tents,
baggage, bread, nor salt, and no commissary
department to furnish regular supplies. Pota-
toes, pumpkins, roasted corn, and occasionally a
bit of venison supplied by their own rifles, com-
posed their daily food. Such were the men
who were gathering among the mountains and
valleys of the Upper Carolinas to beat back the
invaders."-Lossing's Field-Book of the Revo-
utiio, 'n



















CONTENTS.




CHAPTER I. PAoZ
A Britisher's Threat ............................ ...... 1

CHAPTER II.
The Tory's Purpose..................................... 25

CHAPTER III.
A Desperate Venture..................................... 50

CHAPTER IV.
The Struggle ................................... ........ 74

CHAPTER V.
Sarah Dillard............ .... ......................... 99

CHAPTER VI.
Greene's Spring......................................... 123

CHAPTER VII.
At Watuga......................... ................... 149

CHAPTER VIII.
The Prisoner........................................... 174

CHAPTER IX-
King's Mountain....................................... 200



















LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.




PAGE
"You are grown timorous indeed, Evan, if you can imagine
that noise to be caused by the Redcoats."............... 7

"Take your hands off I I am not to be treated as a prisoner,"
Ephraim cried.............................. ........... 2

Nathan did as his comrade suggested, and save for a slight
creaking now and then, the work was carried on........ 91

The colt darted forward at full speed with Mrs. Dillard...... 113

"Wheel about, and march back to the house, or I shall
shoot," said the Tory................................. 153

Nathan and Evan crept within three feet of the Tory........ 193











SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


CHAPTER I.

A BRITISHER'S THREAT.

IN the year 1780 there was in North Carolina,
west of Broad River, and near the site of what
is now known as Rutherfordton, a settlement
called Gilbert Town.
Within five or six miles of this village on a
certain September day in the year above men-
tioned, two lads, equipped for a hunting trip,
had halted in the woods.
One was Nathan Shelby, a boy sixteen years
of age, and nephew of that Isaac Shelby whose
name is so prominent in the early history of
North Carolina; the other, Evan McDowells,
son of Colonel Charles McDowells, was one
year younger than Nathan.






SARAH DILLARD S RIDE.


But for the fact that these two lads were sorely
needed at their homes, both would have been
enrolled either among the American forces, or
with those hardy pioneers who were then known
as Mountain Men, for the time was come when
the struggling colonists required every arm that
could raise a musket.
On the previous month the American forces
under General Gates had been defeated by
Cornwallis at Camden. Tarleton had dispersed
Sumter's forces at Rocky Mount, and the south-
ern colonists appeared to have been entirely
subdued by the royal troops.
General Cornwallis, now at Camden, was
bending his efforts to establish the king's gov-
ernment in South Carolina, and in punishing
those "rebels" who, despite their many reverses,
were yet among the mountains awaiting a favor-
able opportunity to strike another blow in
behalf of freedom.
It was at this time, and especially in the





SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


SCarolinas, as if the attempt to free the colonists
from the oppressive yoke of the British had
utterly failed, and even the most sanguine
despaired of being able to accomplish anything
in that section until General Washington should
lend them some assistance.
Nathan and Evan, lads though they were,
understood full well the situation of affairs, and
as they sat upon the trunk of a fallen tree,
resting from the labor of seeking food-for this
hunting trip had been made for serious pur-
poses, rather than in pursuit of sport-the two
spoke concerning the reverses which had been
visited upon the patriots.
"It is as if we were already whipped into
submission," Evan said sadly, "for how is it
possible our people shall gather in such force
Sas to be able to offer successful resistance ?"
"That seems indeed true," Nathan replied,
"and yet will Colonel William Campbell of
Virginia remain idle? Do you believe my





SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


uncle, Colonel Shelby, or Lieutenant-Colonel
John Sevier, have laid down their arms? Or
even if those three are subdued, is it likely,
think you, that your father will rest content
while the king's forces overrun the country at
their pleasure ?"
There are matters which cannot be mended,
however brave men may be, and it seems to me
that now has come the time when we must say
that the struggle for liberty can no longer be
continued."
If all who have for four years opposed the
king's will were as faint-hearted as you, Evan,
then indeed had the rebellion been crushed be-
fore it was well begun."
But tell me, Nathan, how may the Ameri-
cans, with but few men, scanty equipment, and
little or no money, even attempt to hold their
own against the royal forces, which outnumber
us mayhap ten to one?"
"That I cannot do, and perchance even your





SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE. 5

father might find it difficult to make reply to
such question, but this much I believe to be a
certainty. The desire for freedom has not been
crushed out from the hearts of the American
people, and while it remains strong as at present,
some way will be found whereby we shall have
at least the semblance of an army again."
"I would I could believe you."
"Is your mother thus despondent ?"
"I cannot say, Nathan. It is now near two
weeks, as you know, since I have seen her."
"But think you she has lost all hope ? She,
who has dared to burn charcoal in the fireplace
of her own home, while the Britishers were
about, in order to carry it to your father, who
was making gunpowder in a cave among the
mountains."
"My mother is brave, which is more, may-
hap, than can be said for her son."
"Ay; had she not been, when your father's
cattle were driven off by the British skirmishers,





6 SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.

she had hardly called the neighbors together,
and by such show of strength recovered the
property. With women like your mother, and
men such as your father and my Uncle Isaac, I
tell you, Evan, the cause of liberty is not lost."
"But it would seem as if we were further
from our purpose now than four years ago, when
a declaration of our independence was read
throughout the colonies. Then we had more
money, and it was not as difficult to find re-
cruits. Now ten dollars in paper is hardly
worth two cents-in fact, I am told that even
the troops consider it too cumbersome for its
value to repay them for carrying it around."
"That is the case only with the paper
money."
"Ay, Nathan; and as for gold and silver, we
still trust to that on which is stamped the king's
image. But it is not for you and I to talk of
political matters, when both are really in the
same way of thinking; the only difference be-



























































"You are grown timorous indeed, Evan, if you can imagine that noise to be
caused by the Redcoats."-Page 7.







SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


tween us is that I, who was never so courageous
as you, have grown faint-hearted."
Evan ceased speaking very suddenly, for at
that instant both the lads heard the hoof-beats
of horses in the distance, and started up in what
was very like alarm as they listened, while ex-
changing inquiring glances.
"It must be that the British are coming this
way," Evan said, turning as if to flee; bVut his
companion clutched him by the arm, saying with
a laugh:
"You are grown timorous indeed, Evan, if
you can imagine that noise to be caused by the
redcoats. Surely there are none nearabout
here, and even though there were, it is not likely
they would attempt to make their way through
this wood."
Evan ceased his efforts to flee, but turned as
if unwilling, with a forced smile upon his face.
"Of course it must be as you say, Nathan,
for the Britishers would have no business here;






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


yet it is even true they may be nearabout, for
we have heard that General Cornwallis was
bent on sending a force into this section, and he
is not wise who refuses to take heed of any
warning in these times."
"You need not set me down as one who makes
light of the information which has been brought
by those whom we could trust; but I refuse to
be alarmed without cause, and the idea that the
Britishers would ride into this thicket is-
They are redcoats It is I who am playing the
fool by setting myself up as an authority on
those matters of which I know nothing !"
The foremost of a mounted band had come
into view, causing this sudden change in
Nathan's speech, and the two boys gazed in
alarm at the rapidly advancing horsemen, for
now was it too late to make any attempt at
flight. Both knew, from reports which had
been spread through the country, of outrages
committed among even those who were not in






SARAH D)ILARI)'S RIDE,


arms, what it might mean to fall into the hands
of the enemy, who were bent on subjugating
the country by any means, however harsh, and
they had good reason to expect brutal treatment
once they were caught in the clutches of the
king's troops.
Involuntarily the lads clasped hands. Al-
though armed, there was no thought in the
mind of either that resistance might be offered,
and indeed it would have been in the highest
degree foolhardy to have done other than they
did at this moment-quietly await that foe
from which escape was impossible.
Where they stood the forest was open and
free from underbrush, therefore while the troop-
ers were yet a quarter of a mile away they were
in full view, their red coats showing in vivid
contrast among the green leaves, and before the
advance squad were yet arrived at where the
boys were standing, the entire company could
be seen.






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


Fully two hundred men, a goodly portion of
whom were Tories, clad in the ordinary garb of
the country, and the remainder wearing the
king's uniform, made up the party.
Among the foremost of the riders was one
clad in the habiliments of a major, and from
what had been told by those who brought the
information of General Cornwallis' movements,
the boys knew at once that this must be Patrick
Ferguson of the Seventy-first Royal Regiment.
It was this officer who accosted the frightened
lads, by asking in a loud voice which had in it
much of menace:
"What are you two doing here armed?
Rebel spawn no doubt, who lie in wait to do
mischief when it may be accomplished without
danger to yourselves."
"We are out hunting, and if it please you,
sir, in order to get meat for the family," Nathan
replied, speaking stoutly, although he was in-
wardly quaking with fear.






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


Tell me no lies or it shall go the worse with
you. How long has it been that you of the
Carolinas must search for food in the forests ?"
"Since his majesty's troops overrode the
colony, quartering themselves upon those whose
store of provisions was already scanty."
"Be careful how you speak! I am not in a
mood to hear insolence from those who rebel
against their lawful king," and the major made
a threatening gesture, bending from his horse as
if he would strike the boys.
Evan stepped back a pace in fear; but
Nathan boldly held his ground as he asked
bravely:
"Think you, sir, that two lads like us may
do the king harm ?"
S Major Ferguson's face reddened with rage,
and motioning for one of the troopers to ad-
vance, he said:
"Disarm and bind these insolent cubs who
dare bandy words with their betters. They






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


shall talk in a different strain before I am done
with them."
"Would you make prisoners of us who are
not soldiers ?" Nathan asked even as the man
seized him by the arm. "Would you carry
away from their homes two boys upon whom a
family is depending for food ?"
"Where are your fathers ?" Major Ferguson
asked sharply.
"I have none," Nathan replied. My mother
is a widow."
"And yours ?" he continued, turning toward
Evan.
"Colonel Charles McDowells."
"As rank a rebel as lives in the Carolinas.
See that you bind them well, my man, for I
doubt not these two, innocent as they would
appear, have already had their fingers in the
rebel broth."
"Since you are bent on making us prisoners,
sir, it is useless to deny that we have done aught






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


against the king, save it be a crime to perform
our share in feeding those dependent upon us."
"If those who make up the ragamuffin follow-
ing of Mister Washington could not depend on
such as you to provide for the women and
children, they might be forced to remain at
home where they belong, instead of hatching
treason, and I could then, perhaps, clear this
portion of the colonies of every male inhabitant
who is old enough to be of service in any ca-
pacity. Before I have performed my mission
you of the Carolinas shall understand what re-
bellion means, for it is my purpose to teach you
a lesson."
Having said this the valiant major turned his
horse that he might speak with some of his fol-
lowers, and the trooper who was bidden to dis-
arm and bind the lads had well-nigh finished
with the task.
Nathan and Evan were rudely searched, and
with such effect that even their spare flints were






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


taken from them. Their hands were bound
behind their backs securely with leather
straps; the fowling pieces and the scanty store
of ammunition were taken charge of by one of
the troopers, and he who had been detailed to
seize them stood as if awaiting orders of his
commander.
"Keep up a brave heart, Evan," Nathan
whispered courageously. Do not give yonder
redcoated brute the satisfaction of seeing that
we are afraid."
"We are likely to be carried very far from
home, Nathan, and it may be that much suffer-
ing is in store for us."
"Of that there can be little doubt; but no
good will come to us by showing the white
feather, for of how much weight, think yon,
tears and prayers be upon such as our captor.
It would please him were we to give free rein
to our sorrow, and I am not minded he shall
have such gratification from me."






SARAHI DILLARD'S RIDE.


"But surely there is no reason why you
should anger him by bold speaking-that will
not avail us."
"No more than it would if we pleaded for
mercy, and there is much satisfaction to be
gained by depriving him of the pleasure that
would come with the sight of our tears. Hold
firm, Evan McDowells, as your father and your
mother would do were they in like situation,
and mayhap the time will come when this Major
Ferguson's grasp will be so far lessened that we
shall see a chance of slipping through his
fingers."
I have little hope of any such good fortune,"
Evan replied, with a long-drawn sigh, and then
both the boys fell silent.
The horsemen had dismounted, and it was
evident that a prolonged halt would be made.
The major gave no further orders concerning
his prisoners, and the trooper stood guard over
them four or five paces away, giving no appar-






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


ent heed to the conversation in which they had
been indulging.
During half an hour the situation remained
unchanged, and then came into view two hun-
dred or more men on foot, the greater number
wearing scarlet uniforms, the remainder being
evidently Tories.
At first glance the boys believed this last
body of Britishers had come by accident upon
the halting-place; but as the men exchanged
salutations with the members of the advance
party, it could be seen that they all formed one
company under the leadership of Major Fer-
guson, and had been temporarily separated
because of the more rapid traveling of the
horsemen.
When another half-hour had been spent here
the order was given to resume the march, and
an officer in the uniform of a captain brought
word from the major to the man who was
guarding the boys, that he would be relieved






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


from duty, one of the foot-soldiers taking his
place.
When the change of guards had been effected,
Nathan and Evan were ordered into line
midway of the column, and thus hemmed in on
every side they were forced to advance, traveling
with difficulty, and even pain, because their
arms were fettered.
As a rule, the men gave very little attention
to these young prisoners, save when one or the
other of the boys fell slightly in the rear, and
then a blow from the butt of a musket would
warn him that he must keep pace with the
remainder of the troop or suffer because of ina-
bility to do so.
Now that the lads were completely surrounded
by foes, no conversation of a private nature was
possible, and in silence they marched on, with
ample food for unpleasant thoughts.
The only question in the minds of both was
as to the destination of this body of Britishers,






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


for there seemed little reason why so many men
should penetrate this mountainous portion of
the Carolinas, where there was no important
stronghold to be captured.
Until five o'clock in the afternoon the troop
advanced steadily, and then the foot-soldiers
were arrived at a small valley where the horse-
men had already apparently halted for the night.
Fires were kindled here and there; some of
the soldiers were engaged in cooking, others in
caring for the horses, and all so intent upon
making themselves comfortable that it was as
if the prisoners had been forgotten by everyone
save him who was charged with their custody.
When an hour had passed the lads were still
standing where they had been halted, and
Nathan said with a mirthless laugh:
"It looks as though we might be forced to
keep our feet until morning, for so nearly as I
can make out food has been served to all save
ourselves and our guard."





SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE. 19

"I am counting on being relieved before
many more moments pass," the soldier said
petulantly, for Nathan had spoken so loudly
that he could not fail to hear the remark.
"And are we to be starved because we
neither wear red coats nor are willing to march
shoulder to shoulder with them ?"
"It matters not to me what disposition may
be made of you, so that I am given an oppor-
tunity of getting my rations," the soldier said,
and a moment later one of his comrades came
up, musket in hand, to relieve him.
To this last guard Nathan repeated his ques-
tion as to the probability of their being pro-
vided with supper, and the soldier replied care-
lessly :
"I am not the quartermaster of this detach-
ment, and if I was I question whether much
time would be spent over such as you."
Then he fell to pacing to and fro, watching
his comrades as they lounged around the camp-





SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


fire; but all the while keeping close guard over
the two lads, who were so weary from the hunt-
ing of the forenoon and the march of the after-
noon that it is questionable whether they could
have fled even if the opportunity presented
itself.
"I had expected to be ill-treated," Nathan
said with an assumption of carelessness to his
comrade; "but did not count on being starved.
It is a pity, since we were to be made prisoners,
that this gallant Major Ferguson could not have
come up after we had partaken of dinner, for it
seems as if many hours had passed since we ate
breakfast."
Evan was on the point of making some reply
to this mournful remark when from the distance
he observed a lad, who, coming directly across
the valley, was halted by the sentinels stationed
around the encampment.
Look there !" he said, in a low tone of ex-
citement. If I mistake not, it is Ephraim Sow-






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


ers, and what may he be doing here among the
redcoats ?"
"It is as I have always believed," Nathan
cried, forgetting that the man who acted as their
guard could hear every word he spoke. "Eph-
raim is neither more nor less than a Tory, and
I venture to say he comes now to give informa-
tion concerning our friends."
It is not the first time be has met this detach-
ment of men," Evan added, "See! He speaks
now with one of the soldiers as to an old
acquaintance."
"Who may say for how long he has acted
the spy ? When it was told on the day before
yesterday that he had gold in his possession, I
would not believe it; but now it is plain to be
seen that there was truth in the statement, and
we can say how he earned it."
This Ephraim Sowers was the son of one who
claimed to be "a man of peace;" one who by
many a loud word had declared that he believed






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


it a sin to resort to arms, whatever the provo-
cation, and, living a near neighbor to the Mc-
Dowells, was in a position, if it so pleased him,
to give much of valuable information to the
enemy. Until this moment, however, there
had been no suspicion that he might be tempted
to play the part of spy, and his son's arrival at
this encampment told the boys as plainly as
words could have done how it was General
Cornwallis had reliable knowledge concerning
that portion of the colony, for he had given
good proof that he knew who among the in-
habitants favored the king or the "rebels."
Ephraim advanced leisurely, and with the
air of one who believes he is expected, until his
eyes rested upon the prisoners; then he started
suddenly, a flush as of shame came over his
face for the instant, and straightening himself
defiantly, he walked up with a vindictive smile
until he was within half a dozen paces of the
two lads.





SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


"I had thought that the sight of a redcoat
was so displeasing that it went against your
stomachs," he said tauntingly, "and yet I find
you hobnobbing with Major Ferguson's men."
"It seems that you know who commands
this detachment," Evan said sternly, forgetting
all his fears now in the anger he felt that this
lad whom he had once trusted should have been
all the while a Tory.
"I'll warrant you two know as much."
"Ay; but we are here as prisoners, and you
have come as a visitor-one who has seen these
men before, to judge from the manner in which
you accosted them."
"Well, what does that prove?" Ephraim
asked, an evil look coming into his eyes.
"It proves you to be a spy, and when we
shall make known what has been seen this
night, I am thinking neither you nor your peace-
loving father will find the Carolinas a pleasant
abiding place,"






24 SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.

"And I am thinking that when such rebels
as you have the chance to tell what has been
seen, the rebellion will have been crushed out,
for now that you are here, if my words go for
anything, you will not soon be set at liberty."






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


CHAPTER II.

THE TORY'S PURPOSE.

UNTIL the moment when Ephraim Sowers
had revealed his true self by coming into the
British camp as a spy, neither Nathan nor Evan
had felt any grave anxiety regarding the future.
They knew full well that the redcoats were
not given to being friendly in their intercourse
with the so-called rebels, and that such persons
as they took were treated with roughness, if
not absolute harshness.
Such treatment as had previously been dealt
out to captured Americans the boys could en-
dure without a murmur, therefore there was no
painful anxiety regarding the outcome of the
matter; but when Ephraim Sowers appeared,
the situation of affairs seemed to be decidedly
changed.






SARAH DiLLARD S RIDE.


Now that he had been recognized by these
two, the news that he was a Tory and in league
with the Britishers would be carried to all that
country roundabout where he lived, whenever
Nathan and Evan were set free.
It was only reasonable to suppose he had
some slight degree of influence in the camp,
having served Major Ferguson as a spy, and
these two lads might safely count on his doing
whatsoever was in his power to have them held
prisoners, even if worse did not follow, and it
was evident Nathan feared this last possibility,
for he said in a low tone to his comrade, when
the young Tory had walked away with a swag-
ger in the direction of Major Ferguson's tent:
"No good will come to us through having
seen that villain."
"On such a point there need be little discus-
sion, for I am of the same mind, and it will be
exceedingly fortunate if he leaves this encamp-
ment without having worked us some harm,





SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


although I cannot say in what way it might be
done."
"For his own safety, should he ever count on
returning home, we must be silenced, Evan, and
I am thinking Ephraim Sowers knows in this
encampment enough of his own kidney who
would aid him in thus doing."
"Do you mean that he would dare to kill
us ?" and now Evan looked up in alarm.
"He would dare do anything when there was
no danger of his receiving bodily injury. But
don't let me play upon your fears, for there is
no reason why we should look abroad for
trouble when we have sufficient of it close
around us. We will trust to the chances that
that young Tory is powerless, or too much occu-
pied just at present, to give evil heed to us."
"The last is what we should not take into
consideration, for however actively engaged he
may be it is necessary for his own safety, should





SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


he ever return among his neighbors, to prevent
us from telling what we have just learned."
"If you refuse such comfort as I try to give,
then we will put it that he will be content so
long as we are held prisoners here, and who
shall say that we may not soon find an oppor-
tunity for escape ? Captives while on the march
are not like to be kept under overly strict
guard."
Where did the Tory go ? I was so bewil-
dered both by seeing him here and realizing
what his coming might mean, as to be almost
in a daze while he was making his threats."
"I fancied I saw some one nearabout Major
Ferguson's tent beckoning for the scoundrel,
and he hurried away as if bent on visiting the
commander. I venture to predict we shall see
him again before he leaves this locality."
Then the lads fell to speculating as to how
long young Sowers had been engaged as a Brit-
ish spy; what might be the result of Major





SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


Ferguson's march through the mountains, and
in other ways discussing the situation as if they
were to be spectators rather than participants in
whatever might occur.
When half an hour had passed, much to
their surprise, for the boys had come to believe
they would not be given food that night, rations
were served out to them, and they were partak-
ing of the limited meal with such keenness of
appetite and eagerness as to be unaware of
Ephraim Sowers' return until he stood close
beside them.
"Well, have you finished giving Major Fer-
guson all the information he desired ?" Nathan
asked curtly, only glancing toward the new-
comer sufficiently to discover his identity.
"I may have told him -some things that
wouldn't be pleasant for you to hear," the Tory
replied surlily.
"Of that I have no question, for it is easy to
guess that you have done all the injury to






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


your neighbors of which your tongue was
capable."
"I have given the major such a good account
of you two that he won't be likely to part com-
pany with you for some time to come."
We are not surprised, because it was only
what might have been expected after we found
you were playing the part of spy," Evan said,
determined to so far hide his fears that this
vicious enemy should not suspect what was in
his heart.
"I am ready to do whatsoever I can against
the enemies of the king," Evan replied, assum-
ing what he intended should be a dignified
attitude.
"His majesty must rest content now, if he
knows that you stand ready to aid his officers
by playing the spy upon those who have be-
friended you when you were in need."
Nathan spoke distinctly and deliberately, in
a tone so loud that all might hear, and Eph-






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


raim's face crimsoned with mingled rage and
shame, for he knew full well that but for the
aid afforded him by Nathan's uncle during the
previous winter his sufferings might have been
great indeed.
"I shall do all in my power to overthrow the
wicked plans of the rebels, and more particu-
larly will I exert myself against the Mountain
Men," he cried, in a fury of passion, whereat
Evan added quietly:
"We can well fancy that, for Master Isaac
Shelby is a Mountain Man, and but for him
you would have starved. Let me see: vipers
have been supposed to be the only living things
that would sting the hand which feeds them."
"I shall sting you even worse than I have
already done!" Ephraim cried, shaking his
clinched hand in impotent rage, and so threat-
ening was his attitude that the soldier on guard
seized him, as if fearing the boy would strike
the helpless prisoners.






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


"Take your hands off !" Ephraim cried, liter-
ally trembling with passion. "I am not to be
treated as a prisoner in this camp after all I
have done."
"Very true," the soldier replied quietly.
"You shall not be deprived of your liberty save
when it becomes necessary to prevent you from
striking helpless captives, and that I would not
allow my own comrade to do."
"I had no idea of touching them."
Your actions told a different story, and even
though these two lads be rebels, they shall be
treated decently while I am on guard over
them."
"I will see them hanged, and that before
long !" Ephraim screamed.
The soldier released his hold of the infuriated
Tory, but took the precaution of stepping di-
rectly in front of Nathan and Evan, as if to
afford protection; while Ephraim, standing a
few paces away, poured out a flood of invec-




























































"Take your hands off I I am not to be treated as a prisoner," Ephraim
cried.-Page 32.






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


tive, during the course of which much infor-
mation was gained by those whom he menaced.
"I didn't come to this place empty-handed !"
he cried, "nor will my visit be of little concern
to the rebels! I brought Major Ferguson in-
formation that Clarke and his men are in camp
at Greene's Spring, and to kill and capture
them. all will be a simple matter for this troop."
You have dared bring the enemy down upon
your mother's own cousin," Evan cried in aston-
ishment.
"He is no cousin of mine once he raises his
hand against the king."
"I'll venture to say there will be little desire
on his part to claim relationship after he knows
the part you have been playing," Nathan replied
with a laugh, which yet further increased the
Tory's wrath. "But have a care, Ephraim
Sowers. The men in this colony are not easily
whipped into submission, nor do they readily
forget an enemy, and if it should so chance, as





SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


it has many times since '76, that the king's
forces were driven out of the Carolinas, your
life would not be an enviable one."
"If anything of that kind should happen, and
I am ready to wager all I possess it never will,
you won't be here to know what comes to me,
for before then I will take good care you are
put where all rebels should be-under the sod."
If the king's officers will commit, or permit,
murder at your request, then must they give up
all claim to the name of soldiers," and now
Evan was rapidly becoming as excited as the
Tory. "It may be you can succeed in having
us killed; but the reckoning will come, Ephraim
Sowers, and the longer it is deferred the more
must you pay."
"I will settle with you first after my own
fashion, and when that has been done we will
see what your ragamuffin friends are able to do
about it."
Ephraim would doubtless have indulged in






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


further threats, but just at that instant a sol-
dier came up from the direction of Major Fer-
guson's tent, and the vindictive lad was sum-
moned to the commander's quarters.
"It seems that his footing here is not so se-
cure that he can give his tongue free rein many
minutes at a time," Nathan said in a tone of
relief as the spy walked reluctantly away, liter-
ally forced so to do by the messenger who had
come in search of him.
It is not his words which trouble me," Evan
said mournfully. "Just now he is in a position
to work us great injury, and by yet further
provoking his wrath we have made of him even
a more bitter enemy than he naturally was."
"I question if that could be possible."
"Yet you cannot dispute his power to work
us harm."
"Neither do I. If he be willing, as it ap-
pears he has shown himself, to betray the
whereabouts of Colonel Clarke's forces, know-





SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


ing full well that this troop can readily cut
them down, it is certain we stand a good show
of learning how great is his power for mischief."
"For myself I have little concern at this
moment, because of the knowledge that our
friends are in such peril."
"And yet there is nothing we can do to aid
them."
"Unless it might be we could escape." Evan
said suddenly, lowering his voice to a whisper
lest the sentinel should overhear his words.
"It is only needed that you look about in
order to see how much hope there is of such a
possibility," Nathan said despondently. "Even
though we were fresh, instead of so weary that
I question if we could travel a single mile
further, and if we might so far elude the senti-
nel as to gain the cover of the thicket, it would
be impossible to continue the flight two miles,
for the Tories in this troop know the country
as well, if not better, than we."






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


"I was not so foolish as to believe that escape
might be possible, but only spoke because my
thoughts were with those who are threatened,
and my desire is to aid them."
I wish it might be done," Nathan replied
with a long-drawn sigh, and then the two fell
silent, each occupied with his own gloomy
thoughts.
An hour passed, and nothing more had been
seen or heard of the Tory spy.
Even though they were in such desperate
straits, the boys began unconsciously to yield
themselves up to slumber, and after a time,
bond as they were, both were reclining upon
the green turf in at least partial repose.
When morning came they ached in every
limb, with arms so benumbed that it was as if
those useful members had been paralyzed.
They had slept fitfully, and were hardly more
refreshed than when the halt was called after
the day's march.





SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


Scanty rations were served out to them, and
to the intense relief of both the lads a captain,
more humane that his commander, ordered that
the bonds be taken from their arms.
They were to be tied together in such man-
ner that any attempt at flight would be useless,
and yet the labor of marching would be much
lightened.
The prisoners had expected another visit from
the Tory before the troop started; but in this
they were happily disappointed, and when the
march was begun they almost believed Ephraim
Sowers had been left behind, until shortly
before noon they saw him riding with the
mounted detachment.
"He is most likely guiding the force to
Greene's Spring," Nathan said bitterly. He
counts on seeing those who have played the
part of friends to him shot down, and even
though their blood will be upon his head, he is
well pleased,"






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


To the relief of both the boys, their enemy
did not come near where they were, and it was
reasonable to suppose Major Ferguson, although
not prone to be overcareful of the feelings of his
"rebel" prisoners, had given Sowers orders to
put a check upon his tongue.
When noon came the detachment of foot sol-
diers arrived at Martin Drake's plantation,
where the cavalry had already halted and were
actively engaged in wantonly destroying
property.
Outbuildings were torn down, lambs, chick-
ens, and geese were being slaughtered although
they were not needed for food, and the house-
hold furniture which, rude though it was, repre-
sented all that went to make up the interior of
the home, was thrown about the grounds, or
chopped into kindlings, from sheer desire to
work destruction.
The horsemen could not have been at this
place more than an hour when the foot soldiers






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


came up, and yet in that short time they had
completely wrecked the dwelling portion of the
plantation, and caused such a scene of devasta-
tion as would lead one almost to believe that a
despei'ate conflict had raged at that point.
"All this must be pleasing to Ephraim
Sowers," Evan said bitterly, for it was Martin
.Drake's wife who tended him when he was ill
with the fever, and this may be a satisfactory
way of requiting her."
"Have you seen him since we halted ?"
"No, and I am hoping he has gone ahead
with the advanced detachment, for it seems
certain all of the horsemen are not here."
Although Master Blake's live stock had been
slaughtered in such quantities that there was
treble the amount of food the troop could con-
sume, the boys were given nothing more than
cornbread for dinner, and hardly so much of
that as would suffice to satisfy their hunger.
Not until everything portable had been






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


destroyed, the doors torn from the house, and
the windows shattered, was the march resumed,
and then the prisoners heard the Tory who was
acting as guide say that at nightfall they would
camp on Captain Dillard's plantation.
There was in this information a ray of hope,
so far as warning Colonel Clarke's men of what
threatened, for Captain Dillard was in his com-
mand, and if information could be conveyed to
the mistress of the house it was possible she
might send a message ahead.
This much in substance Nathan had sug-
gested to his comrade; but Evan failed to see
any possibility that good might be effected
so far as the friends of the cause were con-
cerned.
"Even though Mrs. Sarah Dillard can be told
all that we know, it is not likely she will have
an opportunity of sending a messenger from the
plantation. Ephraim Sowers knows full well
where the captain may be found, and will warn






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


Major Ferguson against permitting any person
to leave the place."
If Dicey Langston, a girl only sixteen years
old, could baffle Cunningham's band, who gave
themselves the name of the Bloody Scouts, as
she did on that night when alone she crossed
the Ennoree, swollen though the waters were,
what may Sarah Dillard do when she knows
her husband's life hangs in the balance ?"
"It is not a question of what she would do,
but of what she can," Evan replied gloomily.
"Thanks to Ephraim Sowers, the commander of
this force will know only too well how eager
she must be to send news ahead of his where-
abouts, and will take precautions accordingly."
"That is as may be. We can at least hope
for the best," Nathan replied bravely, and then
word was given for the troop to resume the
march.
During the afternoon the British soldiery
came upon two plantations, the buildings of






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


which they utterly wrecked, shooting from sheer
wantonness the live stock that could not be run
down without too much labor, and seeming
eager in every way to mark their trail by de-
struction.
It was an hour before sunset when the boys
saw in the distance the buildings of the Dillard
plantation, and knew that the time was near at
hand when, if ever, they must get word to that
little band whose lives were in such deadly
peril."
Ephraim Sowers was nowhere to be seen; but
slight comfort could be derived from this fact,
for it seemed reasonable to suppose he was
making himself obnoxious in the dwelling of
those people whom he had once claimed as his
friends, but was now visiting as their bitterest
enemy.
"Keep your wits about you for the first op-
portunity to gain speech with Sarah Dillard,"
Nathan whispered to his comrade, and Evan






44 SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.

sighed as he nodded in reply, for it seemed to
him there was little chance they would be per-
mitted to hold a conversation with any acquaint-
ance, because of the probable fact that Ephraim
Sowers would guard against such a proceeding.
The prisoners were marched directly up to
the dwelling, and there, with the windows and
doors flung wide open, they had a full view of
the entire interior, but their enemy was nowhere
to be seen.
This, to Evan, unaccountable absence, troubled
him not a little, for he believed it betokened
yet more mischief on the part of the vindictive
Tory, but Nathan was not so ready to take
alarm.
It may be that he is keeping out of sight,
hoping Sarah Dillard will still look upon him
as a friend, and, in case the captain should suc-
ceed in escaping, confide the secret of his where-
abouts to him."
The mistress of the house was doing all in






SARAHl DILLARD'S RIDE.


her power to satisfy the exacting demands of
the officers who had quartered themselves upon
her, as the boys could see while they remained
halted near the doorway.
It appeared that such servants as she had
were not sufficient in numbers to please these
fastidious red-coated gentlemen, and they had
insisted that Mrs. Dillard should perform her
share of waiting upon them. Now one would
call out some peremptory order, and then follow
it with a demand that the mistress of the house
give it her especial attention, while, despite such
insolence, Sarah Dillard moved with dignity
here or there, as if it were pleasure rather than
necessity which caused her to so demean herself.
On the outside roundabout the soldiers were
engaged in their customary diversion of killing
every animal which came within range of their
guns, and a huge bonfire had been built of the
corncribs, near which a score or more of men
were preparing the evening meal.






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


A spectator would have said that the dwell-
ing itself was spared only because in it the
officers had taken up their quarters, and once
they were ready to depart it would be demol-
ished as the other structures surrounding it had
been.
During half an hour or more the boys stood
close by the door under close guard, and then
one of the officers appeared to have suddenly
become conscious of their existence, for he called
in a loud tone to Mrs. Dillard:
"We desire of you, madam, some apartment
which will serve as a prison for two rebel cubs
that we have lately taken. Can the cellar be
securely fastened ?"
"There is only a light lattice-work at the
windows, which might readily be broken out if
your prisoners made an effort at escape," Mrs.
Dillard replied.
"* But surely you have some apartment which
will answer our purpose ? If not, the men can






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


speedily nail bars on the outside of one of the
chamber windows."
"There is a room above, the window of which
is already barred, that may serve your purpose,"
Mrs. Dillard said, as she glanced toward the
boys with a certain uplifting of the eyes, as if
to say that they should not recognize her as an
acquaintance.
Show it to me and we will soon decide if
that be what is required, or whether we shall
call upon our troopers to turn carpenters," the
officer said with a laugh, as if believing he had
given words to some witticism, and in silence
Mrs. Dillard motioned one of the servants to
lead the way to the floor above.
The brief survey which he made appeared to
satisfy the Britisher, for on his return he said
to Major Ferguson, who was seated at the head
of the table, giving his undivided attention to
the generous supply of food which the mistress
of the house had been forced to bring out:






SARAH DILLARDS' RIDE.


"There is but one window in the room of
which our fair hostess spoke, and that overlooks
the stable-yard; it is barred on the outside with
oaken rails stout enough to resist the efforts of
any three of our troopers, I should say. The
door can be not only bolted, but locked on the
outside, and in my opinion there should be
no need of a sentinel stationed inside the
building."
"If such is the case, why spend so much
breath in describing the dungeon," Major Fer-
guson said with a laugh. "It is enough for our
purpose if the lads cannot break out, and the
sooner they are lodged within the sooner you
will be ready to hold your peace, thus giving
me an opportunity of enjoying this admirable
game pie. Put the rebels away and sit down
here, for it may be many days before another
such chance presents itself."
Word was passed to the soldier who had the
prisoners in charge for him to take them to






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE. 49

the upper floor, and this trifling matter having
been arranged, the gallant British officers turned
their attention once more to converting their
hostess into a servant.






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


CHAPTER III.

A DESPERATE VENTURE.

THE meaning look which Mrs. Dillard had
bestowed upon the prisoners, brief though it
was, sufficed to revive their spirits wonderfully.
Not that there was any promise in it; but it
showed they were recognized by the hostess
and, knowing her as they did, the boys knew
that if there was a loophole of escape for them
she would point it out.
While preceding the soldier up the stairs it
was much as though they were guests in Sarah
Dillard's home, and there came with the fancy
a certain sense of relief and security such as had
not been theirs for many hours.
The apartment selected to serve as prison was
by no means dismal; it was cleanly, like unto






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


every other portion of Sarah Dillard's home,
and sufficiently large to permit of moderate
exercise, with a barred window overlooking the
stable-yard which allowed all that took place
in the rear of the dwelling to be seen.
I shouldn't mind being a rebel myself for a
few hours in order to get such quarters as these,"
the soldier said as he followed the boys into the
chamber. "Not a bad place in which to spend
the night."
"With a couple of blankets a body might be
very comfortable," Nathan replied in a cheery
tone, for despite the dangers which threatened
that little band at Greene's Spring, despite
Ephraim Sowers' avowed enmity and probable
ability to do harm, despite the fact that he was
a prisoner, this enforced visit to Captain Dill-
ard's house was so much like a home-coming
that his spirits were raised at once.
"And you have the effrontery to ask for
blankets after getting such a prison as makes a







SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


soldier's mouth water," the Britisher said with
a certain rough good-nature in his tone. "You
rebels have a precious queer idea of this sort of
business, if you can complain because of lack of
blankets."
"I am not complaining," Nathan replied with
a laugh. Of course there is no situation which
cannot be bettered in some way, and I was sirm-
ply speaking of how this might be improved.
We are satisfied with it, however, as it is."
"And so you had better be, for I am think-
ing there are not two rebel prisoners as com-
fortably bottled up, and by this time to-morrow
night you will be wishing yourselves back," re-
plied the guard.
Then the soldier locked and barred the door
on the outside, trying it again and again to
make certain it could not readily be forced open,
and a few seconds later the sound of his foot-
steps told that the boys were comparatively
alone for the time being.






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


Now was come the moment when they should
make known the danger which threatened the
friends of freedom through Ephraim Sowers'
perfidy, for every second might be precious if a
warning message could be sent, and involun-
tarily both the lads ran to the window, looking
eagerly out through the bars in the hope of see-
ing some member of the household whose
attention might be attracted.
Major Ferguson's subordinates were not so
careless as to allow their prisoners many oppor-
tunities of such a nature. All the servants, and
in fact every person on the plantation, was kept
busily engaged waiting upon the. redcoats, a
goodly number of whom could be seen in the
stable-yards, which knowledge caused Evan to
say mournfully:
"We are not like to get speech with any one
who could carry word to Greene's Spring. It
stands to reason Ephraim Sowers has warned
the Britishers that such an attempt might be






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


made, and you may be certain, Nathan, no one
can leave the plantation without Major Fergu-
son's permission."
"It is possible he can prevent a message
being carried; but I shall not give up hope yet
awhile."
Before many hours have passed the troop,
or at least a portion of it, will set out to
slaughter our friends. I would I knew where
that Tory spy was at this moment !"
"Most likely he has gone ahead to make sure
his victims do not escape. We shall hear of
him again twixtt now and daybreak."
"I am afraid so," Evan replied with a long-
drawn sigh, and then, leaning his forehead
against the wooden bars, he gazed out longingly
in the direction his feet would have taken had
he been at liberty.
With two hours' start he might save the lives,
perhaps of a hundred men, all of whom could
be accounted his friends, and yet because of






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


one lad's wickedness that littlee band of patriots
was in imminent danger of being massacred.
From the apartments below the coarse laugh
and coarser jest of a Britisher could be heard,
telling that the enemy were still bent on mak-
ing themselves as obnoxious to the inmates of
the household as was possible, while now and
then from the outside came sounds of the
splintering of wood or the cackling of poultry
as the soldiery continued their work of wanton
destruction.
Both officers and men grew more nearly quiet
as the shadows of night began to lengthen. The
Britishers were weary with asserting their pre-
tended right as victors, and the stable-yard was
well-nigh deserted of its redcoated occupants.
The young prisoners were standing near the
window in silence, when a slight noise as of
some animal scratching at the door attracted
their attention, and instantly the same thought
came into the mind of each.






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


Sarah Dillard, freed for the time being from
the exacting demands of the unwelcome visitors,
had come, perchance, to point out some way of
escape.
Now was arrived the moment when they
might reveal to this brave woman the dangers
which threatened, and yet for the instant Nathan
hesitated so to do, because it appeared to him
that he would be distressing her needlessly,
since it was hardly probable she could find
means of conveying the warning to those in
peril. By making her acquainted with all that
threatened he would be doing no more than to
increase her distress of mind.
Evan, however, was not looking so far into
the future. He only realized that perhaps now
was the moment when he would make known
Ephraim Sowers' perfidy, and crept noiselessly
toward the door, whispering eagerly:
"Is that you, Mistress Dillard ?"
"Yes, boys, and I have come in the almost





SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


vain hope that it may be possible to serve you,
although I know not how. When did you fall
into the hands of the enemy ?"
"Have you seen Ephraim Sowers here?"
Evan asked, heeding not the question.
"No. Has he also been made prisoner?"
"It is far worse than that. He is a spy in
the service of the redcoats, and has revealed to
them the whereabouts of Colonel Clarke's
band."
That is impossible, for the entire company
were here not more than eight hours ago, and
with them was my husband."
"Then the miserable spy is mistaken, and
these Britishers will have their journey for their
pains," Nathan whispered in a tone of intense
relief. Ephraim has told Major Ferguson that
they were encamped at Greene's Spring, and
there- "
"And it is to Greene's Spring they are go-
ing!" Mrs. Dillard crieA unconsciously loud.






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


"How could any spy have learned of their
intended movements?"
"You must remember that Ephraim Sowers
has not been looked upon as a spy. Perchance
no one except the Britishers knew it until we
two saw him coming into the camp where we
were prisoners," and Nathan spoke hurriedly.
"It is not for us to speculate how our friends
have been betrayed; but to give the warning to
them without loss of time."
Mrs. Dillard did not reply immediately, and
the prisoners could well fancy that she was try-
ing to decide how the danger might best be
warded off.
"Is it not possible for you to release us?"
Nathan asked after a brief pause. "If either
"Evan or I were at liberty we might be able, by
rapid running, to cover the distance between
here and Greene's Springs before the redcoats
could arrive there, for it is not likely they will
start very early in the night."






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


"To escape from the window while the
soldiers are in the stable-yard is impossible,"
Mrs. Dillard replied, much as though speaking
to herself, "and as for getting you out by this
way I am powerless. One of the officers has a
key to the door, and even if it was in our pos-
session, there is little chance you could make
your way through the house secretly."
"But something must be done, and at once,"
Nathan whispered in an agony of apprehension,
and at that moment the sound of footsteps on
the floor below caused Mrs. Dillard to beat a
retreat.
The boys could hear the swish of her gar-
ments as she ran through the hallway, and it
was as if the good woman had no more than
hidden herself from view before the heavy foot-
steps of a man on the stairs told that some one
of the Britishers was coming to make certain
the prisoners were securely confined.
Creeping noiselessly away from the door lest






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


the redcoat should enter and find them in a
position which betokened that they had been
holding converse with some one on the outside,
the lads remained silent and motionless until
the noise of footsteps told that this cautious
Britisher, having satisfied himself all was as it
should be, had returned to the floor below.
Then the lads stole softly back near the door
where they awaited the coming of the woman
whom they hoped might show them the way to
freedom, even though at the time it seemed iim-
possible she could do so.
The moments passed like hours while she re-
mained absent, and then once more they heard
a faint scratching at the door which told of her
return.
"Tell me all you know regarding this boy
Sowers being a spy," Mrs. Dillard whispered
when she was once more where private conver-
sation could be carried on. and Nathan said
nervously:






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


"Why speak of him at a time when every
moment is precious? Instead of giving such as
that villain a place in our thoughts we should
be trying to form some plan whereby the lives
of our friends may be saved."
"It is yet too early in the night for us to
make any move," the brave woman replied as if
her mind was already made up to a course of
action. Until the men have quieted down
somewhat we cannot so much as cross the yard
without being challenged, and I would know all
that may be told before setting out for Greene's
Spring."
"Do you count on making such a venture ?"
Evan asked in surprise.
"Some one must do it, and since I cannot set
you free, I must act as messenger."
"But there is hardly one chance in a hun-
dred you will succeed."
"Yet I shall try to take advantage of that
hundredth chance."






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


"But how may you get there? It is twenty
miles over a rough mountain road."
"Even though it were ten times as far, and
the peril greater an hundredfold, do you not
think I would brave it in the hope of saving
the lives of those brave men ?"
Evan ceased to find objections to her plan;
but asked how she might be able to make the
journey.
There is in the stable a colt which the
Britishers will hardly attempt to drive away
because he has not yet been broken. I shall do
my best at riding him, and trust in the good
God for protection."
Nathan was not a cowardly lad ; his acquaint-
ances spoke of him as one having much courage,
and yet he trembled at the thought of this
woman attempting to bridle an unbroken colt,
and then ride him twenty miles over the rough
mountain roads where only the steadiest of
horses might safely be used.





SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


He would have said something in the hope of
dissuading her from her purpose; but it was as
if his tongue refused its office, for Sarah Dil-
lard would ride that night not only to save a
hundred or more friends of freedom, but to save
the life of her husband.
"Tell me all you know of the spy, so that I
may warn our people against him with fair
proof."
Neither Evan nor Nathan made any attempt
at giving advice; the woman's courage so far
eclipsed theirs that it was as if she should com-
mand and they obey-as if they had no right
even to offer a suggestion. Obedient to her
wishes they repeated all they had heard the
vindictive Tory say, and described in detail
his reception at Major Ferguson's camp.
"If you could only take us with you, or what
would be better, so manage it that we might go
in your stead," Nathan said when his account
of Ephraim Sowers was brought to an end,






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


"I would willingly do so if it might be pos-
sible; but I can see no way to accomplish such
a purpose."
"Yet there are many chances against your
being able to ride the colt, however willing you
may be," Evan said, as if hoping such sugges-
tion might cause her to devise another means of
forwarding the warning.
"I know full well how many chances there
are against success, and yet because it is the
only' hope, I shall venture."
But little conversation was indulged in after
this assertion, which seemed prompted by
despair.
Nathan told the brave woman all he knew
regarding the most direct path through the
thicket to the American encampment, and Evan
warned her to be on the alert for Sowers near-
about the spring, where both he and his com-
rade believed the spy had gone to make certain
his intended victims did not escape.





SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


Then all fell silent as if awed by the dangers
which were to be voluntarily encountered, and
pi-esently the boys knew from the faint sounds
that Sarah Dillard had stolen swiftly away
without so much as a word of adieu.
She will never be able to get an unbroken
colt out of the stable, even if she succeeds in
bridling him," Evan whispered, and Nathan
replied with a certain hopefulness in his tone,
although he was far from believing the venture
might succeed:
"It is possible the task may be accomplished.
I have more faith in her gaining the mastery of
the colt for a certain time than I have of her
being able to keep him on the trail. There are
many places twixtt here and Greene's Spring
where a single misstep, such as an untrained
animal is likely to make, will send them both
into eternity."
As if by a common impulse the boys moved
toward the window, and there stood gazing out,





SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


waiting for the appearance of the brave woman
who had not only to master an untamed horse,
but to keep herself concealed from view while
surrounded by enemies.
The troopers' steeds had been stabled in the
huge barns to theright of the dwelling, where
were kept the draft animals, and, as the boys
well knew, Captain Dillard's saddle horses and
the colt to which his wife had referred, were
housed in the small building directly across the
stable-yard from the improvised prison.
This particular portion of the plantation
appeared to be entirely abandoned by redcoats;
but the officers in the dwelling were so near at
hand that any unusual noise in or around the
yard would immediately attract their attention,
even though the sentinels were remiss in their
duty, and it seemed well-nigh impossible that
Sarah Dillard could so much as lead the
most steady animal out into the open without
betraying her movements to the enemy.





SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


"She won't be able to bridle the colt without
something of a fight," Evan said half to him-
self, and Nathan added as if he would find some
ray of hope in the gloom which surrounded
them:
"It is fortunate that the stable has no floor,
and the colt may do considerable prancing
around without giving an alarm."
"Yet it is not likely she can ride him out
without a certain amount of noise."
"I know the venture is a desperate one,"
Nathan replied mournfully; but I am forcing
myself to believe it may succeed."
At this instant a dark form was seen moving
cautiously around the corner of the house in the
direction of the small stable, and the boys knew
that the desperate venture was begun.
Although the night had fully come it was
not so dark but that surrounding objects could
be seen with reasonable distinctness, and from
the moment Sarah Dillard thus came in view






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


the prisoners were able to follow her every
movement.
No frontiersman could have made his way
across the yard with less noise than she did;
not so much as the breaking of a twig betrayed
her movements, and if this stealing out of the
house had been the only difficult part of her
task, then one might say she would accomplish
it readily.
The boys hardly dared to breathe as she came
from the shadows of the building, moving with
reasonable rapidity across the yard until she was
lost to view in the gloom of the stable, and then,
although no creaking of hinges betrayed her
purpose, both knew she had effected an entrance.
It was only the easiest portion of the work
which had been accomplished, however, and the
prisoners stood with every nerve strained to its
utmost tension as they listened for what would
betoken that the struggle with the untamed
animal had begun.






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


Once, just for an instant, they saw her form
at the door, and then she suddenly disappeared
as if the colt had pulled her back; but as yet,
even though on the alert, they could hear noth-
ing unusual, and unless the British officers grew
suspicious because of her absence, she was yet
in safety.
One, two, three moments passed almost as if
they were hours, and then the brave woman
could be seen fondling and petting the colt, who
already wore the bridle, as she peered out from
the doorway to learn if the coast was yet clear.
"She has bridled him, and without making a
noise," Evan whispered in a tone of astonish-
ment.
"It was easier to do that in the darkness than
it would have been in the light, and if she is
wise she will mount inside, instead of trying to
do so out here."
It was as if Nathan had no more than spoken
when with a bound the colt, bearing on his






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


back the woman who was risking her life to
save her husband, came over the threshold,
rearing straight up on his hind feet until there
seemed every danger he would topple backward;
but yet his rider kept her seat.
"I had never believed a woman could do
that," Evan exclaimed in a whisper.
"Perhaps this one might not have been able
to but for the necessity. It hardly seems pos-
sible she can get out of the yard without detec-
tion, for the sound of his hoofs as he rears and
plunges must of necessity bring the redcoats
out in the belief that their own horses have been
stampeded."
The colt struggled desperately to free himself
from the strange burden upon his back, and yet,
singularly enough, never once did he come down
upon the ground with sufficient force to cause
alarm. He alternately reared and plunged
while one might have counted ten, his rider
clinging to him meanwhile as if she had been






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE. 71

strapped securely down, and then with a bound
he cleared the stack of brush which was piled
just behind the stable, disappearing an instant
later amid the forest, which on this side the
plantation had been left standing within a
hundred yards of the dwelling.
"She is off, and headed in the right direc-
tion," Nathan said in a tone of amazement, as if
it was almost incredible the feat had been
accomplished, and the words were no more than
uttered before out of the house came trooping
half a dozen men, alarmed by the thud of the
animal's hoofs.
They have heard her," Evan cried in an
agony of apprehension, "and now the chase
will begin, for they must understand what her
purpose is in thus running away."
Fortunately for the safety of that little band
at Greene's Spring, the Britishers were not so
well informed by the noise of all that had taken
place as Evan believed.






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


The thud of the colt's feet had simply caused
them to believe there might be a disturbance
among their own animals, and they were
very far from suspecting the real truth of the
matter.
They went hurriedly toward the barns where-
in their horses were stabled, however, and see-
ing this both the boys believed that chase was
about to be given.
"If she can keep the colt straight on the
course, I have no fear they will overtake her,"
Nathan said, much as though speaking to him-
self ; but it is not probable the beast will be
so tractable."
Now the prisoners watched in anxious sus-
pense to see the first of the troop ride out in
pursuit, and as the moments passed their spirits
increased almost to bewilderment because no
such move was made.
Finally, one by one, the redcoats returned to
the house as if satisfied everything was as it






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


should be, and Evan whispered, as if doubting
the truth of his own statement:
"It must be that they fail to suspect any-
thing is wrong. There is yet a possibility,
Nathan, that Sarah Dillard will accomplish the
task which half an hour ago I would have said
was absolutely beyond her powers."
"And if she can bridle and mount the beast,
I am tempted to believe she may reach Greene's
Spring in time, for certain it is that up to this
moment no one suspects that she has left the
plantation."
"I could- "
Evan ceased speaking very suddenly, and it
was with difficulty he could repress a cry of
fear, for at this instant the key was turned in
the lock, the door flung open, and as the prison-
ers suddenly faced around, they saw before
them Ephraim Sowers, looking satisfied and
triumphant.






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


CHAPTER IV.

THE STRUGGLE.

THE first and most natural thought that came
into the minds of the boys, as they turned to
see their enemy standing in the doorway, was
that he had discovered the flight, and, perhaps,
counted on doing something toward checking it
even now, when Sarah Dillard must have been
a mile or more away.
Almost as soon as this idea presented itself,
however, both realized that if the grinning
Tory had even so much as a suspicion of the
real state of affairs he would be urging the
troopers on in pursuit, rather than standing idly
there.
The young scoundrel remained for an instant
in the doorway enjoying his triumph, and






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE. 75

Nathan found it difficult to repress a smile of
satisfaction as he saw the spy thus unsuspicious,
while Sarah Dillard was speeding toward
Greene's Spring to carry the warning which, if
told, would most likely save the lives of a
hundred men.
Ephraim, firmly convinced that nothing could
avert the fate shaped by him for Colonel
Clarke and his force, was enjoying the situation
as pictured in his mind, to the utmost of his
mean nature, and the boys almost forgot they
were prisoners in the pleasure born of the
knowledge that the Tory might yet be out-
witted.
"What are you fellows doing over there by
the window ?" Ephraim asked peremptorily
after surveying the two in silence fully a
moment.
Have the Britishers any law or rule which
forbids one deprived of liberty from seeking
fresh air whenever he may be so fortunate






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


as to get an opportunity ?" Nathan asked
sharply.
"Hark you, Nathan Shelby, I am tired of
hearing your long-winded speeches, and we will
have done with them from this out-at least, so
long as I am the master."
"So long as you are the master!" Evan re-
peated in a tone of contempt. "We haven't
been aware that such was the case."
"Then you may know it now for a certainty.
I am counting on you two trying to escape, and
therefore have come to stand guard in this
room."
"And a valiant guard you.will be, Ephraim
Sowers, if your courage is no greater than it was
one year ago, when you fled in hot haste from
what proved to be a turkey-cock, thinking you
saw the head of an Indian among the weeds,"
Nathan said jeeringly, and the spy retorted
angrily:
Have a care over your tongue, my bold
.1






SARAI DILLARD'S RIDE.


rebel! Matters have changed now from what they
were forty-eight hours ago. You are among
those who obey the king, and do not allow
sedition-breeders free rein of their tongues."
"And now hark you, Master Sowers," Nathan
cried, losing his temper somewhat because of
the air of authority which this fellow assumed.
"' Rebels and sedition-breeders' are names which
have too much meaning in these days for you
to let them fall so trippingly from your tongue !
Have a care, you Tory sneak, lest even while
acting the part of guard over your betters, you
come to grief! I'm not minded to take many
threats from a coward and a spy."
"In this case, however, you will take whatso-
ever I choose to give, Nathan Shelby, for it
needs only that I raise my voice to bring here
those who would shoot you down did you so
much as lift your hand against me."
"And it is such knowledge which makes you
so wondrous brave," Evan said with a laugh of






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


scorn which did more to rouse the young spy's
anger than words could have done.
He struggled for an instant to speak; but
stammered and hesitated as the blood rushed
into his face until, losing the last semblance of
patience, he motioned for them to move back
toward the window from which they had just
come.
"If this is what you mean, we are willing to
take our stations here without your running the
risk of bursting because of your own sense of
importance," Nathan said as he moved back a
few paces, Evan'following the example. "Have
a care, however, that you do not attempt to give
such orders as we shall be indisposed to obey, lest
it seem as if your authority amounted to noth-
ing."
By this time Ephraim so far regained the
mastery over himself as to be able to speak, and
he cried in a fury:
"We'll soon see whether you dare disobey,





SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


and to that end. I will keep you busy for an
hour or more, until you have learned that I am
really the master. Now then, you rebels, re-
member that the king's troops are near at hand
to shoot you down at the first sign of insubordi-
nation, and take good heed to move exactly as I
command."
Ephraim straightened his body with a conse-
quential air, and stood for an instant as if
reflecting upon how he had best prove his
authority, while the two prisoners gazed at him
in astonishment that he should thus dare trust
himself unarmed alone with them.
"Stand straight and look me in the face !" he
commanded. "If the day's march was not
enough to break your spirits, we Will see what
a little exercise will do for you now. Keep
step, and travel around this room until I give
you permission to stop."
"Do you think we are to be bullied by such
as you ?" Nathan asked in great astonishment.






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


"If you think it is wise, refuse to do as I say,
and before five minutes have gone by you will
learn the result of disobedience."
Neither Evan nor Nathan moved, but stood
looking inquiringly into each other's eyes with
an expression on their faces which would have
warned the Tory of mischief had he been less
deeply occupied with his own fancied impor-
tance.
"Fall into line and march, or it will be the
worse for you!" he cried, advancing threaten-
ingly with upraised hand until he was within
striking distance of the prisoners, and for an
instant it appeared as if he intended to inflict
punishment then and there.
Whatever idea may have been in his mind
cannot be said, yet it hardly seems possible he
would have attempted personal violence while
alone with those whom he had wronged, even
though the soldiers were so near at hand.
It is certain, however, the boys fully believed





SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


he would carry out the implied threat, and
without thinking of the possible consequences,
or stopping to realize what might be the result
if this spy was roughly handled, as if with one
accord they leaped upon him, Nathan taking the
precaution of clapping his hand over the bully's
mouth at the first onset in such manner that
it was impossible for him to speak or make an
outcry.
Even a stronger lad than Ephraim Sowers
would have gone down before this sudden
attack as quickly as did he, and in a twinkling
the prisoners held him upon the floor in such
fashion that only one arm remained free.
Evan sat upon his feet, while Nathan, in ad-
dition to covering his mouth, held his right arm
firmly.
With his left hand Ephraim struck out to
the best of his ability, but without accomplish-
ing anything whatsoever, and he was permitted
to thus thrash around, doing no harm to any






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


save himself, until he had been thoroughly
wearied by the struggle.
"I reckon we have got time enough to
teach you quite a lesson," Nathan whispered
with but slight show of anger. "You are sup-
posed to be guarding us prisoners, and the red-
coats will give little heed to you for some hours
to come. While we are alone you shall get a
taste of what you would deal out to others."
As a matter of course Ephraim made no
reply, because it was impossible so to do; but
his captors could read in his eyes the threats his
tongue was powerless to utter.
"I know what you would say, my fine Tory
spy. You have in your mind the thought that
we must in time let you up, and then it shall
be your turn, for the soldiers will be called in
to perform what you fail in doing. How well
would that plan work if we did our duty, and
killed you here and now ? It is what should be
done to a lad who, having received nothing but






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


favors in this section of the colony, betrays to
their death a hundred or more of his neigh
bors."
Anger had rapidly died out of Ephraim's eyes
as Nathan spoke, for by the tone of the latter,
one would have said that he was in deadly
earnest, and really questioned whether or no it
was not his duty to take this worthless life.
It would not be a hard matter to let his life-
blood out," Evan added, intent only on doing
his share toward frightening the spy, "and per-
haps it will be best even though he had not be-
trayed Colonel Clarke and his men, for we can
have a very fair idea of what he will be, once
power is his."
"Find something with which to tie his feet
and hands, and then we will contrive a gag so
that it is not necessary to sit over him in this
fashion."
Evan obeyed the command by tearing from
the lad's hunting-shirt two or three strips of






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


material sufficiently stout to resist all his
struggles, and in a comparatively short space of
time the Tory was bound hand and foot, with
one sleeve of his own garment stuffed inside his
mouth as a gag.
He was powerless now either to move or
speak, and only when the work was accom-
plished did the boys fully realize that they had,
perhaps, injured themselves by thus temporarily
turning the tables.
It would have been better had we let him
go his own gait," Evan said in a whisper as he
drew Nathan toward the window where the
helpless Tory could not overhear his words.
" Of course we cannot hope to keep him here
longer than morning, and it is hardly likely the
redcoats will suffer him to be absent so many
hours without making certain he is safe. Once
the troopers come we shall suffer for this bit of
pleasantry."
"They are not like to put in an appearance






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


for several hours yet, more especially if the
villain gave out that he would stand guard
until weary of the sport."
"Yet the end must finally come."
Nathan started as if a sudden thought had
flashed upon him, and turned quickly toward
the window as he seized one of the heavy bars.
"Have you any idea that it might be possi-
ble to pull that down?" Evan asked won-
deringly.
"Hark you, lad," and now Nathan appeared
like one laboring under great excitement. Why
might we not escape ? The Britishers will have
no care for us while it is believed that sneak is
acting as sentinel, and if one of these bars could
be removed, we might count on at least an
hour's start."
"But there is no hope of our being able to
remove the barrier."
"Who shall say until it has been tried ?"
"I am certain that with our bare hands we






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


might tug and strain until morning without so
much as loosening one of the fastenings."
It was as if this suggestion excited Nathan
to a yet more brilliant flight of fancy in the line
of escape, for suddenly he darted toward the
door where he stood a moment in the attitude
of a listener, and then retracing his steps, whis-
pered to Evan :
"It is almost certain the Britishers are on the
floor below. This Tory has the key of the door
in his pocket- "
"Surely you are not thinking of attempting
to make your way down past all those who have
taken possession of the house ?"
"By no means; yet what will prevent our
venturing into some of the chambers nearby,
where perchance we shall find what will serve
as a lever to remove these bars."
Evan seized his comrade's hands ecstatically.
There was every reason to believe such a ven-
ture might be made, and without waiting to






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


discuss it he began searching Ephraim's pockets
for the key.
This was [soon found. A bulky iron instru-
ment fashioned by hand, and mostlike brought
from the mother country, it could not well be
concealed.
Cautiously, lest the slightest grating of the
iron should give the alarm, the boys shot the
bolt back; the door was opened, and they were
at last free of the upper portion of the house.
It was not safe to loiter in their work, how-
ever, for at any moment some one might come
from below to ascertain what Ephraim was do-
ing, and the boys moved as swiftly as they did
noiselessly until, when hardly more than a
minute had elapsed, they had in their posses-
sion such tools as it seemed positive would
enable them to effect the purpose.
An old musket barrel, and a strip of oak
which went to make up a quilting-frame; were
the articles which the lads brought into the






SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


room, carefully barring the door behind them
and replacing the key in Ephraim's pocket.
These implements would serve to pry off the
bars of the window, but whether it might be
done silently or not was a matter that could
only be determined by experiment.
The helpless spy was watching their every
movement, and by bending over him now and
then the lads could see, even in the gloom, an
expression of anger in his eyes.
He must have realized now that the chances
in favor of their escape were brought about
wholly through his desire to gloat over those
whom he believed were in his power.
It can readily be believed, however, that the
two lads did not spend much time upon the
spy. Had there been a possibility of taking
him with them, they would have run many
risks in order to accomplish such a purpose; but
since that was out of the question, and he
powerless for harm during a certain time at





SARAH DILLARD'S RIDE.


least, they could not afford to waste precious
moments upon him.
"I will use this bar as a lever, and do you
stand by with the musket-barrel to hold such
advantage as may be gained," Nathan said. "It
is reasonable to suppose there will be some
creaking as the nails are forced out; but that we
cannot prevent."
Work as cautiously as may be possible, for
we have ample time."
The lower bar was within three inches of the
window-ledge, and upon this Nathan determined
to direct his efforts, since it would probably be
the most easily removed.
The stout quilting-frame was inserted be-
neath it edgewise, which brought one end some
distance into the room, the window-ledge serv-
ing as a fulcrum.
Evan stood near at hand, ready with the
musket-barrel in case a shorter lever could be
used to better advantage, and, after listening




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