• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Advertising
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 The pilot and the Indian
 The boys and the jackscrew
 "By Ahava River"
 The pilot and the little pilgr...
 Epenow, the Indian wonder
 The story of the speedwell
 The tale of Henry Hudson
 The voyage of the Mayflower
 The Mayflower at sea
 The legendary sword
 The compact of the Mayflower
 The first discovery
 Pilot Coppin's second story
 Kidnaped Indians
 The man who gave up all
 The rock of faith
 Elder Brewster's looking-glass
 In the woods
 The thatch gatherers
 Indians
 The Indian mill
 Massasoit
 The death of Ellen More
 The departure of the Mayflower
 Lost
 The White Fool King
 The copper chain again
 The first Thanksgiving
 "Good cheer!"
 The Plymouth of to-day
 The landing of the pilgrims
 Compact Day
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: The pilot of the Mayflower : a tale of the children of the pilgrim republic
Title: The pilot of the Mayflower
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00087073/00001
 Material Information
Title: The pilot of the Mayflower a tale of the children of the pilgrim republic
Series Title: Creators of liberty series
Physical Description: viii, 1, 248, 6 p., 12 leaves of plates : ill. ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Butterworth, Hezekiah, 1839-1905
D. Appleton and Company
Publisher: D. Appleton and Company
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1898
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Pilgrims (New Plymouth Colony) -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Pilots and pilotage -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Frontier and pioneer life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Indians of North America -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Ships -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Sailors -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Seafaring life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Courage -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Determination (Personality trait) -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Imagination -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Liberty -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Tales -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
History -- Fiction -- Massachusetts -- New Plymouth, 1620-1691   ( lcsh )
Colonies -- Juvenile fiction -- Great Britain -- America   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1898   ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature -- 1898   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Hezekiah Butterworth ; with illustrations.
General Note: Pictorial front cover and spine.
General Note: Engraved title page.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements precede and follow text.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00087073
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223212
notis - ALG3461
oclc - 03786436
lccn - 98000006

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Half Title
        Half Title
    Advertising
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Preface
        Page v
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
        Page viii
    List of Illustrations
        Page ix
    The pilot and the Indian
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    The boys and the jackscrew
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    "By Ahava River"
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 24a
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    The pilot and the little pilgrims
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Epenow, the Indian wonder
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 42a
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    The story of the speedwell
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    The tale of Henry Hudson
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    The voyage of the Mayflower
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    The Mayflower at sea
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
    The legendary sword
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
    The compact of the Mayflower
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 90a
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    The first discovery
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 104a
        Page 105
    Pilot Coppin's second story
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
    Kidnaped Indians
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
    The man who gave up all
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
    The rock of faith
        Page 130
        Page 130a
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 136a
        Page 137
        Page 138
    Elder Brewster's looking-glass
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 148a
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
    In the woods
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
    The thatch gatherers
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
    Indians
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 170a
        Page 171
        Page 172
    The Indian mill
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
    Massasoit
        Page 184
        Page 184a
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
    The death of Ellen More
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
    The departure of the Mayflower
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
    Lost
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 216a
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
    The White Fool King
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
    The copper chain again
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
    The first Thanksgiving
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
    "Good cheer!"
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
    The Plymouth of to-day
        Page 244
        Page 244a
        Page 245
    The landing of the pilgrims
        Page 246
        Page 247
    Compact Day
        Page 248
    Advertising
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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VALLEY FALLS,


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THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER

A TALE OF THE CHILDREN
OF THE PILGRIM REPUBLIC












Books by Hezekiah Butterworth.
UNIFORM EDITION. EACH, 12MO, CLOTH, $1.50.

True to his Home. A Tale of the Boyhood of Franhlin.
Illustrated by H. WINTHROP PEIRCE.
"Mr. Butterworth's charming and suggestive story presents the most inter-
esting and picturesque episodes in the home life of Franklin, as well as a narra-
tive of the salient phases of his public life. The author has succeeded most
happily in carrying out his plan of "story-telling education" based on Froe-
bel's principle that "life must be taught from life."
The Wampum; or, The Fairest Page of History. A Tale
of William Penn's Treaty with the Indians. Illustrated by
H. WINTHROP PEIRCE.
"Historic truth is the foundation of all the incidents in this finely written,
instructive, and wholly charming book. The personality and character of
William Penn are most admirably treated, and his figure looms up to its noble
proportions in the historic perspective."-PhiladelIhia Press.
The Knight of Liberty. A Tale of the Fortunes of La-
fayette. With 6 full-page Illustrations.
"No better reading for the young man can be imagined than this fascinat-
ing narrative of a noble figure on the canvas of time."-Boston Traveler.
The Patriot Schoolmaster; or, The Adventures of the
Two Boston Cannon, the "Adams" and the "Hancock." A
Tale of the Minutemen and the Sons of Liberty. With Illus-
trations by H. WINTHROP PEIRCE.
The true spirit of the leaders in our War for Independence is pictured in
this dramatic story. It includes the Boston Tea Party and Bunker Hill; and
Adams, Hancock, Revere, and the boys who bearded General Gage, are living
characters in this romance of American patriotism.
The Boys of Greenway Court. A Story of the Early
Years of Washington. With ic full-page Illustrations by H.
WINTHROP PEIRCE.
"Skillfully combining fact and fiction, he has given us a story historically
instructive and at the same time entertaining."-Boston Transcript.
In the Boyhood of Lincoln. A Story of the Black Hawk
War and the Tunker Schoolmaster. With 12 full-page Illus-
trations and colored Frontispiece.
"The author presents facts in a most attractive framework of fiction, and
imbues the whole with his peculiar humor. The illustrations are numerous and
of more than usual excellence."-New Haven Palladium.
The Log School-House on the Columbia. With 13
full-page Illustrations by J. CARTER BEARD, E. J. AUSTEN,
and Others.
"This book will charm all who turn its pages. There are few boiks of
popular information concerning the pioneers of the great Northwest, and this
one is worthy of sincere praise."-Seattle Post-lntelligencer.
New York: D. APPLETON & COMPANY, 72 Fifth Avenue.





























































The pilot telling the story .of IHudson.


(See page 59.)









THE PILOT

OF THE MAYFLOWER

a tale of the Cbil ren
of the pilgrim lRepublic


BY
HEZEKIAH BUTTERWORTH
AUTHOR OF TRUE TO HIS HOME, THE WAMPUM BELT, ETC.


ILLUSTRATED


NEW YORK
D. APPLETON AND COMPANY
1898





































COPYRIGHT, 1898,
BY D. APPLETON AND COMPANY.














Sword, pot, and platter of Miles Standish.


PREFACE.


THIS volume, the eighth of the Creators of Liberty
Series, although it should really have been the first, is for
the most part but fact in picture. The voyage of the May-
flower is one of the most important events in the history of
the New World, and the writer has sought to bring into his
narrative all the known incidents that took place on the
ship during this voyage, which brought our own Argonauts
to our shores. While the methods of fiction have been em-
ployed in the story, they have not departed from the his-
torical spirit. As a method of fiction, the good pilot of the
Mayflower has been made a story-teller, but his stories are
substantially true. The incident of the jackscrew and the
service that it rendered, and that of-the copper chain, so far
as such a chain became a gift from the Pilgrims to Massa-
soit, and was made by that chief a sign of peace in his rela-
tions to the colony, were suggested by the Pilgrims' own
records. The decision of all the Pilgrims who survived the
great sickness not to return with the Mayflower, but to








THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


struggle on for the cause of human liberty, is one of the
noblest examples of moral heroism, and the first Thanks-
giving in the colony, with IMassasoit for a guest, closes in
a picturesque way the narrative of the decisive part of a
history which will ever be sacred to America and the Eng-
lish race. These events it has been our aim to present in
pen picture.
The other volumes of this series of books. have been suc-
cessful in finding a large audience of young readers, for
which the writer is grateful. The story of the children of
the Mayflower is a haunting theme. He has sought to
make this interpretation of the life of the young Pilgrims
of the Mayflower the best of the series, and he will be glad
if it should awaken an interest to study the Pilgrims' litera-
ture in those original documents that are now placed within
the reach of all.
It was a Greek adage that A people are known by the
heroes they crown." It is true of our own land. The Pil-
grim Fathers followed the faith of Columbus in moral
enterprise. They stood firm in the storms that would have
wrecked common lives, and have added their names to those
who walked by faith in the great and decisive events of
human history.
H. B.
28 WORCESTER STREET, BOSTON, MASS.




















CONTENTS.



CHAPTER PAGE
I.-THE PILOT AND THE INDIANS 1
II.-THE BOYS AND THE JACKSCREW 11
III.-" BY AHAVA RIVER" 18
IV.-THE PILOT AND THE LITTLE PILGRIMS.-THE STORY OF
THE CAPTIVE INDIAN TUSQUANTO 31
V.-EPENOW, THE INDIAN WONDER 39
VI.-THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL .46
VII.-THE TALE OF HENRY HUDSON 56
VIII.-THE VOYAGE OF THE MAYFLOWER.-" A MAN OVERBOARD 65
IX.-THE MAYFLOWER AT SEA.-A LEAK.-"BEAR HARD TO
THE WEST" .71
X.-THE LEGENDARY SWORD 80
XI.-THE COMPACT OF THE MAYFLOWER 89
XIT.-THE FIRST DISCOVERY 97
XIII.-PILoT COPPIN'S SECOND STORY 106
XIV.-KIDNAPED INDIANS.-" OUR PILOT" 116
XV.-THE MAN WHO GAVE UP ALL.-THE GOLDEN CHAIN 124
XVI.-THE ROCK OF FAITH 130
XVII.-ELDER BREWSTER'S LOOKING-GLASS 139
XVIII.-IN THE WOODS 153
XIX.-THE THATCH GATHERERS.-HERO, THE MASTIFF OF THE
MAYFLOWER.-A NIGHT UNDER-A TREE .. 158
XX.-INDIANS 165
XXI.-THE INDIAN MILL.-A ,CURIOUS EVENT 173









THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


CHAPTER
XXII.-MASSASOIT.-THE COPPER CHAIN
XXIII.-DEATH OF ELLEN MORE
XXIV.-THE DEPARTURE OF THE MAYFLOWER
XXV.-L6sT
XXVI.-THE WHITE FOOL KING
XXVII.-THE COPPER CHAIN AGAIN .
XXVIII.-THE FIRST THANKSGIVING .
XXIX.-" GOOD CHEER!" .


APPENDIX.

THE PLYMOUTH OF TO-DAY .
THE LANDING OF THE PILGRIMS .
COMPACT DAY. .


Elder Brewster's chair and cradle of Peregrine White, Pilgrim Hall.

























Governor Carver's chair and ancient spinning-wheel, Pilgrim Hall.



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


The pilot telling the story of Hudson Frontis
The embarkation of the Pilgrims
From the picture by Robert Weir, in the Capitol at Washington.
The departure from Delftshaven
From the painting by Charles Lucy.
Reading the compact in the Mayflower's cabin
The Mayflower in Plymouth harbor .
From the painting by William F. Halsall.
Plymouth Rock .
The canopy under which Plymouth Rock is now preserved
The landing of the Pilgrims
From the painting by Henry Sargent.
The fort and meeting-house, 1621
View of Leyden Street, Plymouth colony .
The return of the lost boy. .
National Monument to the Forefathers


FACING
PAGE
piece
25


42


90
S105


S181
186
149


S170
S185
216
244






















Pilgrim Hall, Plymouth.


THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


CHAPTER I.
THE PILOT AND THE INDIANS.

"BEAUTIFUL Leyden! "
It was a rugged Scottish sailor who spoke. He had been
a fisherman on the coasts of New England and the Banks of
Newfoundland. He was among the few sailors that had
ever seen these mysterious coasts, for the time was the spring
of 1620. He was held to be a wonderful man in those re-
markable times, for he had seen American Indians.
A man who had seen American Indians before 1620
never wanted companionship. These Indians were to the
Europeans the children of Nature, about whom every one
1







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


wished to hear. Columbus had awakened a strange and
vivid curiosity in the dusky race, as he had presented to
Isabella the bejeweled Caribs, with splendid figures and
strong arms holding aloft gorgeous birds, on the occasion of
the festival at Santa F6 in honor of the discovery of the
New World. Captain John Smith had thrilled England
with Indian tales, to which was added the sylvan romance
of Pocahontas, who had died at Gravesend in 1617, a con-
vert to the Christian faith and the wife of a gallant English-
man.
These were times before De Foe and his nursery-haunt-
ing narrative of Robinson Crusoe, but all men who had seen
Indians were like De Foes in the public eye.
Delightful as were such sea adventurers, traders, and
fishermen to men and women, they were as giants in the
imagination of the children. What child had not heard of
the lovely Pocahontas, of how she stayed the war club, and
of her marriage aniid the English hedgerows?
Sebastian Cabot, in 1502, had brought three Indians
from Newfoundland to England, and had presented them
to Henry VII. They were the first Indians ever seen in
England. What were their names? We do not know.
What became of them? We do not know, but this we are
pleased to know, that they filled England with wonder.
We are told that when they were found in America they
were clothed with skins of beasts and lived on raw flesh,
"but that, after two years' residence in England, they were







THE PILOT AND THE INDIANS.


seen in the king's court clothed like Englishmen." And
this was in those far, wise days of Henry VII, nearly one
hundred years before the Pilgrim Fathers began their wan-
derings.
In 1576 Captain Martin Frobisher brought to England
an Indian whose history was more strange than romantic.
He had attracted him to his ship by the ringing of a bell,
and so seized him, canoe and all. The savage retained his
native fierceness, and we are told that he inflicted terrible
injuries upon himself, not being able to injure others. He
died of England's cold. There were hearts that pitied him,
both for his sufferings and for the injustice that had been
done him.
The Scottish sailor whom we introduced to the reader
with the words Beautiful Leyden" was approaching the
quaint Holland city on a very remarkable undertaking. He
was to pilot the Pilgrim Fathers, or the younger part of the
exiled church of John Robinson, from Leyden to Southamp-
ton, and thence to the New World, where he had been be-
fore, and had seen Indians.
His name was Robert Coppin, a hardy, simple, true-
hearted Scotchman, and his services had been secured in
England by one Thomas Nash, who was bringing him to
Leyden to meet the Pilgrims, then preparing to cross the sea.
Our pilot," they came to call him, and there is such
tenderness and significance in the words that we must use
him for the character by which to interpret the life of the








THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


children of the Pilgrims on board the Speedwell, the May-
flower, on the smooth, pleasant waters of the early part of
the voyage that changed the history of mankind, on the bil-
lows of the storms that followed, and then among the In-
dians on the rude and wintry New England coast. "Our
pilot" has a friendly sound, and this pilot had a kindly
heart.
Robert Coppin, our pilot," might well exclaim Beau-
tiful Leyden! He had seen many cities in his day, but
never one like this on the borders of the old Rhine. Leyden
was the oldest city in Holland; here were the ruins of a for-
tress founded before Christ; here was a city of heroes.
When it had been besieged by the Spaniards, the Prince
of Orange had broken the dikes and let in the sea.
Then the prince said to the people:
"As a compensation for your losses I will remit your
taxes or build you a university. Which shall it be? "
The people chose the university. It stood there now,
with its roofs glimmering over the canals and above the
lime trees.
The people had chosen well; some of the greatest schol-
ars of Europe are associated with the University of Leyden.
Robert Coppin, the pilot, who had seen Indians, drifted
up one of the canals under the lime trees. The spring was
waning; the trees were filled with song birds and the gardens
with flowers.
"Thomas Nash," said the merry sailor, why do the







THE PILOT AND THE INDIANS.


Separatists wish to leave this goodly place Why do they
not remain here?"
He saw the. church, the tiled roofs, the pleasant gables
and open lattices, and the long lines of water streets or canals.
There are not many towns like this," he added. One
could stay here forever, if his soul were only content."
"But the souls of these people are not content."
"Why, why, Thomas Nash? Have they not liberty?"
asked our pilot.
Some children came down to the landing under the
lime trees. Among them was Ellen More, who had
found a home in the family of Edward Winslow, and
who was to become a little Pilgrim on the Mayflower by
and by.
Yes," said Thomas Nash, they have liberty, but they
fear that it will not last. Yonder is the common cause of the
discontent."
"What-the children?"
"Yes, the children. The Separatists wish to found a
home where their children can enjoy religious freedom and
be educated. Go with me to their meetings and you shall
hear."
They landed under the lime trees.
The Scottish seaman felt a little touch on his hand.
He looked down into a child's face. It was a beautiful
face, amid waving hair.
What is your name, my girl? "








THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


Ellen More."
"Do you belong to the Brownites?" The Brownites
were a sect of dissenters.
"Elizabeth Winslow keeps me, sir. She is not my own
mother, but she is a good, good mother to me. May I ask
you something, sir?"
"Aye, aye-ask on; prattle like yours always holds me.
What is it you would know? "
Are you a pilot, sir? "
"Aye, aye."
Ar you to be our pilot, sir? "
"Aye, aye; and I'll pilot true such girls as you, and
I would die for such a crew. You see I can talk in
rhymes."
And mother Elizabeth said that you had seen Indians.
Will you tell us children all about what you saw in New
England some day, sir?"
Aye, aye, my pet; some day-my heart hugs you to
think of it-some day, some day, when I am off duty upon
the open sea. I have heard of your foster father before,"
he added. "Edward Winslow; he has been a great trav-
eler. He is rich, and he is much esteemed, and he is going
to leave this beautiful city, and all, and take you with him,
my pet. Oh, this is a beautiful world; and God is good,
I'm thinking, but men's hearts are hard. I will tell you
about the Indian that I saw some day."
And you will tell all the children, sir? "







THE PILOT AND THE INDIANS.


Yes, yes, you great little heart, all. How many will
there be of you? "
"Twelve little ones, and as many young folks, I heard
mother Elizabeth say."
That is quite a company of children and young people."
"But you are to be our pilot."
"I must go now-methinks such as you ought to have a
better pilot than I. And you have, though I am a rough man
that says it-you have, you have. Such as you have a
Pilot that the eye does not see."
He left the canoe and followed Thomas Nash to the
house of John Robinson, the pastor of the church in Leyden.
The place where the goodly man's house stood is still marked
in Leyden. It is near the great church, which is also in-
scribed, the tablets being the gifts of grateful sons of the
Pilgrims in America.
Then Robert Coppin, our pilot, stood face to face with
this aged man, the prophet of America, who was to build
beyond the seas, but never to go to the new colony that he
had builded.
There was to be a gathering of the exiles in that house
that day. The pilot would hear what these people had to
say, and then he would better understand their case and
cause. Perhaps he would meet there again the sweet face
of Ellen More, if the Winslows should come to the meeting.
He hoped he would, for he was a lonely man, and the child's
touch had made him very happy.
2







THE, PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


There are people that it is a blessing for a lonely heart
to know, and little Ellen More, to whom Edward Winslow
had given a home, was one of them.
The little girl came to the meeting as the pilot had
hoped. She was led by the hand of a lovely lady, Mistress
Elizabeth Winslow.
After the religious exercises were over, Pastor John Rob-
inson said: Our pilot is here, a lusty Scotchman whom we
are glad to welcome. He brings to us a letter from Robert
Cushman, our English agent. This letter I will read."
He read the letter, which stated that the Mayflower, a
ship of one hundred and eighty tons, Thomas Jones master,
would soon leave London for Southampton, and take there
a company of English immigrants, who would sail in her to
the Hudson River.
The Mayflower! It was probably the first time that
John Robinson's people heard the name! It was to be a
ship of destiny, the winged messenger of heaven to the west-
ern world!
The people listened to the tidings with intense in-
terest.
"But," said John Robinson, "this is not the most im-
portant information to us now and here that our good Scotch
pilot has brought. The letter further says that a sixty-ton
pinnace, the Speedwell, has been purchased by the Adven-
turers, our company, and that she is to be fitted out here in
Holland, and that she is to take you to Southampton, and to







. THE PILOT AND THE INDIANS.


go with the Mayflower to the new country, and is to remain
there for a year. I will read you this part of the letter."
There was silence as he read this part of the letter which
so concerned the pastor's congregation. He then said pleas-
antly "Our pilot here has seen the New World, and he may
be able to tell us what we need most to carry. Speak out,
Robert Coppin, our people have eager ears to hear you!"
Robert Coppin, our pilot," holding his hat in his hand,
bowed low and said:
My it please your reverence and your honors, if I may,
thus address you, who do not desire titles or any flattering
words, the best things that you can carry, which you do not
now have, are, in my'humble opinion, presents for the In-
dian chiefs."
"That is a good thought," said Edward Winslow, who
had traveled much, and had read the letter of Sir Walter
Raleigh and other adventurers in the New World. A
very good thought, Master Coppin; and may I ask what'
trifles most please the Indians on these new coasts?"
Chains for the neck," said he, and belts for the waist.
The Indians wear chains made of shells. Free chains among,
these people are emblems of dignity and power. A chain
that holds a treasure that can lie upon the breast is very
highly esteemed by the lords of the forest."
"But," said Mr. Winslow, "we would hardly be able to
carry to them gold or silver chains."
"A copper chain with a medal would do as well," said






THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


the pilot. "You can buy such chains at the shops in the
town."
Little Ellen More's eyes danced. A copper chain with
a medal for a chief," said she to her foster mother, Elizabeth
Winslow, when the two had gone out upon the street. "I
wish that I had such a chain."
Our pilot had joined Mistress Elizabeth Winslow and
Ellen, and had heard what Ellen had said.
I will buy you a copper chain and medal if your mother
is willing, little girl," said he.
May I carry it over the sea?"
If the mistress wills."
And give it to an Indian chief?"
If she so wills." The answer made light the steps of
the girl.
They came to a shop where jewels, rings, and chains
with medals of Holland were sold, and our pilot asked them
to enter the place. He there purchased a copper chain with
a medal, and put it over Ellen's neck.
"See," said he, "it reaches nearly to the floor. "But
an Indian is tall and big."
"You are very kind to my little girl," said Elizabeth
Winslow. "I am glad indeed that we are to have you for
our pilot. I love them that love children; such people are
true friends to all men, and I can read your heart."
The pilot wondered if indeed the copper chain would
ever find an Indian chief.















CHAPTER II.


THE BOYS AND THE JACKSCREW.

IN the houses in the neighborhood many of the people
were preparing their goods or effects for removal to the
quay where lay the ship that was to take them to Southamp-
ton and thence across the sea, three thousand miles wide, to a
wilderness as wide as the sea.
The immigrants had sold most of their household prop-
erty, but each had retained something that he wished to take
to the new land. This one had a chair that he wished to
keep; that one a stand or table with sacred associations.
Elder Brewster had a chest and a looking-glass. The chest
is still to be seen in Pilgrim Hall, Plymouth; America's
"Ark of the Covenant" it came to be, on account of the
purpose to which it was put on the last days of the voyage
of the Mayflower. Of this we will tell you the story in
its place. The looking-glass which, with Elder Brewster's
Bible, may still be seen at Plymton, near Plymouth, in an
ancient Brewster house, is perhaps the most precious of all
American mirrors. Into it all of the Pilgrim fathers and
mothers may have looked, including Robinson of Leyden,
their old pastor, who expected to follow them when the
11








THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


younger members of the church should have planted their
church in the wilderness, but who was called to make another
pilgrimage from which none return.
Every one seemed to wish to take on board the little ship
more articles than it could be allowed to carry.
As soon as it became known that the pilot had come and
was at the house of the Pilgrim pastor, the boys and young
men began to gather there to meet him. They wished to
see a man who had been to the land whither they were going.
Among the boys was Jasper More, a brother of little Ellen
More, of the Winslow family. Love Brewster and Wrastle
Brewster, sons of the amiable Elder Brewster, as also John
Billington and John Hooke, a servant in the Allerton
family.
At last the day before that set for the departure came.
The children gathered with the others at Robinson's house.
They were a merry group on this serious day. John
Robinson seems to have loved young people, and to have won
them as a common father. They appealed to him when in
doubt, and he decided their cases with a sympathetic heart.
A friend of mankind is always the children's friend.
Two of the boys and a carpenter came bringing a jack-
screw. They wished to take it on board the ship. The
boys were carrying the screw, and the carpenter was follow-
ing them.
That is a curious instrument that you have there, my
friend," said Elder Robinson to the carpenter. "It is not







THE BOYS AND THE JACKSCREW.


great for size, but they tell me that there is power in it,"
looking toward the pilot.
Aye, aye, sir, that there is. There has been many a
ship saved from wreckage by a jackscrew. Are you going
to take it on board? "
"That is what I would do," said the carpenter. "But
they say that we are in danger of overloading the ship with
storage, that nothing more must go on board of the barges
which are to take us to the ship-not so much as an axe or
hatchet. That instrument might prove very much of serv-
ice in case of a strain on the ship during the voyage."
"Which may Heaven prevent," said good Elder Robin-
son. It is the duty of people to live where they can do the
most good, and carry with them where they go the things
that will be most useful. I am not the captain of the ship,
but if I were I would admit the jackscrew."
But, my good man," said Coppin, may it please you,
I am to be the pilot and so one of the mates, and I know the
value of a jackscrew. We may see hard weather before we
reach the American coast. I will take it on board; the
captain will not object to that. It is small baggage that I
will have to carry."
One of the boys shouted-" Our pilot!"
"Aye, aye, boys; it is good hearts that ye have to say
that. Put down the jackscrew under the trees, until after
the meeting has been held, and I will see that it is taken
on board the ship from the barges. I am to be pilot of







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


this goodly company, thank Heaven, and to do your bid-
ding."
"Our pilot! said the boys. They all felt that there
was something in the Scotchman's heart to trust.
I am glad, my boys, of all this good will. I have seen
the shores on which you are going to settle. I am going
with you, and my heart as well as my hand shall be true
to you. I wish that I were going to share your lot, but that
will never be the fate of Robert Coppin, the sailor and
fisherman; he must follow the sea, he must follow the
sea! "
You have seen the Indians," said Jasper More.
Aye, aye; I have seen a forest king in all of his wam-
pum and feathers, with his bow and quiver, and his lusty
men."
"Will they harm us where we settle?" asked Love
Brewster.
No, no, I mind not, or they would not have done so
if the captains on the coast had not stolen some of them and
carried them away."
"Will you tell us about those stolen Indians? asked
Wrastle Brewster.
Aye, aye, my lads, some day, some pleasant day on the
sea. The people are gathering now, and Elder Brewster de-
sires me to stay to this godly meeting."
"Yes, yes, my good sailor," said the elder, "I wish you
to stay that you may see what a precious freight you are to







THE BOYS AND THE JACKSCREW.


pilot to the unknown shore. Men's hearts are more than
any gold that they can possess, and it is the worth that is in-
visible that determines the destinies of men. It is the elect
of time that you are to meet to-day, sir, and to pilot into
the empty world where Heaven has opened the gate of op-
portunity. I like you well, sir, I like you well. But no more
now; the people are coming, and this is our last day to-
gether here! "
Robert Coppin bowed his head.
The boys took off their hats and shouted again: Our
pilot! "
The Scotchman watched the people as they gathered.
How noble and yet how simple they looked! Captain
Carver and his wife; William Brewster, the deacon, and
Mistress Brewster; Edward Winslow and Mistress Winslow,
and beautiful little Ellen More; William Bradford and Mis-
tress Bradford; Isaac Allerton and his family; Captain
Miles Standish and Rose Standish; William Mullins, his
wife, and the afterward historic Priscilla, then a Puritan
girl; the Hopkinsons; the Billingtons; the Tilleys; the Chil-
tons; and John Alden, who was one day to marry Priscilla.
Many were young people. Their dress was simple; they
wore the crown of character. They had dwelt together in
Leyden in love and unity for nearly twelve years-pilgrims,
led by an invisible hand.
He watched them there as they came toward the house
through the sunny streets cooled by the lime trees. It was







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


a silent throng-as still as the placid canals. Some of the
women were weeping.
He saw the children as they came. Pastor Robinson
was to speak especially of the children and to them that
day. Ellen More and her brother Jasper had already inter-
ested him, and his heart went out in pitying love to them
because they were dependent on others, and in a sense
alone in the world. He could feel for broken families and
be as arms, heart, and guidance to such, for such was his
nature.
The sun rose high over the canals and the lime trees.
The storks sat listlessly on the chimneys and gables. The
black flat-bottomed boats lay idling on the waters. In the
square students in dark habits passed thoughtfully to and
fro. Leyden is beautiful now; it was so in 1620.
Why were these people going out of these serene streets
on the Rhine across an uncertain sea into a wilderness of
savages, wild beasts, and tangled trees? Why? why? the
pilot asked as he stood there and wondered.
There was not a church, a school, a roof in all the land
to which they were going. Not a single road. The blazed
trail of the red hunter was there; the frail tent of bark and
skins. Not a library was there on all the shining shores.
The forest lords knew not their own history. They were
probably the descendants of some wandering Asiatic race.
Their gods were the beings of a rude imagination. They
had not the vices of the old nations, but to shed blood was







THE BOYS AND THE JACKSCREW.


their glory, and revenge was the sweetest passion of life.
The race that seeks blood will perish.
Why? why?
The people had assembled now in the great room. He
would go in and stand by the door, holding his hat in his
hand. He would hear what the grave and gentle pastor had
to say. This was to be the good man's last discourse. He
would listen intently. The pastor should answer the ques-
tions that kept rising in his mind on this late midsummer
day, amid the beautiful serenity that ends in the low Rhine
lands the last shortening days of July.
What will the pastor say? He will at least tell his peo-
ple, his young people, why he wills them to go.
The young people all bent a friendly look on the pilot as
they passed into the room. The children sat so that they
could look upon him, as he stood there with his bowed head,
hat in hand. He had seen many strange seas-the Spanish
Main, the island of Newfoundland. They had been told
this; and he had seen a red Indian king.















CHAPTER III.


BY AIAVA RIVER."

THE room was still. The occasional sob of a woman
caused the children's faces to wear a look of sympathy and
wonder. One woman spoke aloud to another who was deaf,
breaking the silence. She. said, "Not one of us will ever
see this place again, not one! "
John Robinson arose, bowed his head in silence, and then
read Luther's version of Psalm C, which the company sung.
The house had very large rooms, and a garden which was
a kind of park and now blowing with flowers. In Robinson's
garden were some twenty or more cabins, and here the poor
people lived. His congregation worshiped in his house, and
the place where this socialistic community dwelt in wonder-
ful harmony and love is now marked with the beautiful in-
scription:
"ON THIS SPOT LIVED, TAUGHT, AND DIED,
JOHN ROBINSON, 1611-1625."
Robinson's congregation must have numbered some five
hundred. The Dutch came to love this wandering church,
and gathered about the doors of the church, home, and
garden.







"BY AHAVA RIVER."


Such people were gathering now, and a whisper went
round that it was the pilot who was standing hat in hand in
the door.
"It is sorry that we are that they are going," said a
rugged Hollander to the pilot in English. "It is kind
hearts that they have, "and there is never one of them but
pays his debts. They all know the meaning of the text,
'Owe no man anything'; ah, they do speak the truth and
pay their debts, but they dispute about doctrines, much is
the pity, I think. What have you here outside? "
The pilot looked down on the blooming grass, and saw it
was the jackscrew to which the Hollander alluded.
"It is a tool that I am going to put on board the boats
that go to the ship as soon as the meeting is over," said the
pilot.
Here the pastor arose again and spread out his hands.
How holy and noble he looked! There were tears in his
eyes, but his face glowed.
"Here," said the Hollander to the pilot, take it away."
"What, my friend? asked the pilot.
"That jackscrew; it is out of harmony with the place;
this is a spot where one should take off his shoes, I mind;
and that thing looks like a trespasser-a sinner, it is a world-
ly thing-let me take it out into the garden."
"Your spiritual sense is keen indeed, my friend," said
the pilot.
The old Dutchman took the jackscrew and carried it into







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


the garden and set it down amid the flowers, then took it up
again and left it among some weeds, "where it belonged,"
as he said as he came back and looked into the door again.
John Robinson prayed. The prayer seemed to rise into
the regions of spiritual mystery, and the reverent old Hol-
lander listened as though a very prophet was speaking.
Then the pastor uttered the strange words "By the
River Ahava."
The pilot listened.
What did it mean? He had never heard of that river be-
fore; in all of his sailings and wanderings he had not
found it.
Then Robinson repeated an ancient record from sacred
Hebrew history:
And there at the river by Ahava, I proclaimed a fast,
that we might humble ourselves before God, and seek a right
way for us, and for our children, and all our substance."
He related the Hebrew story that had left this simple
record. He preached from each clause, but when he came
to speak on the clause "and for our children the room
was silent, and the pilot stepped within the door. Robert
Coppin saw that the pastor had made in his interpretation
the Zuyder Zee a River Ahava, and that "our children"
were a cause of the event of this memorable day.
"Why do you venture upon the ocean," said Robinson
in substance, to find a home in an unknown land? This is
a pleasant place, amid the lime trees, the canals, the sea







"BY AHAVA RIVER."


meadows, the ancient homes, and the towers of learning and
the spires of faith? Why do you leave the pleasant lands of
the vineyards of the Rhine? Children, hear me; ye young
people whom I have so much loved, and shall always love,
listen to me; 'tis the last time that I shall open to you my
heart.
It is for your sakes that the boats that are to bear you to
the Speedwell will sail in the cool of the day.
It is England that has caused you to go into exile, but
her blood flows in our veins; we love her history, her name,
and we must remain Englishmen. In Holland, by the pleas-
ant sea, you are losing your language. This must not be.
The language of old England, of the heroes of faith, of the
homes of our fathers, must be kept sacred. It will be so in
the wilderness.
"You are changing in character here. The habits of a
city of luxury are taking away your strength of soul. Your
faith must be kept pure; wealth is nothing, fame is nothing,
character is all.
"You must be educated; all of you must be educated
in the free air of faith. There must be planted for you in
the wilderness a place where education shall be free.
My children, I may never be able to follow you into the
wilderness. It matters not. Your parents may suffer-it
matters not, if so be it is Heaven's will. It matters not if you
can be educated for a higher life of the freedom of the faith
that the suffering world waits.







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


Go forth, go forth, prisoners of hope. All light has
not yet been revealed. New light will break forth from the
world in the wilderness. Some minds can go as far as
Luther, some as far as Calvin, some can see truth in very
vision, but do you not resist new truth, and you must only
follow me as far as I follow the truth of Christ! "
The pilot saw, as it were, the serene pastor's soul. The
purpose of the pilgrims was now clear to him. They were
to face the perils of the world, of the seas, and the wilderness,
not for themselves, but for their children; not for their own
comfort, but for the comfort of those who were to come after
them. They loved welfare more than wealth, and others
more than themselves.
Many of them had become poor for this purpose of the
help of mankind. They were not going to seek for riches,
they were leaving worldly riches behind. They had turned
their backs on ease and comfort and the hopes of peace, all
of which might have been theirs.
When and where in all history was there ever an assem-
bly like this?
At the close of the discourse, the communion was admin-
istered to those who were to go and those who were to stay.
That scene is worthy of a painting.
Then they went out into the great garden, many of them
leading the children by the hand.
The pilot went out to find his jackscrew in the weeds
"where it belonged." He took it up, and was about to







"BY AHAVA RIVER."


make his way with it toward the barges that were to go down
the canals to the Speedwell, when he was met by a sea cap-
tain who had come up here from Delftshaven.
They will all wish to come back again," said the cap-
tain, in the hearing of the company.
"Pilot," said Elder Brewster, "you have been to the
country; do you think that we shall ever wish to come back
again?"
"Nay, nay," said the pilot, a man's country is in his soul.
Nay, nay, not one of you will ever wish to come back."
But the captain's words echoed.
"Shall we wish to return with you again, when the ship
lifts her wings for old England, I wonder?" said Elizabeth
Winslow. 0 pilot, those words of the captain's are a hawk
in the sky. What do you think? "
"Shall we wish to come back?" said Rose Standish,
echoing the dark prophecy.
"Nay, nay," said the pilot. "Come back? Did you
ever hear a woman wish to return from any place where were
the best prospects for her children? Come back, come back?
No; it is prospects that make the heart happy. Present
hardship is nothing if the future is bright."
But the Israelites longed for the fleshpots of Egypt,"
said one who had heard what the captain had said.
"There are no Israelites of that kind here, please your
honor," said the pilot. "The world grows better, else what
is the use of the world?"
3







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


Right, right you are," said Parson Robinson. There
will never be an age when there will be not a better one to
come. The world will be better when we go out of it than
when we came into it, or it ought to be. Whatever happens
to this one or that, it matters not; it is the destiny of these
people to sail. God's time has come. The sea may rage,
the savages of an unknown land may uplift their weapons
of war, but the time has come for the truth to make a new
nation of free men, who may own their souls, and found a
new nation in faith."
The pilot turned away and went down to the boats that
were to take them to the Speedwell which lay at Delfts-
haven, some ten or more miles away.
Little Ellen More ran after him.
0 pilot, pilot, do you think that we will ever want to
come back again?"
No, no, my little one, you will never come back again,"
said the pilot.
His words were prophetic. Little Ellen More would
never come back.
Of their departure on that day of the glowing prophecy
of Robinson, and of the dark words of Captain Bradford, the
leader wrote a single sentence that might well be set in
gold. Were we to be asked what is the most beautiful
sentence in all history, we would say it was this:
So they left that goodly and pleasant city which had
been their resting place near twelve years, but they knew









































T re embarkation of the Pilgrims.







"BY AHAVA RIVER."


that they were pilgrims, and looked not much on those
things, but lifted up their eyes to the heavens, their dearest
country, and quieted their spirits."
The words pictured Robinson's own soul, which was the
sentiment of all.
That evening the company went on board the boats that
were to convey them to the Speedwell at Delftshaven; they
started for the ship early in the morning, and Robinson went
with them.
Some of the children wished to go in the boat with the
pilot, and they were allowed so to do. The older colonists
sought the boat of Robinson, Brewster, and Carver, that they
might talk with him as they went along the canal in the late
midsummer day.
The barges were moored near the Nan's Bridge, oppo-
site the Klok-steeg, where Robinson's house and garden
were.
They were to go by the way of the Vliet, as a part of the
canal between Leyden and Delft was called. They would
pass a water gate. After some nine miles on the Vliet they
would come to a city and wide canal called The Hague.
They would here find the still placid waters lined with noble
trees, and they would pass in view of Oud-Delft, and the Old
Kirk with its lancet windows, and perhaps in sight of the red-
tiled house in which William the Silent, the father of the
cause of liberty in the Netherlands, had thirty-six years be-
fore been assassinated. They would pass the gates of Delft,








THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


and leave the town, and enter the Delftshaven Canal, at the
end of which their ship would appear.
The dikes were high in this part of the Low Countries,
and the tide was full, and they found themselves sailing
above the land. They may have stopped at Delft, and
probably did. If so, their journey lasted a large part of
the day.
And now they are upon the canals.
As they passed the gates of Delft, and beheld the slender
spire fading against the sky, Elizabeth Winslow called the
children around her, and pointed out to them the red gables
of the palace of William the Silent.
"Who was William the Silent? asked little Ellen More
of her foster mother.
"He was the defender of the liberties of the people of
Holland. Had he not been, it is probable that we should
never have found in that colony a home. For the sake of
liberty he broke the dikes of the sand dunes and let in the
sea. And the sea fought for Holland. He died a martyr,
and his last thoughts were for liberty."
They were approaching the village of Overschie, and the
children asked Mistress Elizabeth to tell them the story of
the death of William in the cause of liberty, because of this
tragedy all the people had heard.
Mistress Elizabeth was not loth to speak of these things
with the fading town of Delft, that she would never see
more, still in view.







"BY AHAVA RIVER."


THE STORY OF THE SILENT PRINCE.
"William," she said, taking Ellen More in her arms,
" was a man of few words and wonderful wisdom in council.
So they called him William the Taciturn, or William the
Silent. He was bred to courts, and he lived in a very
splendid way; but when he espoused the cause of liberty he
sold his valuables and gave up all show and vainglory, and
was glad to live like one of the people. He announced him-
self a convert to the Holland faith, and asked to lead the
armies of the Netherlands in the cause of liberty.
His love for the cause of the liberty of the people grew,
until he thought and dreamed of nothing else. He felt that
Heaven had given this cause to him, and that he was invisi-
bly, as it were, in the little country of the dikes leading the
hopes of mankind.
The war for liberty was waged against Philip of Spain,
who claimed the country for the Spanish crown.
"William was sometimes successful and sometimes de-
feated in a long war, but in 1579 he laid the foundation of
the Dutch Republic, and Holland and Zeeland proclaimed
him their Stadtholder.
But Philip of Spain, enraged at the loss of the country
which he claimed as his hereditary right, offered twenty-five
thousand gold crowns for his head.
"Perilous days were his then. He went about his new
republic of freedom as a marked man. The town of Delft







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


was beset with mysterious men-ruffians, some of them, per-
haps, Spaniards in disguise, some Italians, all adventurers,
whose presence was suspected and feared.
"There was a little, thin, dark-minded man named Bal-
thazar Gerard, who appeared before the Prince of Parma, in
the interest of the Spanish king, and asked for money to go
to Delft as a pretended refugee. The money was refused,
but a councilor of the prince said to him: 'Go forth and
defray your own expenses, and if you succeed the king
will reward you, and you shall make yourself an immortal
name.'
He came to Delft pretending to be a friend to William.
He obtained a commission to go to France, and there
was made a commissioner to bear dispatches to the Dutch
court, and was admitted into the presence of the prince.
"When he met the prince with the dispatches he trem-
bled. He had come unarmed this time, and he had prepared
for no way of escape; but the prince's door was open to him
now, and he would come again.
On Sunday morning, as the bells were tolling, Bal-
thazar entered the courtyard.
"'What brings you here to-day?' asked the sergeant of
the halberdiers.
I would like to go to church across the way,' said the
wily conspirator, 'but see, I have only this travel-stained
attire, without fit shoes or hose.'
"The little dusty stranger with his pious\words did not







"BY AHAVA RIVER."


excite the suspicion of the guard. The latter spoke to an
officer about the matter, and the officer probably asked the
prince for money that the messenger of France might be
able to appear at church decently.
"William's heart responded to the appeal, and he fur-
nished Balthazar with the money for his own ruin.
On Tuesday, July 10, 1584, the dinner hour was an-
nounced in the palace. The prince with his wife on his
arm, followed by the ladies and gentlemen of his family,
started to enter the dining room. The prince was dressed
like a plain man. He wore a beggar's hat, a high ruff, and
a loose surcoat of gray.
As he passed along the white face of a little man met
him in the doorway.
"' I have come for my passport, prince,' said the little
man.
"'Who is that?-what does he mean?' asked the prin-
cess, noticing with alarm the pallor of the man's face.
"' Merely a person who has come for a passport,' said he.
'Give him one,' he said to his secretary.
"' I never saw so villainous a face,' said the princess to
William in an undertone.
The company passed on to the tables. After the meal
William came out into the vestibule, and began to ascend
the stairway, upon the left side of which was a recess. Sud-
denly there was a report of a pistol, and the prince fell back,
exclaiming:







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


"' 0 my God, have mercy upon my soul! O my God,
have mercy upon my poor people!'
"His sister rushed toward him, and saw that he was
dying.
"' Do you commend your soul to Christ?' she asked.
"' I do,' he answered, and soon after expired in the arms
of his wife.
"Balthazar had accomplished his purpose. He was cap-
tured and torn to pieces. This is a terrible tale for you to
hear, but if we should ever lay the foundation of a free
colony, and it should grow, we shall owe much to him who
perished for liberty under the red roofs of yonder palace."

The children looked back. It was, as we may suppose,
near night now. Delft was fading.
The placid canal that led to the port was near. They
still had some miles to go. We can not be sure of the time,
but we will suppose it to be near nightfall when the barges
drifted into the last canal.
"That is a hard story, little Ellen More," said our pilot,
"but you should know what liberty costs."
"The Indians could not do a more terrible thing than
that," said she. And she added: "The great chief will be
god ,to us, for we will give him the copper chain."














CHAPTER IV.


THE PILOT AND THE LITTLE PILGRIMS.--THE STORY OF THE
CAPTIVE INDIAN TUSQUANTO.

IN the long summer twilight and evening the Pilgrims
drifted along the still waters of the canal between Delft and
Delftshaven, which is now as it was then. The water runs
on a level with the wide green plain, on which flocks and
herds grazed then as now. The great fans of windmills
turned in the air. Around the mills were farm sheds, with
walks of powdered shells, and flower gardens that were fan-
tastically arranged amid the green lawns and that blazed
with color. As they passed the gates of Delft, two airy
fortalices shadowed the warm, flower-scented air. They
could not sleep. Winslow says that "the night was passed
with little sleep for the most, but with friendly entertainment
and Christian discourse." There must have been several
boats, for the Pilgrims numbered one hundred and two, and
the people who went to Delftshaven to bid them a last fare-
well in the morning were many, and their baggage was great,
for many of the exiles had been or were people of means.
The way from the fortalices of Delft to Delftshaven
was a clear one. We will picture it as taking place late in
81







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


the day. The weather was mild. The pilot had little to do,
and the children turned from Mistress Elizabeth Winslow
to him, and when he sat down after the afterglow had
faded, Ellen More said:
You said that you-would tell us of the Indians that you
have met in your voyages."
Aye, aye, that I did, my little Pilgrim, and if it suits
you well I will tell you of one that I have seen. He was a
chief, or a sagamore, or lord, but I did not find him on the
coast of the new land at all; I met him in England."
The children and young people gathered closely around
the pilot.
"Ah! ah! what are you about to do?" said Captain
Reynolds. "Away with your story-telling, but I would
not refuse to hear something entertaining myself now, seeing
everything is so quiet; there is a bit of the child left in me
yet, and I will take a seat among the children and be a
child in my ears, as I used to be when my father told sea
tales of the Hebrides. Go on, go on, and I'll not bother you.
The ship goes fair."

THE STRANGE STORY OF TUSQUANTO.
"There is a country on the cool side of the sea which
Sir Francis Drake first saw, which some call New Albion,
but which he named New England. There is a harbor there
which the Virginia Company call Plymouth, from our
Plymouth. It is a fine country in summer time; great vines







THE PILOT AND THE LITTLE PILGRIMS.


are there, heavy with grapes; the sea is full of fish, and the
sky of birds; but oh, the winters-o-o-o-oh! may you never
see the like, or hear the wind blow there!
"Who has not heard of Sir Ferdinando Gorges? He
was the friend of Raleigh, you know, and the enemy of
Essex, as all Englishmen have heard, and he served Eliza-
beth with so much valor on the sea that the crown made him
Governor of Plymouth in 1604-the Plymouth of the oaks,
the grapes, the harbors of fish, where the sky is full of
wings, and the summers are so lovely, and the wind blows
so cold.
Now Plymouth is called by the Indians Pawtuxet, and
some fifteen or sixteen years ago Captain Weymouth, one of
the knight's captains, found at this town of Pawtuxet a
solitary Indian, a lord, a sagamore, or chief, who told a ter-
rible tale. Listen to it-it haunts me sometimes when I am
all alone.
The Indian said that all of his people were dead. That
a great blight had fallen upon them; that they suddenly
turned yellow and died, and that there was none left to
bury them, and that he alone was left.
"Alone, all alone, he had gone to his tent, and cried
out when there was none to hear. He could only say alone,
alone, alone,' to the sea and the stars.
Was his story true?
The sailors went on shore; they entered the evergreen
forests, and wandered among the oaks, the vines and rocks,







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


and they found it even as Tusquanto, or Tusquantum, the
lonely forest lord, had said.
The people died in heaps,' said the solitary Indian.
"They found that it had been so. There were whole
villages of the dead; the bodies lay unburied, with only
the ravens to lament for them.
"So Tusquanto was left alone with the dead nation, cry-
ing out on the shores that blosomed still, though the people
were dead.
Captain Weymouth told the wandering chief of his
own land, of England over the sea. He told him, I think,
of his master Sir Ferdinando, who would welcome such as
he. I hope this is so, for some think that he carried Tus-
quanto away as captive; but be this as it may, Captain Wey-
mouth sailed away from Plymouth with Tusquanto, the only
surviving Indian of Pawtuxet. Now if I were a poet I
would write a poem about Tusquanto and his lament for the
dead tribes.
"Sir Ferdinando, of the Virginia Colonization Com-
pany, was delighted to meet the Indian lord. He took him
to his courtly home, and instructed him in the English
language. He taught him how to talk, that the Indian
might tell him about the country and people over the sea.
Marvelous were the tales that the Indian began to tell.
Sir Ferdinando used to say that the more he conversed with
him the better hope he gave him of the lands over which he
had been made governor. Tusquanto told him of goodly







THE PILOT AND THE LITTLE PILGRIMS. 35

rivers in the new country, of mountains that pierced the
sky, of roaring waterfalls, of harbors rich in fish, of fruits
that delighted the taste.
He kept Tusquanto for three years, and then loaded
him with gifts and sent him back to New England as a
land pilot with Captain Thomas Dermer, a sea rover in his
service.
"Dermer went to the land of the dead a year ago to see
if the tales that Tusquanto had told Sir Ferdinando were
true.
"The men from the ship, guided by Tusquanto, entered
the forests. The woods were still, save the birds singing
there. Grand trees and great lakes were there. It was a
glorious country. Tusquanto had spoken truly.
"They came to a place called Namasket, now Middle-
boro, Massachusetts.
"Tusquanto had told them of a great forest king named
Massasoit. He lived at Pokonoket, a land of green woods
and bright rivers, a day's journey away. Captain Dermer
sent a message to this great forest king.
Two kings came to meet him. One of them may have
been a brother to the great king. They were clad in glit-
tering shells, in plumes, and were followed by stately men
with bows and quivers of arrows.
Captain Dermer wondered when these giants appeared.
He had great reason for surprise, as you shall hear.
One of the forest lords approached the captain.







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


'Your face is white,' cried he. 'You belong to the
race that steal. You steal our people from the fishing
grounds, and carry them away. You are here to steal, and
you shall suffer for your crimes. You shall not return to
the ship; follow the chiefs! follow me! '
"' Captain Dermer is no thief,' pleaded Tusquanto.
"' The whole pale race are thieves!' cried the red lord.
'They steal our people and carry them away on their great
boats with wings. Listen!
"' Many moons ago we found one of your winged boats
off the shore.
We stole up to it at night and burned it, and we car-
ried away three of the men. We have kept them to cut wood
and draw water and to make sport for us. They are with
us now. You shall follow back the chiefs to cut wood and
draw water and make sport for us.
"' The men that we led captive talk our language now.
One of them says that your God will punish us for what
we have done to him. But your God can not do it; we
are too many-we are too many.' Here the Indian be-
gan to dance and cry out, 'We are too many! we are too
many!'
"Then Tusquanto said: 'The men whom you hold are
innocent. They never meant you harm. You do them
wrong to make them captives.'
"'But your people do the same. You must follow us
back, and cut wood and draw water and make sport for us.







THE PILOT AND THE LITTLE PILGRIMS.


Your God can not harm us; we are too many!' Then he
danced again.
I have brought the sea captain here as a messenger of
a great king,' said Tusquanto. 'He comes to meet a king
as a man of honor. We are not' to blame for what others
have done. We came to smoke the pipe of peace.'
"Then the great Massasoit spoke.
"' You are from the king over the sea. We will smoke
the pipe of peace together, and I will set the captives that we'
hold free. Massasoit is a man of honor!'
Then they smoked the pipe of peace together. It was
May time. The birds sang and the Indians danced. There
were Indian runners there, and they brought back the white
captives after a little time. The captives were Frenchmen.
Such is my story; it is substantially a true one. I
would like to see the great Massasoit. Would not you, my
children? "

The young people dreamed over the tale: the silent
land; the Indian lord; Tusquanto at the home of Sir Fer-
dinando; the journey toward the Indian country in the
silent woods; and the great king Massasoit, who was gov-
erned by a sense of justice, mercy, and honor.
"I wish that we might live in Massasoit's country," said
little Ellen More. "It may be that the copper chain is
for him. I hope that it is."
So thought all the little Pilgrims.







38 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

"We must attend ,to our own work now, pilot," said
Captain Reynolds. "Were I to emigrate, I would go to the
country of Massasoit. He must be a godlike chief."
In the last light of the long sunset little Ellen More held
up the copper chain. Would that chain ever gleam under
the forest trees on the neck of some bronze lord of the far,
far West?














CHAPTER V.


EPENOW, THE INDIAN WONDER.

THE rising light of the morning at Delftshaven revealed
the outline of the Speedwell, which was to take the Pilgrims
to Southampton. The sails of the ship were already set to
the fresh breeze. The tide was at its full, and there was
given them but a brief time for parting after the baggage
was hurried on board. The pastor fell upon his knees and
prayed for his flock with streaming eyes.
The full tide beat against the ship and they must be
gone. The Union Jack rolled out, and high in the air the
pennant blew westward. The ship swung away from the
pier and drifted down the channel along the "creeping
Maas beyond the isle Ysselmonde. The company fired a
volley with small arms, a cannon boomed, the smoke cleared
in the sun; Holland faded away, the forms of loved ones
vanished; they would never see the country nor their old
friends there again. Their sails were set to the west; they
were to work the miracle of the ages under the setting sun.
The young folks gathered around the pilot again when
they saw that his hands were free. They had dreamed of
the Indian chiefs of which he had spoken.







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


He told them another story of an Indian captive who
was still alive, and whom perhaps they would sometime meet
in the new country, as Indians who could speak English were
of great value to the colonists.

EPENOW, THE INDIAN WONDER.
"It was Sir Ferdinando Gorges who used to tell this tale,
and it was a favorite story among the traders who were look-
ing for fortunes beyond the sea.
I was one day surprised,' said Sir Ferdinando, 'to see
one Henry Harley come bringing to me an Indian giant.'
"Here is an Indian who can talk English," said Har-
ley. '" He might be valuable to us as a pilot." '
"' From whence does he come?' asked Sir Ferdinando.
"'"From near Plymouth. He was captured with
twenty-nine other natives, and was taken to Spain to be sold
for a slave. He escaped slavery, and was brought to London,
and he has been exhibited here as a wonder."'
A wonder he was, lofty in stature, with a haughty face.
He used to say 'Welcome! welcome!' to the crowds who
visited him in London. He was a wonder in intellect as well
as in body. He acquired the English readily, and he soon set
Sir Ferdinando wondering in the most unexpected way, as
you shall be told.
"Sir Ferdinando was ambitious, of great wealth, and
hoped to hear of a gold mine on the coasts of the northern
seas,such as had been found in Peru.







EPENOW, THE INDIAN WONDER.


The Indian wonder came to understand this, and to see
in it a way of escape. So one day he began to speak of the
golden treasures worn by the Indian lords of Pokonoket and
places like that. The eyes of the knight must have enlarged,
and his hearing become keen.
"' Gold, Epenow? Did you say gold?'
"'Yes, master, such as your lady wears on her neck.
Gold, not wampum, but gold.'
"' Where did your people find this gold? asked Sir Fer-
dinando.
In the rocks and in the caves.'
"'Do you know where the caves of gold are?' asked the
trader.
"'Yes, master. We light our council fires there.'
"'Could you pilot my men to the caves of gold '
'Yes, master, yes. The Indian lords mingle gold with
their wampum. Gold is as thick as berries in the wampum
maker's lodges. I could take your men to the workers in
wampum and gold.'
"Sir Ferdinando needed to hear no more. HIe fitted out
a ship and loaded Epenow with presents, and dreamed
golden dreams, like the Spanish sailor who went to find the
fountain of youth.
"So the tall Epenow became suddenly not only a won-
der, but a very great man among the traders, and they sailed
away with him, and he feasted the minds of the adventurers
with marvelous tales of the treasures of the country.







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


"He must have told them how many of the people had
died of the plague, and they must have imagined that the
gathering of treasures would be easy in such a land. This
was in June, 1614.
They came to the Plymouth country, where there were
sandy capes and great green islands.
In the harbor where the ship was moored the wonderful
Epenow asked leave to invite his friends on board. They
came and he welcomed them lustily, and probably talked
much in English for English ears, but he talked with the
Indians in the Indian tongue for a very different purpose.
Some of these Indians were his relatives, and among them
were his brothers.
You may be sure that he and his brothers met most
graciously, and that he had much to say to them that was not
in the English tongue.
"When they were gone he said to his English friends:
I have invited my people to come to see me again to-
morrow.'
"' I fear that they would kill thee if it were known to
them that thou hadst come to reveal the secrets of their
country,' said the captain. 'I must guard thee from
harm.'
Then the captain put upon Epenow flowing garments,
so that he could be caught and held, in case his friends
should seek to tear him away. He also placed two men
over him, to guard him during the visit of his friends.








































The departure from Delftshaven.







EPENOW, THE INDIAN WONDER.


"The next day the Indians came in twenty canoes.
How lovely they must have looked in the summer sea!
"Epenow shouted to them in English. What he meant
by this I can not say. He and they knew.
( The captain ordered his musketeers to be prepared
against any surprise, for all his hopes were centered in the
friendly service of the Indian giant, who must have looked
very queerly in his flowing robes.
"The Indians drifted about on the sea in their canoes
until the captain called to them to come on board. They
were armed with bows and arrows.
The chief men came at the captain's call.
Epenow was in the hold of the ship. The captain was
in the forecastle.
"' Come to me, Epenow,' said the captain.
Epenow started up and walked toward the captain,
the two guards walking beside him.
"Suddenly he was gone. Whence? where? He had
vanished. He had stepped back. His loose garments were
seen floating in the air, when nothing more was to be found
of him. He had gone over the side of the ship.
I tried to catch him by his coat,' said a sailor, 'but he
could not be stayed.'
The sailors rushed to the side of the ship, but were met
by a flight of arrows.
"The canoes disappeared from the sea as rapidly as
Epenow had gone over the side of the ship. The musket-







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


eers fired, but the swift canoes swept the waters like wings
of birds, and gone was the wonderful Epenow, and gone
were the Englishmen's hopes of finding caves of gold
through the pilotage of the sharp-witted Indian captive.
"It made the Indians laugh to tell the story of how
Epenow had got away.
"It was a sorry voyage that the English made on their
return, without gold or treasure of any kind, and with the
tale of how foolishly they had been outwitted.
"Fancy Sir Ferdinando when the news was brought to
him! But the Indian was not more cunning and deceitful
than had been his captors, and he had a right to be free,
though not by such arts as these."

"Do you think that we will ever see Epenow?" asked
little Ellen More. "I would be afraid of him."
"You are not unlikely to meet both Epenow and Tus-
quanto; but were I Epenow, I would be very careful never
to fall into the hands of the English again."
"I do not blame Epenow for what he did," said one of
the boys. "I would have done the same. Such things
must make the Indians look upon the traders as enemies.
Deception does not pay."
No, my lad," said the pilot. They pay dearly who
handle this coin, be they English or Indians."
Is your story quite true? asked Wrastle Brewster, one
of the boys.







EPENOW, THE INDIAN WONDER.


Yes; in substance both the stories of Tusquanto and
Epenow are true; you must allow a story-teller to use his
imagination when that only serves to make a fact a picture."
Some four days were passed on the voyage to Southamp-
ton. There were spiresrising in the sunset. Gables-the
palace where Anne Boleyn spent her few happy days with
Henry VIII.
Netley Abbey gleamed afar. Along the sea were great
walls mantled with ivy. On the hills rose great clusters of
oaks. Near by was the New Forest, and farther away lay
Winchester with its cathedral, where were buried the early
kings.
They were approaching the place where Canute ordered
back the sea and it did not obey him.
They were in Southampton Water.














CHAPTER VI.


THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL.

THE heroes and saints of the world are those who build
life the direct opposite of their natural character, on the
principle that it is only that which is true that has any right
to exist. The Leyden Pilgrims had learned this truth when
they had given up wealth and the prospects of ease in age
that they might live for the highest principles of the soul.
Many of them had been men who had loved their own will,
but had come to see that strength and power lie in giving up
one's will for the good of a common cause.
The happy midsummer voyage from Leyden was over,
and their troubles were now to begin. They had fallen into
the hands of selfish, overbearing men, who were to carry
them across the sea. They expected to go in two ships.
The smaller of these was the Speedwell, Captain Reynolds,
of which the pilot was good Robert Coppin. She was a
pinnace, as we have said, without decks, of some sixty tons.
The larger ship was the Mayflower, Captain Jones, of
which Christopher Martin was to be the governor for the
company, and which awaited them on Southampton Water.
The voyage of the Speedwell from Delftshaven to
46







THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL.


Southampton Water was full of promise. But the little
ship had been overmasted in Holland, a thing which will
cause the timbers to spring at sea. It has been claimed
that this was purposely done, as Captain Reynolds had con-
tracted to remain in the service of the colony a year, and
wished to escape his obligation. The charge may not have
been well founded, but perilous times for the little Speed-
well were at hand.
It was the purpose of the Pilgrims to have the Mayflower
and Speedwell leave Southampton Water about August
1st, and they expected to arrive on the Hudson River in
October, after a voyage in summer and early autumn
weather.
They were not supposed to be sailing for Plymouth on
the bleak New England coast, where the good Scottish pilot,
Robert Coppin, had seen Indians, but for the sheltered
shores of the Hudson, of which our pilot will have some
stories to tell.
The overmasting of the Speedwell in Holland, causing
her to leak as soon as she was out on the high sea, changed
the whole plan of the voyage, and was the cause of great
events, which had a powerful and far-reaching influence on
the destiny of the American nation. The hardships of
New England were to school American life.
On a serene day in early August the two ships, the
Mayflower, Captain Jones, and the Speedwell, Captain Rey-
nolds, sailed out of Southampton Water, leaving behind the







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


beautiful views of the ivied walls and towers. A part of
the Pilgrims were on the larger and a part on the smaller
ship. The two ships sailed in view of each other, and every-
thing indicated a prosperous voyage. The young folks felt
secure, for "our pilot" was on board.
The Speedwell crowded on sail, and for a little time
made her name good. But on the wide sea she began to
strain under the canvas, and the boards in her hull spread
apart, and it became hard to keep out the water. The con-
dition grew worse and worse.
"I must consult Captain Jones," said Captain Reynolds.
"The pinnace will soon fill with water and will sink. We
can never cross the sea as we are now."
To the leaks we may fancy that Robert Coppin brought
the unwelcome jackscrew, and that the boys cheered when
they saw him about to apply the powerful push to a refrac-
tory beam. The leak was stayed, and we may hear the
pilot say to Wrastle Brewster:
Ho, my hearty! "
And the boys respond:
"Ho, my hearty! "
But a stayed leak may cause two leaks to open. The
jackscrew could do much, but it could not overcome the
Atlantic Ocean.
It is little use for a pinnace like this to contend against
the sea," said the pilot. "We will have to go ashore again."
"You will not leave us? said the boys.







THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL.


No, no; I have shipped for all the way."
Some of the boards sprung so that one could lay one's
hand between them. It was useless to try to bail out the
water; one might almost as well have tried to bail the
ocean.
It was a bitter disappointment to the Pilgrims to find
the little ship in this pitiful and perilous state.
We must go back and repair," said Captain Reynolds
to Captain Jones.
"It will cause us to arrive late on the Hudson," said
Captain Jones. "But we must put back, or the pinnace
will sink."
So the ship put back and anchored in Dartmouth Har-
bor, and the Speedwell was overhauled, and was made, as
was supposed, seaworthy.
The two ships started out again, the Speedwell following
close to the Mayflower, crowded with her sightly sails. But
they had hardly gone a hundred leagues beyond Land's End
when the Speedwell began to yawn and to leak again, and
Captain Reynolds declared to Captain Jones that they must
take back the ship or she would go to pieces. So the two
ships went back again to the coast-this time to Plymouth.
They unloaded the Speedwell, sent back twenty discouraged
people to their homes, and with one hundred and two per-
sons on board set sail for the Hudson, on the 6th of Sep-
tember; or, strangely enough, they set sail from Plymouth,
England, to arrive in Plymouth, New England, for it was







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


another power than their own that was directing their
voyage.
What a sifting of people there had been to elect the
heroes who were to make this voyage, in which human
destiny was so greatly concerned! Macaulay said that God
sifted the nations of the world to make the band of Pilgrim
pioneers. Those who had lacked faith had been left behind
in England; the aged had been left in Holland, and now
those who had not the courage had been sent home.
One of the discouraged adventurers, Mr. Cushman, has
left some account of the terrible days when the Speedwell
was found leaking. You may like to read it-it is a
picture.
Our pinnace [, the Speedwell,] will not cease leaking;
else, I think, we had been half way at Virginia. Our voy-
age hither hath been as full of crosses as ourselves have been
of crookedness. We put in here to trim her; and I think,
as others also, if we had stayed at sea but three or four hours
more, she would have sunk right down. And though she
was twice trimmed at [South]hampton; yet now she is as
open and [as] leaky as a sieve: and there was a board, two
feet long, a man might have pulled off with his fingers;
where the water came in as at a mole hole.
"Friend, if ever we make a Plantation, GOD works a
miracle! especially considering how scant we shall be of
victuals; and,'most of all, ununited amongst ourselves, and
devoid of good tutors and regiment [leaders and organiza-







THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL.


tion]. Violence will break all. Where is the meek and
humble spirit of MOSES? and of NEHEMIAH, who reedified
the walls of Jerusalem, and the State of Israel? Is not the
sound of REHOBOAM'S brags daily heard amongst us? Have
not the philosophers and all wise men observed that, even
in settled Common Wealths, violent Governors bring, either
themselves, or [the] people, or both, to ruin? How much
more in the raising of Common Wealths, when the mortar
is yet scarce tempered that should bind the walls?
If I should write to you of all things which promiscu-
ously forerun our ruin, I should overcharge my weak head,
and grieve your tender heart: only this I pray you, Prepare
for evil tidings of us, every day! But pray for us instantly
[without ceasing]! It may be the Lord will be yet in-
treated, one way or other, to make for us. I see not, in
reason, how we shall escape, even the gasping of hunger-
starved persons: but GOD can do much; and his will be
done! "
Such a man had not the inspiration for a voyage of the
Argonauts. He went back among the discouraged twenty,
as he should have done.
Robert Coppin brought with him the jackscrew from
the Speedwell when he came on board the Mayflower for the
last time.
The young folks, after all their terrors, cheered when
they saw the jackscrew in his hand.
It is shipped for all the voyage," he said, "like myself.







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


The ocean has beaten me once, but I will have a wrestle
with her again."
Cheer, cheer for Robert, our pilot," said Wrastle Brew-
ster.
"Don't call me that," said the lusty sailor; "call me
Bob. We'll get somewhere yet, by the aid of the jack-
screw. It minds me that Providence only knows where we
will land, but we will land somewhere."
And now the Mayflower is on the sea. It is the sixth of
September. The weather is fair, but the season is getting
late. In a few days or weeks they may expect the equi-
noctial gales.
Captain Jones was a hard, testy man. He domineered
over the Pilgrims, and their governor insulted them with
high words. But in the beautiful weather of the early days
of the voyage he probably did not prevent our pilot from
relating to the little Pilgrims his adventures in the New
World.
England was gone, and the women and the children
must have felt the influence of the kindly heart of "our
pilot."
"Tell us new stories now that we are on the new ship,"
said little Ellen More.
Once when I was in the woods," said the pilot, "I
saw a little deer amid the cedars, and I made chase for it
so as to get a range to shoot it for our meat.
"I followed it with an Indian trail, when what do you







THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL.


think I saw? The animal suddenly went up into the air,
and there it remained. I was amazed. I thought that it
had fallen under the power of some Indian wizard, who,
they say, work enchantment.
"But the deer in the air uttered a pitiful cry, and it
touched my heart. I heeded the cry and went to it. Its
head was hanging down in the air. Its eyes stood out of
its head and its tongue was out of its mouth.
It had been caught in an Indian snare. The Indians
bend over the top of a birch tree and put a noose on it, and
hold it to the ground by a wooden bar set in two notches in
trees, so that it will slip out when a foot gets entangled in
the noose and cause the tree to fly up. This snare had a
powerful birch for its pole, and the deer was young and
slender, and so was lifted into the air as by magic.
"I cut the noose, and it did look at me so pitifully that
I let it go. One hates to kill an animal that he has re-
leased. We love everything that we help and hate every-
thing that we injure. So we must love everybody and
everything."
"Even Captain Jones? asked the child.
The pilot did not answer. The wind was fair, the sky
blue, and the ocean a long, rippling splendor, and such was
the voyage for many days.
Will you not tell us some stories of the Hudson, where
we are going? asked Ellen More.
Aye, I will, if the weather continues fair," said "our







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


pilot," and it may be like this all of the way. But the
season is getting late, and it is storms I fear; I am preparing
for storms; the time for them is at hand."
He told them tales of the sea birds. Captain Jones be-
times gave him a harsh word, but he was used to such
treatment on the sea.
It is not the storms that I fear," said he, "it is the cross
waves and the sickness that such water brings."
The Mayflower went on and on in the bright September
days.
They were going, as they thought, to New Amsterdam,
where the Dutch had a great plantation. They were to
build up an independent English colony beside the Dutch
colony. So when Pilot Robert promised to relate to the
little Pilgrims some stories that he had heard in the shipping
places of the colonist companies in London and in Holland,
even profane Captain Jones did not object; he liked to hear
such stories himself. He was looking for rough weather,
and he did not object to his pilot's making merry a few idle
hours when the ship was yet going fair.
There were some rough and reckless people on board,
who had the ungovernable spirit of Captain Jones. Brad-
ford, in his so-called Log of the Mayflower, relates a brief
but vivid story of the career of one of these. He says,
writing after the manner of the Puritans:
And I may not omit here a special work of GOD's
Providence. There was a proud and very profane young







THE STORY OF THE SPEEDWELL.


man, one of the seamen; of a lusty able body, which made
him the more haughty. He would always be contemning the
poor people in their sickness, and cursing them daily with
grievous execrations, and [he] did not let [stop] to tell
them, That he hoped to help to cast half of them overboard
before they came to their journey's end; and to make merry
with what [property] they had. And if he were by any
gently reproved, he would curse and swear most bitterly.
"But it please GOD, before they came half [the] seas
over, to smite this young man with a grievous disease; of
which he died in a desperate manner and so [he] was him-
self the first that was thrown overboard. Thus his curses
light [ed] on his own head: and it was an astonishment to
all his fellows; for they noted it to be the just hand of GOD
upon him."
In this manner the Pilgrims viewed all of the events of
life. They believed that Providence was their real pilot,
and that they were on the sea of destiny. Every event that
happened they held to be ordered by God. In all things
their faith was their anchor. They were Argonauts sailing
not for themselves, but for the welfare of mankind.














CHAPTER VII.


THE TALE OF HENRY H=UDSON.

DAY after day the Mayflower moved on under heavy
sail. The white wings of the birds that followed her far
out of Southampton Water disappeared, and the New
World's ark, the ship of the new Argonauts, was steadily
piloted over the calm solitude of the waters toward the west.
Many of the passengers who had been sick in the early
days of the voyage were well again. Governor Carver and
his wife, Rose Standish and Elizabeth Winslow-how sad
was the fate that awaited these lovely and gentle spirits!-
might talk now of the nation that they hoped to found where
the children would be educated in freedom of faith, and in
which the ancient prophecies should be fulfilled.
We can fancy Elder Brewster repeating to them the
ancient Jewish prophecy:
A stone is about to be cut out of the mountain without
hands, that will break into pieces all the other nations of
the earth."
"But what will become of the Indian races?" said
Elizabeth Winslow, whose heart loved every one and pitied
all who were unfortunate.
56







THE TALE OF HENRY HUDSON.


"They will either become converted to God or will
perish," said the elder. They have been a bloody and
revengeful race, and it may be their hour of salvation is
come, or that their cup of iniquity is full."
"We must all labor to bring them to a knowledge of the
truth," said the amiable lady. "Who do you think these
races are, and how do you imagine that they found Amer-
ica? "
"I think, my lady, that they may be the descendants
of the lost tribes of Israel. Or they may have been wan-
derers from the regions of the Nile across Asia in the days
of the Shepherd Kings. Or they may be the descendants
of some Mongolian race."
How did they find America? "
"That would not have been difficult in the long gone
days. The strait between Asia and America (Behring's) is
not wide now, and it must once have been very narrow, and
perhaps there was once no strait there at all. And nations
wandering across Asia could have easily made the passage
to America in boats."
Oh," said Mistress Elizabeth, "if the Indians are the
descendants of the lost tribes, and we could convert them,
what a glorious voyage this would be! It makes my heart
throb to think of it."
"One of two things," we imagine the prophetic Carver
to have said, "will happen to these races. They will either
give up their savagery or perish. That is the law of the







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


human kind when a superior race mingles with a lower
race."
"It was Robinson's wish that we might win the Indian
races back to God. Of this he dreams continually; for this
he prays. Oh, that he could have crossed the sea with us,
and inspired us for this great work! "
We are being guided by an unseen hand," said Carver.
"'But whether we are to found a new nation or to convert
an old one we can not see; we can only know that whatever
may happen, the law of righteousness will live, and those
who obey it will rise and those who reject it may fall."
Our people have not treated the Indian races well on
their voyages," said Rose Standish. I hope we will follow
the heart of Robinson in all that we do."
The October moon was on the sea. The ship was drift-
ing fair, and Robert Coppin, the pilot, came toward this
group who were reviewing the thoughts of Elder John Rob-
inson in regard to the conversion of the Indians, and listened
to their hopes and plans.
The young people and children gathered around him.
The 1l>:d- audience was almost a solid one, and they engaged
in most earnest conversation as the ship's lights swayed under
the moon and stars.
When the older people had ceased to talk in regard to
the conversion of the Indians, Love Brewster said:
S"Now let me ask our pilot' what he has heard in re-
gard to the Hudson River, where we are going. Pilot







THE TALE OF HENRY HUDSON.


Coppin, who was Henry Hudson, and how did he find the
river where the Dutch have settled? We should surely
know more of him."
To this inquiry Elder Brewster assented as one emi-
nently proper to be made. Mistress Bradford, Mistress
Standish, and Mistress Winslow seemed as interested in the
question as the boys Jasper Richard More and Wrastle and
Love Brewster. Mary Allerton and Priscilla Mullins sat
side by side, eager to hear what Coppin would say. The
whole company became silent, and under the moonlit sails
Robert Coppin related the following strange story:

CAST ADRIFT.
It is a story to draw tears that I will tell you now.
There was once a hardy sailor, and where he is now no
one knows, be he living or dead. His name was, as you
have already guessed, Henry Hudson, and he dreamed of
making great discoveries in the north after the manner of
those that had been made in the Spanish Main. His early
life is a mystery, but he had one boy whom he dearly loved,
and he took this boy wherever he went on his many voyages.
He made many voyages, and those of them to the
north had filled the shipping world with wonder. He pre-
pared for a fourth voyage, on which he expected to find a
polar sea.
While dreaming of the lands he would discover, and
that would make him rich and famous, he became acquainted








THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


with a young man of most engaging manners but dissolute
habits, named Henry Greene. The better class of people
had withdrawn from association with this false-hearted
youth, and even his own family had left him to his own
fate.
The great navigator pitied him, and sought to reform
him. He took him into his heart and his own home, and he
said to him one day:
"' Henry, go with me to the north. You shall share in
the glory of the discoveries we will make, and on your return
I will report you to the crown and secure for you a place in
the royal service.'
Henry Greene loved roystering and dissolute company,
but he was so abandoned by friends and fortune that he
accepted the invitation to sail to the mysterious countries
of the north, where the nights were long, where the ice
mountains glittered in the moon, where the northern
lights filled the sky with wonder. So he made himself a
devoted friend of the captain, and Henry Hudson sailed
away for Greenland in April, some eleven years ago (1610),
with insufficient provisions, and he reached Greenland in
June.
"They came to a strait in the ice lands that led to an
inland sea (Hudson Bay). Here was a land of desolation
and surprise. But it was a land of winter and night, of
savage animals and lone Indians.
The summer passed, and Hudson, having failed to find







THE TALE OF HENRY HUDSON.


a country that promised him wealth, proposed to his men to
winter in the wild regions of darkness, ice, and snow.
"He was a quick-tempered man, although he so much
loved his son and had taken such a friendly interest in the
fascinating Henry Greene.
"The men rebelled at the thought of staying in the
land of desolation, where there was neither wealth nor
glory for them. They knew that their provisions were
scanty, and there was but a poor prospect of hunting in
the cold.
"'I will have to leave some of you behind,' said the
irritable captain, when the men complained that the ship's
provisions were getting low.
"The men began to plot against him, and among his
secret enemies was Henry Greene.
"One day, when his friends were below decks, one of
the conspirators closed the hatch and shut them down, and
the mutineers at once seized the captain and bound him, and
put him, with his son and some friends, among them a
faithful carpenter, on board the shallop, which they had
towed after the ship. They then formed a company of their
own to sail the ship, and they made Henry Greene captain,
and resolved to return immediately to England. That
was a dark day when Henry Hudson, a man of noble parts,
met Henry Greene.
"For a time the ship drew the shallop after her. Then
came the fatal time to cut the rope. As they did so, the







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


lost navigator heard a voice ringing through the air that
pierced his heart.
It was that of the villain, Henry Greene!
"Henry Greene, captain, sailed away, leaving the shal-
lop rocking on the icebound sea, with only provisions for a
few days. Whatever became of Henry Hudson we do not
know. Ships were sent out to find him, but he was never
seen. He probably has perished amid the ice, he and his
faithful son.
"But we do know what became of the faithless Henry
Greene. He landed on the coast for provisions, and was
set upon by the natives and murdered.
"The survivors undertook to take the ship home. Their
provisions failed, and when they came to Iceland they were
too weak to walk the decks. They told their tale. So all
of these people who were engaged in plans to cast others
adrift were themselves cast adrift on the sea and on the
world.
"But it was this same Henry Hudson, with his faithful
boy, who discovered the land for which we are now sailing,
and which they call New Amsterdam. He passed through
raging waters [Hell Gate] and came to a most beautiful bay,
and sailed up a river through a land of plenty, which we may
find, and have better luck than he. The best thing that
can be said of any man is that he is true-hearted, and all who
are will have the heartache some day in this troubled world.
"It is a hard and lonesome story."







THE TALE OF HENRY HUDSON.


"Is it the Hudson River that was found by the captain
whom they cast adrift in the ice to which we are going?"
said little Ellen More to our pilot, as he sat with a very
troubled and far-away look in his face.
"Ah! child, ah! child, you may well ask me that.
Older heads might think that question. I wonder myself if
we shall find ourselves there at last."
The child was startled at the strange look in the pilot's
face. She laid her white hand on his rough palm and
said:
"It may be that we will go to the country of the
great and good Indian king of whom you spoke. It
may be that we are carrying the copper chain to him. It
makes me feel glad to think of it. How I should like to
see him wearing it with a pleased look! And all under
the greenwood trees. Do you think I will, Pilot Cop-
pin? "
The pilot smiled and then he shuddered.
The Mayflower was carrying a dark secret in the head of
her captain which it is probable that only the pilot suspected.
His suspicion, were it so, would not have troubled him had
not his heart turned toward the Pilgrims in their high pur-
pose, struggles, and sufferings.
Was the Mayflower really bound for the Hudson
River?
Only Captain Jones and the planters of the Dutch col-
onies in England and Holland really knew. But the







64 THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.

pilot would know some day. There would come to him
a secret order from Captain Jones that would disclose to
him his real purpose. So under a dark secret were they
crossing the sea; the angel of Providence was still in all
events.














CHAPTER VIII.


THE VOYAGE OF THE MAYFLOWER.-- A MAN OVERBOARD."

THE serene days passed, and cross waves began to shake
the ship and to cause a renewal of seasickness among the
passengers. The blue sky became overcast and wild, sullen
under clouds drifted across the wide gray canopy of cloud
that shut out the sun.
Storms were approaching. One of them struck the ship
in such a manner as to cause her to strain and tremble. The
waves became higher and higher. The sea rolled green and
white under a dim gray light.
The Mayflower was in the middle of the great ocean,
and a hundred times a day seemed to be lost as she sank
into the trough of the sea.
The first storm was succeeded by another. The rain
fell in sheets and the nights were blackness. The wind
lashed the waves. It seemed impossible that the ship could
ever survive the war of the elements that raged on every
side.
0 pilot," said Rose Standish, "did you ever see
weather like this before?"
Many a time, lady."







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


Did the ship live? "
You may comfort your heart when I tell you that she
did."
We are but a speck in infinity," said Mistress Bradford,
"and I do not feel that I shall ever rest my foot on the land
again. But what matters it if you may live to carry the
Gospel to the Indians? I have ceased to care for myself."
Storm followed storm. One day Captain Jones said to
the pilot:
"We can not bear a bit of sail; we shall be forced to
hull" (to drift without sails).
The days when the ship was in hull were terrible indeed.
All felt their helplessness. The women cried; the children
gathered in a pitiful group and cried out:
0 pilot, when will this weather be over? "
"Keep up your courage, my hearties. I have weath-
ered storms as hard as these. You shall live to see sunny
skies again, and great oak forests, and Indian kings. Heav-
en holds her own in her hands, and John Robinson's prayers
have not gone up to heaven in vain. Trust, trust, trust! "
Poor little Ellen More clung to the pilot wherever he
went, even at the wheel.
I am all alone," she said; you do pity me, don't you?
I am all alone in the world and on the sea."
"It is the Mistress Winslow that is good to ye," said the
pilot. She is good to everybody. You must cling to her,
and not to a poor rover like me."







THE VOYAGE OF THE MAYFLOWER.


"But, pilot, I love you."
Love me, love me, Ellen More? Oh, that these dull
old ears should ever hear that. 0 my little girl, that goes
right to my heart, and while Robert Coppin lives you shall
never want for a friend. Little Ellen More, I would die
for such as thou."
Master Coppin, do you say that? Suppose we
were to go down? "
"Then I will go down with thee in my arms. What
am I?-a poor sailor! What is life to me? I am not sent to
convert the Indians. I would love to die for such a heart
as yours, Ellen More."
You will let me cling to you, won't you? "
Yes, yes, my darling heart. This old pilot will let you
do that-he will now."
"At the wheel?"
"Yes, at the wheel."
And if I should die, you tell me the way I must go.
Pilot, pilot, you will tell me the way."
O Ellen More, Ellen More, this breaks my heart. But
I will be true to the wheel. If a true heart will bring us to
land, you will see the light of the shore again. Living or
dying, I will be true to thee, Ellen More."
And I will cling to thee, Pilot Robert-let me call you
that-you are our pilot."
No, no, child."
"Then who is? "







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


God. He holds the waters in the hollow of his hand."
As the ship lay in hull, drifting sailless and helpless, a
great wave dashed over her, and the cry arose:
"John Howland has gone overboard! "
Overboard! a man overboard! passed from lip to lip.
John Howland is overboard! cried the captain.
The ship was rolling from side to side. One could see
but a little way ahead, for everywhere in a dim light rose
the billows.
John Howland, who was in the service of Governor John
Carver, was a strong, lusty young man, one of the last of the
passengers who would seem likely to meet with any accident.
He had come above the gratings when the ship was roll-
ing and the waves dashing above the decks, and had been
thrown into the sea.
John Howland is overboard!" said little Ellen More to
the pilot, in terror. You save him, oh do! "
The topsail halyards hung over the helpless ship and
out into the water.
John Howland went down some fathoms under the
waves, but he was buoyed up, and, strange as it may seem,
caught hold of the dragging halyards under the sea, and his
strong arm held to them with a grasp like death.
The pilot saw that the halyards were shaken by a power
under the waves.
"Haul up the halyards, gently, gently, for Heaven's
sake, gently, man! "







THE VOYAGE OF THE MAYFLOWER.


He seized the ropes.
They drew up the halyards. John Howland came up
with them. The pilot shouted as he saw the young man's
head.
"Saved! he cried. "Pass the word. John Howland
is saved! It is a miracle."
They drew John Howland up into the ship by a boat
hook.
"But for the halyards I should have perished," said the
young man.
But for the providence of God you would have per-
ished," said Elder Brewster.
They carried him below and laid him down. The
shock left him with but little strength and he fell ill.
"John Howland, a good spirit was with thee in the
storm," said the pilot. "You will recover, and will see
the light of land. May be that you will live to tell
your grandchildren of this strange event; may be you
will."
Calmer weather came under colder skies. The women
shrank from the chill. The children felt the bitter weather,
all except little Ellen More. She tented under the great sea
coat of Pilot Robert, and helped him with brace and wheel
to direct the rudder to the gray west.
November was now on the ocean. One of the passen-
gers, William Butler, in the service of Dr. Samuel Fuller,
we think, fell very sick. He longed to see the new land,







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


and the heart of all went out to him as he lay in his bunk
day by day, tossed by the dark agitated sea.
One morning a deep silence fell upon all.
It is over," said Dr. Fuller to our pilot. You must
do your office."
They wrapped the body in the scanty clothing he had
brought in his chest.
Then Elder Brewster knelt down beside the dead, and
the sublime words of Hebrew psalmody, "Lord, thou hast
been our dwelling-place in all generations," rose amid the
storm.
Our pilot took up the body gently and laid it in the
great graveyard of the deep, and as it sunk from sight for-
ever all bowed in tears, and heard the elder's voice saying:
"Until the deep gives up its dead! "















CHAPTER IX.


THE MAYFLOWER AT SEA.--A LEAK.--" BEAR HARD TO THE
WEST."

IN these troubled days of the equinox, the cross seas, and
the long-continued fall storms, the captain was one day seen
to be in an unusually ugly and profane mood. He called to
him the ship's carpenter and stormed at him, then the
pilot, and talked to him in a high tone. One of his exclama-
tions rose above the winds. It was:
If it can not be replaced we shall all go down, and the
ranters will go with us. That is all."
Some of the Pilgrims, many of whom were lying on their
beds, which were soaked with the dashing of the sea, heard
these ominous words and started up. The dismal exclama-
tion of Captain Jones was passed from one to another, and
when it reached little Ellen she said:
Then I will never live to give the copper chain to the
red forest king. But Pilot Robert, he can save us. A soul
like his has power with God." A great sea dashed upon the
ship, and the water came over the decks.
Edward Winslow went to the pilot, seeing that the cap-
tain was in no mood to be questioned.







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


"Pilot, what was it that the captain said? That the
ship was in danger? "
"The ship is straining, sir, and there is a leak. The
main beam has sprung out of place."
Edward Winslow went back to the men of the May-
flower.
"The ship," said he, "is straining from stem to stern.
Even our pilot says that we are in danger."
"What shall we do? Shall we have to return? asked
many voices.
The captain came below.
Is the ship in danger? asked Elder Brewster.
"In danger? Well, I should say she was. The main
beam is sprung, and the men are toiling at the pumps.
What a miserable expedition all this is! "
"Would you advise us to return?" asked the governor
of the ship, who was the adviser of the Pilgrims.
"No! thundered the captain. It is as far from here
to England as it is to America. We will go on or go down.
We would be as likely to go down in an attempt to return as
we would to go on. No, no, whistle, ye winds, and dash
over us, ye seas! We will go on or down, and it is down
that we will go unless the beam can be forced into place
again."
Many of the women-the Pilgrim mothers-were sick,
but they started up and began to pray and to talk in the
language of faith to each other.







THE MAYFLOWER AT SEA.


The waves rolled high, and the ship quivered, and the
leak grew. There were faith, terror, brave words, and falter-
ing lips among the little nation sitting by their sea-soaked
beds in the dim light below. Sea after sea smote the wind-
ward side of the ship. The frail bark seemed as a thistle
down in a November hurricane.
For hours the terror lasted. Night came, a darkness of
death. Few dared to sleep.
The gray morning rose over the ocean. The sailors were
worn out, and hope seemed to have fled.
At last the Pilgrims heard a firm step on the stairs.
There was faith in it, and it was coming down. The men
lifted their hands when they saw who it was. The women
cried out and wept.
"Robert Coppin, our pilot," said Elizabeth Winslow,,
"can you save the ship? "
"Pilot Robert, you have come to be our Moses," said
Rose Standish. I can feel it, I can feel it."
God help you to save us," cried Mistress Carver.
A child's voice rose above the rest.
"He will! he will!"
It was Ellen More.
The pilot bent his face, full of love and pity, on the
child.
"I will do everything human power can for you, my
girL"
The chief must have the copper chain," said she.







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


Aye, aye, and I have seen as dark a stress of weather as
this, but never a ship so strained in mid-ocean."
A new resolution seemed to come to him with the words
of the child and the vision of the copper chain.
He suddenly put his hand to his head and exclaimed;
"Thank God!"
"What? asked many voices.
"The jackscrew, boys, where is the jackscrew? Bring
me the jackscrew! "
They brought the curious instrument out of the baggage;
he seized it and rushed toward the broken rib of the ship,
crying, "Send the ship's carpenter to me! "
He applied the power of the screw to the beam, or rib,
which had been wrenched from its place. The ship's car-
penter joined him at once, and Wrastle and Love Brewster
stood by him and a crowd gathered around him.
The captain came roaring down and cleared the boys
away.
"A jackscrew!" cried one of the officers. "A jack
straw might answer as well."
But the beam is moving back," said the pilot.
"Then," said the officer, the Power that uplifted the
arm of Moses must be in it; if you can do that you can do
more than old Canute did when he ordered back the sea."
But the beam moved. Slowly, and at times it obeyed
the power applied, when the ship righted and the beam was
lifted into its place.







THE MAYFLOWER AT SEA.


"The beam does not spring back," said the pilot, "and
I move it into place a little every time the ship rights."
Hour by hour he applied the jackscrew, and the captain
and the officers of the ship and the Pilgrim company came
and stared as they saw Robert Coppin and the ship's car-
penter overcoming the elements and the adverse forces of
gravitation, until the rib of the ship stood firm again.
At last the pilot started up.
"Wrastle Brewster," said he, "go and tell little Ellen
More that the Mayflower is safe! It was not the jack-
screw-no, no, it was a Power behind the jackscrew
that guided us and has provided for us. Providence
has ordered that the Pilgrim company shall build an
everlasting habitation of faith and freedom beyond the
sea! "
They came to calmer waters.
The Indian summer weather, so beautiful upon the land,
sends its influence far out to sea.
One day the captain said to Pilot Robert:
"We must run landward soon. Steer hard toward the
west."
"Captain, it is the Hudson River for which we are
booked to sail."
Pilot Robert Coppin, don't you dare to reply to me or
to ask me any questions. It is your office to obey, and not
to reason aloud or to argue with any one. I know my busi-
ness, sir. Steer hard toward the west."







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


You surely are not deceiving these poor people? "
"The people's affairs are no part of your duties, sir.
Steer toward the west. If we shall touch upon the Plym-
outh country what is that to you? You are to obey me,
sir, and to ask no questions. I have given you great liber-
ties in this voyage, and these people seem to have brought
you over to them. They did not employ you; it was I,
and I know what I am doing, and do not want and will never
receive any unasked-for advice from any inferior officer.
So not one word more. Cease you story-telling; stop all
this association with women and children. Attend in the
future strictly to your own duties, and bear toward the
west! "
Robert Coppin, pilot, had probably expected such an
order. He understood it. It was in his contract to obey
the captain and not to follow his own sense of equity, of the
truth of which he could not be sure.
But to bear hard to the west" would take the ship to
a long sandy cape in Massasoit's country, before it could
come to the Hudson River. That cape was known as Male-
bar and also as Cape Cod.
What was the captain's purpose in prolonging the jour-
ney amid the wintry seas?
Had he been bribed by the Dutch to keep away from
their rich territory at Manhattan?
If so, no one on board but the pilot could have suspected
it at this time.







THE MAYFLOWER AT SEA.


So the Mayflower goes on her way over the troubled
waters.
There is a white wing in the sky. A sea bird appears.
The pilot bears hard to the west:
Beside the jackscrew there were other things that the
Pilgrims were bringing over the sea that excited the in-
terest of all in the days of quiet water. Elizabeth Wins-
low had a curious mortar and pestle. Where would it
find use?
Mistress Brewster had a looking-glass, into which it was
the delight of the young people to see their faces. It was
taken out of the chest at times and passed around, and was
very carefully handled. It answered the question:
"How do I look now?"
Mistress Elizabeth Winslow had a very beautiful figured
mat, which was like a picture to unroll. It was green.
"It is fine enough for a king," said Pilot Coppin one
day when Mistress Winslow had unrolled it. "The Indian
kings sit down on the ground when they are in council.
Perhaps we shall hold a council with an Indian chief some
day. If so, we would want that mat."
"The Indian chief smokes in his council," said John
Billington, the boy. "Perhaps he would want your silver
pipe."
"That is a point well taken, my boy. But I would be
slow to give away the pipe that the Traders' Company gave
to me. Let me go to get the pipe."







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


It was in the few calm days of the latter part of the voy-
age. The people seemed all to fall into the spirit of amusing
and entertaining each other.
So Mistress, Brewster brought out the looking-glass and
laid it down on the famous chest on which the compact
would one day be signed, and the sea-worn people looked
into it to see how they looked now."
Mistress Brewster spread out the green rug before the
chest, and Pilot Coppin came bringing the silver pipe, which
was his special treasure, it having been given him for faith-
ful service on the high seas.
Others brought out little keepsakes and treasures, and
related the simple history of them.
John Billington had a quick fancy. He began to tell
little Ellen More a fairy story: how that the mat would some
day be unrolled under the oaks of Virginia, and a great king,
with fur robes and feathers and pearl shells, would come and
sit upon it, and smoke the silver pipe.
Ellen, too, was a child of imagination, and she called
Pilot Coppin to hear the wonderful tale that John had
told.
Strangely enough," he said, "such dreams as these
come true. The soul's purpose is in them and behind them.
I believe in fairy stories, though others do not. There is
good suggestion in them. The world is governed by sug-
gestion."
Say you that, Pilot Coppin? asked Elder Brewster.







THE MAYFLOWER AT SEA.


Yes, yes, think of the power of the suggestion in the
parable of the prodigal son! "
You may be right, Pilot Coppin. I had not thought
of life in that way, but I will take a look at it so. You are
a very hopeful man. A ship needs a hopeful man for a
pilot."
"So does the ship of life, Elder Brewster; one that
would say good cheer if a boat were going to pieces on the
waves, and in that spirit the chances are that we would not
be lost."
Whales were seen spouting in these days of calmer water.
The ship drove on and on, into the sunlight, into the shade,
into the red morning, into the pale starlight, into the night.
Whither go they? The sails are the wings of destiny.
Whither go they? The nation of nations is on the sea.
On and on.
On and on. Will the mat ever be spread for an Indian
king, or the copper chain given to chief or sagamore? On
and on!
















CHAPTER X.


THE LEGENDARY SWORD.

THE Pilgrims were long making preparations for their
journey, and they crowded into their baggage many strange
and curious things beside the copper chain and the jewel to
give to some great forest lord. Some of these curious things
are still to be found in old houses in the cape towns and
elsewhere among Puritan descendants.
Among these interesting relicts none is more wonderful
than Miles .Standish's sword, which may still be seen in
Pilgrim Hall in Plymouth.
When the seas began to run smoother again, the boys
and girls of the Mayflower importuned Robert Coppin for
stories in the idle hours.
Who were the boys and girls of the Mayflower? It was
the colonization plan of Robinson, of Leyden, that the
young people should sail first for the founding of a new
colony, and that the older people should follow them. He
himself expected to join them in the New World when the
fathers of the Pilgrim republic should sail, but he did not
live to follow them. The pilot of the Argo of old did not
80







THE LEGENDARY SWORD.


return, and the prophets of great movements do not often
live to see them fulfilled, except in faith and promise.
When we look at the names of the boys and girls of the
Mayflower, it would seem that they were a large part of the
company of that ship of destiny. One wonders as one
reads it.
There were Jasper More and William Latham, two boys
in the service of John Carver, the first governor. Jasper
More died in Cape Cod harbor.
There were Love Brewster and Wrastle, or Wrestling,
Brewster, two sons of Elder Brewster, and Richard More
and his brother, in the same family.
There was Ellen More in the Winslow family. She was
a sister of the boys of the same name. The More children
were orphans.
There were Bartholomew Allerton, Remember and
Mary Allerton, and John Hooke, a servant boy in the Aller-
ton family.
There were Joseph Mullins, a child, and the famous
Priscilla Mullins, a girl, in the Mullins family.
There was Resolved White. Peregrine White was born
on board of the Mayflower.
There were Giles Hopkins and Constance Hopkins, and
three more children of the Hopkins name. Oceanus Hop-
kins was born on the Mayflower.
There were two boys in the Billington family, John and
Francis.







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


There were Henry Samson and Humility Cooper, both
children in the Tilley family, and John Tilley and Elizabeth
Tilley, a son and daughter.
There were Mary Chilton, Joseph Rogers, and John
Cooke, and a son in the Tinker family; Samuel Fuller and
two boys by the name of Turner. There were Samuel
Eaton, a baby, and several young people in the service of
the principal families.
There were thirteen children of the leading Pilgrims on
board, and most of these were boys. Nobly enough, the
Pilgrims brought their adopted children, or the children of
their charity, with them.
There were more than twenty young people on board the
ship, and to these "our pilot," who had seen Indians and
gazed on the wonderful shores and fishing grounds of the
new land, became more and more interesting; his heart
drew them all to him; he was Sinbad the Sailor" to these
young emigrants.
Miles Standish was the man of valor among the com-
pany. Of him the young people must have stood in awe.
But one day when the sun was struggling through the
clouds and the waves were merciful, the boys, among whom
were the Brewsters, ventured to look at Miles Standish's
sword.
It was a very curious sword. It had an inscription on it
that no one could read. The emblems of the sun, moon,
and stars were stamped upon it.







THE LEGENDARY SWORD.


That is a strange sword that you have, Master Stand-
ish," ventured Wrastle Brewster, who was young and bold.
"Would you like to see it bend?"
"Aye, aye, Master Standish! cried the boys.
The stout man bent the sword and said:
A Damascus blade, or like it."
Where did it come from?" asked Richard More.
"From the air!"
The boys' eyes were filled with surprise.
"There are mines in the air as well as on the earth,"
said Standish. "This sword is said to have been made of
meteoric metal."
When was it made? asked Wrastle Brewster.
"A thousand years ago, it may be," said the sturdy
man, flashing it in a sunbeam. "In the days of Charle-
magne, or of Peter the Hermit, or of the Crusades. I do
not know when it was made. It is claimed that it was once
a magic sword, but the charm upon it does not extend to
me. I have nothing to do with any heathenish enchant-
ments."
What is engraved upon it? asked Mary Allerton.
That John Robinson, with all his learning, was not
able to tell. An old man in Amsterdam poked it over with
his long nose, and said that those were magic words to pro-
tect a devotee from evil. But I am no devotee to the faith
of the pagans for which the charm was wrought. My pro-
tection comes only from my faith, honor, and courage."







THE PILOT OF THE MAYFLOWER.


"Where did you get it?" asked little Ellen More, as
Robert Coppin lifted her up above the heads of those who
were crowding close to the rugged Standish.
"Now why did you ask that, little girl? That is a
secret, a story."
"Tell us the story, Master Standish," said Ellen More.
"Pilot Coppin tells us stories. Do stories hurt any one? "
No, no, my little girl. It is Coppin's little girl you
seem to be-he has made you that by stories. Stories are
fairy lands to such as you-well, never mind, the world is
governed by imagination. I might refuse the boys, but I
could never refuse such as you; marry, I could not. Well,
here is the story of the sword, and an old one it is. Sit
down and you shall hear! "
The short, stout, ruddy man turned the sword upward,
as saluting on parade.
"I was once, as you know," he said, a soldier in the
Netherlands. Ears, all, and be quiet while I speak. In
those days we were in Ghent, and one day I beheld a com-
pany of soldiers about to capture a girl who was out on
some errand in the streets. I protected the girl, and en-
abled her to return safely home.
Her father was an old armorer. He was very grateful
to me for what I had done, for his daughter seems to have
been all the world to him. So one day he made his way to
me. He had something under his silk mantle. Ears all,
now, and be quiet while I am talking.







THE LEGENDARY SWORD. 85

"'I want to speak with you in private,' said he. 'Is
any one around?'
"' No one, sir,' said I.
"He began to unfold his silken scarf or mantle.
"'You saved my daughter,' said he. 'I have brought
a little present to you-not much to look upon, but it is the
most precious gift I have. It came from the skies.'
He drew back the mantle fold by fold, and the sword
appeared.
"'Meteor metal,' said he. 'Damascus, and it has a
grand legend, one worthy to make it sacred to a man of
honor.'
"He held it aloft, looking around to see that no one
was approaching.
"'What is the legend?' I asked, and motioned him to
sit down.
He sat down. An animation as of youth came into his
withered face. How intense and how grateful he looked,
that old armorer of Ghent!
He said that when he was a young man he went to the
East to engage in the war against the Turks, to bear the
Cross against the Crescent. He was taken prisoner, and was
carried into an Ottoman town, and there was cared for by
a very beautiful young woman. She came to love him, and
she told him of her love; but he said to her that there was
one whom he loved and who loved him in his own land, and
that to be a true man to all. good people his heart must be




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